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Encyclopedia > United States presidential election, 1992
1988  Flag of the United States 1996
United States presidential election, 1992
3 November 1992
120x
Nominee Bill Clinton George H. W. Bush Ross Perot
Party Democratic Republican Independent
Home state Arkansas Texas Texas
Running mate Al Gore Dan Quayle James Stockdale
Electoral vote 370 168 0
States carried 32+DC 18 0
Popular vote 44,909,806 39,104,550 19,743,821
Percentage 43.0% 37.4% 18.9%
United States presidential election, 1992

Presidential election results map. Red denotes states won by Bush/Quayle, Blue denotes those won by Clinton/Gore. The United States presidential election of 1988 featured an open primary for both major parties. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Presidential electoral votes. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale (December 23, 1923 – July 5, 2005) was one of the most highly decorated officers in the history of the United States Navy. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1182x635, 110 KB) This map image (or all images in this article or category) should be recreated using vector graphics as an SVG file. ...

Incumbent
George H. W. Bush
Republican George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... GOP redirects here. ...

Successor
Bill Clinton
Democratic William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...

The United States presidential elections of 1992 featured a battle between incumbent President, Republican George Bush; Democrat Bill Clinton, the governor of Arkansas; and independent candidate Ross Perot, a Texas businessman. Bush had alienated much of his conservative base by breaking his 1988 campaign pledge against raising taxes, the economy had sunk into recession, and the president's perceived best strength, foreign policy, was regarded as much less important following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the relatively peaceful climate in the Middle East following the defeat of Iraq in the First Gulf War. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Bush delivering the famous line at the 1988 convention Read my lips: No new taxes was a famous pledge made by Republican Presidential candidate George H.W. Bush at the 1988 Republican convention in his acceptance speech on August 18. ... -1... In macroeconomics, a Recession is a decline in any countrys Gross Domestic Product (GDP), or negative real economic growth, for two or more successive quarters of a year. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Nominations

Republican nomination

See also: 1992 Republican presidential primary, 1992 Republican National Convention For only third time in the 20th Century, after the elections of 1912 and 1978, a Republican President was seriously challenged for partys nomination. ... The 1992 National Convention of the Republican Party of the United States was held in the Astrodome in Houston, Texas, from August 17 to August 20, 1992. ...


Republican candidates

Despite a challenge by conservative journalist Pat Buchanan, President George H. W. Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle easily won renomination by the Republican Party. However, the success of the conservative opposition forced the moderate Bush to move further to the right than in 1988, and to incorporate many socially conservative planks in the party platform. Bush allowed Buchanan to give the keynote address at the Republican National Convention in Houston, and his culture war speech alienated many moderates. David Duke also entered the Republican primary, but performed poorly at the polls. Patrick Buchanan Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938), usually known as Pat Buchanan, is an American conservative journalist and a well known television political commentator. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Nixon redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... David Ernest Duke (born July 1, 1950) is a former member of the Louisiana House of Representatives, a candidate in presidential primaries for both the Democratic and Republican parties, and former Grand Wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. ... The Louisiana House of Representatives is the lower house in the Louisiana State Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Harold Edward Stassen (April 13, 1907 - March 4, 2001) was the 25th Governor of Minnesota from 1939 to 1943. ... The Governor of Minnesota is the chief executive of the U.S. state of Minnesota, leading the states executive branch. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... The 1992 National Convention of the Republican Party of the United States was held in the Astrodome in Houston, Texas, from August 17 to August 20, 1992. ... Houston redirects here. ... A culture war speech is term used in the United States of America to refer to a speech given either by a conservative or by a liberal that predominately supports a single culturally-biased or ethnocentric point of view and that does not recognize the validity of even parts of... David Ernest Duke (born July 1, 1950) is a former member of the Louisiana House of Representatives, a candidate in presidential primaries for both the Democratic and Republican parties, and former Grand Wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. ...


With intense pressure on the Buchanan delegates to relent, the tally for president went as follows:

Vice President Dan Quayle was renominated by voice vote. Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... Patrick Buchanan Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938), usually known as Pat Buchanan, is an American conservative journalist and a well known television political commentator. ... Alan Keyes (born August 7, 1950) is an American political activist, author and former diplomat. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ...


1992 election was the last with Stassen as a candidate.

Democratic Party nomination

See also: 1992 Democratic presidential primary, 1992 Democratic National Convention The 1992 Democratic presidential primary chose the Democratic nominee for the general election. ... The 1992 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party nominated Governor Bill Clinton of Arkansas for President and Senator Al Gore of Tennessee for Vice President; Clinton announced Gore as his running-mate on July 9, 1992. ...


