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Encyclopedia > United States presidential election, 1972
Presidential electoral votes by state.
Presidential electoral votes by state.

The U.S. presidential election of 1972 was waged on the issues of radicalism and the Vietnam War. The Democratic nomination was eventually won by George McGovern, who ran an anti-war crusade against incumbent President Richard M. Nixon, but was handicapped by his outsider status and having to fire his vice presidential candidate. Nixon, proclaiming that peace was at hand in Vietnam because of his policies, ridiculed McGovern as the radical candidate of "acid, amnesty and abortion." The election took place on November 7, 1972. Nixon won the election in a landslide, with a 23.2% margin of victory in the popular vote, the 2nd largest such margin in Presidential election history. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1182x635, 105 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1182x635, 105 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ... This article is about the office in the United States. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...

Contents

Nominations

Democratic Party nomination

Senate Majority Whip Ted Kennedy had been the favorite to win the 1972 nomination, but his hopes were derailed by his role in the 1969 Chappaquiddick incident. He was not a candidate. Shirley Anita St. ... NY redirects here. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Fred Roy Harris (born November 13, 1930) was a Democratic United States Senator from the state of Oklahoma from 1964 until 1973. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... Henry Martin Scoop Jackson (May 31, 1912 – September 1, 1983) was a U.S. Congressman and Senator for Washington State from 1941 until his death. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... John Vliet Lindsay (November 24, 1921 – December 19, 2000) was an American politician who served as a Congressman (1959-1965) and mayor of New York City (1966-1973). ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... Eugene Joseph Gene McCarthy (March 29, 1916 – December 10, 2005) was an American politician and a longtime member of the U.S. Congress. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Wilbur Daigh Mills (May 24, 1909-May 2, 1992), was a powerful Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Arkansas. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Official language(s) None (English de facto; French is also an administrative language) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... George Corley Wallace, or officially George C. Wallace, Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ... Samuel William Yorty (October 1, 1909 – June 5, 1998) was an outspoken politician from Los Angeles, California. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ... On July 18, 1969, Ted Kennedy attended a party on Chappaquiddick, Marthas Vineyard, which was intended to be a reunion of those who had worked on his brother Roberts 1968 presidential campaign. ...


The establishment favorite for the Democratic nomination was Ed Muskie, the moderate who acquitted himself well as the 1968 Democratic vice presidential candidate. In the New Hampshire primary, Muskie gave a speech to defend himself and his wife, Jane, against the claims of the Canuck Letter. The press reported that Muskie was crying during the speech, and this likely caused Muskie to do worse than expected in the primary, while McGovern came in a surprisingly-close second. McGovern now had the momentum, which was well orchestrated by his campaign manager, Gary Hart. Edmund Muskie Edmund Sixtus Muskie (Edmund Marciszewski) (March 28, 1914–March 26, 1996) was a Polish-American politician from Maine. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... Jane Gray Muskie (February 12, 1927- December 25, 2004) was the widow of U.S. senator and 1968 vice presidential candidate Edmund Muskie, whose 1972 presidential campaign collapsed after he emotionally defended Mrs. ... The Canuck Letter was a forged letter to the editor of the Manchester Union Leader, published 24 February 1972, two weeks before the New Hampshire primary. ... Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Warren Hartpence, November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ...


Alabama governor George Wallace, with his "outsider" image, did well in the South (he won every single county in the Florida primary) and among alienated and dissatisfied voters. What might have become a forceful campaign was cut short when Wallace was shot while campaigning, and left paralyzed in an assassination attempt by Arthur Bremer. Wallace did win the Maryland primary, but the shooting incident was effectively the end of his campaign. George Corley Wallace, or officially George C. Wallace, Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In the end, McGovern succeeded in winning the nomination by winning primaries through grass-roots support in spite of establishment opposition. McGovern had led a commission to redesign the Democratic nomination system after the messy and confused nomination struggle and convention of 1968. The fundamental principle of the McGovern Commission—that the Democratic primaries should determine the winner of the Democratic nomination—lasted throughout every subsequent nomination contest. However, the new rules angered many prominent Democrats whose influence was marginalized, and those politicians refused to support McGovern's campaign (some even supporting Nixon instead), leaving the McGovern campaign at a significant disadvantage in funding compared to Nixon.


