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Encyclopedia > United States of Europe

The United States of Europe (sometimes abbreviated U.S.E. or USE) is a name given to several similar speculative scenarios of the unification of Europe, as a single nation and a single federation of states, similar to the United States of America, both as projected by writers of speculative fiction and science fiction,[1] and by political scientists, politicians, geographers, historians, and futurologists.[attribution needed] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A map displaying todays federations. ... Most countries with a federal constitution are made up of a number of subnational entities called states or provinces. ... Speculative fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... See also: Political Science Notable political scientists Kenneth Arrow - Nobel Memorial Prize winning economist who published influential paper on his widely cited Arrows Impossibility Theorem Robert Axelrod Duncan Black - Responsible for unearthing the work of many early political scientists, including Charles Dodgson Jean-Charles de Borda - 18th century mathematician... A politician is an individual involved in politics, sometimes this may include political scientists. ... A geographer is a scientist whose area of study is geography, the study of the physical environment and human habitat. ... This is a list of historians. ... Futurology or futures studies (called futurism in the United States) is the study of the medium to long-term future, by extrapolating present technological, economic or social trends, or by attempting to predict future trends. ...


The member states of the European Union do have many common policies within the European Union (EU) and on behalf of the EU that are sometimes suggestive of a single state. It has a common civil service (the European Commission), a single High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy, a common European Security and Defence Policy, a supreme court (European Court of Justice — but only in matters of European Union law), a peacekeeping force (Eurofor), and an intergovernmental research organisation (the EIROforum with members like CERN). The euro is often referred to as the "single European currency", which has been officially adopted by thirteen EU countries while seven other member countries of the European Union have linked their currencies to the euro in ERM II. In addition a number of European territories outside the EU have adopted the euro unofficially. EU member states and candidates Current members There are currently 25 member states in the European Union. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... The Common Foreign and Security Policy or CFSP was established as the second of the three pillars of the European Union in the Maastricht treaty of 1992, and further defined and broadened in the Amsterdam Treaty of 1997. ... The European Security and Defence Policy or ESDP is a major element of the Common Foreign and Security Policy pillar of the European Union (EU). ... Official emblem of the ECJ The Court of Justice of the European Communities, usually called the European Court of Justice (ECJ), is the highest court in the European Union (EU). ... European Union law is the unique legal system which operates alongside the laws of Member States of the European Union (EU). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Eurofor is a multinational rapid reaction force composed of forces from France, Spain, Portugal, and Italy. ... CERN logo The European Organization for Nuclear Research (French: ), commonly known as CERN (see Naming), pronounced (or in French), is the worlds largest particle physics laboratory, situated just northwest of Geneva on the border between France and Switzerland. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... The Eurozone (also called Euro Area, Eurosystem or Euroland) refers to the European Union member states that have adopted the euro currency union. ... The European exchange rate mechanism (or ERM) was a system introduced by the European Community in March 1979, as part of the European Monetary System (EMS), to reduce exchange-rate variability and achieve monetary stability in Europe, in preparation for Economic and Monetary Union and the introduction of a single...


The EU, however, does not have a single government, a single foreign policy set by that government, or a single taxation system contributing to a single exchequer. It does not have a constitution. The Exchequer was (and in some cases still is) a part of the governments of England (latterly to include Wales, Scotland and Ireland) that was responsible for the management and collection of revenues. ...


The European Union does not include every nation in Europe and there is no consensus among the existing national governments towards becoming even a Confederation. There is also significant internal opposition to the concept in many member states. A confederation is an association of sovereign states or communities, usually created by treaty but often later adopting a common constitution. ... Euroscepticism has become a general term for opposition to the process of European integration. ...