In 1991, President Bush had high popularity ratings in the wake of the Gulf War. Many well-known Democrats considered the race unwinnable and did not run for the nomination. Those that did run included several less-well-known candidates. Some of the potential candidates who did not run included: Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...

Overview

Clinton, a Southerner with experience governing a more conservative state, positioned himself as a centrist New Democrat. He prepared for a run in 1992 amidst a crowded field seeking to beat the incumbent President George H. W. Bush. In the aftermath of the Persian Gulf War, Bush seemed unbeatable but a small economic recession spurred Democrats on. Tom Harkin won his native Iowa without much surprise. Clinton, meanwhile, was still a relatively unknown national candidate before the primary season when a woman named Gennifer Flowers appeared in the press to reveal allegations of an affair. Clinton sought damage control by appearing on 60 Minutes with his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton, for an interview with Steve Kroft. Paul Tsongas of Massachusetts won the primary in neighboring New Hampshire but Clinton's second place finish - strengthened by Clinton's speech labeling himself "The Comeback Kid" - re-energized his campaign. Clinton swept nearly all of the Super Tuesday primaries, making him the solid front runner. Jerry Brown, however, began to run a surprising insurgent campaign, particularly through use of a 1-800 number to receive grassroots funding. Brown scored surprising wins in Connecticut and Colorado and seemed poised to overtake Clinton but a series of controversial missteps set Brown back and Clinton effectively won the Democratic Party's nomination after winning the New York Primary in early April. For the Canadian New Democratic Party, see New Democratic Party. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... In macroeconomics, a Recession is a decline in any countrys Gross Domestic Product (GDP), or negative real economic growth, for two or more successive quarters of a year. ... Gennifer Flowers (born January 24, 1950) is one of three women who have claimed to have had affairs with U.S. President Bill Clinton. ... This article is about the CBS news magazine. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... Steve Kroft is an American journalist. ... In the United States, Super Tuesday commonly refers to a Tuesday in early March of a presidential election year. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...


The convention met in New York City, and the official tally was: New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

Clinton chose U.S. Senator Albert A. Gore Jr. (D-Tennessee) to be his running mate on July 9, 1992. Choosing Gore, who is from Clinton's neighboring state of Tennessee, went against the popular strategy of balancing a Southern candidate with a Northern partner. Gore did serve to balance the ticket in other ways, as he was perceived as strong on family values and environmental issues, while Clinton was not.[1] Also, Gore's similarities to Clinton allowed him to really push some of his key campaign themes, such as centrism and generational change.[2] William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... For the whistleblower, see Gerald W. Brown. ... Paul Efthemios Tsongas Paul Efthemios Tsongas (February 14, 1941 – January 18, 1997) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... “Robert Casey” redirects here. ... Patricia Schroeder (born July 30, 1940), American politician, was a twelve-term Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from Colorado, serving from 1972 to 1996. ... Larry Agran is the former mayor of Irvine, California, Orange Countys noted planned city. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ...


The Democratic Convention in New York City was essentially a solidification of the party around Clinton and Gore, though there was controversy over whether Jerry Brown would be allowed to speak. Brown did indeed speak and ultimately endorsed the Clinton campaign. The 1992 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party nominated Governor Bill Clinton of Arkansas for President and Senator Al Gore of Tennessee for Vice President; Clinton announced Gore as his running-mate on July 9, 1992. ...


Before Gore's selection, other politicians were mentioned as a possible running-mate, e.g. Bob Kerrey, Dick Gephardt, Mario Cuomo, Indiana Representative Lee H. Hamilton, Pennsylvania Senator Harris Wofford, Florida Senator Bob Graham, and Massachusetts Senator John Kerry. Joseph Robert Bob Kerrey (born August 27, 1943) was the Democratic Governor of Nebraska from 1983 to 1987, and a U.S. Senator from Nebraska (1989–2001). ... Richard Andrew Dick Gephardt (born January 31, 1941) is senior counsel at the global law firm DLA Piper and a former prominent American politician of the Democratic Party. ... Mario Matthew Cuomo (born June 15, 1932) served as the Governor of New York from 1983 to 1995. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Lee Hamilton redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Senator Harris Wofford Harris Llewellyn Wofford (born April 9, 1926) is an American politician and member of the Democratic Party who served as a U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania from 1991 to 1995. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Daniel Robert Graham (born November 9, 1936) is an American politician. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


Another additional controversy concerned Pennsylvania Governor Bob Casey, who sought a speaking slot at the convention but was not granted one. Casey complained that it was because of his outspoken anti-abortion views: he had warned the platform committee that Democrats were committing "suicide" because they did not support restrictions on abortion.[3] Clinton supporters have said that Casey was not allowed to speak because he had not endorsed the ticket. The 1992 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party nominated Governor Bill Clinton of Arkansas for President and Senator Al Gore of Tennessee for Vice President; Clinton announced Gore as his running-mate on July 9, 1992. ... “Robert Casey” redirects here. ...