The tally:

George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ... Henry Martin Scoop Jackson (May 31, 1912 – September 1, 1983) was a U.S. Congressman and Senator for Washington State from 1941 until his death. ... George Corley Wallace, or officially George C. Wallace, Jr. ... Shirley Anita St. ... James Terry Sanford (August 20, 1917 – April 18, 1998) was a Southern Democratic politician. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ... Wilbur Daigh Mills (May 24, 1909-May 2, 1992), was a powerful Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Arkansas. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... Wayne Levere Hays (May 13, 1911, Bannock, Ohio – February 13, 1989, Flushing, Ohio), was an American politician whose tyrannical rule of the House Administration Committee extended to even the smallest items; in the mid-1970s, lawmakers avoided crossing Hays for fear that he would shut off the air conditioning in... Eugene Joseph Gene McCarthy (March 29, 1916 – December 10, 2005) was an American politician and a longtime member of the U.S. Congress. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... William Ramsey Clark (born December 18, 1927) is a lawyer and activist. ...

The Eagleton affair and the Vice Presidency

As several of his former opponents refused the honor, McGovern chose Missouri Senator Thomas F. Eagleton as his running mate. With hundreds of delegates either actively supporting Nixon or angry at McGovern for one reason or another, the vote was chaotic, with at least three other candidates having their names put into nomination and votes scattered over 70 candidates, including Mao Tse-Tung and TV anchor Roger Mudd. Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former U.S. Senator from Missouri. ... Mao Zedong (December 26, 1893—September 9, 1976) was the chairman of the Communist Party of China from 1935 until his death. ... Roger Mudd, born February 9, 1928 in Washington, is a U.S. television journalist. ...


The tally:

The vice presidential balloting went on so long that McGovern and Eagleton were forced to make their acceptance speeches at around three in the morning, local time. Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former U.S. Senator from Missouri. ... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (IPA: ) (born May 13, 1930), is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska for two terms, from 1969 to 1981. ... Endicott Peabody (February 15, 1920–December 1, 1997) was a Governor of Massachusetts Peabody was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, served in the United States Navy during World War II, and received a BA and a law degree from Harvard University. ... Birch Evans Bayh II (born January 22, 1928) was a U.S. Senator from Indiana between 1963 and 1981. ... Peter Wallace Rodino Jr. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... Shirley Anita St. ... Maurice Edwin Moon Landrieu (born July 23, 1930) is a former judge, mayor of New Orleans, Louisiana, and United States secretary of housing and urban development. ...


A couple of weeks after the convention ended, it was discovered that Eagleton had undergone psychiatric electroshock therapy for depression, and had concealed this information from McGovern. McGovern initially claimed that he would back Eagleton “1000%”, only to ask Eagleton to withdraw 3 days later. This perceived indecisiveness was disastrous for the McGovern campaign. Electroconvulsive therapy, also known as electroshock or ECT, is a controversial type of psychiatric shock therapy involving the induction of an artificial seizure in a patient by passing electricity through the brain. ... Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or unipolar depression when compared to bipolar disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ...


After a week in which six prominent Democrats publicly refused the VP nomination, Sargent Shriver, brother-in-law to the Kennedys and former ambassador to France and head of the War on Poverty, finally said yes. He was officially nominated by a special session of the Democratic National Committee. By this time, McGovern's poll ratings had plunged from 41% to 24%. Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... John, Robert, and Edward Kennedy The Kennedy family is a prominent family in American politics and government descending from the marriage of Joseph P. and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The Hunter S. Thompson book Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72 covers McGovern's campaign to win the Democratic nomination. Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. ... Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail 1972 is a collection of articles covering the 1972 presidential campaign serialized in Rolling Stone magazine and later released as a book, written by gonzo journalist Hunter S Thompson and illustrated by Ralph Steadman. ...


Republican Party nomination

Richard Nixon during the campaign
Richard Nixon during the campaign

Nixon was a popular incumbent president in 1972, riding a wave of peace and prosperity, as he seemed to have reached détente with China and Russia. He shrugged off the first glimmers of what, after the election, became the massive Watergate scandal. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... John Milan Ashbrook (September 21, 1928 – April 24, 1982) was an American politician of the Republican party who served in the United States House of Representatives from Ohio from 1961 until his death. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Paul Norton Pete McCloskey Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... This article is about the office in the United States. ... Détente is a French term, meaning a relaxing or easing; the term has been used in international politics since the early 1970s. ... The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ...


