FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > United States of America
United States of America
Flag of the United States Great Seal of the United States
Flag Great Seal
Motto: E Pluribus Unum (traditional)
In God We Trust (official, 1956–present)
Anthem: "The Star-Spangled Banner"



Capital Washington, D.C.
38°53′N 77°02′W
Largest city New York City
Official language(s) None at the federal level;
English de facto
Government Federal Republic
 - President George W. Bush (R)
 - Vice President Dick Cheney (R)
Independence
- Declared
- Recognized
From Great Britain
July 4, 1776
September 3, 1783
Area  
 - Total 9,631,420 km² (3rd1)
  (3,718,695 sq mi) 
 - Water (%) 4.87
Population  
 - 2006 est. 299,360,879[2] (3rd)
 - 2000 census 281,421,906
 - Density 31/km² (172nd)
(80/sq mi) 
GDP (PPP) 2005 estimate
 - Total $12.36 trillion (1st)
 - Per capita $41,800 (3rd)
HDI (2003) 0.944 (10th) – high
Currency United States dollar ($) (USD)
Time zone (UTC-5 to -10)
 - Summer (DST) (UTC-4 to -10)
Internet TLD .us .gov .edu .mil .um
Calling code +1
1.) Area rank is disputed with China and sometimes is ranked 3rd or 4th.

The United States of America, also known as the United States, the U.S., the U.S.A., and America, is a country in North America. A federal republic, the United States shares land borders with Canada and Mexico, and extends from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Washington, D.C. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (665x652, 547 KB) The Great Seal of the United States, obverse side. ... National flag and ensign. ... Obverse The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States government. ... This page lists state and national mottos for the worlds independent states and if applicable, their component states. ... E pluribus unum is included in the Great Seal of the United States E pluribus unum was the first national motto of the United States of America. ... In God We Trust on the twenty dollar bill In God We Trust is the national motto of the United States of America. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogizing the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognzed either by a nations government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Nicholson took the copy Key gave him to a printer, where it was published as a broadside on 17 September 1814 under the title Defence of Fort McHenry, with a note explaining the circumstances of its writing. ... Locator map of the USA, created/modified by Aris Katsaris from other Wikipedia locator maps File links The following pages link to this file: United States Template:United States infobox Categories: GFDL images ... This is a list of national capitals of the world in alphabetical order. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., with regard to the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia. ... Population of the United States, 1790 to 2000 The demographics of the United States depict a largely urban nation, with 75% of its population living in urban and suburban areas. ... Nickname: Big Apple Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... An official language is a language that is given a privileged legal status in a state, or other legally-defined territory. ... // Although the United States currently has no official language, it is largely monolingual with English being the de facto national language. ... English language spread in the United States. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... The Federal Republic of Germany and its sixteen Bundesländer (federal states) A federal republic is a federation of states with a republican form of government. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government. ... Fuck the white house and all you Wikipedia users Fuck the white house and all you Wikipedia users Fuck the white house and all you Wikipedia users Fuck the white house and all you Wikipedia users Fuck the white house and all you Wikipedia users Fuck the white house and... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies in North America declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... Painting by Benjamin West depicting John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different surface areas  here is a list of areas between 1 million km² and 10 million km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... This is a list of sovereign states and other territories by population, using the most recently available official figures. ... World map of the population density in 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries/dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The figures in the following table are based on areas including inland water bodies (lakes, reservoirs, rivers). ... In economics, purchasing power parity (PPP) is a theory which says that the long-run equilibrium exchange rate of two currencies is the rate that equalizes the currencies purchasing power. ... The numeral trillion refers to one of two number values, depending on the context of where and how it is being used. ... Map of world GDP (PPP) by country using the IMF and World Bank lists for 2004 There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP), the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. ... Map of countries by GDP (PPP) per capita, based on the 2005 IMF data. ... Coloured world map indicating Human Development Index (as of 2003) HDI redirects here. ... Coloured world map indicating Human Development Index (as of 2003)  High human development Medium human development Low human development Unavailable This is a list of countries by Human Development Index (2003), as included in the United Nations Development Programme Report 2005. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation rate 3. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... It has been suggested that leap second be merged into this article or section. ...  Areas that observe daylight saving time  Areas that once observed daylight saving time  Areas that have never observed daylight saving time (incorrect - Arizona briefly observed DST in the 1960s, but then repealed it) A public service announcement for turning the clock back one hour at the end of daylight... It has been suggested that leap second be merged into this article or section. ... The following is a list of currently existing Internet Top-level domains (TLDs). ... .us is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for the United States of America, established in 1985. ... .gov is the generic top-level domain used by the United States federal government. ... .edu (dot-edu) is the generic top-level domain for educational institutions, primarily those in the United States. ... .mil is the generic top-level domain for the United States Department of Defense and its subsidiary organizations. ... .um is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for the United States Minor Outlying Islands. ... A telephone dial This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... Countries by area This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by total area. ... Look up country in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... The Federal Republic of Germany and its sixteen Bundesländer (federal states) A federal republic is a federation of states with a republican form of government. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., with regard to the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia. ...


The present-day continental United States has been inhabited for at least 15,000 years by indigenous tribes.[1] After European exploration and settlement in the 16th century, the English established their own colonies, and gained control of others that had been begun by other European nations, in the eastern portion of the continent in the 17th and early 18th centuries. On 4 July 1776, at war with Britain over fair governance, thirteen of these colonies declared their independence; in 1783, the war ended in British acceptance of the new nation. Since then, the country has more than quadrupled in size: it now consists of 50 states and one federal district, and has a number of overseas territories. American Indian and Alaskan Natives[1] (term preferred by the majority of people included) are the indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska down to their descendants in modern times. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... The Flag of England The Kingdom of England was a kingdom located in Western Europe, in the southern part of the island of Great Britain. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, The Netherlands, Spain, American Indians Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, American Indians Canadian Indians Commanders George Washington, Comte de Rochambeau, Nathanael Greene, Bernardo de Gálvez William Howe, Henry Clinton, Charles Cornwallis (more commanders) The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 states. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies in North America declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... A state of the United States (a U.S. state) is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, along with the District of Columbia, form the United States of America. ... ...


At over 3.7 million square miles (over 9.5 million km²), the U.S. is the third or fourth largest country by total area, depending on whether or not the disputed areas of China are included. It is also the world's third most populous nation, with nearly 300 million people. A square mile is an Imperial unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (5,280 feet, 1,760 yards, 1,609. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Countries by area This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by total area. ... This is a list of extant territorial disputes around the world. ... This is a list of sovereign states and other territories by population, using the most recently available official figures. ...


The United States has maintained a liberal democratic political system since it adopted its Articles of Confederation on 1 March 1781 and the Constitution, the Articles' replacement, on 17 September 1787. American military, economic, cultural, and political influence increased throughout the 20th century; with the collapse of the Soviet Union at the end of the Cold War, the nation emerged as the world's sole remaining superpower.[2] Today, the U.S. continues to play a leading role in world affairs. This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document of the United States of America. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The rise of Gorbachev Although reform stalled between 1964–1982, the generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ... The Cold War (Russian: Холодная Война Kholodnaya Voina) was the protracted geopolitical, ideological, and economic struggle that emerged after World War II between capitalism and communism, centering around the global superpowers of the United States and the Soviet Union, and their military alliance partners. ... An American B-2 bomber in flight. ...

Contents

Name

See also: List of meanings of countries' names This is a list of original meanings of the names used by countries, and additionally the original meaning of their names in English (where different). ...


The earliest known use of the name America is from 1507, when a globe and a large map created by the German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller in Saint-Die-des-Vosges described the combined continents of North and South America. Although the origin of the name is uncertain[3], the most widely held belief is that expressed in an accompanying book, Cosmographiae Introductio, which explains it as a feminized version of the Latin name of Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci (Americus Vespucius); in Latin, the other continents' names were all feminine. Vespucci theorized, correctly, that Christopher Columbus, on reaching islands in the Caribbean Sea in 1492, had come not to India but to a "New World". World map showing the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... Martin Waldseemüller (ca. ... Cosmographiae introductio was a book published in 1507 to accompany Martin Waldseemüllers map of the world and wall-map, which was the first appearance of the name America. It is widely held to have been written by Matthias Ringmann although some historians attribute it to Waldseemüller himself. ... It has been suggested that natural gender be merged into this article or section. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language. ... Amerigo Vespucci (March 9, 1454 - February 22, 1512) was an Italian merchant and cartographer who voyaged to and wrote about the Americas. ... Born c. ... // Ecology A view of the Caribbean Sea from the Dominican Republic coast The Caribbean is home to about 9% of the worlds coral reefs covering about 20,000 square miles, most of which are located off the Caribbean Islands and the Central American coast. ... 1492 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, c. ...


The Americas were also known as Columbia, after Columbus, prompting the name District of Columbia for the land set aside as the U.S. capital. Columbia remained a popular name for the United States until the early twentieth century, when it fell into relative disuse; but it is still used poetically and appears in various names and titles. A female personification of the country is also called Columbia; she is similar to Britannia.[4][5][6][7] Columbus Day, a holiday in the U.S. and other countries in the Americas, commemorates Columbus's October 1492 landing. World map showing the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere historically considered to consist of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). ... Personification is a term used in literary criticism to name the figure of speech which involves directly speaking of an inanimate object, or an abstract concept, as if were a living entity, often one with specifically human attributes. ... Britannia, the British national personification. ... Columbus Day is a holiday celebrated in many countries in the Americas, commemorating the date of Christopher Columbuss arrival in the New World in 1492. ...


The term "united States of America" was first used officially in the Declaration of Independence, adopted on 4 July 1776. On 15 November 1777, the Second Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation, the first of which stated "The Stile of this Confederacy shall be 'The United States of America.'" U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies in North America declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Second Continental Congress was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of several British North American colonies which met from May 10, 1775 to March 1, 1781. ... The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document of the United States of America. ...


The adjectival and demonymic forms for the United States are American, a point of controversy among some. An adjective is a part of speech which modifies a noun, usually describing it or making its meaning more specific. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Use of the word American differs between historical, geographical and political contexts. ...


History

Main article: History of the United States
The Mayflower, which transported Pilgrims to the New World, arrived in 1620.
The Mayflower, which transported Pilgrims to the New World, arrived in 1620.

Before the European colonization of the Americas, a process that began at the end of the 15th century, the present-day continental U.S. was inhabited exclusively by various indigenous tribes, including Alaskan Natives, who migrated to the continent over a period that may have begun 35,000 years ago and may have ended as recently as 11,000 years ago.[8] Native Americans in the eastern United States independently developed agriculture as early as 2500 BC with the domestication of indigenous sunflower, squash and goosefoot.[9] The first confirmed European landing in the present-day United States was by a Spaniard, Juan Ponce de Leon, who landed in 1513 in Florida, and as part of his claim, the first European settlement was established by Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles on the site of a Timucuan Indian village in 1565 at St. Augustine, Florida. The first successful English settlement was at Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607, followed in 1620 by the Pilgrims' landing at Plymouth, Massachusetts. In 1609 and 1617, respectively, the Dutch settled in part of what became New York and New Jersey. In 1638, the Swedes founded New Sweden, in part of what became Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania after passing through Dutch hands. Throughout the 17th and early 18th centuries, England (and later Great Britain) established new colonies, took over Dutch colonies, and split others. With the division of the Carolinas, in 1729, and the colonization of Georgia, in 1732, the British colonies in North America, excluding present-day Canada, numbered thirteen. These thirteen colonies would be drawn closer together over the coming decades. The United States is a country occupying part of the North American continent ranging from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean and including outlying areas as well. ... Image File history File links MayflowerHarbor. ... Image File history File links MayflowerHarbor. ... Mayflower in Plymouth Harbor by William Halsall (1882) The Mayflower was the ship that transported the Pilgrims from Plymouth, England, to Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, in what would become the United States, in 1620. ... Pilgrims Going to Church by George Henry Boughton (1867) The Pilgrims were a group of English religious separatists who sailed from Europe to North America in the early 17th century, in search of a home where they could freely practice their style of religion. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... American Indian and Alaskan Natives[1] (term preferred by the majority of people included) are the indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska down to their descendants in modern times. ... Alaska Natives are indigenous peoples who live in what is now the U.S. state of Alaska. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... A Hupa man, 1923 The term Indigenous peoples of the Americas encompasses the inhabitants of the Americas before the European discovery of the Americas in the late 15th century, as well as many present-day ethnic groups who identify themselves with those historical peoples. ... Binomial name Helianthus annuus L. The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant in the Family Asteraceae, with a large flower head (inflorescence). ... Species - hubbard squash, buttercup squash - cushaw squash C. moschata- butternut squash C. pepo- most pumpkins, acorn squash, summer squash References: ITIS 223652002-11-06 Hortus Third Squashes are four species of the genus Cucurbita, also called pumpkins and marrows depending on variety or the nationality of the speaker. ... Species See text Chenopodium is a genus of plant in the family Amaranthaceae, known generically as the Goosefoots. ... See also Agueybana Hayuya Jumacao Discoverer of the Americas Categories: People stubs | 1460 births | 1521 deaths | History of Puerto Rico | Conquistadores ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the continent. ... Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles Pedro Menendez de Aviles (born 1519 in Avilés, Spain, dead in Santander on September 17, 1574), was the first Spanish governor of Florida. ... The Timucuans were a prehistoric Native American civilization centered around the present-day central and north Florida and southeastern Georgia area of the Southeast United States. ... St. ... The Flag of England The Kingdom of England was a kingdom located in Western Europe, in the southern part of the island of Great Britain. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Pilgrims Going to Church by George Henry Boughton (1867) The Pilgrims were a group of English religious separatists who sailed from Europe to North America in the early 17th century, in search of a home where they could freely practice their style of religion. ... Plymouth is a city in the southwest of England, or alternatively the Westcountry, and is situated within the traditional county of Devon. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... New Amsterdam (Dutch: Nieuw Amsterdam) was the name of the 17th century fortified settlement on Manhattan Island in the New Netherland territory (1614-1674) situated originally between 38 and 42 degrees latitude. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... New Sweden, or Nya Sverige, was a small Swedish settlement along the Delaware River on the Mid-Atlantic coast of North America. ... Official language(s) None Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Area  Ranked 49th  - Total 2,491 sq mi (6,452 km²)  - Width 30 miles (48 km)  - Length 100 miles (161 km)  - % water 21. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... The Carolinas is a collective term used in the United States to refer to the states of North and South Carolina together. ... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 states. ...

