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Encyclopedia > United States presidential election, 1876
1872  Flag of the United States 1880
United States presidential election, 1876
7 November 1876
Nominee Rutherford B. Hayes Samuel J. Tilden
Party Republican Democratic
Home state Ohio New York
Running mate William Almon Wheeler Thomas Andrews Hendricks
Electoral vote 185 184
States carried 21 17
Popular vote 4,034,311 4,288,546
Percentage 47.9% 51.0%

Presidential election results map. Blue denotes states won by Hayes/Wheeler, Red denotes those won by Tilden/Hendricks. Numbers indicate the number of electoral votes allotted to each state. Summary Incumbent President Ulysses S. Grant was easily elected to a second term in office despite a split within the Republican Party that resulted in a defection of many key Republicans to opponent Horace Greeley. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The United States presidential election of 1880 was largely seen as a referendum on the Republicans relaxation of Reconstruction efforts in the southern states. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1277, 140 KB) U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the state. ... William Almon Wheeler (June 30, 1819–June 4, 1887) was a Representative from New York and the nineteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819–November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... Download high resolution version (1182x635, 104 KB)Image from http://nationalatlas. ...

Incumbent President
Ulysses S. Grant
Republican

The United States presidential election of 1876 was one of the most disputed and intense presidential elections in American history. Samuel J. Tilden of New York defeated Ohio's Rutherford Hayes in the popular vote, and had 184 electoral votes to Hayes' 165, with 20 votes yet uncounted. These 20 electoral votes were in dispute: in three states (Florida, Louisiana, and South Carolina) each party reported its candidate had won the state, while in Oregon one elector was declared illegal (on account of being an "elected or appointed official") and replaced. The votes were ultimately awarded to Hayes after a bitter electoral dispute. Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... GOP redirects here. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... GOP redirects here. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Many historians believe that an informal deal was struck to resolve the dispute. In return for Southern acquiescence in Hayes' election, the Republicans agreed to withdraw federal troops from the South, effectively ending Reconstruction. This deal became known as the Compromise of 1877. The Compromise effectively pushed African-Americans out of power in the government; soon after the compromise, African-Americans were barred from voting by poll taxes and grandfather clauses. For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... A drawing by Joseph Keppler depicts Roscoe Conkling as Mephistopheles, as Rutherford B. Hayes strolls off with a woman labeled as Solid South. The caption quotes Goethe: Unto that Power he doth belong / Which only doeth Right while ever willing Wrong. ... The Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1870 to protect the suffrage of freedmen after the American Civil War. ... A poll tax, head tax, or capitation is a tax of a uniform, fixed amount per individual (as opposed to a percentage of income). ... A grandfather clause is an exception that allows an old rule to continue to apply to some existing situations, when a new rule will apply to all future situations. ...

Contents

Nominations

Republican Party nomination

Republican candidates

James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Oliver Hazard Perry Throck Morton (August 4, 1823–November 1, 1877) was a U.S. politician of the Republican Party. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Benjamin Helm Bristow (June 20, 1832–June 22, 1896) was an American lawyer and politician who served as the first Solicitor General of the United States and as a U.S. Treasury Secretary. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Roscoe Conkling (October 30, 1829–April 18, 1888) was a United States politician from New York. ... This article is about the state. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...

Candidates gallery

When the 6th Republican National Convention assembled in Cincinnati on 14 June, 1876, it appeared that James G. Blaine of Maine would be the nominee. On the first ballot, Blaine was just 100 votes short of a majority. His vote began to slide after the second ballot, as many Republicans feared that Blaine could not win the general election. Anti-Blaine delegates could not agree on a candidate until Blaine's total rose to 41% on the sixth ballot. Leaders of the reform Republicans met privately and considered alternatives. The choice was Ohio's reform Governor, Rutherford B. Hayes. On the seventh ballot, Hayes was nominated with 384 votes to 351 for Blaine and 21 for Benjamin Bristow. William Wheeler was nominated for Vice President by a much larger margin (366-89) over his chief rival, who would later serve as a member of the electoral commission: Frederick T. Frelinghuysen. Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... William Almon Wheeler (June 30, 1819 – June 4, 1887) was a Representative from New York and the nineteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen (August 4, 1817–May 20, 1885) was a member of the United States Senate from New Jersey and a United States Secretary of State. ...