Polls showed that Nixon had a strong lead. He was challenged by two minor candidates, liberal Pete McCloskey of California and conservative John Ashbrook of Ohio. McCloskey ran as an anti-war and anti-Nixon candidate, while Ashbrook opposed Nixon's détente policies towards the China and the Soviet Union. In the New Hampshire primary McCloskey's platform of peace garnered 11% of the vote to Nixon's 83%, with Ashbrook receiving 6%. Paul Norton Pete McCloskey Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... John Milan Ashbrook was an American politician of the Republican party who served in the United States House of Representatives from Ohio from 1961 to 1982. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Détente is a French term, meaning a relaxing or easing; the term has been used in international politics since the early 1970s. ... The New Hampshire primary marks the opening of the quadrennial U.S. presidential election. ...


Nixon won 1323 of the 1324 delegates to the GOP convention, with McCloskey receiving the vote of one delegate from New Mexico. Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ...


Third parties

Perhaps the only major third party candidate in the 1972 elections, Conservative congressman John G. Schmitz of the American Party (the party on whose ballot George Wallace ran in 1968) was on the ballot in 32 states and received 1,099,482 popular votes. Unlike Wallace, however, he received no electoral votes at all. John George Schmitz (August 12, 1930–January 10, 2001) was an ultraconservative Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Orange County, California, prominent member of the John Birch Society, and the American Independent Party candidate for President of the United States in 1972. ... The American Independent Party is a California political party. ...


John Hospers of the newly-formed Libertarian Party was on the ballot only in Colorado and Washington and received only 3,573 popular votes. However, he did receive one electoral vote from Virginia from a Republican dissenter (see below). John Hospers (born 9 June 1918) was the first presidential candidate of the United States Libertarian Party, running in the 1972 presidential election. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ...


Benjamin Spock was nominated by the People's Party, which was formed in 1971. Dr. Spock (l) with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ... The Peoples Party was a political party in the United States, founded in 1971 by various individuals and local groups, including the Peace and Freedom Party, Commongood Peoples Party, Country Peoples Caucus, Human Rights Party, Liberal Union, New American Party, New Party and No Party. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ...


General election

Campaign

The New York Times front page from the day after the election: November 8, 1972.

George McGovern ran on a platform of ending the Vietnam War and instituting guaranteed minimum incomes for the nation's poor. However, his campaign was greatly crippled because of the electro-shock therapy controversy involving his original running mate, and because his view on the primaries had alienated many powerful Democrats. With McGovern's presence weakened by these factors, the Republicans successfully portrayed him as a half-crazy radical, and McGovern suffered a landslide defeat of 61%–38% to Nixon. Nixon's percentage of the popular vote was only sightly less than Lyndon Johnson's record in the 1964 election, and his margin of victory was slightly larger. Nixon won a majority vote in 49 states (including McGovern's home state of South Dakota), with only Massachusetts and the District of Columbia voting for the challenger, resulting in an even-more-lopsided Electoral College tally. Download high resolution version (925x1418, 411 KB)New York Times front page: November 8, 1972 This work is copyrighted. ... Download high resolution version (925x1418, 411 KB)New York Times front page: November 8, 1972 This work is copyrighted. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... ...


Nixon ran a harsh campaign with an aggressive policy of keeping tabs on perceived enemies, and his campaign aides committed the Watergate burglary to steal Democratic Party information during the election. Nixon's level of personal involvement with the burglary was never clear, but his tactics during the later coverup would eventually destroy his public support and lead to his resignation. Also, Nixon's so-called "southern strategy" of reducing the pressure for school desegregation and otherwise restricting federal efforts on behalf of blacks had a powerful attraction to northern blue-collar workers as well as southerners. Nixon is the surname of some prominent people: Richard Nixon - 37th President of the United States Patricia Nixon - First Lady to President Richard Nixon Tricia Nixon Cox - older daughter to Richard and Pat Nixon Julie Nixon Eisenhower - younger daughter to Richard and Pat Nixon John B. Nixon - oldest inmate executed... The Watergate building. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...


This election had the lowest voter turnout for a presidential election since 1948, with only 55 percent of the electorate voting. Part of the steep drop from the previous elections can be explained by the ratification of the 26th Amendment which expanded the franchise to 18-year-olds. 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Amendment XXVI (the Twenty-sixth Amendment) of the United States Constitution was ratified on July 1, 1971. ...




