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Encyclopedia > University College, Oxford
University College, Oxford
                     
College name University College
Collegium Magnae Aulae Universitatis
Named after
Established 1249
Sister College Trinity Hall
Master Lord Butler of Brockwell
JCR President Peter Surr
Undergraduates 420
MCR President Monte MacDiarmid
Graduates 144
Homepage
Boatclub
Crest of University College, Oxford
Crest of University College, Oxford

University College (in full, the The Master and Fellows of the College of the Great Hall of the University commonly called University College in the University of Oxford, usually known by its abbreviation, Univ.), is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. It is a contender for being the oldest of the colleges of the university, and is amongst the largest in terms of population. It is one of the wealthier colleges with an estimated financial endowment of £68m (2003). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1103x814, 554 KB) Summary University College, Oxford University Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: University College, Oxford Culture of the United Kingdom Jacobean architecture ... Events University, the first College at Oxford founded Births Emperor Kameyama of Japan Pope John XXII Frederick I, Margrave of Baden Deaths July 6 - Alexander II of Scotland (b. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... Full name College of Scholars of the Holy Trinity of Norwich Motto - Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names - Established 1350 Sister College(s) University College All Souls College Master Prof. ... Arms of Baron Butler of Brockwell The Right Honourable Frederick Edward Robin Butler, Baron Butler of Brockwell, KG, GCB, CVO, PC (born 3 January 1938) is a retired British civil servant, now sitting in the House of Lords as a life peer. ... The term Junior Combination Room or Junior Common Room (JCR) is used in many British universities (as well as at Harvard College in the United States) to refer to the collective of students (similar to a students union) at a constituent part of a university, typically a college or a... The term Middle Common Room (MCR) is used in some British universities, especially Oxford, Cambridge and Durham, to refer to the body of postgraduate students (similar to a students union) at a constituent college. ... Image File history File links Univ_crest. ... Image File history File links Univ_crest. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...


Univ was founded by William of Durham in 1249 (not King Alfred as has been claimed in the past), and until the sixteenth century was only open to Fellows studying theology. As Univ grew in size and wealth, its medieval buildings were replaced with a new Front Quad in 1640, followed by the additional Radcliffe Quad by 1719, and the Library was built in 1861. Univ only began to accept female undergraduate students in 1979. William of Durham, who is said to have founded University College, Oxford, probably came from the neighbourhood of Durham and was educated at Wearmouth monastery and in Paris. ... Events University, the first College at Oxford founded Births Emperor Kameyama of Japan Pope John XXII Frederick I, Margrave of Baden Deaths July 6 - Alexander II of Scotland (b. ... Alfred (849? – 26 October 899) (sometimes spelt Ælfred) was king of England from 871 to 899, though at no time did he rule over the whole of the land. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογια, logia, words, sayings, or discourse) is reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Events December 1 - Portugal regains its independence from Spain and João IV of Portugal becomes king. ... The Radcliffe Quadrangle (or Rad Quad as it is known to students of the College) is the second quadrangle of University College, Oxford. ... // Events January 23 - The Principality of Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe June 10 - Battle of Glen Shiel Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Miners in Falun, Sweden find an apparently petrified body of Fet-Mats Israelsson in an unused... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... The hand mirror and comb of the Roman Goddess Venus is often used to represent the female sex. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ...


The Master, Lord Butler of Brockwell, was appointed head of an inquiry into the 2003 Iraq War in February 2004. Her Majesty The Queen is Visitor. Previous Masters include John Albery, Kingman Brewster, Lord Goodman, Lord Redcliffe-Maud, Arthur Lehman Goodhart, and William Beveridge. Frederick Edward Robin Butler, Baron Butler of Brockwell, KG, GCB, CVO, PC (born 3 January 1938) is a retired British civil servant, now sitting in the House of Lords as a life peer. ... On February 3, 2004 the British Government announced an inquiry into the intelligence relating to Iraqs weapons of mass destruction which played a key part in the Governments decision to invade Iraq (as part of the U.S.-led coalition) in 2003. ... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq without the explicit backing of the United... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... A Visitor, in United Kingdom law and history, is an overseer of an autonomous ecclesiastical or eleemosynary institution (i. ... Wyndham John Albery was Professor of Physical Chemistry at Imperial College London (ICL) and master of University College at the University of Oxford. ... Kingman Brewster, Jr. ... Arnold Goodman CH QC (Hon) (1913–1995), British lawyer and political advisor. ... John Primatt Redcliffe Maud, Baron Redcliffe-Maud (February 3, 1906 - November 20, 1982) was a British politician. ... Arthur Lehman Goodhart KBE, KC (1891-1978) was an academic lawyer and the first American to be the Master of an Oxford College. ... William Henry Beveridge, 1st Baron Beveridge of Tuggal (March 5, 1879 – 16 March 1963) was a British economist and social reformer. ...


