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Encyclopedia > United States presidential election, 1848
‹ 1844  Flag of the United States 1852 ›
United States presidential election, 1848
7 November 1848
Nominee Zachary Taylor Lewis Cass
Party Whig Democratic
Home State Louisiana Michigan
Running mate Millard Fillmore William Orlando Butler
Electoral Vote 163 127
States Carried 15 15
Popular Vote 1,361,393 1,223,460
Percentage 47.3% 42.5%
United States presidential election, 1848

Presidential election results map. Red denotes states won by Cass/Butler, Purple denotes those won by Taylor/Fillmore. Numbers indicate the number of electoral votes allotted to each state. The United States presidential election of 1844 saw Democrat James Knox Polk defeat Whig Henry Clay in a close contest that turned on foreign policy, with Polk favoring the annexation of Texas and Clay opposed. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Zachary_Taylor. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (564x812, 56 KB) http://hdl. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... William Orlando Butler (April 19, 1791 - August 6, 1880) was a U.S. political figure from Kentucky. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (868x635, 77 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: 1848 United States presidential election, 1848 ...

Before Election
James K. Polk
Democratic This article is about the U.S. President. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...

After Election
Zachary Taylor
Whig This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ...

The United States presidential election of 1848 was an open race. President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, kept his promise not to sleepwith pamela anderson... again. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. President. ...


The Whigs in 1846-47 had focused all their energies on condemning Polk's war policies. They had to quickly reverse course. In February 1848 Polk surprised everyone with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that ended the war and gave the U.S. vast new territories (including California and most of Arizona and New Mexico). The Whigs in the Senate voted 2-1 to approve the treaty. Then in the summer the Whigs nominated the hero of the war, Zachary Taylor. While he did promise no more future wars, he did not condemn the war or criticize Polk, and Whigs had to follow his lead. They shifted their attention to the new issue of whether slavery could be banned from the new territories. The choice of Taylor was almost in desperation--he was not clearly committed to Whig principles, but he was popular for leading the war effort. The Democrats had a record of victory, peace, prosperity, and the acquisition of both Oregon and the Southwest; they appeared almost certain winners unless the Whigs picked Taylor. "It is doubtful whether we can beat the scoundrels next Pres. Election," complained one Whig leader (John Defrees). "The war will have been ended -- and an immense acquisition of Land will be pointed to as the result of Democracy -- the Land stealing, even among our best Christians, is popular!" [Holt p. 312] Taylor's victory made him one of only two Whigs to be elected President before the party ceased to exist in the 1850's, the other Whig to be elected President was William Henry Harrison, who had also been a general and war hero. The Mexican Cession (red) and the Gadsden Purchase (orange). ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ...

Contents

Nominations

Whig Party nomination

Taylor/Fillmore
Taylor/Fillmore

Mexican-American War General Zachary Taylor of Louisiana, spurred by his successes on the battlefield but who had never voted in an election himself, was openly courted by both the Democratic and Whig parties. Taylor ultimately declared himself a Whig, and easily took their nomination, receiving 171 delegate votes to defeat Henry Clay, Winfield Scott, Daniel Webster and others. After Webster turned down the vice presidential candidacy, Millard Fillmore received the party's nomination for Vice President. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The History of the Democratic Party is an account of a continuously supported political party in the United States of America. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... For his namesake son, see Henry Clay, Jr. ... For other uses of Winfield Scott, see Winfield Scott (disambiguation). ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ...


Democratic Party nomination

Cass/Butler
Cass/Butler

The Democrats countered by nominating Lewis Cass, who had served as Governor and Senator for Michigan, as well as Secretary of War under Andrew Jackson, and from 1836-1842 as ambassador to France. General William Orlando Butler was nominated to join Cass on the ticket, garnering 169 delegate votes to defeat five other candidates, including future Vice President William Rufus deVane King and future Confederate President Jefferson Davis. The Democrats chose a platform that remained silent on slavery, and with Cass suspected of pro-slavery leanings, many anti-slavery Democrats walked out of the Baltimore convention to begin the Free Soil party. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 786 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,248 × 952 pixels, file size: 201 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 786 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,248 × 952 pixels, file size: 201 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The History of the Democratic Party is an account of a continuously supported political party in the United States of America. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... William Orlando Butler (April 19, 1791 - August 6, 1880) was a U.S. political figure from Kentucky. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... Baltimore redirects here. ...


