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Encyclopedia > United States presidential election, 1984
Presidential electoral votes by state.
Presidential electoral votes by state.

The U.S. presidential election of 1984 was a contest between the incumbent President Ronald Reagan and the former Vice President Walter Mondale and other candidates. Mondale lost the electoral vote in every state in the union except for his home state, Minnesota - which he won by fewer than 3,800 votes - and the District of Columbia. Reagan received 58.8% of the popular vote to Mondale's 40.6%. Download high resolution version (1182x635, 103 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1984 Categories: National Atlas images ... Download high resolution version (1182x635, 103 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1984 Categories: National Atlas images ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... ...

Contents

Nominations

Republican Party nomination

President Ronald Reagan and Vice President George Bush at the 1984 Republican National Convention in Dallas, Texas.

Ronald Reagan--the incumbent President-- was unopposed as the nominee for the Republican Party. He was renominated by a vote of 2,233 to two abstaining. Image File history File links Reagan_Bush_1984. ... Image File history File links Reagan_Bush_1984. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... The 1984 Republican National Convention convened August 20– 23, 1984 at the Dallas Convention Center in downtown Dallas, Texas, and nominated the incumbent Ronald Reagan of California for President of the United States and incumbent George H. W. Bush of Texas for Vice President. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ...


For the only time in American history, the vice presidential roll call was taken concurrently with the presidential roll call. Results:

This was the last time in the 20th Century that the Vice Presidential candidate of either major party was nominated by roll call vote. Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... Jeane Jordan Kirkpatrick (born November 19, 1926) is an American conservative political scientist and member of the neoconservative movement. ... Jack French Kemp (born July 13, 1935) is an American politician and former professional football player. ...


Democratic Party nomination

The field was crowded in the race for the Democratic nomination:

In the Iowa caucuses, the results were as follows: Mondale 45%, Hart 15%, McGovern 13%, Cranston 9%, Uncommitted 7%, Glenn 5%, Askew 3%, Jackson 3%, Hollings 0%. Reubin ODonovan Askew (born September 11, 1928) is an American politician. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Alan MacGregor Cranston (June 19, 1914 – December 31, 2000) was a U.S. journalist and politician. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... For other persons named John Glenn, see John Glenn (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Warren Hartpence, November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Ernest Frederick Fritz Hollings (born January 1, 1922) was a Democratic United States Senator from South Carolina from 1966 to January 3, 2005. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... Jesse Louis Jackson (born October 8, 1941) is an American politician, civil rights activist, racist, and falseBaptist ministerwith no divinity degree. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ...


In the New Hampshire primary, the results were as follows: Hart 37.3%, Mondale 27.9%, Glenn 12.0%, Jackson 5.3%, McGovern 5.2%, Reagan 5.0% (write-in votes), Hollings 3.5%, Cranston 2.1%, Askew 1.0%. Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ...


The field of candidates then shrank tremendously. Ultimately, only three candidates survived long enough to win states: Mondale, Hart, and Jackson.


Jackson was the second African-American (after Shirley Chisholm) to mount a nationwide campaign for the Presidency. He garnered 3.5 million votes during the primaries, third behind Hart and Mondale. He managed to win Virginia, South Carolina, and Louisiana, and split Mississippi, where there were two separate contests for Democratic delegates. Through the process, Jackson helped confirm the black electorate's importance to the Democratic Party in the South at the time. During the campaign, however, Jackson made an off-the-record reference to Jews as "Hymies" and New York City as "Hymietown", for which he later apologized. Nonetheless, the remark was widely publicized, and derailed his campaign for the nomination. Ending up, Jackson received 21% of the votes but only 8% of delegates, and he initially charged that his campaign was hurt by the same party rules that allowed Mondale to win. He also poured scorn on Mondale, saying that Hubert Humphrey was the "last significant politician out of the St. Paul-Minneapolis" area [1]. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Shirley Chisholm in 1972 Shirley Anita St. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... New York, NY redirects here. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ...