Perot candidacy

The public's unease about the deficit and fears of professional politicians allowed the independent candidacy of billionaire Texan Ross Perot to explode on the scene in the most dramatic fashion—at one point Perot was the leader in the polls.[4] Perot crusaded against the national debt, tapping into voter's potential fear of the deficit. His volunteers succeeded in collecting enough signatures to get his name on the ballot in all 50 states. In June, Perot led the national public opinion polls with support from 39% of the voters (versus 31% for Bush and 25% for Clinton).[4] Perot severely damaged his credibility by dropping out of the presidential contest in July and remaining out of the race for several weeks before re-entering. He compounded this damage by eventually claiming, without evidence, that his withdrawal was due to Republican operatives attempting to disrupt his daughter's wedding. His presence, however, ensured that economic issues remained at the center of the national debate. Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... GOP redirects here. ...


Other nominations

The 1992 campaign also marked the entry of Ralph Nader into presidential politics as a candidate. Despite the advice of several liberal and environmental groups, Nader did not formally run. Rather, he tried to make an impact in the New Hampshire primaries, urging members of both parties to write-in "none of the above." As a result, several thousand Democrats and Republicans wrote-in Nader's own name. Despite being a very liberal politician, Nader received more votes from Republicans than Democrats. Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ...


The Libertarian Party nominated Andre Marrou, former Alaska representative and the Party's 1988 vice-presidential candidate, for President. Nancy Lord was his running mate. The Marrou/Lord ticket made the ballot in all fifty states plus Washington, D.C. and received 291,627 votes (0.28% of the popular vote). The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... Andre V. Marrou (born 4 December American political figure, affiliated with the United States Libertarian Party. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... The Alaska House of Representatives is the lower house in the Alaska Legislature of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Libertarian Party vice presidential nominees ...


Former United States Army Special Forces officer and Vietnam veteran Bo Gritz was the nominee of the Populist Party. He received 106,152 votes nationwide (0.10% of the popular vote). Blue Light redirects here. ... This article is about veterans of the Vietnam War. ... Bo Gritz James Bo Gritz (born January 18, 1939 in Enid, Oklahoma) was a highly decorated Green Beret officer during the Vietnam War whose post-war activities—notably attempted POW rescues—have proven controversial. ... The Populist Party (also known as the Peoples Party) was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ...


Psychotherapist and political activist Lenora Fulani, who was the 1988 presidential nominee of the New Alliance Party, received a second consecutive nomniation from the Party in 1992. Fulani and running mate Maria Elizabeth Munoz received 73,622 votes (0.07% of the popular vote). Lenora Branch Fulani (b. ... The New Alliance Party was an American political party formed by psychotherapists Fred Newman and Lenora Fulani. ...


The U.S. Taxpayers Party ran its first presidential ticket in 1992, nominating conservative political activist Howard Phillips. Phillips and running mate Albion Knight, Jr. drew 43,369 votes (0.04% of the popular vote). The Constitution Party is a conservative third party in the United States, founded as the U.S. Taxpayers Party in 1992. ... Howard Phillips (born February 6, 1941 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American conservative political figure. ... Albion Knight, Jr was the vice-presidential candidate of the US Taxpayers Party in the U.S. presidential election, 1992, as the running-mate of Howard Phillips. ...


The newly formed Natural Law Party nominated scientist and researcher John Hagelin for President and Mike Tompkins for Vice President. The party's first presidential ticket appeared on the ballot in 32 states and drew 39,000 votes (0.04% of the popular vote). The Natural Law Party was founded in 1992 in the United States by a group of educators, business leaders, and lawyers in Fairfield, Iowa who practiced Transcendental Meditation. ... Dr. John Hagelin Dr. John Hagelin, scientist, educator, and three-time third-party candidate for President of the United States, is Professor of Physics, Director of the Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy at Maharishi University of Management, and Minister of Science and Technology of the Global Country of...