Contents

Ever closer union

At present, the European Union is a free association of sovereign states designed to further their shared aims. Other than the vague aim of "ever closer union" in the Solemn Declaration on European Union, the Union (meaning its member governments) has no current policy to create either a federation or a confederation. However, in the past, Jean Monnet, a person associated with the EU and its predecessor the European Economic Community did make such proposals. A wide range of other terms are in use, to describe the possible future political structure of Europe as a whole, and/or the EU. Some of them, such as United Europe, are used often, and in such varied contexts, but they have no definite constitutional status. On 19 June 1983 in Stuttgart the 10 Heads of State and Government signed the Solemn Declaration on European Union. ... Jean Omer Marie Gabriel Monnet (November 9, 1888 – March 16, 1979) is regarded by many as the architect of European Unity. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ...


In the United States of America, the concept enters serious discussions of whether a unified Europe is feasible and what impact increased European unity would have on the United States of America's relative political and economic power. Glyn Morgan, a Harvard University associate professor of government and social studies, uses it unapologetically in the title of his book The Idea of a European Superstate: Public Justification and European Integration. While Morgan's text focuses on the security implications of a unified Europe, a number of other recent texts focus on the economic implications of such an entity. Important recent texts here include T. R Reid's The United States of Europe and Jeremy Rifkin's The European Dream. Neither the National Review nor the Chronicle of Higher Education doubt the appropriateness of the term in their reviews.[2][3] Harvard redirects here. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ...


Opposition

The term "United States of Europe", as a direct comparison with the United States of America, would imply that the existing nations of Europe would be reduced to a status equivalent to that of a U.S. state, losing their national sovereignty in the process and becoming constituent parts of a European federation. Just as the United States of America has evolved from a confederation (under the 1777 Articles of Confederation) into a federation, the term "the United States of Europe" might also be used to describe a potential confederation of independent states. Those who oppose and criticize forming a federation or confederation of European states may be termed Eurosceptics; however it should be noted that opposition to the creation of a European federation does not equate with opposition to the European Union or the process of European integration. This is an alphabetical list of European countries and dependencies. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... “Sovereign” redirects here. ... A map displaying todays federations. ... A confederation is an association of sovereign states or communities, usually created by treaty but often later adopting a common constitution. ... The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ... Euroscepticism has become a general term for opposition to the process of European integration. ... European integration is the process of political and economic (and in some cases social and cultural) integration of European states into a tighter bloc. ...


Geography

Debate on European unity is often vague as to the boundaries of 'Europe'. The word 'Europe' is widely used as a synonym for the European Union, although the European "continent" is just a political structure. Geologically speaking, there is no such thing as a European continent. Frequently, commentators exclude Russia, a partially European country, from their ideals of inclusion.[attribution needed] Indeed, whilst many in the EU are currently happy for the culturally European but geographically Asian country of Cyprus to be an EU member state, there is much debate about Turkey's application for EU membership.[attribution needed] Synonyms (in ancient Greek, συν (syn) = plus and όνομα (onoma) = name) are different words with similar or identical meanings. ... One of a number of posters created to promote the Marshall Plan in Europe, featuring Turkey Turkeys formal application to join the European Community—the organization that has since developed into the European Union—was made on April 14th, 1987. ...


Many have also debated the location of a possible capital city of a united Europe.[attribution needed] As the seat of most EU institutions, the city of Brussels is the current de facto "capital" of the EU. For some, Brussels is not acceptable as capital of a future unitary or federal state, comprising Europe as a whole.[attribution needed] Some have suggested building a new capital, on a separate territory, comparable to the District of Columbia.[attribution needed] Most other large cities in the EU have, at some time, been proposed as a possible capital city (including London, Paris, Berlin and Madrid).[attribution needed] The Parliaments Paul-Henri Spaak building, as seen from Justus Lipsius Brussels (Belgium) is considered to be the de facto capital of the European Union, having a long history of hosting the institutions of the European Union. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ...