Presenting the Declaration of Independence to the Continental Congress
Presenting the Declaration of Independence to the Continental Congress

Tensions between American colonials and the British during the revolutionary period of the 1760s and 1770s led to open military conflict in 1775. George Washington commanded the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) as the Second Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence on 4 July 1776. The Second Continental Congress had been formed to confront British actions, and did create the Continental Army, but did not have the authority to levy taxes or make federal laws. In 1777, the Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation, uniting the states under a weak federal government, which operated from 1781 until 1788, when enough states had ratified the United States Constitution. The Constitution, which strengthened the union and the federal government, has since remained the supreme law of the land.[10] Image File history File links Declaration_independence. ... Image File history File links Declaration_independence. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies in North America declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... The American Revolution was a political movement that ended British control of the south-eastern coastal area of North America, resulting in the formation of the United States of America in 1776 and sparking the American Revolutionary War. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) commanded Americas war for independence (1775–1783), and was the first President of the United States, from 1789 to 1797. ... The Second Continental Congress was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of several British North American colonies which met from May 10, 1775 to March 1, 1781. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... A tax (also known as a duty) is a financial charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (e. ... The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document of the United States of America. ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...

National Atlas map depicting dates of select territorial acquisitions. Full Oregon and other claims are not included.
National Atlas map depicting dates of select territorial acquisitions. Full Oregon and other claims are not included.

From 1803 to 1848, the size of the new nation nearly tripled as settlers (many embracing the concept of Manifest Destiny as an inevitable consequence of American exceptionalism) pushed beyond national boundaries even before the Louisiana Purchase.[11] The expansion was tempered somewhat by the stalemate in the War of 1812, but was subsequently reinvigorated by victory in the Mexican–American War in 1848. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x1038, 1136 KB)United States Territorial Acquisitions // Summary Main article: United States territorial acquisitions This image depicts the United States historic acquisitions of territories, such as the Thirteen Colonies, the Louisiana Purchase, British and Spanish Cession, and so on. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x1038, 1136 KB)United States Territorial Acquisitions // Summary Main article: United States territorial acquisitions This image depicts the United States historic acquisitions of territories, such as the Thirteen Colonies, the Louisiana Purchase, British and Spanish Cession, and so on. ... This painting (circa 1872) by John Gast called American Progress is an allegorical representation of Manifest Destiny. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... From Frank Bond, Louisiana and the Louisiana Purchase. ... Combatants United States Native Americans United Kingdom Canadian colonial forces Native Americans Native Canadians Commanders James Madison Winfield Scott George Prevost Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Commissioned vessels: 22 •Indigenous peoples: ? •British & Provincial... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia Strength 7,000 - 43,000 18,000 - 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded (Mexican government...

The Battle of Gettysburg, a major turning point of the American Civil War. The victory of the Union kept the country united.

As new territories were being incorporated, the nation was divided over the issue of states' rights, the role of the federal government, and, by the 1820s, the expansion of slavery, which had been legal in all thirteen of the colonies but was rarer in the north, where it was abolished by 1804. The Northern states were opposed to the expansion of slavery whereas the Southern states saw the opposition as an attack on their way of life, since their economy was dependent on slave labor. The failure to permanently resolve these issues led to the Civil War, following the secession of many slave states in the South to form the Confederate States of America after the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln.[12] The 1865 Union victory in the Civil War effectively ended slavery and settled the question of whether a state had the right to secede. The event was a major turning point in American history, with an increase in federal power.[13] Download high resolution version (900x569, 409 KB)The battle of Gettysburg, Pa. ... Download high resolution version (900x569, 409 KB)The battle of Gettysburg, Pa. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 83,289 75,054 Casualties 23,049 (3,155 killed, 14,529 wounded, 5,365 captured/missing) 28,000 (3,500 killed, 18,000 wounded, 6,500 captured/missing) The Battle of... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert Edward Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties Killed in action: 110,000 Total dead: 360,000 Wounded: 275,200 Killed in action: 93,000 Total dead: 258... States rights refers to the idea that U.S. states possess certain rights and political powers in the politics of the United States and constitutional law. ... Slave sale in Easton, Maryland The history of slavery in the United States began soon after Europeans first settled in what in 1776 became the United States. ... Map of the division of the states during the Civil War. ... Southern United States The states shown in dark red are usually included in the South, while all or portions of the striped states may or may not be considered part of the Southern United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert Edward Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties Killed in action: 110,000 Total dead: 360,000 Wounded: 275,200 Killed in action: 93,000 Total dead: 258... A slave state is a U.S. State that had legal slavery (overwhelmingly the enslavement of African-Americans, although historically also the enslavement of Native Americans, and Whites through indentured servitude) in the period leading up to the American Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (April 3–April 10, 1865) Largest city New Orleans... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Map of the division of the states during the Civil War. ...


After the Civil War, an unprecedented influx of immigrants, who helped to provide labor for American industry and create diverse communities in undeveloped areas, together with high tariff protections, national infrastructure building, and national banking regulations, hastened the country's rise to international power. The growing power of the United States enabled it to acquire new territories, including the annexation of Puerto Rico after victory in the Spanish–American War[14], which marked the debut of the United States as a major world power. The Statue of Liberty was a common sight to many immigrants who entered the United States through Ellis Island Immigration to the United States of America is the act of immigrating, or moving, to territory within the United States culture and government. ... A typical archetype, the cowboy, in the Wild West. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba First Philippine Republic Spain Commanders William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Casualties 379 U.S. dead; considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties Unknown[1] The Spanish-American War took place in 1898 and... It has been suggested that Global Power be merged into this article or section. ...

Landing at Ellis Island, 1902. Immigration helped spur the American economy.
Landing at Ellis Island, 1902. Immigration helped spur the American economy.

At the start of the First World War, in 1914, the United States remained neutral. In 1917, however, the United States joined the Allied Powers, helping to turn the tide against the Central Powers. For historical reasons, American sympathies were very much in favor of the British and French, even though a sizable number of citizens, mostly Irish and German, were opposed to intervention.[15] After the war, the Senate did not ratify the Treaty of Versailles, because of a fear that it would pull the United States into European affairs. Instead, the country pursued a policy of unilateralism that bordered at times on isolationism.[16] Image File history File links Ellis_island_1902. ... Image File history File links Ellis_island_1902. ... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main immigration port for immigrants entering the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... European military alliances in 1915. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Triple Alliance. ... The Treaty of Versailles (1919) was the peace treaty which officially ended World War I between the Allied and Associated Powers and Germany. ... Unilateralism, (one+side-ism) is any doctrine or agenda that supports one-sided action. ... Isolationism is a foreign policy which combines a non-interventionist military and political policy with a policy of economic nationalism (protectionism). ...

An abandoned farm in South Dakota during the Great Depression, 1936.
An abandoned farm in South Dakota during the Great Depression, 1936.

During most of the 1920s, the United States enjoyed a period of unbalanced prosperity as farm prices fell and industrial profits grew. A rise in debt and an inflated stock market culminated in a crash in 1929, triggering the Great Depression. After his election as President in 1932, Franklin Delano Roosevelt instituted his plan for a New Deal, which increased government intervention in the economy in response to the Great Depression. Image File history File links Location: Dallas, South Dakota Date: May 13, 1936 Buried machinery in barn lot. ... Image File history File links Location: Dallas, South Dakota Date: May 13, 1936 Buried machinery in barn lot. ... The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. ... A scene typical of the Follies of Florenz Ziegfeld, the most popular Broadway impresario of the decade. ... The New York Stock Exchange A stock market is a market for the trading of company stock, and derivatives of same; both of these are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. ... Black Monday (1987) on the Dow Jones Industrial Average A stock market crash is a sudden dramatic loss of value of shares of stock in corporations. ... The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn which started in 1929 (although its effects were not fully felt until late in 1930) and lasting through most of the 1930s. ... This article is becoming very long. ...


The nation did not fully recover until 1941, when the United States was driven to join the Allies against the Axis Powers after a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese. World War II was the costliest war in American history, but helped to pull the economy out of depression as the required production of military materiel provided much-needed jobs and women entered the workforce in large numbers for the first time.[17] The group of countries known as the Allies of World War II consisted of those nations opposed to the Axis Powers during the Second World War. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Combatants United States Empire of Japan Commanders Husband Kimmel (USN), Walter Short (USA) Chuichi Nagumo (IJN) Strength 8 battleships, 8 cruisers, 29 destroyers, 9 submarines, ~50 other ships, ~390 planes 6 aircraft carriers, 2 battleships, 3 cruisers, 9 destroyers, 8 tankers, 23 fleet submarines, 5 midget submarines, 441 planes Casualties... This article is becoming very long. ... Materiel (from the French for material) is the equipment and supplies in Military and commercial supply chain management. ...


After World War II, the United States and the Soviet Union became superpowers in an era of ideological rivalry dubbed the Cold War. The United States promoted liberal democracy and capitalism, while the Soviet Union communism and a centrally planned economy. The result was a series of proxy wars, including the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the tense nuclear showdown of the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Soviet war in Afghanistan. The Cold War (Russian: Холодная Война Kholodnaya Voina) was the protracted geopolitical, ideological, and economic struggle that emerged after World War II between capitalism and communism, centering around the global superpowers of the United States and the Soviet Union, and their military alliance partners. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... A planned economy most often refers to an economic system that is under comprehensive control and regulation by a government in accordance with a plan of economic development. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Western Allied/UN combatants: Republic of Korea United States Britain Communist combatants: Democratic People’s Republic of Korea People’s Republic of China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Jeong Il-Gwon Douglas MacArthur Mark W. Clark Matthew Ridgway Kim Il-sung, Choi Yong-kun Peng Dehuai Strength Note: All... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines Democratic Republic of Vietnam National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength ~1,200,000 (1968) ~520,000 (1968) Casualties South Vietnamese dead... Drink a niggas bucket of cum. ... Combatants Soviet Union Democratic Republic of Afghanistan Mujahideen Rebels supported by nations such as: United States, Iran, Pakistan, China Saudi Arabia Commanders Boris Gromov Pavel Grachev Valentin Varennikov Gulbuddin Hekmatyar Sibghatullah Mojadeddi Ahmed Shah Massoud Abdul Ali Mazari Osama bin Laden Indirect roles Ronald Reagan Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq Rahimuddin...

U.S. astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the moon during the first manned landing, 1969.
U.S. astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the moon during the first manned landing, 1969.

The perception that the United States was losing the space race spurred government efforts to raise proficiency in mathematics and science in schools[18] and led to President Kennedy's call for the United States to land "a man on the moon" by the end of the 1960s, which was realized in 1969.[19] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2700x2700, 1177 KB) Buzz Aldrin with U.S. flag on the moon. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2700x2700, 1177 KB) Buzz Aldrin with U.S. flag on the moon. ... Template:Redirect Template:Redirect U.S. Space Shuttle astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit (MMU) outside the Challenger in 1984. ... Colonel Buzz Eugene Aldrin, Sc. ... For other uses, see Space Race (disambiguation). ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Bulk composition of the moons mantle and crust estimated, weight percent Oxygen 42. ...


Meanwhile, American society experienced a period of sustained economic expansion. At the same time, discrimination across the United States, especially in the South, was increasingly challenged by a growing civil-rights movement headed by prominent African Americans such as Martin Luther King, Jr., which led to the abolition of the Jim Crow laws in the South.[20] The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... Jim Crow laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and in force between 1876 and 1964 that required racial segregation, especially of African-Americans, in all public facilities. ...


After the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States continued to intervene militarily overseas, for example in the Gulf War. // The rise of Gorbachev Although reform in the Soviet Union stalled between 1969 and 1982, a generational shift gave new momentum for reform. ... Combatants UN Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf Saddam Hussein Strength 660,000 545,000 Casualties 345 dead, 1,000 wounded 25,000 dead, 100,000 - 300,000 wounded The Gulf War (1990–1991) (also called the Persian Gulf War or Operation Desert Storm) was a conflict between Iraq...


