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Encyclopedia > Universi Dominici Gregis

Universi Dominici Gregis is an Apostolic Constitution of the Roman Catholic Church issued by Pope John Paul II on February 22, 1996. It superseded Pope Paul VI's 1975 Apostolic Constitution, Romano Pontifici Eligendo. An Apostolic Constitution is a highest category of a document of instruction issued by the Roman Catholic Pope or by a Church council with the approval of the Pope. ... The Roman Catholic Church is the largest religious denomination of Christianity with over 1. ... The Servant of God Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef WojtyÅ‚a [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005), reigned as pope of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City and of the Holy See for almost 27 years, from 16 October 1978 until his... February 22 is the 53rd day of every year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... His Holiness Pope Paul VI, born Giovanni Battista Enrico Antonio Maria Montini (September 26, 1897 – August 6, 1978), reigned as Pope and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1963 to 1978. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Romano Pontifici Eligendo was the Apostolic Constitution governing the election of popes that was promulgated by Pope Paul VI in 1975. ...


Universi Dominici Gregis ('the Lord's whole flock', from the opening statement 'The Shepherd of the Lord's whole flock is the Bishop of the Church of Rome,...'), subtitled On the Vacancy of the Apostolic See and the Election of the Roman Pontiff, deals with the vacancy of the Chair of St Peter and Bishop of Rome namely the Pope. In the several centuries following the founding of Christianity, five particular cities and centers of Christianity were considered to be the Apostolic Sees. ... Pope John Paul II has reigned since 22 Oct 1978. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... In the Roman Catholic Church, Saint Peter, given the keys to heaven by Jesus, was the first Bishop of Rome. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost 4,000,000 1... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ...


The constitution modified or in some cases confirmed the rules for the conclave such that the rules today are as follows: The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave. ...

Contents


Contents

  • Cardinals must be no more than eighty years of age on the day before the death or resignation of the Pope.
  • No more than 120 Cardinals may vote.
  • A Pope shall be elected by a vote of two-thirds until a total of 33 or 34 votes have taken place.
  • Maximum of two votes in the morning and two each afternoon, totaling four votes will be held daily.
  • After a total of 33 or 34 ballots depending whether a ballot took place on the afternoon of the first day, an absolute majority of the College of Cardinals may change the election rule. However, there can be no waiving of the requirement such that a valid election takes place by less than an absolute majority of the votes.

A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official in the Roman Catholic Church, ranking just below the Pope and appointed by him as a member of the College of Cardinals, during a consistory. ... The Sacred College of Cardinals is the body of all Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church. ...

Secrecy

Strict secrecy is to be ensured throughout the process. Anyone violating the security of the Vatican, introducing recording equipment, or communicating with a cardinal elector in any way, risks excommunication. Other penalties are at the discretion of the incoming Pope. Various oaths are also required to be taken by the participants, to ensure that they will act properly. Excommunication is a religious censure which is used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ...


Previous methods of election

Previously, other methods were allowed for the conduct of the election. A committee of some of the cardinals might have been delegated, to make the choice for all (election by compromise, per compromissum). Alternatively, formal ballots could be discarded: in election by acclamation (per acclamationem seu inspirationem) the electors simultaneously shout out the name of their preferred candidate. Both of these methods have now been abolished: the rationale is that they tended to produce controversy, and in any case had not been used for some time (the last compromise election was of Pope John XXII in 1316, and the last affirmation (acclamation) election was of Pope Gregory XV in 1621). A compromise is an agreement (or proposed agreement) to accept a situation in which the parties get variations from what they originally sought, to achieve a compatible outcome. ... A ballot is a device used to record choices made by voters. ... Politics An acclamation is a form of election not using a ballot. ... A controversy is a contentious dispute, a disagreement over which parties are actively arguing. ... Pope John XXII, né Jacques dEuse (1249 - December 4, 1334),was the son of a shoemaker in Cahors. ... Events Pope John XXII elected to the papacy. ... Gregory XV, né Alessandro Ludovisio (January 9, 1554–July 8, 1623), pope (1621-1623), born at Bologna, succeeded Paul V on February 9, 1621. ... Events February 9 - Gregory XV is elected pope. ...


Living quarters of cardinals

Also Universi Dominici Gregis provided that Cardinals would be housed in Domus Sanctae Marthae, a building with dormitory type accommodations built within the Vatican City. Previously Cardinals were housed in improvised accommodations which were often not noted for being particularly comfortable. Domus Sanctæ Marthæ was built by Pope John Paul II as a residence for papal conclave participants. ... A typical American college dorm room A dormitory or dorm is a place to sleep. ...


Major changes

Three major changes occurred in the new Apostolic Constitution.

  • In a complete and controversial breach with all precedent, provision was provided for the election of a pope by an absolute majority in certain circumstances.
  • For the first time in centuries cardinals were to be provided with an official set of apartments separate from the Sistine Chapel.
  • The method by which a pope symbolically took office was made less specific. Whereas Pope Paul's Romano Pontifici Eligendo explicitly required that the new pope be crowned, the new Apostolic Constitution wrote more ambiguously of the inauguration of the pontificate without spelling out specifically by name whether than inaugurating (ie, formal ceremonial beginning of) the pontificate involves either the old enthronement ceremony, the Papal Coronation or the version used since 1978, the Papal Inauguration. All that is required is that some formal ceremony take place. What form that takes is left up to the discretion of the incoming pope.

The Sistine Chapel (Italian: Cappella Sistina) is a chapel in the Palace of the Vatican, the official residence of the Roman Catholic Pope in the Vatican City. ... The coronation of Empress Farah, of Iran in 1968. ... Pope Pius XII, in coronation robes and wearing the 1877 Papal Tiara, is carried through St. ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... Pope John Paul I at the first papal inauguration, in September 1978. ...

2005 papal conclave

The Papal election of 2005 was the first papal election to be held under this system. If Pope Benedict XVI follows the custom of his predecessors in writing a new election constitution, it will also be the last. The Papal conclave of 2005 began on April 18, 2005 and ended the next day after four ballots. ... The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave. ... His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: ; born April 16, 1927 as Joseph Alois Ratzinger in Marktl am Inn, Bavaria) is the 265th reigning pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City. ...


External link

  • Universi Dominici Gregis

  Results from FactBites:
 
Universi Dominici Gregis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (548 words)
Universi Dominici Gregis is an Apostolic Constitution of the Roman Catholic Church issued by Pope John Paul II on February 22, 1996.
Both of these methods have now been abolished: the rationale is that they tended to produce controversy, and in any case had not been used for some time (the last compromise election was of Pope John XXII in 1316, and the last affirmation (acclamation) election was of Pope Gregory XV in 1621).
Also Universi Dominici Gregis provided that Cardinals would be housed in Domus Sanctae Marthae, a building with dormitory type accommodations built within the Vatican City.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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