United States of Europe as a superpower

The United States of Europe is widely hypotheticised, fictionalised, or depicted as a superpower as powerful as, or even more powerful than, the United States of America.[attribution needed] Some people such as T.R. Reid, Andrew Reding, and Mark Leonard, among others, believe that the power of the hypothetical United States of Europe will rival that of the United States of America in the 21st century. Leonard cites seven factors: Europe's large population, Europe's large economy, Europe's low inflation rates, Europe's favourable climate, Europe's central location in the world, the unpopularity and perceived failure of American foreign policy in recent years, and certain European countries' highly developed social organization or quality of life (when measured in terms such as hours worked per week and income distribution)[4] Some experts claim that Europe has developed a sphere of influence called the Eurosphere.[attribution needed] This article is about powerful states. ... Mark Leonard is a British foreign policy thinker and the author of the book Why Europe will run the 21st Century. ... The population growth/decline of European countries The Demographics of Europe refers to the changing number and composition of the population of Europe. ... The economy of Europe comprises more than 710 million people in 48 different states. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Eurocentrism is the practice, conscious or otherwise, of placing emphasis on European (and, generally, Western) concerns, culture and values at the expense of those of other cultures. ... For a history, see Timeline of United States diplomatic history For the published diplomatic papers, see The Foreign Relations of the United States For Foreign relations under George W. Bush, see Foreign policy of the George W. Bush administration. ... A social animal is a loosely defined term for an organism that is highly interactive with other members of its species to the point of having a recognizable and distinct society. ... This article is about the economic and philosophical concept. ... Map showing countries by their relation to the Union, including ENP and ACP countries (covering much of the Eurosphere). ...


History

Main article: Pre-1945 ideas on European unity

Various versions of the concept have developed over the centuries, many of which are mutually incompatible (inclusion or exclusion of the United Kingdom; secular or religious union, etc.). Such proposals include those from King George of Podebrady of Bohemia in 1464; the Duc de Sully of France in the seventeenth century; and the plan of William Penn, the Quaker founder of Pennsylvania, for the establishment of an "European Dyet, Parliament or Estates." This article does not cite any references or sources. ... George of Podebrady - statue in Kunštát (Czech Republic). ... Maximilien de Béthune, duc de Sully (December 13, 1560 – December 22, 1641) was the doughty soldier, French minister, staunch Protestant and faithful right-hand man who enabled Henry IV of France to accomplish so much. ... For other uses, see William Penn (disambiguation). ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


George Washington wrote to the Marquis de La Fayette: "One day, on the model of the United States of America, a United States of Europe will come into being." [4] George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Marie-Joseph-Paul-Roch-Yves-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (September 6, 1757–May 20, 1834), was a French aristocrat most famous for his participation in the American Revolutionary War and early French Revolution. ...


19th century

Felix Markham notes how during a conversation on St. Helena, Napoleon remarked, "Europe thus divided into nationalities freely formed and free internally, peace between States would have become easier: the United States of Europe would become a possibility."[5]


United States of Europe was also the name of the concept presented by Wojciech Jastrzębowski in "About eternal peace between the nations", published May 31, 1831. The project consisted of 77 articles. The envisioned United States of Europe was to be an international organisation rather than a superstate. Wojciech JastrzÄ™bowski (1799 Gierwaty - 1882 Warszawa), polish biologist, author Ergonomics. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The term 'United States of Europe' (États-Unis d’Europe) was used by Victor Hugo, including during a speech at the International Peace Congress held in Paris in 1849. Hugo favoured the creation of "a supreme, sovereign senate, which will be to Europe what parliament is to England" and said "A day will come when all nations on our continent will form a European brotherhood... A day will come when we shall see... the United States of America and the United States of Europe face to face, reaching out for each other across the seas." Victor Hugo planted a tree in the grounds of his residence on the Island of Guernsey he was noted in saying that when this tree matured the United States of Europe would have come into being. This tree to this day is still growing happily in the gardens of Maison de Hauteville, St. Peter Port, Guernsey, Victor Hugo's residence during his exile from France. Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... Elihu Burritt organized the first International Peace Congress in 1848. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... This is a map of Guernsey. ...