Following the September 11, 2001, attacks, U.S. foreign policy focused on the threat of terrorist attacks. In response, the government under George W. Bush began a series of military and legal operations termed the War on Terror, beginning with the overthrow of Afghanistan's Taliban government in October 2001. Soon after, the United States launched the controversial 2003 invasion of Iraq, with support from 30 governments, which George W. Bush referred to as the 'Coalition of the Willing'. Although the Bush administration justified its invasion with a charge that Iraq had stockpiled weapons of mass destruction, no such stockpile was found, and the Bush administration later admitted having acted on flawed intelligence. The towers burn shortly after United Airlines Flight 175 crashed into the South Tower on the right. ... This article is becoming very long. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... The war on terrorism or war on terror (abbreviated in U.S. policy circles as GWOT for Global War on Terror) is an effort by the governments of the United States and its principal allies to destroy groups deemed to be terrorist (primarily radical Islamist organizations such as al-Qaeda... Flag flown by the Taliban. ... Combatants Coalition Forces: United States United Kingdom South Korea Italy Poland Romania Australia Denmark others. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with multinational force in Iraq. ...


Government and politics

Main articles on politics and government of the United States can be found at the Politics and government of the United States series.
The United States Capitol
The United States Capitol

The United States is the longest-surviving extant constitutional republic, with the oldest wholly written constitution in the world. Its government operates as a representative democracy through a congressional system under a set of powers specified by its Constitution. There are three levels of government: federal, state, and local. Officials at all three levels are either elected by voters in a secret ballot or appointed by other elected officials. Executive and legislative offices are decided by a plurality vote of citizens in their respective districts, with judicial and cabinet-level offices nominated by the Executive and approved by the Legislature. In some states, judicial posts are filled by popular election rather than executive appointment. Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a federal presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of the United States is both head of state and head of government, and of a two-party legislative and electoral system. ... Image File history File linksMetadata USCapitol. ... Image File history File linksMetadata USCapitol. ... A constitutional republic is a state where representatives of the people are elected who govern according to existing constitutional law that limits the governments power over citizens. ... Representative democracy is a form of democracy founded on the exercise of popular sovereignty by the peoples representatives. ... A presidential system, or a congressional system, is a system of government of a republic where the executive branch is elected separately from the legislative. ... The Polling by William Hogarth (1755); Before the secret ballot was introduced voter intimidation was commonplace Wikisource has original text related to this article: A History of the Australian Ballot System in the United States The secret ballot is a voting method in which a voters choices are confidential. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Plurality. ...


The federal government comprises three branches, which are designed to check and balance one another's powers: This law-related article does not cite its references or sources. ... The doctrine and practice of dispersing political power and creating mutual accountability between political entities such as the courts, the president or prime minister, the legislature, and the citizens. ...

The United States Congress is a bicameral legislature. The House of Representatives has 435 members, each representing a congressional district for a two-year term. House seats are apportioned among the states according to population every tenth year. Each state is guaranteed at least one representative: currently, seven states have one each; California, the most populous state, has 53. Each state has exactly two senators, elected at large to six-year terms; one third of the 100 senators are elected every second year. A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... In law, the judiciary or judicature is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, and provide a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the judicial branch of the United States federal government. ... The bicameral legislature of the United States is housed in a capitol building with two wings. ... House of Representatives is a name used for legislative bodies in many countries. ... U.S. Congressional districts are determined after each census. ... US Congressional apportionment for states in 2000 The membership of the United States House of Representatives changes each decade following the decennial United States Census. ... A state of the United States (a U.S. state) is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, along with the District of Columbia, form the United States of America. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Bloc voting (or block voting) refers to a class of voting systems which can be used to elect several representatives from a single multimember constituency. ...


Under the country's federal system, the relationship between the state and national governments is complex; under U.S. law, states are considered sovereign entities. However, the American Civil War and Texas v. White established that states do not have the right to secede, and, under the Constitution, they are not allowed to conduct foreign policy. Federal law overrides state law in the areas in which the federal government is empowered to act; but the powers of the federal government are subject to limits outlined in the Constitution. All powers not granted to the federal government in the Constitution are left to the states or the people themselves. However, the "Necessary and Proper" and "Commerce" clauses of the Constitution legally allow the extension of federal powers into other affairs, though this is the topic of considerable debate over states' rights. Federalism can refer to either: The form of government, or constitutional structure, found in a federation. ... The law of the United States was originally largely derived from the common law of the system of English law, which was in force at the time of the Revolutionary War. ... Texas v. ... A foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how a particular country will interact with the other countries of the world. ... Federal law is the body of law created by the federal government of a nation. ... State law, in the United States, is the law of each separate U.S. state, as passed by the state legislature and signed into law by the state governor. ... The necessary and proper clause (also known as the elastic clause) refers to a provision (section eight, clause 18) in Article One of the United States Constitution granting Congress the power to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. ... States rights refers to the idea that U.S. states possess certain rights and political powers in the politics of the United States and constitutional law. ...


The Constitution contains a dedication to "preserve liberty" with a "Bill of Rights" and other amendments, which guarantee freedom of speech, religion, and the press; the right to a fair trial; the right to keep and bear arms; universal suffrage; and property rights. However, the extent to which these rights are protected and universal in practice is heavily debated. The Constitution also guarantees to every State "a Republican Form of Government". However, the meaning of that guarantee has been only slightly explicated.[21] The Statue of Liberty is a very popular icon of liberty. ... Image of the United States Bill of Rights from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... A public anti-war demonstration in Liverpool, England Freedom of speech is the concept of being able to speak freely without censorship. ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... The Right to a fair trial is an essential right in all countries respecting the rule of law. ... Amendment II (the Second Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, declares the necessity for a well regulated militia, and prohibits infringement of the right of the people to keep and bear arms. // Text The Second Amendment, as passed by the House and... Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of suffrage to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, or social status. ... // Use of the term In common usage, property means ones own thing and refers to the relationship between individuals and the objects which they see as being their own to dispense with as they see fit. ...


There are two major political parties: the Republican Party and the Democratic Party. The Republicans are generally socially conservative and economically classical-liberals with some right-leaning centrists. The Democrats are generally socially liberal and economically progressive with some left-leaning centrists. Growing numbers of Americans identify with neither party—with some claiming the title Independent and others joining emerging parties, including the Green, Libertarian, and Reform parties. Except for a Democratic plurality in the Senate in 2001–2002[22], the Republican Party has held the majority in both houses of Congress since the 1994 elections; since 2001, the president has been George W. Bush, a Republican. This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Social conservatism is a belief in traditional or natural law-based morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. ... Classical liberalism (also called laissez-faire liberalism[1]) is a term used to describe the following: the philosophy developed by early liberals from the Age of Enlightenment until John Stuart Mill and revived in the 20th century by Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics – as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues – and... The U.S. House election, 1994 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1994 which occurred in the middle of President Bill Clintons first term. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ...


Foreign relations and military

President of the United States, George W. Bush (right) at Camp David in March 2003, hosting the British Prime Minister Tony Blair of the United Kingdom.
President of the United States, George W. Bush (right) at Camp David in March 2003, hosting the British Prime Minister Tony Blair of the United Kingdom.

The United States has vast economic, political, and military influence on a global scale, which makes its foreign policy a subject of great interest and discussion around the world. Almost all countries have embassies in Washington, D.C., and consulates around the country. However, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, and Sudan do not have formal diplomatic relations with the United States.[23] The United States is a founding member of the United Nations (with a permanent seat on the Security Council), among many other international organizations. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The military of the United States, officially known as the United States Armed Forces, consist of the: United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Navy United States Air Force United States Coast Guard All the services are under the command of the President of the United States. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... Main Lodge at Camp David during Nixon administration, February 9, 1971. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament for the constituency of Sedgefield in North East England. ... It has been suggested that United States, Chanceries of Foreign Governments be merged into this article or section. ... The title Consul has been used for official representatives of a state, outside its (metropolitan) territory, looking after its interests (a task normally largely transferred to the formal diplomacy) and, especially, those of its subjects, individuals as well as enterprises. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The United Nations Security Council (UNSC) is the organ of the United Nations charged with maintaining peace and security among nations. ... For the political science journal, see: International Organization An international organization (also called intergovernmental organization) is an organization of international scope or character. ...


In 1949, in an effort to contain communism during the Cold War, the United States, Canada, and ten Western European nations formed the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, a mutual-defense alliance in which they have since been joined by 14 other European states—including Turkey, which straddles the Eurasian border, and some former Soviet states. In an example of realpolitik, the United States also established diplomatic relations with Communist countries that were antagonistic to the Soviet Union, like the People's Republic of China during the Sino-Soviet split. Recently, the foreign policy of the United States has focused on combating terrorism as well as the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Calls by a majority of American citizens continue for increased border security against illegal immigration and the shipment of illegal narcotics, with their primary goal the protection of American interests and the safety of U.S. citizens around the world, against such threats as terrorist infiltration at the border with Mexico.[24] NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation[1] (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for collective security established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on 4 April 1949. ... Realpolitik (German: real (realistic, practical or actual) and Politik (politics)) is a term used to describe politics based on strictly practical rather than idealistic notions, and practiced without any sentimental illusions. ... The Sino-Soviet split was a major diplomatic conflict between the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), beginning in the late 1950s, reaching a peak in 1969 and continuing in various ways until the late 1980s. ... A weapon of mass destruction or (WMD) is a term used to describe munitions with the capacity to indiscriminately kill large numbers of human beings. ... Illegal immigration refers to a immigration of people across national borders —in violation of the immigration laws of the country of destination. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events...

Supercarriers like the USS Nimitz are a major component of the U.S. system of force projection.
Supercarriers like the USS Nimitz are a major component of the U.S. system of force projection.

The United States has a long-standing tradition of civilian control over military affairs. The Department of Defense administers the U.S. armed forces, which comprise the Army, the Navy, the Marine Corps, and the Air Force. The Coast Guard falls under the jurisdiction of the Department of Homeland Security in peacetime but is placed under the Department of the Navy in times of war. Image File history File links PD Navy photo of USS Nimitz (CVN-68) at sea near the Persian Gulf 12 Oct 1997, cropped from http://www. ... Image File history File links PD Navy photo of USS Nimitz (CVN-68) at sea near the Persian Gulf 12 Oct 1997, cropped from http://www. ... USS , a typical supercarrier, and HMS Illustrious, a light V/STOL aircraft carrier on a joint patrol. ... USS Nimitz (CVN-68) is a supercarrier in the United States Navy, the lead ship of its class. ... In military and diplomatic calculations, projection of force is the capacity, either implied, or demonstrated in practice, to exert control over distant theatres through military action. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... The armed forces of a state are its government sponsored defense and fighting forces and organizations. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The United States Navy (also known as USN or the U.S. Navy) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... This article is becoming very long. ... The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerospace branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... Coast Guard Seal The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a military branch of the United States involved in maritime law, mariner assistance, and search and rescue, among other duties of coast guards elsewhere. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Peace and tranquility — Lake Mapourika, New Zealand. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy. ... The United States detonated an atomic bomb over Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. ...


The military of the United States comprises 1.4 million personnel on active duty[25], along with several hundred thousand each in the Reserves and the National Guard. Service in the military is voluntary, though conscription may occur in times of war through the Selective Service System. The United States is considered to have the most powerful military in the world, in part due to the size of its defense budget; American defense expenditures in 2005 were estimated to be greater than the next 14 largest national military budgets combined,[26] even though the U.S. military budget is only about 4% of the country's gross domestic product.[27][28] The U.S. military maintains over 700 bases and facilities on every continent except Antarctica.[29] Human Resources has at least two meanings depending on context. ... ActiveDuty. ... The Reserve Components of the Armed Forces of the United States are military organizations with members who generally perform a minimum of 39 days of military duty per year and who augment the active duty (or full time) military when necessary. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... The Selective Service System is the means by which the United States administers military conscription. ... The US military budget is that portion of the United States discretionary federal budget that is allocated for the funding of the Department of Defense. ... IMF 2005 figures of GDP of nominal compared to PPP. A regions gross domestic product, or GDP, is one of the several measures of the size of its economy. ... The Military of the United States is deployed in many countries across the world, making it one of the most global militaries since the Roman Empire. ...


The American military is committed to having a technological edge over its potential enemies and has an extensive research program to maintain such an edge. Defense-related research over the years yielded such major breakthroughs as space exploration, computers, the Internet, hypertext, nuclear energy, the Global Positioning System, stealth aircraft, "smart" weapons, better bullet-proof vests, microwaves, and more recently ground-based lasers intended to target and destroy inbound cruise missiles. These force multipliers have traditionally borne more materiel expense than personnel expenses. Military technology maintains a close relationship with the civilian economy and has contributed to general technological and economic development of the United States, and often, via technology transfer, other countries as well. Conversely, the military has also benefited from the American civilian infrastructure. A Lego RCX Computer is an example of an embedded computer used to control mechanical devices. ... In computing, hypertext is a user interface paradigm for displaying documents which, according to an early definition (Nelson 1970), branch or perform on request. ... Over fifty GPS satellites such as this NAVSTAR have been launched since 1978. ... F-117 Stealth Fighter Stealth technology covers a range of techniques used with aircraft, ships and missiles, in order to make them less visible (ideally invisible) to radar and other detection methods. ... BOLT-117 laser guided bomb Precision-guided munitions (smart munitions or smart bombs) are self-guiding weapons intended to maximize damage to the target while minimizing collateral damage. Because the damage effects of an explosive weapon scale as a power law with distance, quite modest improvements in accuracy (and hence... Bullet resistant vest A bullet-resistant vest (body armor) - is an article of protective clothing that works as a form of armour to minimize injury from projectiles fired from handguns, shotguns and rifles . ... Microwave oven A microwave oven, or microwave, is a kitchen appliance employing microwave radiation primarily to cook or heat food. ... Materiel (from the French for material) is the equipment and supplies in Military and commercial supply chain management. ...


