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Encyclopedia > United States dollar coin
Dollar (United States)
Value: 1 U.S. Dollar
Mass: 8.100 g
Diameter: 26.5 mm
Thickness: 2.00 mm
Edge: Plain
Composition: 88.5% Cu
6% Zn
3.5% Mn
2% Ni
Years of Minting: 2000–present
Catalog Number: -
Obverse
Obverse
Design: Sacagawea with child
Designer: Glenna Goodacre
Design Date: 2000
Reverse
Design: Eagle in flight
Designer: Thomas D. Rogers
Design Date: 2000

Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in gold, silver and base metal versions. Silver dollars, the first dollar coin issue, were minted beginning in 1794. This article is about general United States currency. ... The gram or gramme, symbol g, is a unit of mass. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter), symbol mm is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter), symbol mm is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... General Name, Symbol, Number copper, Cu, 29 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 4, d Appearance metallic brown Atomic mass 63. ... General Name, Symbol, Number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Atomic mass 65. ... General Name, Symbol, Number manganese, Mn, 25 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 7, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Atomic mass 54. ... General Name, Symbol, Number nickel, Ni, 28 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 10, 4, d Appearance lustrous, metallic Atomic mass 58. ... United States dollar coin (Sacagawea). ... Sacagawea (Sakakawea, Sacajawea, Sacajewea; see below) (c. ... Glenna Goodacre is an artist best known for having designed the Sacagawea Dollar that entered circulation in the United States in 2000. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (900x881, 160 KB)The reverse of a United States dollar coin. ... Genera Several, see below. ... Thomas D. Rogers is the designer of the reverse side of the US Golden dollar coin, or Sacagawea Dollar. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... It has been suggested that Gold bar be merged into this article or section. ... General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Atomic mass 107. ... A base metal is a common or at least inexpensive metal. ... Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in both gold and silver versions. ... A mint is a facility which manufactures coins for currency. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The term silver dollar may refer to any white metal coin issued by the United States with a face value of one dollar; although some insist that a dollar is not silver unless it contains some of that metal. Gold and gold-colored dollars have also been produced by the United States. The current Sacagawea dollar is usually referred to as "golden." This article is about metals and alloys. ... word coinage Coín (a town in Malaga province in Spain) 25¢ Canadian coin A coin is usually a piece of hard material, generally metal and usually in the shape of a disc, which is issued by a government to be used as a form of money. ... This article is about general United States currency. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... Sacagawea (Sakakawea, Sacajawea, Sacajewea; see below) (c. ...


Dollar coins have found little popular acceptance in modern circulation in the United States, despite several attempts since 1971 to phase-in a coin in place of the one-dollar bill. This contrasts with many other currencies, where the one-unit denomination is only in coin, such as the Canadian Loonie, British Pound sterling, Australian Dollar (both $1 and $2) and Euro coin. The failure to simultaneously withdraw the dollar bill and weak publicity efforts have been cited by coin proponents as primary reasons for the failure of the dollar coin to gain popular support. 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Obverse of the $1 bill Reverse of the $1 bill The U.S. one dollar bill ($1) is a denomination of U.S. currency. ... See also loony (short for lunatic), which is sometimes spelled loonie. Loonie is the unofficial but commonly-used name for Canadas gold-coloured, bronze-plated, one-dollar coin. ... The pound sterling is the official currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... The Australian dollar, AUD or A$, is the official currency of the Commonwealth of Australia, including the Australian Antarctic Territory, Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Heard Island and McDonald Islands and Norfolk Island, as well as the independent Pacific island states of Kiribati, Nauru and Tuvalu. ... The euro (EUR or €) is the currency of 12 European Union (EU) member states: (Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain); three European micro-states: (Monaco, San Marino and the Holy See - Vatican City), as well as EU institutions. ...

Contents


Early dollar coins (1794–1803, 1804)

The U.S. Mint produced silver dollar coins from 1794 to 1803, then stopped regular production of silver dollars until 1836. Original silver dollars from this period are highly prized by coin collectors and are exceptionally valuable, especially the 1804 silver dollar, which is one of the rarest and most famous coins in the world. The Mint ceased production of silver dollars in 1803, and the 1804 silver dollar was not actually minted until 1834, when the U.S. Department of State decided that a few coins with the unusual date of 1804 might make excellent gifts to rulers in Asia in exchange for trade advantages. Only 15 silver dollars with the date of 1804 are known to exist; in 1999, one of them sold at auction for more than $4 million. Newly-minted replica of the original 1804 silver dollar The 1804 silver dollar is one of the rarest and most famous coins in the world, due to its unique history. ... Mrs. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Darwin 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Numismatics (ancient Greek: ) is the scientific study of money and its history in all its varied forms. ... Newly-minted replica of the original 1804 silver dollar The 1804 silver dollar is one of the rarest and most famous coins in the world, due to its unique history. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... See also: Asian and Eurasian World map showing Asia. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... An auctioneer and her assistants scan the crowd for bidders An auction is the process of buying and selling things by offering them up for bid, taking bids, and then selling the item to the highest bidder. ...