A specially constructed building in the College, the Shelley Memorial, houses a statue by Edward Onslow Ford of the poet Shelley — a former member of the college, who was expelled for writing The Necessity of Atheism — depicted lying dead on the Italian sea-shore. Rumour has it that the sunken area around the statue was once filled with water and live goldfish as a student prank. Another apparently common student prank involving the statue has been to paint his genitalia bright colours; for this reason, the statue's appendage is somewhat smaller than it used to be. The Shelley Memorial is a memorial to the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822) at University College, Oxford, England, the college that he briefly attended and from which he was expelled for writing a pamphlet on The Necessity of Atheism. ... Fords statue The Snowdrift Edward Onslow Ford (July 27, 1852 - December 23, 1901), English sculptor, was born in London. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... The Necessity of Atheism is a treatise on atheism by Percy Bysshe Shelley, published anonymously in 1811 while he was a student at University College, Oxford. ...


Notable former students and fellows

See also Former students of University College.

Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, FRS, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1945 to 1951. ... Sir Edwin Arnold (1832-1904), English poet and journalist, was born on June 10, 1832 at Gravesend, the son of a Sussex magistrate, and was educated at Kings school, Rochester; Kings College, London; and University College, Oxford. ... Sir Jeremy Beecham, DL (born 1944) is a British Labour politician and a senior figure in English local government. ... William Henry Beveridge, 1st Baron Beveridge of Tuggal (March 5, 1879 – 16 March 1963) was a British economist and social reformer. ... Robert Boyle Robert Boyle (January 25, 1627 – December 30, 1691) was an Irish natural philosopher, chemist, physicist, inventor and early gentleman scientist, noted for his work in physics and chemistry. ... Jonathan P. Bowen FBCS FRSA (born 1956) is a British computer scientist and is Professor of Computing at London South Bank University where he heads the Centre for Applied Formal Methods in the Institute for Computing Research. ... Frederick Edward Robin Butler, Baron Butler of Brockwell, KG, GCB, CVO, PC (born 3 January 1938) is a retired British civil servant, now sitting in the House of Lords as a life peer. ... Image:Edward Cartwright 2. ... Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury (June 1, 1563 -May 24, 1612), son of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley and half-brother of Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter, statesman, spymaster and minister to Elizabeth I of England and James I of England. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... In the White House: Chelsea (lower right), together with her parents, Bill and Hillary Clinton. ... Kenneth Diplock (1907-1985) was an English judge and Law Lord. ... Paul Foot addressing a miners rally, June 1984 Paul Mackintosh Foot (November 8, 1937 – July 18, 2004) was a British radical investigative journalist, political campaigner, author, and long-time member of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP). ... Paul Matthew Gambaccini (born April 2, 1949, New York) is a radio and television presenter in the United Kingdom. ... Andrew George Andrew Henry George (born December 2, 1958) British politician. ... Philip Hammond (born 4 December 1955, Epping, Essex) is a British politician. ... Robert James Lee Bob Hawke AC (born 9 December 1929) is a former Australian trade union leader turned politician who became the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia. ... Stephen William Hawking, CH, CBE, FRS, FRSA, (born 8 January 1942) is a British theoretical physicist. ... Michael Hoban (7 October 1921 - 6 July 2003) was a teacher of classics, and Head Master of Harrow School from 1971 to 1981. ... Ronald Gordon Honeycombe (born September 27, 1936) is an author, playwright and stage actor, well known in the United Kingdom as a national television newscaster. ... Robert Hooke, FRS (July 18, 1635 – March 3, 1703) was an English polymath who played an important role in the scientific revolution, through both experimental and theoretical work. ... Presenting the Election Night Armistice in 1997 Armando Iannucci (born 1964, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish comedian, satirist and radio producer. ... Richard Ingrams (born 1937) was the second editor of British satirical magazine-cum-newspaper, Private Eye, taking over from Christopher Booker. ... A. K. Hamilton Jenkin (1900-1980) was best known as a historian with a particular interest in Cornish mining, publishing The Cornish Miner, now a classic, in 1927. ... Sir William Jones Sir William Jones (September 28, 1746 – April 27, 1794) was an English philologist and student of ancient India, particularly known for his proposition of the existence of a relationship among Indo-European languages. ... Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Nicholas Vivian Howard Mallett (born October 30, 1956 at Haileybury, England) played for and later coached the Springboks, South Africas national rugby union team. ... Luke McShane (born January 7, 1984) is an English chess player. ... Dornford Yates was the pseudonym of the British novelist, Cecil William Mercer (1885-1960). ... Warren Mitchell, (born 14 January 1926, Stoke Newington, London) is a British-born actor with Australian citizenship. ... Photo of Monier Monier-Williams by Lewis Carroll Sir Monier Monier-Williams (1819–1899) studied, documented and taught Asian languages in England, and compiled one of the most widely-used Sanskrit-English dictionaries. ... Professor Andrew Motion (born October 26, 1952) is an English poet, novelist and biographer who is the current Poet Laureate. ... V.S.Naipauls 2005 book Literary Occasions Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul, T.C. (born August 17, 1932, in Chaguanas, Trinidad and Tobago), better known as V. S. Naipaul, is a Trinidadian-born British novelist of Hindu Bhumihar Brahmin heritage from Gorakhpur in Eastern U.P. and Indo-Trinidadian ethnicity. ... Nigel Playfair (1874-1934) was the great actor-manager of The Lyric Theatre, Hammersmith in the 1920s. ... John Radcliffe. ... Robert Bernard Reich (born June 24, 1946) was the twenty-second United States Secretary of Labor, serving under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1997. ... W. Andrew Robinson (born 1957) is a British author and newspaper editor. ... John Scott, 1st Earl of Eldon (4 June 1751 – 13 January 1838), Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, was born at Newcastle upon Tyne. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Roger Short (December 9, 1944 - November 20, 2003) was a veteran British diplomat who was killed in a terrorist car bombing in Istanbul while serving as the British Consul-General in Turkey. ... Peter Sissons presenting the last BBC Nine OClock News bulletin Peter George Sissons (born 17 July 1942 in Liverpool) is a nationally known television newscaster in the United Kingdom. ... Charles Hamilton Sorley (May 19, 1895 - October 13, 1915) was a British poet of World War I. Born in Aberdeen, Scotland, he was educated, like Siegfried Sassoon, at Marlborough College (1908-1913). ... Sir Stephen Harold Spender CBE, (February 28, 1909 – July 16, 1995) was an English poet, novelist and essayist who concentrated on themes of social injustice and the class struggle in his work. ... Adrian Stoop (1883-1957) was an English-naturalised rugby football player of Dutch descent. ... Peter Frederick Strawson (born November 23, 1919 in London) is a philosopher associated with the ordinary language philosophy movement within analytical philosophy. ... FBA can mean: Fellow of the British Academy Flag Burning Amendment, a proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution Florida Bar Association Flux Balance Analysis, in Chemical Engineering/Systems Biology Freshwater Biological Association In Computer Science, Faceless Background Application, Fix Block Architecture or Fixed Blocked ANSI-defined printer control characters... Henry Thrale by Sir Joshua Reynolds Henry Thrale (born 1724-30, at the Alehouse in Harrow Corner, Southwark, died 4 April 1781, London) was an 18th century English MP and a close friend of Samuel Johnson. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Michael York OBE (born Michael Hugh Johnson, March 27, 1942) is a prolific British actor, more recently best known among mainstream audiences for his role of Basil Exposition in the Austin Powers series of films. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Partial list of fellows and lecturers

See also Fellows of University College.