Administrative divisions

Map of United States, showing state names.
Map of United States, showing state names.[30]

The conterminous, or contiguous, forty-eight states—all the states but Alaska and Hawaii—are also called the continental United States. Some include Alaska in the "continental" states, because, although it is separated from the "lower forty-eight" by Canada, it is part of the North American mainland. All of these terms commonly include the District of Columbia. Hawaii, the fiftieth state, occupies an archipelago in the Pacific Ocean. The political units and divisions of the United States include: the fifty states, which units are typically divided into counties and townships, and incorporate cities, villages, towns, and other types of municipalities, and other autonomous or subordinate public authorities and institutions; and the federal state, which unit is the United... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_with_state_names. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_with_state_names. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Depending on usage, the term continental United States can refer to either: the 48 contiguous states plus the District of Columbia; or the 48 contiguous states plus the District of Columbia and Alaska. ... ... An archipelago is a landform which consists of a chain or cluster of islands. ...


The United States also holds several other territories, districts, and possessions, notably the federal district of the District of Columbia—which contains the nation's capital city, Washington—and several overseas insular areas, the most significant of which are American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the United States Virgin Islands. Palmyra Atoll is the United States' only incorporated territory; but it is unorganized and uninhabited. The United States Minor Outlying Islands consist of uninhabited islands and atolls in the Pacific and Caribbean Sea. In addition, since 1898, the United States Navy has leased an extensive naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Federal districts are subdivisions of a federal system of government. ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... An incorporated territory of the United States is a specific area under the jurisdiction of the United States, over which the United States Congress has determined that the United States Constitution is to be applied to the territorys inhabitants in its entirety (e. ... The term unorganized territories has several connotations depending the exact usage and context. ... The United States Minor Outlying Islands, defined by ISO 3166-1, consists of the following list of islands: Baker Island Howland Island Jarvis Island Johnston Atoll Kingman Reef Midway Atoll Navassa Island Palmyra Atoll Wake Island All of these islands are in the Pacific Ocean except Navassa Island, which is... An atoll is a type of low, coral island found in tropical oceans and consisting of a coral-algal reef surrounding a central depression. ... // Ecology A view of the Caribbean Sea from the Dominican Republic coast The Caribbean is home to about 9% of the worlds coral reefs covering about 20,000 square miles, most of which are located off the Caribbean Islands and the Central American coast. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated. ...


Former U.S. possessions include the Panama Canal Zone, which was a U.S. territory from 1903 until 1979. Additionally, the Philippine Islands were American territory from 1898 until 1935, when the United States established the Commonwealth of the Philippines as a transition between territorial status and full Philippine independence, which occurred in 1946. Because it was part of the United States at the time of World War II, the Philippines is the only independent nation with a memorial pillar at the National World War II Memorial in Washington, DC. The Panama Canal Zone (Spanish: ), was a 553 square mile (1,432 km²) territory inside of Panama, consisting of the Panama Canal and an area generally extending 5 miles (8. ... The Philippine islands is a commonly mistaken description for the Philippines. ... An incorporated territory of the United States is a specific area under the jurisdiction of the United States, over which the United States Congress has determined that the United States Constitution is to be applied to the territorys inhabitants in its entirety (e. ... The Commonwealth of the Philippines was the political designation of the Philippines from 1935 to 1946 when the country was a commonwealth of the United States. ... An insular area is United States territory that is neither a part of one of the fifty states nor a part of the District of Columbia, the nations federal district. ... This article is becoming very long. ... The National World War II Memorial is a national memorial to Americans who served and died in World War II. It is located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on the former site of the Rainbow Pool at the eastern end of the Reflecting Pool, between the Lincoln...


In addition to the actual states and territories of the United States, there are also nations which are associated states of the U.S. The Federated States of Micronesia (since 1986), Palau (since 1994), and the Marshall Islands (since 1986) are associated with the United States under what is known as the Compact of Free Association, giving the states international sovereignty and ultimate control over their territory. However, the governments of those areas have agreed to allow the United States to provide defense and financial assistance. The U.S. also treats these nations uniquely by giving them access to many U.S. domestic programs, including disaster response and recovery and hazard mitigation programs under FEMA. The freely associated states are all dependent on U.S. financial assistance to meet both government operational and capital needs. The Office of Insular Affairs administers this financial assistance. The freely associated states also actively participate in all Office of Insular Affairs technical assistance activities. Together with the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, each of these associated states were once part of the U.S.-administered UN Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, which existed from 1947 until 1986 in the case of the Marshall Islands, the Northern Marianas, and the Federated States of Micronesia; Palau's trusteeship ended in 1994. An associated state is used to describe a free relationship between a territory and a larger nation. ... The Compact of Free Association (COFA) defines the relationship that three sovereign states—the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) and the Republic of Palau—have entered into as Associated States with the United States. ... New FEMA seal The Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, is an agency of the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) within the Emergency Preparedness and Response Directorate. ... United Nations Trust Territories were the successors of the League of Nations mandates and came into being when the League of Nations ceased to exist in 1946. ... National motto: ? Official language English? Capital Saipan Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 78 (United States) 1,779 km² Negligible Population  - Total  - Density 132,929 (1980) N/Akm² GDP  - Total  - GDP/head N/A Currency US Dollar Time zone UTC: ? Independence UN trusteeship administered by the US Internet TLD none? Calling code...


Ecology

Geography and climate

A satellite composite image of the contiguous U.S. Deciduous vegetation and grasslands prevail in the east, transitioning to prairies, boreal forests, and the Rocky Mountains in the west, and deserts in the southwest. In the northeast, the coasts of the Great Lakes and Atlantic seaboard host much of the country's population.
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A satellite composite image of the contiguous U.S. Deciduous vegetation and grasslands prevail in the east, transitioning to prairies, boreal forests, and the Rocky Mountains in the west, and deserts in the southwest. In the northeast, the coasts of the Great Lakes and Atlantic seaboard host much of the country's population.
Mount Hood, a dormant volcano in the Pacific Northwest.
Mount Hood, a dormant volcano in the Pacific Northwest.

The United States is the world's third largest country by land area, after Russia and Canada.[31]. It is bounded by the North Atlantic Ocean to the east, the North Pacific Ocean to the west, Mexico and the Gulf of Mexico to the south, and Canada to the north. Alaska also borders Canada, with the Pacific Ocean to its south and the Arctic Ocean to its north. The state of Hawaii occupies an archipelago in the Pacific Ocean, southwest of the North American mainland. Forty-nine states in the United States (all except Hawaii) lie on the North American continent; 48 of these (all except Alaska and Hawaii) are contiguous and form the continental United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1680x1050, 694 KB) Summary USA, satellite image composite Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1680x1050, 694 KB) Summary USA, satellite image composite Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Depending on usage, the term continental United States can refer to either: the 48 contiguous states plus the District of Columbia; or the 48 contiguous states plus the District of Columbia and Alaska. ... Deciduous means temporary or tending to fall off (deriving from the Latin word decidere, to fall off). ... An Inner Mongolian Grassland. ... A prairie is an area of land of low topographic relief that principally supports grasses and herbs, with few trees, and is generally of a mesic (moderate or temperate) climate. ... Boreal may refer to these: Northern from the eponymous Boreas, god of the North Wind in Greek mythology. ... Moraine Lake, and the Valley of the Ten Peaks, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada View of the Rocky Mountains as depicted on the Colorado state quarter The Rocky Mountains, often called the Rockies, are a broad mountain range in western North America. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... Categories: US geography stubs ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1626, 2365 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Clackamas County, Oregon Mount Hood Wikipedia:Featured pictures visible Gallery of mountains User:Wahkeenah United States User talk:Howcheng Wikipedia:Featured pictures candidates/April-2006 Wikipedia:Wikipedia... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1626, 2365 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Clackamas County, Oregon Mount Hood Wikipedia:Featured pictures visible Gallery of mountains User:Wahkeenah United States User talk:Howcheng Wikipedia:Featured pictures candidates/April-2006 Wikipedia:Wikipedia... Mount Hood is an active stratovolcano in northern Oregon, in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. ... Darker red states are always considered part of the Pacific Northwest. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... An archipelago is a landform which consists of a chain or cluster of islands. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ...


The U.S. has an extremely varied geography, particularly in the West. The eastern seaboard has a coastal plain which is widest in the south and narrows in the north. The coastal plain does not exist north of New Jersey, although there are glacial outwash plains on Long Island, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket. In the extreme southeast Florida is home to the ecologically unique Everglades. Beyond the coastal plain, the rolling hills of the piedmont region end at the Appalachian Mountains which rise above 6,000 feet (1,830 m) in North Carolina and New Hampshire. From the west slope of the Appalachians, the Interior Plains of the Midwest are relatively flat and are the location of the Great Lakes as well as the Mississippi-Missouri River, the world's fourth-longest river system.[32] West of the Mississippi River, the Interior Plains slope uphill and blend into the vast and often featureless Great Plains. The abrupt rise of the Rocky Mountains, at the western edge of the Great Plains, extends north to south across the continental U.S., reaching altitudes over 14,000 feet (4,270 m) in Colorado.[33] In the past, the Rocky Mountains had a higher level of volcanic activity; nowadays, the range only has one area of volcanism (the supervolcano underlying Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, possibly the world's largest volcano), although rift volcanism has occurred relatively recently near the Rockies' southern margin in New Mexico.[34] Dozens of high mountain ranges, salt flats such as the Bonneville Salt Flats, and valleys are found in the Great Basin region located west of the Rockies and east of the Sierra Nevada, which also has deep chasms, including the Snake River. At the southwestern end of the Great Basin, Death Valley lies 282 feet (86 m) below sea level, the second lowest dry land on Earth. It is the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere and is situated near the Mojave Desert. North of the Great Basin and east of the Cascades in the Northwest is the Columbia River Plateau, a large igneous province shaped by one of the largest flood basalts ever to appear on Earth. It is marked by dark black rocks. Surrounding the Four Corners region lies the Colorado Plateau, named after the Colorado River, which flows through it. The Plateau is generally high in elevation, has highly eroded sandstone, and is a blood red in some locations with many national parks, such as Arches, Bryce Canyon, Grand Canyon, and Zion. West of the Great Basin, the Sierra Nevada mountain range has Mount Whitney, the highest peak in the coterminous U.S. Along the Pacific coast, the Coast Ranges and the volcanic Cascade Range extend from north to south across the country. The northwestern Pacific coast shares the world's largest temperate rain forest with Canada. Alaska has numerous mountain ranges, including Mount McKinley (Denali), the highest peak in North America. Numerous volcanoes can be found throughout the Alexander and Aleutian Islands extending south and west of the Alaskan mainland. The Hawaiian islands are tropical, volcanic islands extending over 1,500 miles (2,400 km), and consisting of six larger islands and another dozen smaller ones that are inhabited. In geography, a coastal plain is an area of flat, low-lying land adjacent to a seacoast and separated from the interior by other features. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Mercator projection of Long Island Long Island is an island in New York, USA. It has an area of 1,377 square miles (3567 km²) and a population of 7. ... Map of Marthas Vineyard. ... Nantucket is an island south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, formed of glacial moraine. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An Anhinga perched on the boardwalk railing Everglades is also the name of a city in Collier County, Florida. ... The James River winds its way among piedmont hills in central Virginia. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of North American mountains, partly in Canada, but mostly in the United States, forming a zone, from 100 to 300 miles wide, running from Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, 1... A foot (plural: feet) is any of several old units of distance or length, measuring around a quarter to a third of a meter. ... The metre, or meter (US), is a measure of length. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 560 miles (901 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 9. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Interior Plains is a vast region that spreads across the legs (craton) of North America. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest river in the United States; the longest is the Missouri River, which flows into the Mississippi. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Great Plains is the broad expanse of prairie which lies east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States and Canada. ... Moraine Lake, and the Valley of the Ten Peaks, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada View of the Rocky Mountains as depicted on the Colorado state quarter The Rocky Mountains, often called the Rockies, are a broad mountain range in western North America. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... A supervolcano refers to a volcano that produces the largest and most voluminous kinds of eruption on Earth. ... Yellowstone National Park is a U.S. National Park located in the states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... In geology, a rift is a place where the Earths lithosphere is expanding. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Bonneville Salt Flats The Bonneville Salt Flats are a 121 km² (47 mi²) salt flat in northwestern Utah. ... Drainage map showing the Great Basin in orange Various Definitions of the Great Basin (NPS) The Great Basin is a large, arid region of the western United States. ... This article is about the Snake River in the northwestern United States. ... Death Valley and Panamint Range For other uses, see Death Valley (disambiguation). ... The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ... Looking across from Emigrant Pass towards the Kingston Range in the eastern Mojave. ... The Washington towns of Spokane, Vantage, Yakima and Pasco, and the Oregon town of Pendleton, lie on the Columbia River Plateau. ... A flood basalt is a giant volcanic eruption that coats large stretches of land with basalt lava. ... Hello i am from outer space we great you today. ... The Colorado Plateau, also called the Colorado Plateaus Province, is a physiographic region of the Intermontane Plateaus, roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States. ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River is a river in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, approximately 1,450 mi (2,330 km) long, draining a part of the... Arches National Park preserves over 2,000 natural sandstone arches, including the world-famous Delicate Arch, in addition to a variety of unique geological resources and formations. ... Bryce Canyon National Park is a national park located in southwestern Utah in the United States. ... The Grand Canyon is a very colorful, steep-sided gorge, carved by the Colorado River, in the U.S. state of Arizona. ... Zion National Park is a United States National Park located near Springdale, Utah in the Southwestern United States. ... The Sierra Nevada is a mountain range that is almost entirely in eastern California. ... Mount Whitney is the highest point in the contiguous United States. ... The Pacific Coast Ranges are the series of mountain ranges that stretch along west coast of North America from Alaska to Mexico. ... A smoke plume from Mount Ubinas, Peru, the most historically active volcano in that nation. ... Mount Adams in Washington The Cascade Range is a mountainous region famous for its chain of tall volcanoes called the High Cascades that run north-south along the west coast of North America from British Columbia through Washington and Oregon to the Shasta Cascade area of northern California. ... Temperate rain forests often grow right up to the shoreline. ... Denali redirects here. ... A MODIS photograph of the Alexander Archipelago The Alexander Archipelago is an archipelago, or group of islands, off the southeast coast of Alaska. ... Looking down the Aleutians from an airplane. ... Map of the Hawaiian Islands, a chain of islands that stretches 2,400 km in a northwesterly direction from the southern tip of the Island of Hawai‘i. ... A mile is the name of a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... km redirects here. ...