Seated Liberty dollar (1840–1873)

Main article: Seated Liberty Dollar

Seated Liberty Dollar A silver dollar coin issued by the United States government, equal to 100 cents. ...

Gold dollar coins (1849–1889)

For a period of 40 years between 1849 and 1889, the U.S. also minted gold coins of a one-dollar denomination, the smallest denomination of gold currency ever produced in the United States. The design of the gold dollars presented unique problems, mostly related to size. The first $1 gold coin of 1849 was only 13 mm in diameter; at only three-quarters the size of the present-day dime, it was the smallest coin in U.S. history. Because the coin was so small, it was frequently lost and discarded, and many people refused to use such a coin. In 1854, the Mint increased the coin's diameter to 15 mm without increasing the weight, resulting in a coin that was noticeably larger but considerably thinner. This change resulted in virtually all the coins wearing down quickly in circulation, with their dates and designs fading rapidly into barely legible forms. In 1856, a new design was applied that resulted in a more durable coin. 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter), symbol mm is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... For the geometric term, see diameter. ... Look up Dime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Dime has several different meanings, here are some of them: Dime (U.S. coin) - a U.S. coin worth ten cents. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The bust design on the coin's head side has commonly been described as an "Indian princess," and the gold dollar coin is known as the "Indian Head" dollar coin. However, historians have suggested that the design is actually based on a Roman marble figure, with the headdress added by the actual designer of the coin, James Barton Longacre. Princess is the feminine form of prince (Latin princeps, meaning principal citizen), using the ess ending as in waitress or actress. Most often, the term has been used for the consort of a prince, or her daughters, women whose station in life depended on their relationship to a prince and... The Roman Forum was the central area around which ancient Rome developed. ... Marble For the glass spheres, see marbles. ... Headgear, headwear or headdress is the name given to any element of clothing which is worn on ones head. ... James Barton Longacre, (August 11, 1794 - January 1, 1869) an American engraver, was Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1844 until his death. ...


The added durability of the new design did not increase its popularity, however, and mintages of the coin were low for most of the period of its production. It was finally discontinued in 1889. 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Morgan dollar (1878–1904; 1921)

The Morgan silver dollar
The Morgan silver dollar
Main article: Morgan Dollar

Morgan silver dollars were minted between 1878 and 1921, with a notable break between 1905 and 1920. The 1921-dated coins are the most common, but there exists a substantial collector market for pristine, uncirculated specimens of the rarer dates and mint marks. Morgan dollars are second only to Lincoln Cents in collector popularity. The large size, design and inexpensive nature of most dates of the Morgan dollar makes them highly popular. The coin is named after George T. Morgan, its designer. Some people collect Morgan dollars by "VAM" designation. The top 100 VAM varieties are highly collectible. Picture of the Morgan Silver Dollar File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Picture of the Morgan Silver Dollar File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Morgan Dollar Obverse Morgan Dollar A silver dollar coin issued by the United States government, equal to 100 cents. ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... A mint mark is an inscription on a coin indicating the mint at which the coin was produced. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Cent (U.S. coin). ... George T. Morgan (1845- February 1925) Born in Birmingham, England, Morgan studied in England, and worked for many years as a die engraver at Messrs. ...


The mint mark is found on the reverse below the wreath, above the 'O' in 'Dollar'.


The "king" of the Morgan dollars is the proof-only 1895 with no mint mark, which sell for $10,000 or more. Most early Morgan dollars from the Carson City mint (with the CC mintmark) are worth a premium. Other rare dates include 1892-S, 1893, 1893-O, 1893-S, 1894, 1894-S, 1895-O, 1895-S, 1902-S, 1903-S, 1903-O, and 1904-S all coming in over $100 in circulated (very fine) condition. Many coins exceed $100 in uncirculated condition, but the majority do not. A common date in uncirculated can normally be found for around $12, and often as little as $5 circulated and $8 uncirculated. A beautiful example of a proof coin. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Carson City Mint, 1866 Carson City Mint was a branch of the United States Mint in Carson City, Nevada. ... The San Francisco Mint is a government facility that produces currency. ...