Democratic Party nomination

Democratic candidates

Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... This article is about the state. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer and the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in 1880. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... William Allen ( December 27, 1803 - July 11, 1879) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio and Governor of Ohio. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...

Candidates gallery

The 12th Democratic National Convention assembled in St. Louis just nine days after the conclusion of the Republican National Convention. The convention opened with three contenders, Bourbon Democrat Samuel J. Tilden of New York, Thomas Hendricks of Indiana and Union General Winfield S. Hancock of Pennsylvania. Tilden led on the first vote, but was strongly opposed by John Kelley, the leader of New York's Tammany Hall. Kelley's opposition was not enough to stop the nomination, and Tilden won on the second ballot. Thomas Hendricks was picked to be Tilden's running mate. Bourbon Democrat was a term used in the United States from 1876 to 1904 to refer to a conservative or reactionary member of the Democratic Party, especially one who supported President Grover Cleveland in 1884–1896 and Alton B. Parker in 1904. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... This article is about the state. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819–November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Animated map of secession, Civil War and re-admission:  States of the Union  Territories of the Union (including occupied territory)  States of the Confederacy  Territories claimed by Confederacy During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the twenty-three states of the United States... Portrait of Winfield S. Hancock during the Civil War Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 - February 9, 1886) was born in Montgomery Square, Pennsylvania and named after the famous general Winfield Scott. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Tammany Hall was the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York City politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. ...

The election was hotly contested, as can be seen by this poster published in 1877.
The election was hotly contested, as can be seen by this poster published in 1877.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1509x1112, 231 KB) SUMMARY: Print showing bust portraits of eight men, identified as, clockwise from top, Oliver P. Morton, James A. Garfield, George F. Hoar, William Strong, Joseph P. Bradley, Samuel F. Miller, George F. Edmunds, and Frederick T. Frelinghuysen; also... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1509x1112, 231 KB) SUMMARY: Print showing bust portraits of eight men, identified as, clockwise from top, Oliver P. Morton, James A. Garfield, George F. Hoar, William Strong, Joseph P. Bradley, Samuel F. Miller, George F. Edmunds, and Frederick T. Frelinghuysen; also...

Greenback Party nomination

The Greenback Party had been organized by agricultural interests in Indianapolis in 1874 to urge the federal government to inflate the economy through the mass issuance of paper money called greenbacks. Their first national nominating convention was held in Indianapolis in the spring of 1876. Peter Cooper was nominated for President with 352 votes to 119 for three other contenders. The convention nominated Anti-Monopolist Senator Newton Booth of California for vice president; after Booth declined to run, the national committee chose Samuel F. Cary as his replacement on the ticket. The Greenback Party (Greenback-Labor Party) was an American political party that was active between 1874 and 1884. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... United States Notes (also known as Legal Tender Notes because of their payment obligation stating This Note is a Legal Tender) are characterized by a red seal and serial number. ... Peter Cooper (February 12, 1791 – April 4, 1883) was an American industrialist, inventor, philanthropist, and candidate for President of the United States. ... The Anti-Monopoly Party was a short-lived U.S. political party that was founded in 1884 at its convention in Chicago, which took place on May 14th of that year. ... Senator Newton Booth Newton Booth (December 30, 1825 – July 14, 1892) was an American politician. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Samuel Fenton Cary was an Ohio politician who served in Congress shortly after the Civil War and was Greenback Party candidate for vice-president of the U.S. in 1876. ...