Wasatch Range, in Utah, part of the Rocky Mountains, next to the Great Salt Lake. Mark Twain described the two as America's Great Wall and Dead Sea.
Wasatch Range, in Utah, part of the Rocky Mountains, next to the Great Salt Lake. Mark Twain described the two as America's Great Wall and Dead Sea.

The U.S. also has the world's highest quality fluorescent minerals and the most number of minerals found in any one location, in an area called the Franklin Furnace. Rock hunters the world over come to hunt for minerals, walk through actual fluorescent mineral mines, and visit mineral museums in Franklin and Ogdensburg, NJ. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1981x427, 671 KB) Summary i took it Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Rocky Mountains Utah Wasatch Range ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1981x427, 671 KB) Summary i took it Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Rocky Mountains Utah Wasatch Range ... Wasatch Mountains from space. ... Official language(s) English Capital Salt Lake City Largest city Salt Lake City Area  Ranked 13th  - Total 84,876 sq mi (219,887 km²)  - Width 270 miles (435 km)  - Length 350 miles (565 km)  - % water 3. ... Great Salt Lake, located in the northern part of the U.S. State of Utah, is the fourth largest terminal lake in the world,[1] and the largest salt lake in the Western Hemisphere. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, novelist, writer, and lecturer. ... Great Wall can refer to several things: Great Wall of China Great Wall of Galaxies, part of the Coma Cluster This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Dead Sea (Hebrew: ; Arabic: ‎) is both the lowest point on Earth at 418 metres (1,371 ft) below sea level and falling[2], and the deepest hypersaline lake in the world at 330 m (1,083 ft) deep and 799 m (2,621 ft) below sea level. ... Franklin Furnace is a famous mineral location for rare zinc, iron, manganese minerals in old mines in Franklin, New Jersey USA. This locale produced more species of minerals (over 300) and more different fluorescent minerals than any other location. ...


The climate of the U.S. is as varied as its landscape. In northern Alaska, tundra and arctic conditions predominate, and the temperature has fallen as low as minus 80 °F (−62 °C).[35] On the other end of the spectrum, Death Valley, California once reached 134 °F (56.7 °C); the second-highest temperature ever recorded on Earth.[36] In physical geography, tundra is an area where the tree growth is hindered by low temperatures and short growing seasons. ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border The Arctic is the area around the Earths North Pole. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... A degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701-1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ... Death Valley National Park is a mostly arid National Park located east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range in Inyo County, California, USA with a small section extending into Nevada. ...


On average, the mountains of the western states receive the most snow and are among the snowiest places on Earth. The greatest annual snowfall level is at Mount Rainier, in Washington, at 692 inches (1,757.68 cm); the record there was 1,122 inches (2849.8 cm) in the winter of 1971–1972. Other places with significant snowfall outside the Cascade Range are the Wasatch Mountains, near the Great Salt Lake, and the Sierra Nevada, near Lake Tahoe. In the east, while snowfall does not approach western levels, the region near the Great Lakes and the mountains of the Northeast receive the most. Along the northwestern Pacific coast, rainfall is greater than anywhere else in the continental U.S., with Quinault Ranger in Washington having an average of 137.21 inches.[37] Hawaii receives even more, with 460 inches measured annually on Mount Waialeale, in Kauai. The Mojave Desert, in the southwest, is home to the driest locale in the U.S.—Yuma Valley, Arizona, with an average of 2.63 inches of precipitation each year.[38] Mount Rainier from space Mount Rainier is a stratovolcano in Pierce County, Washington, located 54 miles (87 km) southeast of Seattle, Washington, in the United States. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Mid-19th century tool for converting between different standards of the inch An inch is an Imperial and U.S. customary unit of length. ... Mount Adams in Washington The Cascade Range is a mountainous region famous for its chain of tall volcanoes called the High Cascades that run north-south along the west coast of North America from British Columbia through Washington and Oregon to the Shasta Cascade area of northern California. ... The Wasatch Range (also seen as Wasatch Mountains and Wahsatch Range) is a mountain range that stretches from southern Idaho and Wyoming south through central Utah in the Western United States. ... Tahoe redirects here. ... Mount Wai‘ale‘ale (Hawaiian for rippling waters), elevation 5,208 ft (1,578 m), is the second highest point on the island of Kaua‘i in the Hawaiian Islands. ... Kauai (usually called Kauai outside the Hawaiian Islands) is the oldest and fourth largest of the main Hawaiian Islands, having an area of 1,446 km² . Known also as the Garden Isle, Kauai lies 105 miles (170 kilometers) across the Kauai Channel, northwest of Oahu. ... Looking across from Emigrant Pass towards the Kingston Range in the eastern Mojave. ...


In central portions of the U.S., tornadoes are more common than anywhere else on Earth[39] and touch down most commonly in the spring and summer. Deadly and destructive hurricanes occur almost every year along the Atlantic seaboard and the Gulf of Mexico. The Appalachian region and the Midwest experience the worst floods, though virtually no area in the U.S. is immune to flooding. The Southwest has the worst droughts; one is thought to have lasted over 500 years and to have decimated the Anasazi people.[40] A tornado in central Oklahoma. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Ancient Pueblo People, or Ancestral Puebloans is the preferred term for the group of peoples often known as Anasazi who are the ancestors of the modern Pueblo peoples. ...


Flora and fauna

The Bald Eagle is on the Great Seal of the United States. Protection of this once endangered species has helped save it from extinction.
The Bald Eagle is on the Great Seal of the United States. Protection of this once endangered species has helped save it from extinction.

The U.S. has over 17,000 identified native plant and tree species, including 5,000 just in California (which is home to the tallest, the most massive, and the oldest trees in the world).[41] With habitats ranging from tropical to arctic, the flora of the U.S. is the most diverse of any country; yet, thousands of non-native exotic species sometimes adversely affect indigenous plant and animal communities. Over 400 species of mammal, 700 species of bird, 500 species of reptile and amphibian, and 90,000 species of insect have been documented.[42] Many plants and animals are very localized in their distribution, and some are in danger of extinction. The U.S. passed the Endangered Species Act in 1973, to protect native plant and animal species and their habitats. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (611x762, 47 KB) This image was copied from wikipedia:de. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (611x762, 47 KB) This image was copied from wikipedia:de. ... Binomial name Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Linnaeus, 1766) The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), also known as the American Eagle, is a bird of prey found in North America, most recognizable as the national bird of the United States. ... Obverse The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States government. ... Binomial name Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl. ... Binomial name Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl. ... Species Pinus aristata Pinus longaeva Pinus balfouriana The bristlecone pines are a small group of pine trees (Family Pinaceae, genus Pinus, subsection Balfourianae) that can reach an age far greater than that of any other living thing known - up to nearly 5,000 years. ... Sweet clover (Melilotus sp. ... The Endangered Species Act (, et seq. ...


Conservation has a long history in the U.S.; in 1872, the world's first National Park was established, at Yellowstone. Another 57 national parks and hundreds of other federally managed parks and forests have since been designated.[43] In some parts of the country, wilderness areas have been established to ensure long-term protection of pristine habitats. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service monitors endangered and threatened species and has set aside numerous areas for species- and habitat-preservation. Altogether, the U.S. government owns 1,020,779 square miles (2,643,807 km²) which is 28.8% of the total land area of the U.S.[44] The bulk of this land is protected park and forestland; but some is leased for oil and gas exploration, mining, and cattle ranching. Brecon Beacons National Park, Wales A national park is a reserve of land, usually owned by a national government, protected from most human development and pollution. ... Yellowstone National Park is a U.S. National Park located in the states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The USFWS logo The United States Fish and Wildlife Service is a unit of the United States Department of the Interior that is dedicated to managing and preserving wildlife. ... The endangered Sea Otter An endangered species is a population of organisms (usually a taxonomic species), which because it is either (a) few in number or (b) threatened by changing environmental or predation parameters, it is at risk of becoming extinct. ... Threatened species refers to animal and plant species under a serious, but perhaps not imminent, threat of extinction. ... Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario Petroleum (from Greek petra – rock and elaion – oil or Latin oleum – oil ) or crude oil is a black, dark brown or greenish liquid found in porous rock formations in the earth. ... Chuquicamata, the largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ...


Economy

The economic history of the United States is a story of economic growth that began with marginally successful colonial economies and progressed to the largest industrial economy in the world in the 20th and early 21st century. The United States has the largest and one of the most technologically advanced national economies in the world, with a GDP of 13. ... The United States came into being during the Age of Enlightenment (circa 1680 to 1800), a period in which writers and thinkers rejected the superstitions of the past. ... The median household income in 2003 according to the US Census Bureau was determined to be $43,389 a year[1] with the median income per household member being $23,535. ... Because the automobile industry took off very early in the United States (when compared to other Western nations), much of the development of U.S. urban areas reflects the personal mobility enjoyed by a large portion of the U.S. population. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... The economic history of the United States has its roots in the quest of European settlers for economic gain in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. ...

Wall Street, in New York City, represents the status of the U.S. as a major global financial power.
Wall Street, in New York City, represents the status of the U.S. as a major global financial power.

The economic system of the United States can be described as a capitalist mixed economy, in which corporations, other private firms, and individuals make most microeconomic decisions, and governments prefer to take a smaller role in the domestic economy, although the combined role of all levels of government is relatively large, at 36% of the GDP. The U.S. has a small social safety net, and regulation of businesses is slightly below the average of developed countries.[45] The United States' median household income in 2005 was $43,318.[46] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 431 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Wall Street ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 431 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Wall Street ... View up Wall Street from Pearl Street NYSE and Broad Street view from Wall Street Wall Street is the name of a narrow street in lower Manhattan running east from Broadway downhill to the East River. ... Nickname: Big Apple Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... In economics, a capitalist is someone who owns capital, presumably within the economic system of capitalism. ... A mixed economy is an economy that has a mix of economic systems. ... A corporation is a legal person which, while being composed of natural persons, exists completely separately from them. ... Microeconomics is the study of the economic behaviour of individual consumers, firms, and industries and the distribution of production and income among them. ... The social safety net is a term used to describe a collection of services provided by the state (such as welfare, universal healthcare, homeless shelters, and perhaps various subsidized services such as transit), which prevent any individual from falling into poverty beyond a certain level. ... This is a list of companies from the United States: #Current companies #Former companies, including acquired and merged ones #By industry #By location #See also Current companies Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S... The median household income in 2003 according to the US Census Bureau was determined to be $43,389 a year[1] with the median income per household member being $23,535. ...


Economic activity varies greatly across the country. For example, New York City is the center of the American financial, publishing, broadcasting, and advertising industries, while Los Angeles is the most important center for film and television production. The San Francisco Bay Area and the Pacific Northwest are major centers for technology. The Midwest is known for its reliance on manufacturing and heavy industry, with Detroit serving as the historic center of the American automotive industry, and Chicago serving as the business and financial capital of the region. The Southeast is a major area for agriculture, tourism, and the lumber industry, and, because of wages and costs below the national average, it continues to attract manufacturing. Nickname: Big Apple Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses and organizations raise, allocate and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... This article is concerned with the production of books, magazines, and other literary material (whether in printed or electronic formats). ... individually-donated time and energy direct government payments or operation indirect government payments, such as radio and television licenses grants from foundations or business entities selling advertising or sponsorship public subscription or membership fees charged to all owners of TV sets or radios, regardless of whether they intend to receive... Billboards and street advertising in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, (2005) Advertising is the commercial promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually performed by an identified sponsor, and performed through a variety of media. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as—in metonymy—the field in general. ... USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Darker red states are always considered part of the Pacific Northwest. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Automakers are companies that produce automobiles. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... Southeast is the ordinal direction halfway between south and east. ... El Nido, Philippines Tourism is the act of travel for the purpose of recreation and business, and the provision of services for this act. ... Lumber is the name used, generally in North America, for wood that has been cut into boards or other shapes for the purpose of woodworking or construction. ...