General election

Campaign

Every U.S. presidential election campaign is an amalgam of issues, images and personality; and despite the intense focus on the country's economic future, the 1992 contest was no exception. The Bush reelection effort was built around a set of ideas traditionally used by incumbents: experience and trust. It was in some ways a battle of generations. George H. W. Bush, 68, the last president to serve in World War II, faced a young challenger in Bill Clinton who, at age 46, had never served in the military and had in fact participated in protests against the Vietnam War. In emphasizing his experience as president and commander-in-chief, Bush also drew attention to what he characterized as Clinton's lack of judgment and character. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


For his part, Bill Clinton organized his campaign around another of the oldest and most powerful themes in electoral politics: change. As a youth, Clinton had once met President John F. Kennedy, and in his own campaign 30 years later, much of his rhetoric challenging Americans to accept change consciously echoed that of Kennedy in his 1960 campaign. John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ...


As Governor of Arkansas for 12 years, then-Governor Clinton could point to his experience in wrestling with the very issues of economic growth, education and health care that were, according to public opinion polls, among President Bush's chief vulnerabilities. Where President Bush offered an economic program based on lower taxes and cuts in government spending, Governor Clinton proposed higher taxes on the wealthy and increased spending on investments in education, transportation and communications that, he believed, would boost the nation's productivity and growth and thereby lower the deficit. Similarly, Governor Clinton's health care proposals to control costs called for much heavier involvement by the federal government than President Bush's. During the campaign, Governor Clinton hardened a soft public image on law and order when he controversially traveled back to Arkansas to oversee the execution of functionally retarded inmate Ricky Ray Rector. Clinton's critics from the left, and particularly the writer Christopher Hitchens, have fiercely attacked the apparent cynicism of this decision.[citation needed] This is a list of governors of Arkansas. ... Ricky Ray Rector was arrested for the killing of a police officer and another adult man. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ...


The slogan “The economy, stupid” (coined by Democratic strategist James Carville, and popularly misquoted as “It's the economy, stupid”) was used internally in the Clinton campaign to remind staffers to keep their focus on Bush's economic performance and not get distracted by other issues. Governor Clinton successfully hammered home the theme of change throughout the campaign, as well as in a round of three televised debates with President Bush and Ross Perot in October. Many feel Bush's performance during the town-hall style debate, in which the President was observed on-camera frequently glancing at his watch, made Bush appear uninterested in the concerns raised by the debate audience.[5] The economy, stupid, was a phrase in American politics widely used during Bill Clintons successful 1992 presidential campaign against George H.W. Bush. ... James Carville James Carville (born October 25, 1944) is an American political consultant, commentator, media personality and pundit. ... Town Hall Meeting is a concept which originated in New England when everybody in the town showed up to speak their piece and then vote on an issue. ...


Character issues

Many character issues were raised during the campaign, including allegations that Clinton had dodged the draft during the Vietnam War, and had used marijuana, which Clinton claimed he had pretended to smoke, but "didn't inhale." A draft dodger, or draft evader, is a person who avoids (dodges) the conscription policies of the nation in which he or she is a citizen or resident, by leaving the country or going into hiding. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja (Hindi: गांजा),[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa. ...


Allegations were also made that George H. W. Bush had engaged in a long-term extramarital affair with Jennifer Fitzgerald, who had been his secretary throughout the 1970s.[6] Bush denied ever having an affair with Fitzgerald.[7] Jennifer Fitzgerald, born Jennifer Ann Isobel Patteson-Knight (in 1932), is a retired U.S. diplomat who allegedly had a long-term affair with President George H.W. Bush from the time he was United States ambassador to China which continued while he was Vice President and then President. ...


Results

On November 3, Bill Clinton won election as the 42nd President of the United States by a wide margin in the U.S. Electoral College, despite receiving only 43 percent of the popular vote. It was the first time since 1968 that a candidate won the White House with under 50 percent of the popular vote. The state of Arkansas was the only state in the entire country that gave the majority of its vote to a single candidate; the rest were won by pluralities of the vote. It would not be until the 2004 election that a candidate would receive the majority of the popular vote again. is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Presidential election results map. ...


Independent candidate Ross Perot received 19,741,065 popular votes for President. The billionaire used his own money to advertise extensively, and is the only third-party candidate ever allowed into the nationally televised presidential debates with both major party candidates (Independent John Anderson debated Republican Ronald Reagan in 1980, but without Democrat Jimmy Carter who had refused to appear in a three-man debate). Speaking about the North American Free Trade Agreement, Perot described its effect on American jobs as causing a "giant sucking sound." Perot was ahead in the polls for a period of almost two months - a feat not accomplished by an independent candidate in almost 100 years.[citation needed] Perot lost much of his support when he temporarily withdrew from the election, only to soon after again declare himself a candidate. Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon debate in 1960 Every presidential election in the United States, the two main candidates (almost always the candidates of the two main parties, the Democratic Party and the Republican Party) engage in a debate. ... John Bayard Anderson (born February 15, 1922) was a liberal Republican U.S. Representative from Illinois and presidential candidate in the 1980 election. ... Reagan redirects here. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... NAFTA redirects here. ... The giant sucking sound was presidential candidate Ross Perots colorful phrase for what he believed would be the negative effects of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which he opposed. ...