High-grade Morgan dollars could be considered "investor" coins. This is because the price is very volatile, and the prices set for certified ("slabbed") pieces are set on well-established exchanges. Sight-seen trading often exceeds these sight-unseen prices, but the fact that the sight-unseen prices are posted is seen as a boon to investors.


Peace dollar (1921–1935)

The Peace silver dollar
The Peace silver dollar
Main article: Peace Dollar

Introduced in December of 1921, the Peace dollar, designed by medalist Anthony DeFrancisci, was promulgated to commemorate the signing of formal peace treaties between the United States on the one hand, and Germany and Austria on the other, thus officially ending America's World War I hostilities with these two countries. In 1922 the Mint made silver dollar production its top priority, causing other denominations to be produced sparingly if at all that year. Production ceased temporarily after 1928; original plans apparently called for only a one-year suspension, but this was extended by the Great Depression. Mintage resumed in 1934, but for only two years. Peace dollar - 1925 File links The following pages link to this file: United States dollar coin Categories: Public domain images ... Peace dollar - 1925 File links The following pages link to this file: United States dollar coin Categories: Public domain images ... Peace Dollar Obverse Peace Dollar A silver dollar coin issued by the United States government noncontinuously from 1921-1935, equal to 100 cents. ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... A peace treaty is an agreement (a peace treaty) between two hostile parties, usually countries or governments, that formally ends a war or armed conflict. ... Combatants Entente Powers Central Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties > 5 million military deaths > 3 million military deaths {{{notes}}} World War I, also known as the First World War and (before 1939) the Great War, the War of the Nations, War to End All Wars, was a world... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Dorothea Langes Migrant Mother depicts destitute pea pickers in California, centering on Florence Owens Thompson, a mother of seven children, age thirty-two, in Nipomo, California, March 1936. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1964, a small run of Peace Dollars was produced, all at the Denver Mint; however, plans for completing this coinage were then abandoned and all those that had been minted were melted, with no known specimens being preserved or released either for circulation or collection purposes. For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... The Denver Mint Denver Mint A branch of the United States Mint established in 1906 that produces coins with a D mint mark (not to be confused with the mint in Dahlonega, Georgia). ...


Eisenhower dollar (1971–1978)

Main article: Eisenhower Dollar Eisenhower Obverse (Left) and Reverse (Right) Eisenhower dollar A dollar coin issued by the United States government from 1971-1978, equal to 100 cents. ...

The Eisenhower clad dollar
The Eisenhower clad dollar

From 1971 to 1978, the U.S. Mint issued dollar coins with the obverse depicting Dwight D. Eisenhower and the reverse the insignia of the Apollo 11 moon landing, both designed by Chief Engraver Frank Gasparro. The 1976 Bicentennial commemorative design, produced in 1975 and 1976, featured the Liberty Bell and the Moon on the reverse (designed by Dennis R. Williams), while retaining the Eisenhower obverse. These new dollars contained no silver or gold, but were instead composed of the same copper-nickel clad composition used for the dime, quarter, and half-dollar. This made the coins extremely resistant to wear and, like the smaller denominations, they still retain a good deal of shine even when subject to mass usage. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician. ... Apollo 11 was an American space mission, part of the Apollo program and the first manned mission to land on the Moon. ... Frank Gasparro (August 26, 1909 – September 29, 2001) was the 10th Chief Engraver of the U.S. Mint and held this position from February 23, 1965 to January 16, 1981. ... Quarter bicentennial reverse Half dollar bicentennial reverse Dollar bicentennial reverse All quarter, half dollar and dollar coins produced by the United States Mint during the years 1975 and 1976 bore special designs on their reverse, commemorating the 200th anniversary (bicentennial) of the independence of the United States. ... Commemorative coins are legally issued coins with a denomination that are not usually meant for circulation. ... The Liberty Bell, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is an American bell of great historic significance. ...


The coins were never very popular, primarily due to their large size and weight which made them inconvenient to carry and the fact that very few vending machines are designed to accept them.


Anthony dollar (1979–1981; 1999)

Main article: Susan B. Anthony dollar The Susan B. Anthony dollar is a coin minted between 1979 and 1981, and again in 1999. ...