The Italian philosopher Carlo Cattaneo wrote 'The ocean is rough and whirling, and the currents go to two possible endings: the autocrat, or the United States of Europe'. In 1867 Giuseppe Garibaldi, and John Stuart Mill joined Victor Hugo at a congress of the League for Peace and Freedom in Geneva. Here the anarchist Mikhail Bakunin stated "That in order to achieve the triumph of liberty, justice and peace in the international relations of Europe, and to render civil war impossible among the various peoples which make up the European family, only a single course lies open: to constitute the United States of Europe". The French National Assembly, also called for a United States of Europe on March 1, 1871. Trotsky raised the slogan "For a Soviet United States of Europe" as early as 1923. "The United States of Europe" was also the title of two books published in 1931: by French politician Edouard Herriot and by British civil servant Arthur Salter. Carlo Cattaneo(1801 - 1869) was an Italian philosopher and patriot. ... Garibaldi in 1866. ... John Stuart Mill (20 May 1806 – 8 May 1873), British philosopher, political economist, civil servant and Member of Parliament, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... Mikhail Alexandrovich Bakunin (Russian: Михаил Александрович Бакунин, Michel Bakunin on the grave in Bern), (May 18 (30 N.S.), 1814 – June 19 (July 1 N.S.), 1876) was a well-known Russian revolutionary, and often considered one of the “fathers of modern anarchism. Born in the Russian Empire to a family of Russian... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The National Assembly is either a legislature, or the lower house of a bicameral legislature in some countries. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1915 passport photo of Trotsky Leon Davidovich Trotsky (Russian: Лев Давидович Троцкий; also transliterated Trotskii, Trotski, Trotzky) (October 26 (O.S.) = November 7 (N.S.), 1879 - August 21, 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronstein (&#1051... Soviet redirects here. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Categories: Politics stubs | Liberal related stubs | 1872 births | 1957 deaths | Members of the Académie française | Prime ministers of France | Alumni of the École Normale Supérieure ...


Winston Churchill

The term "United States of Europe" was used by Winston Churchill in a famous speech[6] which he delivered in 1946 at the University of Zürich. Churchill seems to have been deliberately vague about the status of Britain in such a Union, mentioning also its relationship with its Empire and the United States.[7] Churchill redirects here. ... The University of Zurich (in German: Universität Zürich) is the largest university of Switzerland, in the city of Zurich. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ...


Churchill had, however, remarked on another occasion when referring to the place of the United Kingdom in Europe that:


We see nothing but good and hope in a richer, freer, more contented European commonality...but we have our own dream and our own task. We are with Europe, but not of it. We are linked but not combined. We are interested and associated but not absorbed.[8]


Franz Josef Strauß

Herbert W. Armstrong of the Radio Church of God (later renamed Worldwide Church of God), had prophesied the coming of a United States of Europe before the close of WWIII, and he later went so far as to name the German conservative politician Franz Josef Strauß as its future dictator. (Strauß had written a book titled The Grand Design, in which he set forth his views of the future of Europe).[9] Strauß seemed to play along with this portrayal, by becoming a guest of Armstrong in 1971 in his home and at his Ambassador College campus in Pasadena, California where he even agreed to appear on The World Tomorrow television programme. According to a document written by Armstrong in 1983, he became lasting friends with Strauß, but he could not understand why Strauß had returned the friendship. Herbert W. Armstrong (July 31, 1892) – January 16, 1986 (aged 93) was the founder of the Worldwide Church of God and an early pioneer of radio evangelism, taking to the airwaves in the 1930s from Eugene, Oregon. ... The Radio Church of God began as a religious radio program during 1934 on station KORE in Eugene, Oregon presented by Herbert W. Armstrong and supported by an unincorporated voluntary association of members meeting as the Church of God. ... The Worldwide Church of God (WCG), formerly the Radio Church of God, is a Christian church currently based in Glendora, California, USA. Founded in 1933 by Herbert Armstrong as a radio ministry, the WCG under Armstrong had a significant, and often controversial, influence on 20th century religious broadcasting and publishing... This article is about a hypothetical global nuclear war. ... Dr h. ... Ambassador College was originally established as an unaccredited liberal arts institution in 1947 at Pasadena, California by the Radio Church of God, a religious organization incorporated in the State of California by Herbert W. Armstrong to promote the beliefs of the Church of God. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Guy Verhofstadt