Other parties

The Prohibition Party, in its 2nd national convention, nominated Green Clay Smith as their presidential candidate and Gideon T. Stewart as their vice presidential candidate. The American National Party nominated the ticket of James A. Walker and Donald Kirkpatrick. National Prohibition Convention, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1892. ... Green Clay Smith Green Clay Smith (1826-1895), a Major General in the United States Army, received his law degree from the Lexington Law School and became a member of the state legislature of Kentucky. ... Lawyer and newspaper owner-editor Gideon T. Stewart (1824-1909) was very active in promoting the temperance movement. ... James Alexander Walker (August 27, 1832 – October 21, 1901) was a Virginia lawyer, politician, and Confederate general during the American Civil War, later serving as a United States Congressman for two terms. ...


General election

Campaign

Hayes/Wheeler campaign poster
Tilden/Hendricks campaign poster
Tilden/Hendricks campaign poster
certificate for the electoral vote for Rutherford B. Hayes and William A. Wheeler for the State of Louisiana
certificate for the electoral vote for Rutherford B. Hayes and William A. Wheeler for the State of Louisiana

Tilden, who had prosecuted machine politicians in New York and sent legendary boss William Tweed to jail, ran as a reform candidate against the background of the Grant administration. Both parties backed civil service reform and an end to Reconstruction. Both sides mounted mud-slinging campaigns, with Democratic attacks on Republican corruption being countered by Republicans raising the Civil War issue, a tactic ridiculed by Democrats who called it "waving the bloody shirt". Republicans chanted, "Not every Democrat was a Rebel, but every Rebel was a Democrat". Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (535x790, 134 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (535x790, 134 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 434 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1112 × 1536 pixel, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Campaign poster for Samuel Tilden and Thomas Hendricks during the 1876 U.S. Presidential election. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 434 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1112 × 1536 pixel, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Campaign poster for Samuel Tilden and Thomas Hendricks during the 1876 U.S. Presidential election. ... 1869 tobacco label featuring Boss Tweed William Marcy Tweed a. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Waving the bloody shirt, in U.S. history, refers to the demagogic practice of politicians using sectionalist animosities of the American Civil War to gain election in the postbellum North from the 1860s to 1880s. ...


Because it was considered improper for a candidate to actively pursue the Presidency, neither Tilden nor Hayes actively stumped as part of the campaign, leaving that job to surrogates.


Colorado

Colorado had become the 36th state on August 1, 1876. With insufficient time and money to organize a presidential election in the new state, Colorado's state legislature selected the state's electors. These electors in turn gave their three votes to Hayes and the Republican Party. Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ...


Electoral disputes

See also: Electoral Commission (US) The Electoral Commision was a fifteen-member body that was used to resolve disputes in U.S. presidential elections, best known for its use in the 1876 election between Samuel G. Tilden and Rutherford B. Hayes. ...


In Florida (4 votes), Louisiana (8) and South Carolina (7), reported returns favored Tilden, but election results in each state were marked by fraud and threats of violence against Republican voters. One of the points of contention revolved around the design of ballots. At the time parties would print ballots or "tickets" to enable voters to support them in the open ballots. To aid illiterate voters the parties would print symbols on the tickets. However in this election many Democratic ballots were printed with the Republican symbol, Abraham Lincoln, on them. [1] The Republican-dominated state electoral commissions subsequently disallowed a sufficient number of Democratic votes to award their electoral votes to Hayes. This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


In the three southern states the governor recognized by the United States had signed the Republican certificates. The Democratic certificates from Florida were signed by the state attorney-general and the new Democratic governor; those from Louisiana by the Democratic gubernatorial candidate; those from South Carolina by no state official, the Tilden electors simply claiming to have been chosen by the popular vote and rejected by the returning board.[2]