Perot's almost 19% of the popular vote made him the most successful third-party presidential candidate in terms of popular vote since Theodore Roosevelt in the 1912 election. Some conservative analysts believe that Perot acted as a spoiler in the election, primarily drawing votes away from Bush and allowing Clinton to win many states with less than a majority of votes. However, exit polling indicated that Perot voters would have split their votes fairly evenly between Clinton and Bush had Perot not been in the race, and an analysis by FairVote - Center for Voting and Democracy suggested that, while Bush would have won more electoral votes with Perot out of the race, he would not have gained enough to reverse Clinton's victory. [1] Clinton also led Bush in all polls after the Democratic Convention in two way match ups. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The spoiler effect is a term to describe the effect a candidate can have on a close election, in which their candidacy results in the election being won by a candidate dissimilar to them, rather than a candidate similar to them. ... FairVote - Center for Voting and Democracy is a non-profit organization based in Takoma Park, Maryland that provides information to the public about the impact of voting systems on political representation, proportional representation, and voter turnout. ...


Although he did not win any states, Perot managed to finish ahead of one of the two major party candidates in two states: In Maine, Perot received 30.44% of the vote to Bush's 30.39% (Clinton won Maine with 38.77%); in Utah, Perot received 27.34% of the vote to Clinton's 24.65% (Bush won Utah with 43.36%). Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Analysis

Several factors made the results possible. First, the campaign came on the heels of the recession of 1990-91. While in historical terms the recession was mild and actually ended before the election, the resulting job loss (especially among middle managers not yet accustomed to white collar downsizing) fueled strong discontent with Bush, who was successfully portrayed as aloof, out of touch, and overly focused on foreign affairs. Highly telegenic, Clinton was perceived as sympathetic, concerned, and more in touch with ordinary families. The recession of the late nineteen-eighties was an economic recession that hit much of the world beginning in 1987. ... This article is about a journal. ...


Second was the decision by Bush to accept a tax increase. Pressured by rising budget deficits, increased demand for entitlement spending and reduced tax revenues (each a consequence of the recession) Bush agreed to a budget compromise with Congress (where rival Democrats held the majority). Not having been in Congress at the time, Clinton was able to effectively condemn the tax increase on both its own merits and as a reflection of Bush's honesty. Effective Democratic TV ads were aired showing a clip of Bush's infamous 1988 campaign speech in which he promised "Read my lips ... No new taxes." In a semantic irony, President Bush did not add new taxes, only increasing existing taxes, but the implied meaning was clear, as he had explicitly stated in the speech, "My opponent won't rule out raising taxes. But I will. The Congress will push me to raise taxes and I'll say no." A budget deficit occurs when an entity (often a government) spends more money than it takes in. ... Entitlement is the guarantee for access to benefits because of rights, or by agreement through law. ... Bush delivering the famous line at the 1988 convention Read my lips: No new taxes was a famous pledge made by Republican Presidential candidate George H.W. Bush at the 1988 Republican convention in his acceptance speech on August 18. ...


Most importantly, Bush's coalition was in disarray, for both the aforementioned reasons and for unrelated reasons. The end of the Cold War allowed old rivalries among conservatives to re-emerge and meant that other voters focused more on domestic policy, to the detriment of Bush, a social and fiscal moderate. The consequence of such a perception depressed conservative turnout[8]. Unlike Bush, Clinton was able to unite his party behind his candidacy. Despite a fractious and ideologically diverse party, Clinton was able to successfully court all wings of the Democratic party, even where they conflicted. To garner the support of moderates and conservative Democrats, he attacked Sister Souljah, a little-known rap musician whose lyrics Clinton condemned. Clinton could also point to his liberal record as Governor of Arkansas. More liberal Democrats were impressed by Clinton's academic credentials, 60's-era protest record, and support for social causes such as a woman's right to abortion. Supporters remained energized and confident, even in times of scandal or missteps. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... In government, domestic policy is the counterpart of foreign policy; it consists of all government policy decisions, programs, and actions that primarily deal with internal matters, as opposed to relations with other nation-states. ... Sister Souljah (born as Lisa Williamson in 1964, Bronx, New York) is a controversial American hip hop-generation author, activist, recording artist, and film producer. ... Hip hop music is a style of popular music. ...