Following the negative referendums about the European Constitution in France and the Netherlands, the Belgian prime minister Guy Verhofstadt released in November 2005 his book Verenigde Staten van Europa (Dutch for United States of Europe) in which he claims - based on the results of a Eurobarometer questionnaire - that the average European citizen wants more Europe. He thinks a federal Europe should be created between those states that wish to have a federal Europe (as a form of enhanced cooperation). In other words, a core federal Europe would exist within the current EU. He also states that these core states should federalise the following five policy areas: a European social-economic policy, technology cooperation, a common justice and security policy, a common diplomacy and a European army. [5] [6] The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... Guy Verhofstadt (help· info) (born April 11, 1953) is a Belgian politician, municipal councillor in Ghent and current Prime Minister of Belgium. ... Eurobarometer is a series of surveys regularly performed on behalf of the European Commission since 1973. ...


United States of Europe in fiction

Carole Carlson, identified in print as C. C. Carlson, is a professional writer and ghostwriter "coauthoring" many books in print. In 1970, when scandals began to rock the Worldwide Church of God, she teamed up with Hal Lindsey to write a religious best seller called The Late, Great Planet Earth. This book, which sold millions of copies in the 1970s, was made into a movie starring Orson Welles. It followed much of the same prophetic storyline concerning the rise of a powerful state in Europe, as previously told by Herbert Armstrong. The Worldwide Church of God (WCG), formerly the Radio Church of God, is a Christian church currently based in Glendora, California, USA. Founded in 1933 by Herbert Armstrong as a radio ministry, the WCG under Armstrong had a significant, and often controversial, influence on 20th century religious broadcasting and publishing... Harold Lee Hal Lindsey (born November 23, 1929) is an American evangelist and Christian writer. ... The Late, Great Planet Earth is the primary example of pre-millennialist, dispensationalist Christian Zionist literature by prolific author Hal Lindsey (here assisted by co-author C.C. Carlson). ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Herbert Armstrong often used the middle initial W. even though he had no middle name. ...


Incompetence, a dystopian novel by Red Dwarf creator Rob Grant, is a murder mystery political thriller set in a federated Europe of the near-future, where stupidity is a constitutionally protected right. Incompetence is a dystopian novel by Red Dwarf co-creator Rob Grant. ... A dystopia (or alternatively cacotopia) is a fictional society, usually portrayed as existing in a future time, when the conditions of life are extremely bad due to deprivation, oppression, or terror. ... Red dwarfs constitute the majority of all stars According to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, a red dwarf star is a small and relatively cool star, of the main sequence, either late K or M spectral type. ... Rob Grants novel, Colony. ... Sherlock Holmes, pipe-puffing hero of crime fiction, confers with his colleague Dr. Watson; together these characters popularized the genre. ... A political thriller is a thriller that is set against the backdrop of political power struggle. ...


In the fictional universe of Eric Flint's best selling alternate history 1632 series, a United States of Europe is formed out of the Confederation of Principalities of Europe, which was composed of several German political units of the 1630s. A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ... Eric Flint (born California, USA, 1947) is an American science fiction and fantasy author and editor. ... Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The 1632 series, also known as the 1632-verse or Ring of Fire series, is an alternate history book series, created, primarily co-written-by and coordinated by historian Eric Flint. ... The United States of Europe (USE) is a fictional federation in the 1632 series by Eric Flint and many other contributors. ...


Andrew Roberts's book The Aachen Memorandum details a United States of Europe formed from a fraudulent referendum entitled the Aachen Referendum. Andrew Roberts (born on January 13, 1963) is a British conservative, writer of historical biographies and journalist. ...