Biochemistry is the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. ... Chemistry (from Persian language کیمیا Kimia and Greek χημεία khemeia[1] meaning alchemy) is the science of matter at the atomic to molecular scale, dealing primarily with collections of atoms, such as gases, molecules, crystals, and metals. ... Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ... William Allan is a distinguished Scottish classicist specializing in Greek epic and tragedy, particularly the plays of Euripides. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... A. William Roscoe (Bill Roscoe) is director of the Computing Laboratory at the University of Oxford and a Professor of Computing Science. ... Jotun Hein (born 1956) is Professor of Bioinformatics at the Department of Statistics of the University of Oxford and a fellow of University College, Oxford. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The term management characterizes the process of and/or the personnel leading and directing all or part of an organization (often a business) through the deployment and manipulation of resources (human, capital, natural, intellectual or intangible). ... Engineering is the application of scientific and technical knowledge to solve human problems. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Professor Philip Christopher England (born April 30, 1951) is a geophysicist and regarded as a world leader in the application of the theory of Plate Tectonics. ... Equality and the balancing of interests under law is symbolised by a blindfold and weighing scales For other senses of this word, see Law (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John Gardner, (born 1965) is Professor of Jurisprudence, University of Oxford and Fellow of University College, Oxford, and Visiting Professor, Yale Law School, Yale University. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... The terms Modern World, Modern Period, New World, Modern Times, Progressive Age, Modern Age, or Modern Era are recognized by historians as being that period of time commencing after the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period, after the mid-18th century. ... A modern language is any human language that is used by societies in the world today. ... Orientalism is the study of Near and Far Eastern societies and cultures, languages and peoples by Western scholars. ... Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) is a popular interdisciplinary degree which combines study from the three eponymous disciplines. ... Ngaire Woods is fellow in Politics and International Relations at University College, Oxford and Director of the Global Economic Governance Programme at the Department of Politics and International Relations and Centre for International Studies of the University of Oxford. ... Tarek Coury is a Fellow in Economics of University College, Oxford. ... Physics (from the Greek, (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the discovery and understanding of the fundamental laws which govern matter, energy, space, and time. ... Psychology is an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Professor Nicholas Rawlins is a British experimental psychologist. ...

Grace

Univ. has the longest grace of any Oxford (and perhaps Cambridge) College. It is read before every Formal Hall, which takes place every night except Saturday at Univ. St Johns College, Cambridge hall during a formal meal Churchill College, Cambridge dining hall prepared for a formal Formal Hall is the name given to a formal evening meal at any college in the universities of Oxford, Cambridge or Durham open to all members of the college and their guests. ...


The reading is performed by a Scholar of the College, the same person doing it for a whole week, and whoever is sitting at the head of High Table (typically the Master, but maybe just the most senior Fellow at the table if the Master is not dining). The Scholar says the lines beginning "SCHOL."; the Fellow says the lines beginning "RESP.". A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline, perhaps receiving financial support through a scholarship. ... At Oxford and Cambridge colleges, and more traditional academic institutions, High Table is a table on a raised platform at the end of the dining hall for the use of fellows (members of the Senior Common Room) and their guests. ... A fellow in the broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. ...


The Scholar does not need to know it by heart, although it is not unusual for people to do so.


GRATIARIUM ACTIO IN COLLEGIO MAGNAE AULAE UNIVERSITATIS QUOTIDIE ANTE MENSAM DICENDA.


SCHOL. Benedictus sit Deus in donis suis.
RESP. Et sanctus in omnibus operibus suis.
SCHOL. Adiutorium nostrum in Nomine Domini.
RESP. Qui fecit coelum et terras.
SCHOL. Sit Nomen Domini benedictum.
RESP. Ab hoc tempore usque in saecula.
SCHOL. Domine Deus, Resurrectio et Vita credentium, Qui semper es laudandus tam in viventibus quam in defunctis, gratias Tibi agimus pro omnibus Fundatoribus caeterisque Benefactoribus nostris, quorum beneficiis hic ad pietatem et ad studia literarum alimur: Te rogantes ut nos, hisce Tuis donis ad Tuam gloriam recte utentes, una cum iis ad vitam immortalem perducamur. Per Jesum Christum Dominum nostrum.
RESP. Amen.
SCHOL. Deus det vivis gratiam, defunctis requiem: Ecclesiae, Reginae, Regnoque nostro, pacem et concordiam: et nobis peccatoribus vitam aeternam.
RESP. Amen.


References

  • University College Record, the official annual magazine of University College, Oxford. Issues 1996, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2004.

The University College Record is the annual magazine sent to alumni of University College, Oxford each autumn. ...

See also

The University College Players (or Univ Players for short) are the theatrical society of University College, Oxford. ... University Challenge is a long-running British television quiz show, licensed and produced by Granada Television. ...

External links

  • Unofficial information

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