Meanwhile, in Oregon, just a single elector was disputed. The statewide result clearly had favored Hayes, but the state's Democratic Governor (LaFayette Grover) claimed that that elector, just-former postmaster John Watts, was ineligible under Article II, Section 1 of the Constitution, since he was a "person holding an office of trust or profit under the United States". Grover then substituted a Democratic elector in his place. The two Republican electors dismissed Grover's action and each reported three votes for Hayes, while the Democratic elector, C. A. Cronin, reported one vote for Tilden and two votes for Hayes. The two Republican electors presented a certificate signed by the secretary of state. Cronin and the two electors he appointed (Cronin voted for Tilden while his associates voted for Hayes) used a certificate signed by the governor and attested by the secretary of state.[2] Ultimately, all three of Oregon's votes were awarded to Hayes. This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... La Fayette Grover (November 29, 1823 – May 10, 1911) was a Democratic representative and senator from Oregon, USA. Grover was born in Bethel, Maine. ...


Hayes had a majority of one in the electoral college. The Democrats raised the cry of fraud. Suppressed excitement pervaded the country. Threats were even muttered that Hayes would never be inaugurated. President Grant quietly strengthened the military force in and around Washington.[2]


The Constitution provides that "the President of the Senate shall, in presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the [electoral] certificates, and the votes shall then be counted." Certain Republicans held that the power to count the votes lay with the President of the Senate, the House and Senate being mere spectators. The Democrats objected to this construction, since Mr. Ferry, the Republican president of the Senate, could then count the votes of the disputed states for Hayes. The Democrats insisted that Congress should continue the practice followed since 1865, which was that no vote objected to should be counted except by the concurrence of both houses. The House was strongly Democratic; by throwing out the vote of one state it could elect Tilden.[2]


Facing an unprecedented constitutional crisis, on January 29, 1877 the U.S. Congress passed a law forming a 15-member Electoral Commission to settle the result. Five members came from each house of Congress, and they were joined by five members of the Supreme Court. William M. Evarts served as counsel for the Republican Party. The Compromise of 1877 may have helped the Democrats accept this electoral commission as well. is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Congress in Joint Session. ... The Electoral Commision was a fifteen-member body that was used to resolve disputes in U.S. presidential elections, best known for its use in the 1876 election between Samuel G. Tilden and Rutherford B. Hayes. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... Photograph of U.S. Secretary of State William M. Evarts William Maxwell Evarts (February 6, 1818–February 28, 1901) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... A drawing by Joseph Keppler depicts Roscoe Conkling as Mephistopheles, as Rutherford B. Hayes strolls off with a woman labeled as Solid South. The caption quotes Goethe: Unto that Power he doth belong / Which only doeth Right while ever willing Wrong. ...


The majority party in each house named three members and the minority party two. As the Republicans controlled the Senate and the Democrats the House of Representatives, this yielded five Democratic and five Republican members of the Commission. Of the Supreme Court justices, two Republicans and two Democrats were chosen, with the fifth to be selected by these four.


The justices first selected a political independent, Justice David Davis. According to one historian, "[n]o one, perhaps not even Davis himself, knew which presidential candidate he preferred."[3] Just as the Electoral Commission Bill was passing Congress, the Legislature of Illinois elected Davis to the Senate. Democrats in the Illinois Legislature believed that they had purchased Davis' support by voting for him. However, they had made a miscalculation; instead of staying on the Supreme Court so that he could serve on the Commission, he promptly resigned as a Justice in order to take his Senate seat.[4] All the remaining available justices were Republicans, so the four justices already selected chose Justice Joseph P. Bradley, who was considered the most impartial remaining member of the court. This selection proved decisive. David Davis III (March 9, 1815 - June 26, 1886) was a United States Senator from Illinois and associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Joseph Philo Bradley (March 14, 1813-January 22, 1892), was an American jurist. ...