Results

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Richard Milhous Nixon Republican California 47,168,710 60.7% 520 Spiro Theodore Agnew Maryland 520
George Stanley McGovern Democratic South Dakota 29,173,222 37.5% 17 Robert Sargent Shriver Maryland 17
John G. Hospers Libertarian California 3,674 0.0% 1(a) Theodora Nathan Oregon 1(a)
John G. Schmitz American California 1,100,868 1.4% 0 Thomas J. Anderson Tennessee 0
Linda Jenness Socialist Workers Georgia 83,380 0.1% 0 Andrew Pulley Illinois 0
Benjamin Spock People's California 78,759 0.1% 0 Julius Hobson District of Columbia 0
Other 135,414 0.2% 0 Other 0
Total 77,744,027 100.0% 538 Total 538
Needed to win 270 Needed to win 270

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1972 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (August 7, 2005). Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Spiro Theodore Agnew, born Spiro Anagnostopoulos (November 9, 1918–September 17, 1996), was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1973 under President Richard M. Nixon. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... John Hospers (born 9 June 1918) was the first presidential candidate of the United States Libertarian Party, running in the 1972 presidential election. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on Dec. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Theodora Nathalia Tonie Nathan (born 9 February 1923) is the first woman to have received an electoral vote in a U.S. presidential election. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... John George Schmitz (August 12, 1930–January 10, 2001) was an ultraconservative Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Orange County, California, prominent member of the John Birch Society, and the American Independent Party candidate for President of the United States in 1972. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Thomas J. Anderson is a conservative author and farmer, from Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Socialist Workers Party candidate for president in 1972. ... The Socialist Workers Party is a communist political party in the United States. ... Andrew Pulley is an American politician who ran as Socialist Workers Party (SWP) candidate for Vice President of the United States in 1972. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Dr. Spock (l) with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Peoples Party Vice Presidential candidate in 1972. ... ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (August 7, 2005). August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


(a)A Virginia faithless elector, Roger MacBride, though pledged to vote for Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew, instead voted for Libertarian John Hospers and Theodora Nathan.
A faithless elector is a member of the United States Electoral College who casts an electoral vote for someone other than the person whom they have pledged to elect. ... Roger MacBride (6 August 1927 - 5 March 1995) was a U.S. lawyer, political figure, and television producer. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the 39th Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the 55th Governor of Maryland. ... John Hospers (born 9 June 1918) was the first presidential candidate of the United States Libertarian Party, running in the 1972 presidential election. ... Theodora Nathalia Tonie Nathan (born 9 February 1923) is the first woman to have received an electoral vote in a U.S. presidential election. ...


Trivia

  • Libertarian Party vice presidential candidate Tonie Nathan became the first woman in U.S. history to receive an electoral vote.
  • From 1960 to the present day, this was the only Presidential election in which Minnesota voted for a Republican.
  • After the Watergate Scandal bumper sticker from Massachusetts stated, "Don't Blame Me, I'm from Massachusetts."
  • In the Fairly OddParents television special, The Secret Origin of Denzel Crocker, near the end of the episode, Jorgen Von Strangle tells Timmy Turner that he can travel to every other part of 1972 except for March, as long as he doesn't interfere with the election of President McGovern. Since McGovern lost the election, this implies that Timmy somehow caused McGovern to lose the election.

The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on Dec. ... Theodora Nathalia Tonie Nathan (born 9 February 1923) is the first woman to have received an electoral vote in a U.S. presidential election. ... The Fairly OddParents is one of the most popular cartoons on Nickelodeon The Fairly OddParents is an animated series created by Butch Hartman and was first aired in March 30, 2001. ... The Secret Origin of Denzel Crocker is an episode of Nickelodeons animated series, The Fairly Oddparents, created by Butch Hartman. ... Jorgen Von Strangle is a character on the animated series The Fairly OddParents. ... Timothy Timmy Turner is a fictional character in the American animated television series The Fairly OddParents. ...

External links

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The Election Results link also directs the browser to detailed national and state-level results for the major candidates for U.S. President during the presidential primaries (at present, information is only available for the 2000 and 2004 election cycles).
Election Information: menu directs the browser to election information including: historical details (such as election dates, electoral votes by state, the electoral college, etc.), Presidential Election Law from the U.S. Constitution and United States Code, Articles, and a description of the election process.
United States presidential election, 1972 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1365 words)
Nixon won the election in a landslide, but the seeds of his eventual ouster were planted as people working for his campaign broke into the Democratic headquarters in the Watergate hotel.
This election had the lowest voter turnout for a presidential election since 1948, with only 55 percent of the electorate voting.
Governor and Presidential candidate George C. Wallace of Alabama is shot by Arthur H. Bremer at a Laurel, Md., political rally.
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