A farm near Klingerstown, Pennsylvania. Farming accounts for less than 1% of the total GDP of the United States, but still is a major economic activity.

The largest sector in the United States economy is services, which employs roughly three quarters of the work force.[47] The economy is fueled by an abundance in natural resources such as coal, petroleum, and precious metals. However, the country still depends for much of its energy on foreign countries. In agriculture, the country is a top producer of corn, soy beans, rice, and wheat, with the Great Plains labeled as the "breadbasket of the world" for their tremendous agricultural output.[48] The U.S. has a large tourist industry, ranking third in the world[49], and is also a major exporter in goods such as airplanes, steel, weapons, and electronics. Canada accounts for 19% (more than any other nation) of the United States' foreign trade, followed by China, Mexico, and Japan. Image Number K5052-5 Farming near Klingerstown, Pennsylvania. ... Image Number K5052-5 Farming near Klingerstown, Pennsylvania. ... Farming near Klingerstown, Pennsylvania. ... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in Indonesia Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... The service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... Coal (previously referred to as pitcoal or seacoal) is a fossil fuel extracted from the ground by underground mining or open-pit mining (surface mining). ... Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario Petroleum (from Greek petra – rock and elaion – oil or Latin oleum – oil ) or crude oil is a black, dark brown or greenish liquid found in porous rock formations in the earth. ... A gold nugget A precious metal is a rare metallic chemical element of high economic value. ... Binomial name Zea mays L. Maize (Zea mays ssp. ... Binomial name Glycine max Merr. ... Species Oryza glaberrima Oryza sativa Rice refers to two species (Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima) of grass, native to tropical and subtropical southern & southeastern Asia and to Africa, which together provide more than one fifth of the calories consumed by humans[1]. (The term wild rice can refer to wild... Species T. boeoticum T. compactum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat (Triticum spp. ... The Great Plains is the broad expanse of prairie which lies east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States and Canada. ... A good in economics is any physical object (natural or man-made) or service that, upon consumption, increases utility, and therefore can be sold at a price in a market. ... An Air France Boeing 777, a modern passenger jet. ... The old steel cable of a colliery winding tower Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon being the primary alloying material. ... A weapon is a tool used to kill or incapacitate a person or animal, or destroy a military target. ... The field of electronics comprises the study and use of systems that operate by controlling the flow of electrons (or other charge carriers) in devices such as thermionic valves and semiconductors. ...


While the per capita income of the United States is among the highest in the world, the wealth is comparatively concentrated, with approximately 40% of the population earning less than an average resident of western Europe and the top 20% earning substantially more.[50] Since 1975, it has had what can be called a "two-tier" labor market, in which virtually all the real income gains have gone to the top 20% of households.[51] This polarization is the result of a relatively high level of economic freedom.[52] A common understanding of Western Europe in modern times. ...


The social mobility of U.S. residents relative to that of other countries is the subject of much debate. Some analysts have found that social mobility in the United States is low relative to other OECD states, specifically compared to Western Europe, Scandinavia and Canada.[53] [54] [55] Low social mobility may stem in part from the U.S. educational system. Public education in the United States is funded mainly by local property taxes supplemented by state revenues. This frequently results in a wide difference in funding between poor districts or poor states and more affluent jurisdictions. [56] [57] In addition, the practice of legacy preference at elite universities gives preference to the children of alumni, who are often wealthy. This practice reduces available spaces for better-qualified lower income students.[58] Some analysts argue that relative social mobility in the U.S. peaked in the 1960s and declined rapidly beginning in the 1980s.[59] Former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan has also suggested that that the growing income inequality and low class mobility of the U.S. economy may eventually threaten the entire system in the near future. [60] Social mobility is the degree to which, in a given society, an individuals social status can change throughout the course of his or her life, or the degree to which that individuals offspring and subsequent generations move up and down the class system. ... Social mobility is the degree to which, in a given society, an individuals social status can change throughout the course of his or her life, or the degree to which that individuals offspring and subsequent generations move up and down the class system. ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ... A common understanding of Western Europe in modern times. ... Scandinavia is a region in Northern Europe named after the Scandinavian Peninsula. ... Numerus Clausus (closed number in Latin) is one of many methods used to limit the number of students who may study at a university. ... Alan Greenspan, former Fed Reserve Chairman The Honorable Alan C. Greenspan, PhD, KBE (b. ...

The Space Shuttle Columbia takes off on a manned mission to space.
The Space Shuttle Columbia takes off on a manned mission to space.

The United States is an influential country in scientific and technological research and the production of innovative technological products. During World War II, the U.S. was the first to develop the atomic bomb, ushering in the atomic age. Beginning early the Cold War, the U.S. achieved successes in space science and technology, leading to a space race, which led to rapid advances in rocketry, weaponry, material science, computers, and many other areas. This technological progress was epitomized by the first visit of a man to the moon, when Neil Armstrong stepped off of Apollo 11 in July 1969.[61] The U.S. was also perhaps the most instrumental nation in the development of the Internet, through the funding of its predecessor, Arpanet, and the actual physical presence of much of the Internet. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x813, 126 KB) A launch of the NASA Space Shuttle Columbia on STS-1 in April 1981. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x813, 126 KB) A launch of the NASA Space Shuttle Columbia on STS-1 in April 1981. ... The Space Shuttle Columbia seconds after engine ignition, 1981 (NASA). ... Technologies or gadgets that are either developed or significantly advanced in the United States. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... The Atomic Age was a phrase used for a time in the 1950s in which it was believed that all power sources in the future would be atomic in nature. ... The Cold War (Russian: Холодная Война Kholodnaya Voina) was the protracted geopolitical, ideological, and economic struggle that emerged after World War II between capitalism and communism, centering around the global superpowers of the United States and the Soviet Union, and their military alliance partners. ... For other uses, see Space Race (disambiguation). ... A rocket is a vehicle, missile or aircraft which obtains thrust by the reaction to the ejection of fast moving exhaust from within a rocket engine. ... A weapon is a tool used to kill or incapacitate a person or animal, or destroy a military target. ... Materials science includes those parts of chemistry and physics that deal with the properties of materials. ... The tower of a personal computer. ... Neil Alden Armstrong (born August 5, 1930) is a former American astronaut, test pilot, and Naval Aviator who is widely known for being the first human ever to set foot on the Moon. ... Apollo 11 was the fifth human spaceflight of the Apollo program, the third human voyage to the moon, and the first manned mission to land on the Moon. ... ARPANET logical map, March 1977. ...


In the sciences, Americans have a large share of Nobel Prizes, especially in the fields of physiology and medicine. The National Institutes of Health, a focal point for biomedical research in the United States, has contributed to the completion of the Human Genome Project.[62] The main governmental organization for aviation and space research is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Major corporations, such as Boeing and Lockheed Martin, also play an important role. The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Physiology (in Greek physis = nature and logos = word) is the study of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of living organisms. ... This article is about the field of medical practice and health care. ... The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for medical research. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... First flight, December 17, 1903 Aviation or air transport refers to the activities surrounding human flight and the aircraft industry. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661 ) is the world’s largest aircraft manufacturer. ... Lockheed/BAE/Northrop F-35 Lockheed Trident missile C-130 Hercules; in production since the 1950s, now as the C-130J Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is an aerospace manufacturer formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ...


The automobile industry developed earlier and more rapidly in the United States than in most other countries. The backbone of the nation's transportation infrastructure is a network of high-capacity highways. From data taken in 2004, there are about 3,981,521 miles (6,407,637 km) of roadways in the U.S., the most in the world.[63] Highway in Pennsylvania, USA A highway is a major road designed for automobile travel that connects cities, places, other highways, or other significant points of interest. ... A mile is the name of a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ...


Mass transit systems exist in large cities, such as New York, which operates one of the busiest subway systems in the world. With a few exceptions, American cities are less dense than those in other parts of the world. Low density partly results from and largely necessitates automobile ownership by most households. In the United States of America, transit describes local area common carrier passenger transportation configured to provide scheduled service on fixed routes on a non-reservation basis. ... A cycle rickshaw at rest in Manhattan. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway system, usually in an urban area, with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ...


Whereas the freight rail network is among the world's best (and most congested), the passenger rail network is underdeveloped by European and Japanese standards. This is partly due to the longer distances travelled in the U.S.; a destination two thousand miles away is reached more quickly by air than by rail. Government subsidies of air travel played a role in the bankruptcy of passenger-rail corporations in the 1970s. The U.S. had been unique in its high number of private passenger railroads. During the 1970s, government intervention reorganized freight railroads, and consolidated passenger service under the government-backed corporation Amtrak. No other country has more miles of rail than the U.S.[64] Acela Express in West Windsor, NJ Amtrak Cascades service with tilting Talgo trainsets in Seattle, Washington Amtrak train in downtown Orlando, Florida For other uses, see Amtrak (disambiguation). ...


Air travel is the preferred means of travel for long distances. In terms of passengers, seventeen of the world's thirty busiest airports in 2004 were in the U.S., including the world's busiest, Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL). In terms of cargo, in the same year, twelve of the world's thirty busiest airports were in the U.S., including the world's busiest, Memphis International Airport. This article refers to the tool of travel. ... Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (IATA: ATL, ICAO: KATL) is located in the Atlanta, Georgia, USA metropolitan area, and is the busiest airport in the world, with Chicagos OHare as a rival. ... FAA diagram of Memphis International Airport (MEM) Memphis International Airport (IATA: MEM, ICAO: KMEM) is a public airport located 3 miles (5 km) south of the city of Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee, USA. Northwest Airlines operates its third-largest passenger hub in Memphis, with routes to a number of...


Several major seaports are in the United States; the three busiest are California's Port of Los Angeles and Port of Long Beach, and the Port of New York and New Jersey, all among the world's busiest. The Great Lakes also carry shipping traffic, the lakes being extensively connected to one another, the Mississippi River system, and the Atlantic Ocean. The first water link between the Great Lakes and the Atlantic, the Erie Canal, allowed the rapid expansion of agriculture and industry in the Midwest, and made New York City the economic center of the U.S. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Port. ... General Information Founded December 9, 1907 Coordinates  - Latitude  - Longitude 33º4239 N 118º1459 W Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 7500 acres 4200 acres 3300 acres Available Berths 270 Vessel Arrivals 2,813 (FY 2004) Annual container volume 7. ... The Port of Long Beach is the second busiest seaport in the United States and the tenth busiest port in the world. ... Container port facilities at Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal, seen from Bayonne, New Jersey. ... The worlds busiest port is contested by several ports around the world, as there is as yet no standardised means of evaluating port performance and traffic. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest river in the United States; the longest is the Missouri River, which flows into the Mississippi. ... The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ...


Demographics

2000 Population Density Map
2000 Population Density Map

As of August 2006, the United States' population was estimated at 299,059,138, with an annual growth rate of about 0.59%.[65] This figure includes persons living in the U.S. without legal permission to do so, estimated at 12 million, and excludes U.S. citizens living abroad, estimated at 3 million to 7 million. The United States Census Bureau predicts that the population will surpass 300 million in October 2006. In 2000, about 79% of the population lived in urban areas.[66] Population of the United States, 1790 to 2000 The demographics of the United States depict a largely urban nation, with 75% of its population living in urban and suburban areas. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x766, 116 KB) Summary United States population density map based on Census 2000 data. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x766, 116 KB) Summary United States population density map based on Census 2000 data. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... The 22nd United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


Thirty-five million Americans, about 12.6% of the population, live in poverty. About 15.8% of households have annual incomes of at least $100,000; and the top 10% of households had annual gross incomes exceeding $118,200 in 2003.[67] Overall, the top quintile, those households earning more than $86,867 a year, earned 49.8% of all income in 2003.[68] A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... This graph shows the American definition of social class according to the New York Times using the quintiles as measurement for class. ...


In the 2000 census, the country had 31 ethnic groups with at least one million members each, with numerous others represented in smaller amounts.[69] By the federal government's categorization of race, most Americans (80.4% in 2004)[70] are white. These white Americans are mostly European Americans—the descendants of European immigrants to the United States—along with some non-Europeans counted as white in government nomenclature—that is, those with origins in the original peoples of the Middle East and North Africa. To the exclusion of Hispanic-origin European Americans, non-Hispanic whites constituted 67.4% of the population. The non-Hispanic white population is proportionally declining, because of both immigration by, and a higher birth rate among, ethnic and racial minorities.[71] If current immigration trends continue, the number of non-Hispanic whites is expected to be reduced to a plurality by 2040-2050. The largest ethnic group of European ancestry is German at 15.2%, followed by Irish (10.8%), English (8.7%), Italian (5.6%) and Scandinavian (3.7%). Many immigrants also hail from Slavic countries, such as Poland and Russia, as well as from French Canada.[72] African Americans, or Blacks, largely descend from Africans who arrived as slaves during the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries, and number about 35 million or 12.9% of the population. At about 1.5% of the total population, Native Americans and Alaska Natives number about 4.4 million[73], approximately 35% of whom were living on reservations in 2005[74]. The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A European American, or a Euro-American, is an American of European descent. ... European American is a term for an American of European descent, who are usually referred as White or Caucasian. ... World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of Earth; the term continent here referring to a cultural and political distinction, rather than a physiographic one, thus leading to various perspectives about Europes precise borders. ... The Statue of Liberty was a common sight to many immigrants who entered the United States through Ellis Island Immigration to the United States of America is the act of immigrating, or moving, to territory within the United States culture and government. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent. ... The Hispanic world Hispanic (Spanish: Hispano) is a term denoting a derivation from Spain, its people and culture. ... A plurality (or relative majority) is the largest share of something, which may or may not be a majority. ... The English are an ethnic group or nation associated with England and the English language. ... Scandinavia is a region in Northern Europe named after the Scandinavian Peninsula. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... American Indian and Alaskan Natives[1] (term preferred by the majority of people included) are the indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska down to their descendants in modern times. ... Alaskan Natives are Aboriginal Americans who live in Alaska. ... BIA map of Indian reservations in the continental United States. ...