The Anthony clad dollar
The Anthony clad dollar

For the short duration of 1979 to 1981, the Mint produced Anthony Dollars, depicting Susan B. Anthony, the first non-fictitious woman portrayed on circulating US coinage. (Many earlier circulating coins featured images of women, but the women depicted were all non-specific representations of Liberty, not real women. Also, Spain's Queen Isabella was portrayed along with Christopher Columbus on the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition commemorative half dollar, but it was not a circulating coin.) The Anthony dollars, like the Eisenhower dollars, were made from a copper-nickel clad. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Susan B. Anthony dollar is a coin minted between 1979 and 1981, and again in 1999. ... Susan Brownell Anthony, aged 28 Susan Brownell Anthony, (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906) was a prominent American civil rights leader who, along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, led the effort to secure Womens suffrage in the United States. ... ... Isabella of Castile (Spanish: Ysabel, Isabel or Isabela) (22 April 1451 - 26 November 1504) was queen of Castile. ... Christopher Columbus (1451? – 20 May 1506) was assumed to be an Italian explorer and trader who crossed the Atlantic Ocean and reached the Americas on October 12, 1492 under the flag of Castile. ... 1893 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... One-third scale replica of The Republic, which once stood in the great basin at the exposition, Chicago, 2004 The Worlds Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds fair, was held in Chicago in 1893 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbuss... Commemorative coinage of the United States consists of coins that have been minted to commemorate a particular event, person or organization. ...


Susan B. Anthony dollar coins were sometimes referred to as "Carter quarters." This was a snide reference to both the deterioration of the value of the dollar during Jimmy Carter's term and the Anthony dollar's strong physical resemblance to the quarter, often causing it to be mistakenly spent as such. They were quickly discontinued, but were resurrected for 1999 when the Mint decided its reserves of dollar coins were getting low. The Sacagawea dollar wouldn't enter production for another year, so the so-called "Carter quarter" saw a brief revival. For the submarine, see USS Jimmy Carter (SSN-23). ... The quarter is 1/4th of a United States dollar or 25 cents. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


Some consider the Susan B. Anthony dollar to be unlucky. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Sacagawea dollar (2000–present)

Main article: Sacagawea Dollar The Sacagawea Dollar is the current United States dollar coin. ...


The Sacagawea dollar was authorized by Congress in 1997 because the supply of Anthony dollars, in inventory since their last mintage in 1981, was soon expected to be depleted. Delays in ramping up Sacagawea dollar production led to a final 1999-dated mintage of Susan B. Anthony dollars. As predicted by Coin Coalition representatives at Congressional hearings on the United States $1 Coin Act of 1997, the government's failure to eliminate the U.S. one dollar bill prevented the Sacagawea Dollar from being widely circulated. While dollar coins are used infrequently in general commerce, they are used in place of tokens in some areas and are given as change in many United States Postal Service stamp vending machines, creating a relatively small but significant demand. Sacagawea (Sakakawea, Sacajawea, Sacajewea; see below) (c. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... The Coin Coalition is an organization supporting the elimination of pennies and dollar bills from U.S. currency. ... The United States $1 Coin Act of 1997 was legislation passed by the United States Congress providing for a redesigned gold colored coin with a distinctive new rim. ... Obverse of the $1 bill Reverse of the $1 bill The U.S. one dollar bill ($1) is a denomination of U.S. currency. ... A USPS truck in San Francisco A smaller truck (a Long Life Vehicle or LLV) used in suburban areas This article describes the United States Postal Service. ...


The obverse was designed by artist Glenna Goodacre, using Shoshone Randy'L He-dow Teton as a model for Sacagawea [1]. Glenna Goodacre is an artist best known for having designed the Sacagawea Dollar that entered circulation in the United States in 2000. ... Shoshone around their tipi, probably taken around 1890 Shoshone Indians at Ft. ... RandyL He-dow Teton is the model used for the US golden dollar coin - the Sacagawea Dollar issued in 2000. ...


There are approximately 1 billion Sacagawea coins in circulation and about 250 million more in reserve. The US Mint greatly reduced production of Sacagawea Dollars after the 2001 minting, citing sufficient inventory. The Mint continues to produce circulation and proof quantities of the coin each year for sales to numismatists, as of 2005. 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...


The Mint took great care to create the coin with the same size, weight, and electromagnetic properties as the Anthony dollar, but with a golden color. Unfortunately, the selected alloy has a tendency to tarnish quite severely in circulation (unlike Canadian dollar coins, which retain their yellowish appearance in circulation), ruining the "golden" effect. Being able to easily co-circulate the coin with the Anthony dollar was considered a higher priority than maintaining a consistent coloring, despite the fact that the Anthony dollar had virtually no circulation and many vending machines had to be recalibrated to accept the new coins anyway. Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, composed of the electric field and the magnetic field. ... Tarnish is a layer of corrosion that develops over copper, brass, silver, or aluminum as they undergo oxidation. ... Calibration refers to the process of setting the magnitude of the output (or response) of a measuring instrument to the magnitude of the input property or attribute within specified accuracy and precision. ...