Free Soil Party nomination

Van Buren/Adams
Van Buren/Adams

A third party, the Free Soil Party, was organized for the 1848 election to oppose further expansion of slavery into the western territories. Led by Salmon P. Chase and John P. Hale, former President Martin Van Buren defeated John Parker Hale by a 154-129 delegate count to capture their nomination, while Charles Francis Adams, the son and grandson of two other presidents, was chosen as the vice presidential nominee. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1072x1536, 282 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Martin Van Buren Free Soil Party User:Davepape/Images ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1072x1536, 282 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Martin Van Buren Free Soil Party User:Davepape/Images ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Slave redirects here. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... John Parker Hale (March 31, 1806 - November 19, 1873) was an American politician. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... John Parker Hale (March 31, 1806 - November 19, 1873) was an American politician. ... Charles Francis Adams (August 18, 1807, Boston - November 21, 1886, Boston), the son of John Quincy Adams and Louisa Adams, was an American lawyer, politician, diplomat and writer. ...


General election

Campaign

With Taylor remaining vague on the issues, the campaign was dominated by personalities and personal attacks, with the Democrats calling Taylor vulgar, uneducated, cruel and greedy, and the Whigs attacking Cass for graft and dishonesty. The division of the Democrats over slavery allowed Taylor to dominate the Northeast.


Results

"Grand Presidential sweep-stakes" - political cartoon of the three main candidates
"Grand Presidential sweep-stakes" - political cartoon of the three main candidates

With the exception of South Carolina, which left the selection of electors to its legislature, the election of 1848 marked the first time in which every state in the union voted for President and Vice President on the same day: November 7, 1848. Taylor won election over Cass, capturing 163 of the 290 electoral votes cast. However, Taylor won barely more than 47% of the popular vote, and had the Free-Soil Party not diverted votes from the Democratic ticket, Cass might well have won the election. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 587 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,536 × 1,127 pixels, file size: 226 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 587 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,536 × 1,127 pixels, file size: 226 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ...

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote(a) Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Zachary Taylor Whig Louisiana 1,361,393 47.3% 163 Millard Fillmore New York 163
Lewis Cass Democratic Michigan 1,223,460 42.5% 127 William Orlando Butler Kentucky 127
Martin Van Buren Free Soil New York 291,501 10.1% 0 Charles Francis Adams, Sr. Massachusetts 0
Other 2,830 0.1% 0 Other 0
Total 2,879,184 100.0% 290 Total 290
Needed to win 146 Needed to win 146

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1848 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (July 27, 2005). This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... This article is about the state. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... William Orlando Butler (April 19, 1791 - August 6, 1880) was a U.S. political figure from Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. ... This article is about the state. ... Charles Francis Adams (August 18, 1807, Boston - November 21, 1886, Boston), the son of John Quincy Adams and Louisa Adams, was an American lawyer, politician, diplomat and writer. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (July 31, 2005). is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


(a) The popular vote figures exclude South Carolina where the Electors were chosen by the state legislature rather than by popular vote. Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83...


Electoral college selection

"Cock of the walk" - Zachary Taylor as victor
"Cock of the walk" - Zachary Taylor as victor
Method of choosing Electors State(s)
each Elector appointed by state legislature South Carolina
each Elector chosen by voters statewide (all other states) *

* Massachusetts law provided that the state legislature would choose the Electors if no slate of Electors could command a majority of voters statewide. In 1848, this provision was triggered. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 557 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,536 × 1,069 pixels, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 557 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,536 × 1,069 pixels, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


See also

  • History of the United States (1789-1849)

This article covers the History of the United States from 1789 through 1849. ...

References

  • Graebner, Norman A. "Thomas Corwin and the Election of 1848: A Study in Conservative Politics." Journal of Southern History, 17 (1951), 162-79.
  • Hamilton, Holman. Zachary Taylor: Soldier in the White House reprint 1966.
  • Michael F. Holt; The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of the Civil War. 1999.
  • Nevins, Allan. Ordeal of the Union: Volume I. Fruits of Manifest Destiny, 1847-1852 1947.
  • Rayback, Joseph A. Free Soil: The Election of 1848.University Press of Kentucky, 1970.

External links

  • Library of Congress
  • 1848 Election State-by-State popular results
  • The Election of 1848

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