Hart managed to mount a very successful campaign, winning the key New Hampshire, Ohio, and California primaries as well as several others, especially in the west, but he couldn't overcome Mondale, who received the majority of the delegates. Mondale used the Wendy's slogan "Where's the beef?" to describe Hart's policies as lacking depth. For the Australian ice cream chain, see Wendys Supa Sundaes. ... The picture sleeve of a Wheres the Beef single, recorded by Coyote McCloud and Clara Peller, based on her legendary advertisement Wheres the beef? is a catch phrase, which has, since its first usage, become a somewhat universal, all-purpose phrase questioning the substance of an idea, event...


These were the convention's nomination tally: The 1984 Democratic National Convention was held in San Francisco, California in July of 1984, to select a candidate for the 1984 United States presidential election. ...

When he made his acceptance speech at the Democratic Convention, Mondale said: "Let's tell the truth. Mr. Reagan will raise taxes, and so will I. He won't tell you. I just did." Although Mondale intended this to demonstrate that he was honest while Reagan was hypocritical, it was widely remembered as simply a campaign pledge to raise taxes, and it likely damaged his electoral chances. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Warren Hartpence, November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ... Jesse Louis Jackson (born October 8, 1941) is an American politician, civil rights activist, racist, and falseBaptist ministerwith no divinity degree. ... Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former U.S. Senator from Missouri. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ... For other persons named John Glenn, see John Glenn (disambiguation). ... Senator Joe Biden Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. ... Joseph Lane Kirkland (March 12, 1922 - August 14, 1999) US union leader. ...


Vice-Presidential nominee

Mondale chose U.S. Rep. Geraldine A. Ferraro of New York as his running mate and she was confirmed by acclamation, making her the first woman nominated for that position by a major party. Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives. ... NY redirects here. ...


Aides later said that Mondale was determined to establish a precedent with his vice presidential candidate, considering San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein, also a female, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, an African American, and San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, a Hispanic, as other finalists for the nomination. [2] Unsuccessful nomination candidate Jackson derided Mondale's vice-presidential screening process as a "p.r. parade of personalities." Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein (born June 22, 1933) is currently the Democratic senior U.S. Senator from California, an office she has held since 1992. ... Mayor Tom Bradley of Los Angeles, 1973-1993 Thomas (Tom) Bradley (December 29, 1917 – September 29, 1998) was the mayor of Los Angeles, California from 1973 to 1993 (five terms) and the first African American mayor of that city. ... Henry Gabriel Cisneros (born June 11, 1947) is a prominent American politician, businessman, and community leader. ...


Others however preferred Senator Lloyd Bentsen because he would appeal to the Deep South. Nomination rival Gary Hart had also been lobbying for the vice-presidential spot on the ticket once it became apparent that Mondale had clinched the majority of delegates; Hart was expected to perform ten points better than Mondale in a hypothetical matchup with President Reagan[citation needed]. Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Warren Hartpence, November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ...


Ferraro, as Catholic, came under fire from the Roman Catholic Church for being pro-choice on abortion, in opposition to Church doctrine. Further controversy erupted over statements regarding the release of her husband's tax returns. The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... Pro-choice describes the political and ethical view that a woman should have complete control over her fertility and pregnancy. ...


General election

Campaign

The neutrality or factuality of this section may be compromised by weasel words.
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"I will not make age an issue of this campaign. I am not going to exploit, for political purposes, my opponent's youth and inexperience." quipped Reagan during the presidential debates.