The effect of Ross Perot's candidacy has been a contentious point for debate over many years. In the ensuing months after the election, various Republicans asserted that Ross Perot had acted as a spoiler, enough to the detriment of Mr. Bush to lose him the election. While many disaffected conservatives did vote for Ross Perot to protest Bush's tax increase, further examination of the Ross Perot vote in the Election Night exit polls showed that Perot siphoned votes equally among Clinton, Bush, and staying home if Perot had not been a candidate [9]. Perot also appealed to liberals who doubted Clinton's dedication to principle. He also appealed to disaffected voters all across the political spectrum who had grown weary of the two-party system. NAFTA also played a role in Perot's support. Those who voted for Perot on the issue cited the fact that both Clinton and Bush were in favor of implementing the recently negotiated free trade agreement. It is also worth noting that in July 1992, when Perot dropped out of the race temporarily after Clinton's acceptance speech, Bill Clinton opened up a double digit lead on the unpopular incumbent President, which he maintained until Perot re-entered the race in October.[10] [11] From May 1992 until the election, Bush maintained no higher than a forty percent approval rating. Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ...


Clinton, Bush and Perot did not focus on abortion during the campaign. However, exit polls showed that attitudes toward abortion "significantly influenced" the vote, as pro-choice Republicans defected from Bush.[12][13]


Implications

Clinton's election ended an era in which the Republican Party had controlled the White House for 12 consecutive years, and for 20 of the previous 24 years. That election also brought the Democrats full control of the political branches of the federal government, including both houses of U.S. Congress as well as the presidency, for the first time since the administration of the last Democratic president, Jimmy Carter. This would not last for very long however, as the Republicans took control of both the House and Senate in 1994. Clinton meanwhile, would become the first Democratic President since FDR to serve two full terms in the White House. For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Congress in Joint Session. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


Detailed Results

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote Electoral
Vote
Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
RM's Electoral
Vote
Count Pct
William Jefferson Clinton Democratic, Liberal (NY) Arkansas 44,909,806 43.0% 370 Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. Tennessee 370
George Herbert Walker Bush Republican, Conservative (NY), Right To Life (NY) Texas 39,104,550 37.4% 168 James Danforth Quayle Indiana 168
Henry Ross Perot (none) Texas 19,743,821 18.9% 0 James Bond Stockdale California 0
Andre V. Marrou Libertarian Alaska 290,087 0.3% 0 Nancy Lord Nevada 0
James “Bo” Gritz Populist Nevada 106,152 0.1% 0 Cy Minett   0
Lenore Fulani New Alliance Party New York 73,622 0.07% 0 Maria Munoz 0
Howard Phillips U.S. Taxpayers Party Virginia 43,369 0.04% 0 Albion Knight, Jr. 0
Other 152,516 0.13% Other
Total 104,423,923 100 % 538 538
Needed to win 270 270

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1992 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (August 7, 2005). William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Liberal Party of New York is a minor political party active only in New York State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Conservative Party of New York is an American political party active only in the state of New York. ... The New York State Right to Life Party was founded to oppose the legalization of abortion in New York in 1970. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale (December 23, 1923 – July 5, 2005) was one of the most highly decorated officers in the history of the United States Navy. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Andre V. Marrou (born 4 December American political figure, affiliated with the United States Libertarian Party. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Libertarian Party vice presidential nominees ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Bo Gritz James Bo Gritz (born January 18, 1939 in Enid, Oklahoma) was a highly decorated Green Beret officer during the Vietnam War whose post-war activities—notably attempted POW rescues—have proven controversial. ... The Populist Party (also known as the Peoples Party) was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Lenora Branch Fulani (b. ... The New Alliance Party was an American political party formed by psychotherapists Fred Newman and Lenora Fulani. ... This article is about the state. ... Maria Elizabeth Muñoz, a Chicana activist, was a third-party candidate for Vice President of the United States in the United States presidential election, 1992, representing the New Alliance Party (NAP) as the running mate of Lenora Fulani. ... Howard Phillips (born February 6, 1941 in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American conservative political figure. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative United States political party. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Albion Knight, Jr was the vice-presidential candidate of the US Taxpayers Party in the U.S. presidential election, 1992, as the running-mate of Howard Phillips. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (August 7, 2005). is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Close states