In the expansion pack Euro Force of the computer game Battlefield 2, the European faction is portrayed as a single army. In the computer game Battlefield 2142, Europe is portrayed as one of the three great superpowers on Earth. Although most of Europe is frozen it still appears to be very powerful and controls the Union of African States. It loses control of most of Europe in the initial PAC invasion. In the Expansion Northern Strike the EU recaptures all of Europe. In the computer game Shattered Union, set in a future civil war in America, the European Union is portrayed as a peacekeeping force. Battlefield 2 (abbreviated to BF2) is a computer game in which players fight in a modern battlefield using modern weapon systems. ... Battlefield 2 (abbreviated to BF2) is a computer game in which players fight in a modern battlefield using modern weapon systems. ... Battlefield 2142 is a first-person shooter computer game designed by Digital Illusions CE and is the fourth game in the Battlefield series. ... Shattered Union is a turn-based tactics computer game developed by PopTop Software and published by 2K Games in 2005. ...


The 'United States of Europe' figures as the goal of secret cabals in various conspiracy theories, see Priory of Sion - the cabals apparently preferring to borrow their constitutional structures from the USA. For other uses, see Cabal (disambiguation). ... A conspiracy theory is a theory that defies common historical or current understanding of events, under the claim that those events are the result of manipulations by two or more individuals or various secretive powers or conspiracies. ... Prieuré de Sion, usually rendered in English translation as Priory of Sion or even Priory of Zion, is an elusive protagonist in many works of both non-fiction and fiction. ...


References to a United States of Europe, or a similar European Alliance, have also existed in episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation.[10] Star Trek also mentions a loose confederation of European nations called the European Hegemony. This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


See also

Guy Verhofstadt (help· info) (born April 11, 1953) is a Belgian politician, municipal councillor in Ghent and current Prime Minister of Belgium. ... The Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, commonly referred to as the European Constitution, is an international treaty intended to create a constitution for the European Union. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pan-Europeanism. ... European integration is the process of political and economic (and in some cases social and cultural) integration of European states into a tighter bloc. ... The European Union is a unique geo-political entity covering a large portion of the European continent. ... Mercator projection: New England Confederation in yellow The United Colonies of New England, commonly known as the New England Confederation, was a political and military alliance of the British colonies of Massachusetts, Plymouth, Connecticut, and New Haven. ... Pro-European is a subjective term applied to a person who supports the European Union (EU) and/or further European integration, specifically in the context of political argument over the current and future status of the EU and its policies. ... This article is about powerful states. ... Euroscepticism has become a general term for opposition to the process of European integration. ... Eurocentrism is the practice, conscious or otherwise, of placing emphasis on European (and, generally, Western) concerns, culture and values at the expense of those of other cultures. ... It has been suggested that World Federation be merged into this article or section. ... United States usually refers to the United States of America. ... Look up unification in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The European Civil War is a debated period in history between the beginning of the Franco-Prussian War on July 19, 1870 and end of the European portion of World War II on May 8, 1945. ...

References

  1. ^ (2002-11-01) 1632 (novel), trade paperback (July 2003), 655. “President of the United States, prime minister of the United States of Europe” 
  2. ^ http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/ramosmrosovsky200412200804.asp
  3. ^ http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i44/44a01201.htm
  4. ^ Europe: the new superpower by Mark Leonard, Irish Times, Accessed March 11, 2007
  5. ^ Felix Markham, Napoleon (New York: Penguin Books USA Inc., 1966), 257 as quoted in Matthew Zarzeczny, Napoleon's European Union: The Grand Empire of the United States of Europe (Kent State University Master's thesis), 2.
  6. ^ Speech online at [1]
  7. ^ Mauter, Wendell: "Churchill and the Unification of Europe" in The Historian, 61(1), Fall 1998, pp. 67-84. Cited online at [2]
  8. ^ Encyclopedia Britannica: "The United Kingdom", April 02 2006. Cited online at [3]
  9. ^ Franz Josef Strauß. The Grand Design: A European solution to German reunification. English translation: London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1965.
  10. ^ European Alliance

Main articles: 1632 series and The Grantville Gazettes 1632 is the initial novel in the best selling alternate history genre 1632 book series set in the Holy Roman Empire by historian, writer and editor Eric Flint. ... Dr h. ... Weidenfeld & Nicolson is a British publisher of fiction and reference books. ...

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