Mondale ran a liberal campaign, supporting a nuclear freeze and the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). He spoke against what he considered to be unfairness in Reagan's economic policies and the need to reduce federal budget deficits. Not only was he up against a popular incumbent, but his campaign was widely considered to be lackluster. His stands on the ERA and national security turned out to be unpopular, as the ERA had stalled and was facing growing opposition, while many believed that he underestimated the threat of the Soviet Union. Mondale was largely perceived as supporting the poor at the expense of the middle class, which cost him the support of traditional Democrats such as southern whites and northern blue collar workers. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Photo courtesy Ronald Reagan Library President Reagan and Democratic candidate Walter Mondale during the second debate in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Photo courtesy Ronald Reagan Library President Reagan and Democratic candidate Walter Mondale during the second debate in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Political Liberalism is an update to John Rawls 1971 Theory of Justice in which Rawls attempts to show that his theory of justice is not a comprehensive conception of the good, but is instead compatible with a liberal conception of the role of justice: namely, that government should be neutral... The nuclear freeze was a proposed agreement between the worlds nuclear powers, primarily the United States and the then-Soviet Union, to freeze all production of new nuclear arms and to leave levels of nuclear armanent where they currently were. ... The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution that was intended to guarantee equal rights under the law for Americans regardless of gender. ... A budget deficit occurs when an entity (often a government) spends more money than it takes in. ...


At a campaign stop in Hammonton, New Jersey, Reagan said, "America's future rests in a thousand dreams inside your hearts. It rests in the message of hope in songs of a man so many young Americans admire, New Jersey's Bruce Springsteen." The Reagan campaign briefly used "Born in the U.S.A." as a campaign song, without permission, until Springsteen, a lifelong Democrat, requested that they stop. Map of Hammonton in Atlantic County Hammonton is a town in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. ... Bruce Frederick Joseph Springsteen (born September 23, 1949) is an American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Born in the U.S.A. is a 1984 song about the effects of the Vietnam War on Americans, written and performed by Bruce Springsteen. ...


The Reagan campaign was very skilled at producing effective television advertising. Two of the more memorable ads it produced were commonly known as "Bear in the woods" and "Morning in America". There is a bear in the woods was the opening line of an effective political campaign television commercial formally titled Bear (or If There is a Bear). The ad was part of the 1984 U.S. presidential campaign of Republican Party candidate Ronald Reagan. ... Morning in America is the common name of an effective political campaign television commercial formally titled Prouder, Stronger, Better and featuring the opening line Its morning again in America. ...


By 1984, Reagan was the oldest president to have ever served, and there were many questions about his capacity to endure the grueling demands of the presidency, particularly after Reagan had an unexpectedly poor showing in his first debate with Mondale on October 7. He referred to having started going to church "here in Washington" (although the debate was in Louisville, Kentucky), referred to military uniforms as "wardrobe," and admitted to being "confused," among other mistakes. However, in the next debate on October 21, Reagan effectively neutralized the issue by quipping, "I will not make age an issue of this campaign. I am not going to exploit, for political purposes, my opponent's youth and inexperience." October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 71 days remaining. ...


Results

Reagan was re-elected in an electoral vote landslide, winning 49 states. Even in Minnesota, Mondale won by a mere 3761 votes, meaning Reagan came within less than 3800 votes of a total shut-out. Reagan won a record 525 electoral votes total (of 538 possible), and received nearly 60 percent of the popular vote. Mondale's 13 electoral college votes (in Minnesota and Dictrict of Columbia) marked the lowest total of any major Presidential candidate since Alf Landon's 1936 loss to Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Mondale's defeat was also the worst for any Democratic Party candidate in U.S. history. Alfred Mossman Alf Landon (September 9, 1887 – October 12, 1987) was an American Republican politician from Kansas, who was defeated in a landslide by Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1936 presidential election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... “American history” redirects here. ...


Psephologists pointed to "Reagan Democrats" --millions of usual Democrats who voted for Reagan. They characterized such Reagan Democrats as southern whites and northern blue collar workers who voted for Reagan because they credited him with the economic boom, saw Reagan as strong on national security issues, and perceived the Democrats as supporting the poor at the expense of the middle class. Psephology is a term for the statistical study of elections. ... The term Reagan Democrat is used by political commentators to denote traditionally Democratic voters, especially white working-class Northerners, who defected from their party to support President Ronald Reagan, in both the 1980 and 1984 elections. ...