  1. Georgia, 0.59%
  2. North Carolina, 0.79%
  3. New Hampshire, 1.22%
  4. Ohio, 1.83%
  5. Florida, 1.89%
  6. Arizona, 1.95%
  7. New Jersey, 2.37%
  8. Montana, 2.51%
  9. Nevada, 2.63%
  10. Kentucky, 3.21%
  11. Texas, 3.48%
  12. South Dakota, 3.52%
  13. Colorado, 4.26%
  14. Wisconsin, 4.35%
  15. Virginia, 4.38%
  16. Louisiana, 4.61%
  17. Tennessee, 4.65%

Voter demographics

THE PRESIDENTIAL VOTE IN SOCIAL GROUPS (IN PERCENTAGES)
% of
1992
total
vote
3-party vote
1992 1996
Social group Clinton Bush Perot Clinton Dole Perot
Total vote 43 37 19 49 41 8
Party and ideology
2 Liberal Republicans 17 54 30 44 48 9
13 Moderate Republicans 15 63 21 20 72 7
21 Conservative Republicans 5 82 13 6 88 5
4 Liberal Independents 54 17 30 58 15 18
15 Moderate Independents 43 28 30 50 30 17
7 Conservative Independents 17 53 30 19 60 19
13 Liberal Democrats 85 5 11 89 5 4
20 Moderate Democrats 76 9 15 84 10 5
6 Conservative Democrats 61 23 16 69 23 7
Gender and marital status
33 Married men 38 42 21 40 48 10
33 Married women 41 40 19 48 43 7
15 Unmarried men 48 29 22 49 35 12
20 Unmarried women 53 31 15 62 28 7
Race
83 White 39 40 20 43 46 9
10 Black 83 10 7 84 12 4
5 Hispanic 61 25 14 72 21 6
1 Asian 31 55 15 43 48 8
Religion
46 White Protestant 33 47 21 36 53 10
29 Catholic 44 35 20 53 37 9
3 Jewish 80 11 9 78 16 3
17 Born Again, religious right 23 61 15 26 65 8
Age
17 18–29 years old 43 34 22 53 34 10
33 30–44 years old 41 38 21 48 41 9
26 45–59 years old 41 40 19 48 41 9
24 60 and older 50 38 12 48 44 7
Education
6 Not a high school graduate 54 28 18 59 28 11
24 High school graduate 43 36 21 51 35 13
27 Some college education 41 37 21 48 40 10
26 College graduate 39 41 20 44 46 8
17 Post graduate education 50 36 14 52 40 5
Family income
11 Under $15,000 58 23 19 59 28 11
23 $15,000–$29,999 45 35 20 53 36 9
27 $30,000–$49,999 41 38 21 48 40 10
39 Over $50,000 39 44 17 44 48 7
18 Over $75,000 36 48 16 41 51 7
9 Over $100,000 38 54 6
Region
23 East 47 35 18 55 34 9
26 Midwest 42 37 21 48 41 10
30 South 41 43 16 46 46 7
20 West 43 34 23 48 40 8
Community size
10 Population over 500,000 58 28 13 68 25 6
21 Population 50,000 to 500,000 50 33 16 50 39 8
39 Suburbs 41 39 21 47 42 8
30 Rural areas, towns 39 40 20 45 44 10

Source: Voter News Service exit poll, reported in The New York Times, November 10, 1996, 28. The Voter News Service was a consortium whose mission was to provide results for United States Presidential elections, so that individual organizations and networks would not have to do exit polling and vote tallying in parallel. ... An exit poll is a poll of voters taken immediately after they have exited the polling stations. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


See also

Bill Clintons 1992 campaign for President of the United States was a critical turning point for the Democratic Party, which had controlled the White House for only four of the previous twenty-four years. ... Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) Tom Harkin a junior United States Senator from Iowa (serving since 1985) was a candidate for the Democratic Presidential nomination in 1992 and one of the strongest candidates in this year. ... Chicken George was the name for a man in a chicken costume who shadowed George H. W. Bush through a portion of the 1992 U.S. presidential election. ... The giant sucking sound was presidential candidate Ross Perots colorful phrase for what he believed would be the negative effects of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which he opposed. ... This article covers the history of the United States from 1988 through present. ... Bush delivering the famous line at the 1988 convention Read my lips: No new taxes was a famous pledge made by Republican Presidential candidate George H.W. Bush at the 1988 Republican convention in his acceptance speech on August 18. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1992 was an election for the United States Senate in which the victory of Bill Clinton in the presidential election was not accompanied by major Democratic gains in the Senate. ...