Current demographic trends include the immigration of Hispanics from Latin America into the Southwest, a region that is home to about 60% of the 35 million Hispanics in the United States. Immigrants from Mexico make up about 66% of the Hispanic community[75], and are second only to the German-descent population in the single-ethnicity category. The Hispanic population, which has been growing at an annual rate of about 4.46% since the 1990s, is expected to increase significantly in the coming decades, because of both immigration and a higher birth rate among Latinos than among the general population.[76] Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... The Southwest region of the United States is drier than the adjoining Midwest in weather; the population is less dense and, with strong Spanish-American and Native American components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ...


Largest cities

The United States has dozens of major cities, which play an important role in U.S. culture, heritage, and economy. In 2004, 251 incorporated places had populations of at least 100,000 and nine had populations greater than 1,000,000, including several important global cities, such as New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago. In addition, there are fifty metropolitan areas with populations over 1,000,000. This is a list of the 100 largest incorporated cities in the United States (including Puerto Rico), based on the United States Census Bureaus July 1, 2005 population estimates. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1031x740, 688 KB)Midtown Manhattan looking North from the Empire State Building, 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1031x740, 688 KB)Midtown Manhattan looking North from the Empire State Building, 2005. ... Nickname: Big Apple Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Download high resolution version (1200x715, 217 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1200x715, 217 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Nickname: City of Angels Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: State California County Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa Area    - City 1,290. ... Image File history File links Chicago at night from a rooftop of a parking garage near the United Center. ... Image File history File links Chicago at night from a rooftop of a parking garage near the United Center. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... This is a list of the 100 largest incorporated cities in the United States (including Puerto Rico), based on the United States Census Bureaus July 1, 2005 population estimates. ... An incorporated place, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, is a type of governmental unit incorporated under state law as a city, town (except the New England states, New York, and Wisconsin), borough (except in Alaska and New York), or village and having legally prescribed limits, powers, and... A global city and world city, or world-class city, is a city that has a direct and tangible effect on global affairs through socioeconomic, cultural, and/or political means. ... Nickname: Big Apple Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... The following is a list (by population) of all Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the United States Census Bureau. ...

Rank City Population
within
city limits
Population
Density
per sq mi
Metropolitan
Area
Region
millions rank
1 New York City, New York 8,143,197 26,402.9 18.7 1 Northeast
2 Los Angeles, California 3,844,829 7,876.8 12.9 2 West
3 Chicago, Illinois 2,842,518 12,750.3 9.4 3 Midwest
4 Houston, Texas 2,016,582 3,371.7 5.2 7 South
5 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1,463,281 11,233.6 5.8 4 Northeast
6 Phoenix, Arizona 1,461,575 2,782.0 3.7 14 West
7 San Antonio, Texas 1,256,509 2,808.5 1.8 29 South
8 San Diego, California 1,255,540 3,771.9 2.9 17 West
9 Dallas, Texas 1,213,825 3,469.9 5.7 5 South
10 San Jose, California 912,332 5,117.9 1.7 30 West

Nickname: Big Apple Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. ... Nickname: City of Angels Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: State California County Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa Area    - City 1,290. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... If you have been redirected here after viewing any statistical information, note that as defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Nickname: Space City Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Harris County Fort Bend County Montgomery County Mayor Bill White Area    - City 1,558 km²  (601. ... This article does not use inline citations to cite its references or sources. ... Southern United States The states shown in dark red are usually included in the South, while all or portions of the striped states may or may not be considered part of the Southern United States. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City, the City that Loves You Back Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. ... Nickname: Valley of the Sun Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: Country United States State Arizona Counties Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area    - City 1,230. ... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... If you have been redirected here after viewing any statistical information, note that as defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. ... Nickname: Alamo City Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Bexar County Mayor Phil Hardberger Area    - City 1067. ... This article does not use inline citations to cite its references or sources. ... Southern United States The states shown in dark red are usually included in the South, while all or portions of the striped states may or may not be considered part of the Southern United States. ... Nickname: Americas Finest City Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates: Country United States State California County San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders City Attorney Michael Aguirre City Council Scott Peters Kevin Faulconer Toni Atkins Tony Young Brian Maienschein Donna Frye Jim Madaffer Ben Hueso Area    - City 963. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... If you have been redirected here after viewing any statistical information, note that as defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. ... ·· Nickname: Big D Location in the state of Texas Country United States State Texas Counties Dallas, Collin, Denton, Kaufman, and Rockwall Mayor Laura Miller Area    - City 997. ... This article does not use inline citations to cite its references or sources. ... Southern United States The states shown in dark red are usually included in the South, while all or portions of the striped states may or may not be considered part of the Southern United States. ... Nickname: Capital of Silicon Valley Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... If you have been redirected here after viewing any statistical information, note that as defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. ...

Indigenous peoples

The Native Americans of the United States (also known as Indians or American Indians, among others), are an ethnic group who have populated the land that is today the United States since at least 9,000 B.C., more than one hundred centuries before the arrival of European settlers. As in other countries throughout the Western Hemisphere, the impact of European colonization of the Americas changed the lives and cultures of the Native Americans. In the 15th to 19th century, their populations were ravaged by displacement, disease, warfare with the Europeans, and enslavement. Image File history File links Chief_Quanah_Parker_of_the_Kwahadi_Comanche2. ... Image File history File links Chief_Quanah_Parker_of_the_Kwahadi_Comanche2. ... Quanah Parker Quanah Parker (c. ... American Indian and Alaskan Natives[1] (term preferred by the majority of people included) are the indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska down to their descendants in modern times. ... The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In the 19th century, the incessant westward expansion of the United States incrementally compelled large numbers of Native Americans to resettle further west, sometimes by force, almost always reluctantly. Under President Andrew Jackson, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act of 1830, which authorized the president to conduct treaties to exchange Native American land east of the Mississippi River for lands west of the river. As many as 100,000 Native Americans eventually relocated in the West as a result of this Indian Removal policy. In theory, relocation was supposed to be voluntary (and many Native Americans did remain in the East), but in practice great pressure was put on Native American leaders to sign removal treaties. Andrew Old Hickory Jackson (March 15, 1767– June 8, 1845) was the seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), first governor of Florida (1821), general of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a co-founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Indian Removal Act of 1830 was a law passed by the Twenty-first United States Congress in order to facilitate the relocation of American Indian tribes living east of the Mississippi River in the United States to lands further west. ... The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest river in the United States; the longest is the Missouri River, which flows into the Mississippi. ... Indian Removal was a nineteenth century policy of the government of the United States that sought to relocate American Indian (or Native American) tribes living east of the Mississippi River to lands west of the river. ...


Conflicts, generally known as "Indian Wars", broke out between U.S. forces and many different tribes. U.S. government authorities entered numerous treaties during this period, but later abrogated many for various reasons. On January 31, 1876, the United States government ordered all remaining Native Americans to move into reservations or reserves. Combatants Native Americans USA Indian Wars is the name used by historians in the United States to describe a series of conflicts between the United States and Native American peoples (Indians) of North America. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... In the United States, an Indian reservation is land which is managed by a Native American tribe under the United States Department of the Interiors Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...


The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 gave United States citizenship to Native Americans, in part because of an interest by many to see them merged with the American mainstream, and also because of the heroic service of many Native American veterans in the First World War. The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 granted full U.S. citizenship to Americas indigenous peoples. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


As of 2003 according to the 2003 United States Census Bureau estimates, there were 2,786,652 Native Americans in the United States. However, an unknown number of largely indigenous peoples from Latin American countries, particularly Mexico, have migrated to the U.S. over the years. Other tribes, such as the Yaqui have persisted on both sides of the U.S./Mexican border crossing freely for many years until the current border clampdown (see illegal immigration). The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... The Yaqui are a Native American people who live in region comprising the northern Mexican state of Sonora and the southwestern U.S. state of Arizona. ... Illegal immigration refers to a immigration of people across national borders —in violation of the immigration laws of the country of destination. ...


Language

Although the United States has no official language, English is the de facto national language. In 2003, about 214.8 million, or 81.6%, of the population aged five years and older spoke only English at home.[3] Although not all Americans speak English, it is the most common language for daily interaction among both native and non-native speakers. Knowledge of English is required of immigrants seeking naturalization. Some Americans advocate making English the official language, which it is in twenty-seven individual states. Three states also grant official status to other languages alongside English: French in Louisiana, Hawaiian in Hawaii, and Spanish in New Mexico.[77] Besides English, languages spoken at home by at least one million Americans aged five years and up are Spanish or Spanish Creole, spoken by 29.7 million; Chinese, 2.2 million; French (including Patois and Cajun), 1.4 million; Tagalog, 1.3 million; Vietnamese, 1.1 million; and German, 1.1 million.[71][78] // Although the United States currently has no official language, it is largely monolingual with English being the de facto national language. ... English language spread in the United States. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Naturalization is the act whereby a person voluntarily and actively acquires a nationality which is not his or her nationality at birth. ... An official language is a language that is given a privileged legal status in a state, or other legally-defined territory. ... Official language(s) English and French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans at last census; probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... A number of Creole languages are based on the Spanish language. ... Patois, although without a formal definition in linguistics, can be used to describe a language considered as nonstandard. ... This article is about an ethnic culture. ... Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ...


Religion

Pisgah Baptist Church in Four Oaks, North Carolina. The Bible Belt is well known for its large devout Protestant Christian population.
Pisgah Baptist Church in Four Oaks, North Carolina. The Bible Belt is well known for its large devout Protestant Christian population.

The United States government keeps no official register of Americans' religious status. However, in a private survey conducted in 2001 and mentioned in the Census Bureau's Statistical Abstract of the United States, 76.7% of American adults identified themselves as Christian; about 52% of adults described themselves as members of various Protestant denominations; Roman Catholics, at 24.5%, were the most populous individual sect; Judaism (1.4%), the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (1.3%), and other faiths also have firm places in American culture; about 14.2% of respondents described themselves as having no religion; the religious distribution of the 5.4% who elected not to describe themselves for the survey is unknown.[65] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 1304 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: United States Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 1304 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: United States Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 560 miles (901 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 9. ... The approximate extent of the Bible Belt, indicated in red A Bible Belt is an area in which socially conservative Christian Evangelical Protestantism is a pervasive or dominant part of the culture. ... Despite official separation of church and state, many churches in the U.S. take strong stances on political subjects. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Christianity. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ...


The country has a relatively high level of religiosity among developed nations. About 46% of American adults say that they attend religious services at least once a week, compared with 14% of adults in Great Britain, 8% in France, and 7% in Sweden. Moreover, 58% of Americans say they often think about the meaning and purpose of life, compared with 25% of the British, 26% of the Japanese, and 31% of West Germans.[79] However, this rate is not uniform across the country: regular attendance to religious services is markedly more common in the Bible Belt, composed largely of Southern and Southern Midwestern states, than in the Northeast or the West.[80] The approximate extent of the Bible Belt, indicated in red A Bible Belt is an area in which socially conservative Christian Evangelical Protestantism is a pervasive or dominant part of the culture. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. ... If you have been redirected here after viewing any statistical information, note that as defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. ...


Religion among some Americans is highly dynamic: over the period 1990–2001, those groups whose portion of the population at least doubled were, in descending order of growth, Wiccans, nondenominational Christians, Deists, Sikhs, Evangelical Christians, Disciples of Christ, New Age adherents, Hindus, Full Gospel adherents, Quakers, Bahá'ís, independent Christians, those who refused to answer the question, Buddhists, and Foursquare Gospel adherents.[65] The pentagram within a circle is a symbol of faith used by many Wiccans. ... Deism is a religious movement that originated in 17th and 18th century Europe and North America and continues in a mostly similar form today. ... The Harimandir Sahib, known popularly as the Golden Temple, is a sacred shrine for Sikhs. ... The word evangelicalism usually refers to a tendency in diverse branches of conservative Christianity, typified by an emphasis on evangelism, a personal experience of conversion, biblically-oriented faith, and a belief in the relevance of Christian faith to cultural issues. ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... Hinduism (Sanskrit: , , also known as , and , ) is a set of religious traditions that originated mainly in the Indian subcontinent. ... The Full Gospel movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit and in that God wills for his children to be prosperous in all areas of their lives: Spiritual - John 3:3,11; 2 Corinthians 5:17-21; Romans 10:9-10. ... The Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers or Friends) began in England in the 17th century by people who were dissatisfied with the existing denominations and sects of Christianity. ... Seat of the Universal House of Justice in Haifa, Israel, governing body of the Baháís The Baháí Faith is a religion founded by Baháulláh in 19th century Persia. ... Buddhist Flag Buddhism (also known as Buddha Dharma, the teachings of the awakened one) is not a religion, but a way of life, a practical philosophy, and arguably a psychology, focusing on the teachings of Gautama Buddha (Pali: Gotama Buddha), who lived on the Indian subcontinent in or around the... The International Church of the Foursquare Gospel is an evangelical Pentecostal Christian denomination. ...