It was drawing perilously near to inauguration day. The commission met on the last day of January. The cases of Florida, Louisiana, Oregon, and South Carolina were in succession submitted to it by Congress. Eminent counsel appeared for each side. There were double sets of returns from every one of the States named.[2]


The commission first decided not to go behind any returns which were prima facie lawful.[2] Bradley joined the other seven Republican committee members in a series of 8-7 votes that gave all 20 disputed electoral votes to Hayes, giving Hayes a 185-184 electoral vote victory. March 2nd it adjourned, and three days later Hayes was inaugurated without disturbance.[2] Look up prima facie in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The returns accepted by the Commission placed Hayes' victory margin in South Carolina at 889 votes, making this the second-closest election in U.S. history, after the 2000 election, decided by 537 votes in Florida. The United States presidential election of 2000 was a contest between the Democratic candidate Al Gore versus the Republican candidate of George W. Bush. ...


Results

Reflecting the Commission's rulings.

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote Electoral
Vote
Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
RM's Electoral
Vote
Count Pct
Rutherford Birchard Hayes Republican Ohio 4,034,311 47.9% 185 William Almon Wheeler New York 185
Samuel Jones Tilden Democratic New York 4,288,546 51.0% 184 Thomas Andrews Hendricks Indiana 184
Peter Cooper Greenback Labor New York 75,973 0.9% 0 Samuel Fenton Cary Ohio 0
Green Clay Smith Prohibition Kentucky 9,737 0.3% 0 Gideon Tabor Stewart Ohio 0
James Alexander Walker American Illinois 459 0.0% 0 Donald Kirkpatrick New York 0
Other 4,075 0.2% Other
Total 8,413,101 100 % 369 369
Needed to win 185 185

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1876 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (July 27, 2005). Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... William Almon Wheeler (June 30, 1819 – June 4, 1887) was a Representative from New York and the nineteenth Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the state. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... This article is about the state. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Peter Cooper (February 12, 1791 – April 4, 1883) was an American industrialist, inventor, philanthropist, and candidate for President of the United States. ... The Greenback Party was an American political party that was active between 1874 and 1884. ... This article is about the state. ... Samuel Fenton Cary (1814-1900) was an Ohio politician who served in Congress shortly after the Civil War and was Greenback Party candidate for vice-president of the U.S. in 1876. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Green Clay Smith Green Clay Smith (1826-1895), a Major General in the United States Army, received his law degree from the Lexington Law School and became a member of the state legislature of Kentucky. ... National Prohibition Convention, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1892. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Lawyer and newspaper owner-editor Gideon T. Stewart (1824-1909) was very active in promoting the temperance movement. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... James Alexander Walker (August 27, 1832 – October 21, 1901) was a Virginia lawyer, politician, and Confederate general during the American Civil War, later serving as a United States Congressman for two terms. ... The Know-Nothing movement was a nativist American political movement of the 1850s. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the state. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (July 31, 2005). is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

In the 19th century, the United States invented or developed a number of new methods for conducting American Election Campaigns. ... The history of the United States (1865–1918) covers Reconstruction and the rise of industrialization in the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Third Party System, which began in 1854 and changed over to the Fourth Party System in the mid-1890s revolved around the issues of nationalism, modernization, and race. ...

References

  1. ^ Flashback to 1876: History repeats itself. BBC News December 12, 2000. Retrieved on 2006-11-28.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Andrews, E. Benjamin (1912). History of the United States. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 
  3. ^ Morris, Roy, Jr. (2003). Fraud Of The Century. Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden And The Stolen Election Of 1876. New York: Simon and Schuster.
  4. ^ Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named HarpWeek

This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Elisha Benjamin Andrews (1844 - 1917) was a U.S. economist and educator. ...

Bibliography

  • Nikki Oldaker with John Bigelow, 2006, "Samuel Tilden the Real 19th President" http://www.SamuelTilden.com
  • Flick, Alexander C. (1939). Samuel J. Tilden — A Study In Political Sagacity. 
  • Haworth, Paul Leland (1906). The Hayes-Tilden Disputed Presidential Election of 1876. 
  • Hoogenboom, Ari (1995). Rutherford B. Hayes: Warrior and President. ISBN 0-7006-0641-6. 
  • Morris, Roy, Jr. (2004). Fraud Of The Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden And The Stolen Election Of 1876. 
  • Polakoff, Keith Ian (1973). The Politics of Inertia: The Election of 1876 and the End of Reconstruction. 
  • Rehnquist, William H. (2004). The Centennial Crisis: The Disputed Election of 1876. Knopf Publishing Group. ISBN 0-375-41387-1. 
  • Woodward, C. Vann (1951). Reunion and Reaction: The Compromise of 1877 and the End of Reconstruction. 