Trivia

Earlier in the same Democratic primary debate in which Walter Mondale referred to the Wendy's fast food tagline "Where's the beef?" in criticizing Gary Hart's policies, Hart committed a serious faux pas that largely went underreported. Asked what he would do if an unidentified airplane flew over the Iron Curtain from a Warsaw Pact nation, Hart replied that he'd send up a United States Air Force plane up and instruct them to determine whether or not it was an enemy plane by looking in the cockpit window to see if the pilots were wearing uniforms. Fellow candidate John Glenn, a former Marine Corps fighter pilot, replied that this was physically impossible. Warsaw Pact countries to the east of the Iron Curtain are shaded red; NATO members to the west of it — blue. ... Unofficial Seal of the Warsaw Pact Distinguish from the Warsaw Convention, which is an agreement about airlines financial liability and the Treaty of Warsaw (1970) between West Germany and the Peoples Republic of Poland. ... The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... The United States Football team sometimes know as Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military, within the United States Department of the Navy responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with aerial warfare. ...


At a roundtable debate between the three remaining Democratic candidates moderated by Phil Donahue, Mondale and Hart got in such a heated argument over the issue of U.S. policy in Central America that Jesse Jackson had to tap his water glass on the table to get them to simmer down. Phil Donahue Phillip John Donahue (b. ...


At a speech to the Republican National Convention, Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona repeated Robert Dole's 1976 charge that every war of the twentieth century that the United States got involved in was instigated by Democratic administrations. Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998[1]) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for President in the 1964 election. ... Bob Dole Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) is best known as a former Republican United States Senate Majority Leader and Senator from Kansas. ...


Statistics

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Ronald Wilson Reagan Republican California 54,455,472 58.8% 525 George Herbert Walker Bush Texas 525
Walter Frederick Mondale Democratic Minnesota 37,577,352 40.6% 13 Geraldine Anne Ferraro New York 13
David Bergland Libertarian California  228,111 0.3% 0 Jim Lewis Connecticut  0
Other 392,298 0.4% 0 Other 0
Total 92,653,233 100.0% 538 Total 538
Needed to win 270 Needed to win 270

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1984 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (August 7, 2005). Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Official language(s) No Official Language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is best known as the first and, so far, only woman to be a candidate for Vice President of the United States on a major party ticket (although women on third-party tickets continue to run for the position). ... NY redirects here. ... David P. Bergland is an American libertarian activist. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (August 7, 2005). August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Faithless elector

In Illinois, the electors, pledged to Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, conducted their vote in a secret ballot. When the electors voted for Vice President, one of the votes was for Geraldine Ferraro, the Democratic nominee. After several minutes of confusion, a second ballot was taken. Bush won unanimously in this ballot, and it was this ballot that was reported to Congress. Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives. ...


See also

The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1984 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Ronald Reagans landslide re-election as President. ... // Changing demographics and the growth of the Sun Belt The most widely discussed demographic phenomenon of the 1970s was the rise of the Sun Belt, the Southwest, Southeast, and especially Florida and California (surpassing New York as the nations most populous state in 1964). ...

Bibliography

  • (1986) in Jonathan Moore (ed.): Campaign for President: The Managers Look at '84. 
  • Leuchtenburg, William E. (1986). The 1984 Election in Historical Perspective. 
  • Morris, Lorenzo (1990). The Social and Political Implications of the 1984 Jesse Jackson Presidential Campaign. 
  • E. Sandoz and C. V. Crabb, Jr. (eds.), Election 84: Landslide Without a Mandate? (1986) New American Library
  • Stempel, Guido H., III; John W. Windhauser (1991). The Media in the 1984 and 1988 Presidential Campaigns. Greenwood Press. 

External links

  • 1984 popular vote by counties
  • Democratic primaries

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