Further reading

  • Abramowitz, Alan I. "It's Abortion, Stupid: Policy Voting in the 1992 Presidential Election" Journal of Politics 1995 57(1): 176-186. ISSN 0022-3816 in Jstor
  • Alexander, Herbert E.; Anthony Corrado (1995). Financing the 1992 Election. 
  • Thomas M. Defrank et al. Quest for the Presidency, 1992 Texas A&M University Press. 1994.
  • De la Garza, Rodolfo O.; Louis Desipio (1996). Ethnic Ironies: Latino Politics in the 1992 Elections. 
  • Goldman, Peter L.; et al. (1994). Quest for the Presidency, 1992. 
  • Jones, Bryan D. (1995). The New American Politics: Reflections on Political Change and the Clinton Administration. 
  • Steed, Robert P. (1994). The 1992 Presidential Election in the South: Current Patterns of Southern Party and Electoral Politics. 

References

  1. ^ http://select.nytimes.com/search/restricted/article?res=F10610FF3C5C0C7B8CDDA00894DA494D81
  2. ^ Al Gore from the United States Senate
  3. ^ The Atlanta Journal and The Atlanta Constitution May 19, 1992 Page: A/8
  4. ^ a b "The 1992 Campaign: On the Trail; Poll Gives Perot a Clear Lead", The New York Times. Retrieved on 2006-07-05. 
  5. ^ Case experts share what to look for in political debates: Style versus substance - Case Western Reserve University, accessed August 18, 2007
  6. ^ Conason, Joe (July/August 1992). "Reason No. 1 Not To Vote For George Bush: He Cheats on His Wife." Spy magazine.
  7. ^ Kurtz, Howard (August 12, 1992). "Bush Angrily Denounces Report of Extramarital Affair as 'a Lie.'" The Washington Post.
  8. ^ " THE TRANSITION: The Republicans; Looking to the Future, Party Sifts Through Past" http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E0CE2DF173EF932A25752C1A964958260&scp=1&sq=+THE+TRANSITION%3A+The+Republicans%3B+Looking+to+the+Future%2C+Party+Sifts+Through+Past&st=nyt
  9. ^ "Clinton Carves a Path Deep Into Reagan Country" http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E0CEFD8173FF937A35752C1A964958260&scp=1&sq=Clinton+Carves+a+Wide+Path+Deep+Into+Reagan+Country&st=nyt
  10. ^ The Pew Research Center "Perot is Back: Perot Undertoe Threatens Clinton http://people-press.org/reports/pdf/19921026.pdf
  11. ^ "The Race in Different Polls" http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E0CE7D8133DF931A3575AC0A964958260&scp=1&sq=+THE+1992+CAMPAIGN%3B+The+Race+in+Different+Polls&st=nyt
  12. ^ Donald T. Critchlow. Intended Consequences: Birth Control, Abortion, and the Federal Government in Modern America. (2004) p. 221
  13. ^ Abramowitz (1995)
  • Outline of U.S. History: Chapter 15: Bridge to the 21st Century. Official web site of the U.S. Department of State. Retrieved on December 10, 2005.
    • Bulk of article text as of January 9, 2003 copied from this page, when it was located at http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/history/ch13.htm#1992 and titled “An Outline of American History: Chapter 13: Toward the 21st Century”.
    • An archival version of this page is available at http://web.archive.org/web/20041103020223/usinfo.state.gov/products/pubs/history/ch13.htm.
    • This page is in the public domain as a government publication.

Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
United States Elections 2004 (2938 words)
The actual size of any state's delegation to the national nominating convention is calculated on the basis of a formula established by each party that includes such considerations as the state's population, its past support for the party's national candidates, and the number of elected officials and party leaders currently serving in public office.
Thus, states that permit selection of party convention delegates in a manner that does not conform to party rules may find their delegates challenged when they get to the national party conventions, or they may find the size of the delegation reduced by the party for violating its rules.
The presidential nominating process is not perfect, but in recent decades it has enhanced participation, improved demographic representation, and strengthened the tie between the average partisan and the candidates.
United States presidential election, 1992 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2734 words)
Even when the economy began recovering in 1992, its growth was virtually imperceptible until late in the year, and many regions of the country remained mired in stagnation.
Every U.S. presidential election campaign is an amalgam of issues, images and personality; and despite the intense focus on the country's economic future, the 1992 contest was no exception.
That election also brought the Democrats full control of the political branches of the federal government, including both houses of U.S. Congress as well as the presidency, for the first time since the administration of the last Democratic president, Jimmy Carter.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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