William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer, jurist, and a political figure who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and later as the Chief Justice of the United States. ...

Primary sources

  • Democratic National Committee (1876). The Campaign Text Book: Why the People Want a Change. The Republican Party Reviewed…. 

External links

For the current presidential election see: United States presidential election, 2008 United States presidential election determines who serves as president and vice president of the United States for a four-year term, starting at midday on Inauguration Day, which is January 20 of the year after the election. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The United States presidential election of 1789 was the first presidential election in the United States of America. ... The United States presidential election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors (in addition to newly added states Kentucky and Vermont). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... In the United States presidential election of 1800, sometimes referred to as the “Revolution of 1800”, Thomas Jefferson defeated John Adams. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1804 pitted incumbent (Democratic-)Republican President Thomas Jefferson against Federalist Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... In the United States presidential election of 1824, John Quincy Adams was elected President on February 9, 1825 after the election was thrown into the House of Representatives. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1832 saw incumbent President Andrew Jackson, candidate of the Democratic Party, easily win reelection against Henry Clay of Kentucky. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1844 saw Democrat James Knox Polk defeat Whig Henry Clay in a close contest that turned on foreign policy, with Polk favoring the annexation of Texas and Clay opposed. ... The United States presidential election of 1848 was an open race. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1860 set the stage for the American Civil War. ... The United States presidential election of 1864 saw Abraham Lincoln, the Republican running on a coalition ticket, win by a landslide over the Democratic candidate, George B. McClellan. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary Incumbent President Ulysses S. Grant was easily elected to a second term in office despite a split within the Republican Party that resulted in a defection of many key Republicans to opponent Horace Greeley. ... The United States presidential election of 1880 was largely seen as a referendum on the Republicans relaxation of Reconstruction efforts in the southern states. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States Presidential Election of 1888 was held on November 6, 1888. ... The United States presidential election of 1892 was held on November 8, 1892. ... The United States presidential election of November 3, 1896 saw Republican William McKinley defeat Democrat William Jennings Bryan in a campaign considered by historians to be one of the most dramatic in American history. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1916 took place while Europe was embroiled in World War I. Public sentiment in the still neutral United States leaned towards the British and French (allied) forces, due to the harsh treatment of civilians by the German Army, which had invaded and occupied large... The United States presidential election of 1920 was dominated by the aftermath of World War I and the hostile reaction to Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic president. ... The United States presidential election of 1924 was won by incumbent President Calvin Coolidge, the Republican candidate. ... The United States presidential election of 1928 pitted Republican Herbert Hoover against Democrat Al Smith. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1948 is considered by most historians as the greatest election upset in American history. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1960 marked the end of Dwight D. Eisenhowers two terms as President. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1976 followed the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon in the wake of the Watergate scandal. ... The United States presidential election of 1980 featured a contest between incumbent Democrat Jimmy Carter and his Republican opponent, Ronald Reagan, along with third party candidates, the independent John B. Anderson and Libertarian Ed Clark. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The United States presidential election of 1988 featured an open primary for both major parties. ... The United States presidential elections of 1992 featured a battle between incumbent President, Republican George Bush; Democrat Bill Clinton, the governor of Arkansas; and independent candidate Ross Perot, a Texas businessman. ... Presidential electoral votes. ... The United States presidential election of 2000 was a contest between the Democratic candidate Al Gore versus the Republican candidate of George W. Bush. ... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... This is an incomplete list of United States presidential election results by state. ...

 
 

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