As of 2006, dollar coins are seldom encountered in commerce in the United States, except in vending machines dispensing tickets, tokens, or cards for rides on public transit vehicles in or near large cities (which offer the coins as change from a $5 or larger bill where necessary) and at casinos, where they are used in slot machines. However, the Sacagawea dollar has achieved popularity in Ecuador, where the US dollar is also the official currency. 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ... Casino (disambiguation). ... Slot machines in the Trump Taj Mahal A slot machine (American English), poker machine (Australian English), or fruit machine (British English) is a certain type of casino game. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Presidential Dollar Coin Program (2007–unknown)

See article at Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005

In December 2005, Congress decided to create a new series of $1 coins that would honor 37 former presidents in 38 different coins (Grover Cleveland will be on two coins, since he served two non-consecutive terms). Beginning in 2007, four new coins would be produced per year, honoring the Presidents in order of service. The Presidential $1 Coin Act is intended to create renewed interest in the coin like that seen during the 50 State Quarters program [2]. At least 13 of all dollar coins produced would still be Sacagawea coins, with the remaining coins making up the 4 presidential coins annually. The Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-145; 119 Stat. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program is the release of a series of commemorative coins by the United States Mint. ...


List of designs

  • Silver dollar coins
    • Flowing Hair 1794–1795
    • Draped Bust, Small Eagle 1795–1798
    • Draped Bust, Heraldic Eagle 1798–1803, 1804
    • Gobrecht Dollar 1836–1839
    • Seated Liberty No Motto 1840–1866
    • Seated Liberty With Motto 1866–1873
    • Trade Dollar 1873–1883
    • Morgan Dollar 1878–1921
    • Peace Dollar (High Relief) 1921
    • Peace Dollar (Low Relief) 1922–1935
  • Gold dollar coins
    • Liberty Head 1849–1854
    • Indian Head Small Head 1854–1856
    • Indian Head Large Head 1856–1889
  • Manganese-Brass dollar coins

Newly-minted replica of the original 1804 silver dollar The 1804 silver dollar is one of the rarest and most famous coins in the world, due to its unique history. ... Morgan Dollar Obverse Morgan Dollar A silver dollar coin issued by the United States government, equal to 100 cents. ... Peace Dollar Obverse Peace Dollar A silver dollar coin issued by the United States government noncontinuously from 1921-1935, equal to 100 cents. ... Peace Dollar Obverse Peace Dollar A silver dollar coin issued by the United States government noncontinuously from 1921-1935, equal to 100 cents. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ... Quarter bicentennial reverse Half dollar bicentennial reverse Dollar bicentennial reverse All quarter, half dollar and dollar coins produced by the United States Mint during the years 1975 and 1976 bore special designs on their reverse, commemorating the 200th anniversary (bicentennial) of the independence of the United States. ... Susan Brownell Anthony, aged 28 Susan Brownell Anthony, (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906) was a prominent American civil rights leader who, along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, led the effort to secure Womens suffrage in the United States. ... Sacagawea (Sakakawea, Sacajawea, Sacajewea; see below) (c. ...

See also

Newly-minted replica of the original 1804 silver dollar The 1804 silver dollar is one of the rarest and most famous coins in the world, due to its unique history. ...

Sources

  • Comprehensive Catalog and Encyclopedia of Morgan and Peace Dollars, ISBN 0966016823
  • Financial Impact of Issuing the New $1 Coin, GAO/GGD-00-111R, Apr. 7, 2000.
  • New coin unlikely change?, Steve Cranford, Charlotte Business Journal, July 21, 2000.

External links


The Denver Post is a daily newspaper published in Denver, Colorado. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 6 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American newspaper published by the Gannett Corporation. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

United States currency and coinage
Topics: Federal Reserve Note | United States Note | United States coinage | United States dollar
Currency: $1 | $2 | $5 | $10 | $20 | $50 | $100 | Larger denominations
Coinage: Cent | Nickel | Dime | Quarter | Half Dollar | Dollar

  Results from FactBites:
 
United States dollar coin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1848 words)
Dollar coins have found little popular acceptance in modern circulation in the United States, despite several attempts since 1971 to phase-in a coin in place of the one-dollar bill.
Original silver dollars from this period are highly prized by coin collectors and are exceptionally valuable, especially the 1804 silver dollar, which is one of the rarest and most famous coins in the world.
Susan B. Anthony dollar coins were sometimes referred to as "Carter quarters." This was a snide reference to both the deterioration of the value of the dollar during Jimmy Carter's term and the Anthony dollar's strong physical resemblance to the quarter, often causing it to be mistakenly spent as such.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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