Over the same period, the group whose portion of the population grew by the most percentage points was those who claimed no religion, making up 8.2% of the adult population in 1990, but 14.2% in 2001.[65] This group includes atheists, agnostics, humanists, secularists and those who answered to the effect of "No religion". The number of those with no religion varies widely with location, reaching a high in Washington, at 25%, and the rest of the relatively agnostic western United States, and a low in North Dakota, at 3%, followed shortly by the Bible Belt.[81] List of the continental U.S. states and Washington D.C. by percentage of population claiming no religion. ... The term agnosticism and the related agnostic were coined by Thomas Henry Huxley in 1869. ...


One comprehensive study showed that in the U.S. women are generally more religious than men, with 42% identifying as "religious" and 36% as "somewhat religious," versus 31% and 41% for men, respectively. Younger Americans were twice as likely to choose "secular" than their older counterparts, at 14% and 7%, respectively. Among racial and ethnic groups, blacks had the highest religious figures, at 49% "religious" and 31% "somewhat religious"; Asians had the lowest numbers, at 28% "religious" and 34% "somewhat religious".[82] An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to sub-saharan Africa. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Asian people. ...


Education

Education in the United States has been a state or local, not federal, responsibility. The Department of Education of the federal government, however, exerts some influence through its ability to control funding. Students are generally obliged to attend school starting with kindergarten, and ending with the 12th grade, which is normally completed at age 18, but many states may allow students to drop out as early as age 16. Besides public schools, parents may also choose to educate their own children at home or to send their children to parochial or private schools. After high school, students may choose to attend universities, either public or private. Public universities receive funding from the federal and state governments, as well as from other sources, but most students still have to pay student loans after graduation. Tuition at private universities is generally much higher than at public universities. Educational oversight Secretary Deputy Secretary U.S. Department of Education Margaret Spellings Eugene W. Hickok National education budget $69. ... The educational attainment of the US population is similar to that of many other industrialized countries with the vast majority of the population having completed secondary education and a rising number of college graduates that outnumber high school dropouts. ... The United States Department of Education (also known as ED) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government. ... A kindergarten in Afghanistan. ... The term public school has different (and in some cases contradictory) meanings due to regional differences. ... Thomas Edison attended compulsory school for only three months, after which he was taught at home by his mother and a tutor. ... A parochial school (or faith school) is a type of private school which engages in religious education in addition to conventional education. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... High school - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ...

America's 19 World Heritage Sites include the University of Virginia, one of many highly regarded public universities supported by taxpayers at the state level of government.
America's 19 World Heritage Sites include the University of Virginia, one of many highly regarded public universities supported by taxpayers at the state level of government.

There are many competitive institutions of higher education in the United States, both private and public. The United States has 168 universities in the world's top 500, 17 of which are in the top 20.[83] There are also many smaller universities and liberal arts colleges, and local community colleges of varying quality across the country with open admission policies. Image File history File links RotundaII.jpg Summary The Rotunda at the University of Virginia. ... Image File history File links RotundaII.jpg Summary The Rotunda at the University of Virginia. ... Site #86: Memphis and its Necropolis, including the Pyramids of Giza (Egypt). ... Mascot Cavalier Website www. ... This List of colleges and universities in the United States includes colleges and universities in the U.S. that grant four-year baccalaureate and/or post-graduate masters and doctorate degrees. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... In Canada and the United States, a community college, sometimes called a technical college, county college, junior college or a city college, is an educational institution providing higher education and lower-level tertiary education, granting certificates, diplomas, and Associates degrees to people like laertes. ...


The United States ranks 24th in the reading and science literacy as well as mathematical abilities of its high school students when compared with other developed nations.[84] The United States also has a low literacy rate compared to other developed countries, with a reading literacy rate at 86 - 98% of the population over age 15.[85] As for educational attainment, 27.2% of the population aged 25 and above have earned a bachelor's degree or higher, and 84.6% have graduated high school.[86] Literacy is the ability to use text to communicate across space and time. ... The educational attainment of the US population is similar to that of many other industrialized countries with the vast majority of the population having completed secondary education and a rising number of college graduates that outnumber high school dropouts. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Health

Main article: Health care in the United States

The World Health Organization ranks the United States' health level 72nd among the world's nations.[87] Infant mortality is 5 per 1,000; among developed nations, only Latvia ranks lower, at 6 per 1,000. However, this statistic is contested by some experts, because other nations may not define infant mortality as broadly as the United States. [88] Obesity is also a public-health problem, which is estimated to cost tens of billions of dollars every year.[89] Health care in the United States is provided by many separate legal entities. ... Flag of World Health Organization The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations, acting as a coordinating authority on international public health, headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. ... For early system failures, see failure rate. ... Public health is concerned with threats to the overall health of a community based on population health analysis. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ...


Unlike most Western governments, the U.S. government does not guarantee publicly funded health care to its citizens. Consequently, a high number of people lack proper healthcare. Private insurance plays a major role in covering health care costs. [90] Health insurance in the United States is traditionally a benefit of employment. However, emergency care facilities are required to provide service regardless of the patient's ability to pay. Medical bills are overwhelmingly the most common reason for personal bankruptcy in the United States.[91] The nation spends a substantial amount on medical research through such federal agencies as the National Institutes of Health.[92] This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for medical research. ...


Culture

American cultural icons, such as apple pie, baseball, and the American flag.
American cultural icons, such as apple pie, baseball, and the American flag.

The culture of the United States began as the culture of its first English colonists, but quickly evolved as an independent frontier culture supplemented by indigenous and SpanishMexican cowboy culture and by the cultures of subsequent waves of immigrants, first from Europe and Africa and later from Asia. Overall, significant cultural influences came from northern Europe, especially from the German, English and Irish cultures and later from Italian, Greek and Ashkenazi cultures. Descendants of enslaved West Africans preserved some cultural traditions from West Africa in the early United States. Geographical place names largely reflect the combined English, Dutch, French, Spanish, and Native American components of U.S. American history.[71] American culture is a Western culture, with influences from Europe, Canada, the Native American peoples, African Americans and young groups of immigrants. ... Elvis Presley This is a copyrighted promotional photo with a known source. ... Elvis Presley This is a copyrighted promotional photo with a known source. ... Elvis Aaron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer and actor. ... http://www. ... http://www. ... In cooking, an apple pie is a fruit cake in which the principal filling ingredient is apples. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... National flag and ensign. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of Earth; the term continent here referring to a cultural and political distinction, rather than a physiographic one, thus leading to various perspectives about Europes precise borders. ... For other uses, see Africa (disambiguation). ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... The culture of England is sometimes difficult to separate clearly from the culture of the United Kingdom, so influential has English culture been on the cultures of the British Isles and, on the other hand, given the extent to which other cultures have influenced life in England. ... Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim (אַשְׁכֲּנָזִי אַשְׁכֲּנָזִים Standard Hebrew, AÅ¡kanazi, AÅ¡kanazim, Tiberian Hebrew, ʾAÅ¡kănāzî, ʾAÅ¡kănāzîm, pronounced sing. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ...


Some have described the United States as a melting pot in which immigrants eventually assimilate into a unified American culture that incorporates contributions from immigrant cultures. A more recently proposed model is that of the salad bowl, in which immigrant cultures retain at least some of the unique characteristics of their culture without merging into a completely unified American culture.[93] Modern American sociologists tend to view pluralism, rather than assimilation, as the way for American society to acheive ethincal and racial harmony and state that the workings of pluralism are visible within modern American society, largely disregarging the idea of the melting pot.[71] Alternate meaning: crucible (science) The melting pot is a metaphor for the way in which heterogenous societies develop, in which the ingredients in the pot (iron, tin; people of different backgrounds and religions, etc. ... The salad bowl is the idea that the U.S. is not a melting pot but a salad bowl. ...


A key component of American culture is the American Dream: the idea that, through hard work, courage, and self-determination, regardless of social class, a person can gain a better life.[94] Historical American flags in Washington, DC: the Betsy Ross flag hangs on both ends and the classic Old Glory is to each side of the current 50 state version. ... Social mobility is the degree to which, in a given society, an individuals social status can change throughout the course of his or her life, or the degree to which that individuals offspring and subsequent generations move up and down the class system. ...


American cuisine, embraces native American ingredients such as turkey, potatoes, corn, and squash, which have become integral parts of American culture. Such popular icons as apple pie, pizza, and hamburgers are either derived from or are actual European dishes. Burritos and tacos have their origins in Mexico. And Soul food, which originated among African slaves, is extremely popular in the U.S. as well. However, many foods now enjoyed worldwide either originated in the United States or were substantially altered by American chefs. As a nation of immigrants, it is no surprise that the cuisine of the United States is incredibly diverse. ... Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, grown for its starchy tuber. ... Look up corn in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up squash in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In cooking, an apple pie is a fruit cake in which the principal filling ingredient is apples. ... A Pizza Margherita made in Naples (Napoli), Italy Pizza (IPA pronunciation: ) or Pizza Pie is an oven-baked, flat, usually round bread covered with tomato sauce and cheese with optional toppings, or a savory pie with similar ingredients. ... Hamburgers often contain beef, lettuce, onions, and other toppings in a bun. ... A large burrito. ... Tacos al pastor Plate of tacos A taco is a traditional Mexican dish comprised of a rolled or folded, pliable maize tortilla filled with an edible substance, while meat (generally grilled beef, picadillo, fish, chicken or pork) is most common, there are numerous regional and personal variations on the theme... For the type of cuisine, see soul food. ...


Music in the United States also traces to the country's diverse cultural roots through an array of styles. Rock and roll, hip hop, country, blues, and jazz are among the country's most internationally renowned genres. Since the late 19th century, popular recorded music from the United States has become increasingly known across the world, such that some forms of American popular music are heard almost everywhere.[95] The United States is home to a wide array of regional styles and scenes. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Hip hop music (also referred to as rap or rap music) is a style of popular music which came into existence in roughly the mid 70s but became a large part of modern day pop culture in the late 80s. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) In popular music, country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic music, blues, gospel music, and old-time music that began... Rhythm and blues (AKA R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences — first performed by African American artists. ... Jazz is an original American musical art form originating around the start of the 20th century in New Orleans, rooted in Western music technique and theory and marked by the profound cultural contributions of African Americans. ... A genre is a division of a particular form of art or utterance according to criteria particular to that form. ... Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and mostly distributed commercially. ...


However, not all American culture is derived from forms found elsewhere in the world. For example, the birth of cinema, as well as its development, largely took place in the United States. In 1878, the first recorded instance of sequential photographs capturing and reproducing motion was Eadweard Muybridge's series of a running horse, which the British-born photographer produced in Palo Alto, California, using a row of still cameras. Since then, the American film industry, based in Hollywood, California, has had a profound effect on cinema across the world. Other genres that originated in the United States and spread worldwide include the comic book and Disney's animated films. Muybridges The Horse in Motion. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue... An American comic book is a small magazine originating in the United States containing a narrative in the comics form. ... The Walt Disney Company (most commonly known as Disney) (NYSE: DIS) is one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ...

Pro Bowl, 2006. American Football is the most popular spectator sport in the United States.
Pro Bowl, 2006. American Football is the most popular spectator sport in the United States.[96]

Sports are a national pastime, and playing sports, especially American football, baseball, and basketball, is very popular at the high-school level. Professional sports in the U.S. is big business, with most of the world's most highly paid athletes.[97] The "Big Four" sports are baseball, American football, ice hockey, and basketball. Baseball is popularly termed "the national pastime"; but, since the early 1990s, American football has largely been considered the most popular sport in America. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2284x2012, 500 KB) Subject: Pro Bowl Source page url: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2284x2012, 500 KB) Subject: Pro Bowl Source page url: http://www. ... Tackle during 2006 Pro Bowl in Hawaii A top cheerleader from each team takes part in the 2006 Pro Bowl in Hawaii The Pro Bowl is the National Football Leagues all-star game. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A spectator sport is one that is characterized by the presence of spectators, or watchers, at its matches. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Stadium II St. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005. ... High school - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Many other sports, including auto racing, lacrosse, soccer, golf, and tennis, have significant followings. The United States is among the most influential regions in shaping three popular board-based recreational sports: surfboarding, skateboarding, and snowboarding. Eight Olympiads have taken place in the United States; in medals won, the United States ranks third in the Winter Games, with 218 (78 gold, 81 silver, and 59 bronze),[98][99] and first in the Summer Games, with 2,321 (943 gold, 736 silver, and 642 bronze).[100][101] Auto racing (also known as automobile racing, autosport or motorsport) is a psuedo-sport involving racing automobiles. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Golfer after swing. ... A tennis net Tennis is a sport played between either two players (Singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). Players use a stringed racquet to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over a net into the opponents court. ... The first boardsport was surfing, followed by skateboarding. ... See World Wide Web for surfing the web; see also Wind surfing Surfing at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. ... A skateboarder performing a frontside lipslide. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopaedia entry. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... A runner carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games or the Olympic Winter Games, are a winter multi-sport event held every four years. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ...

See also: Arts and entertainment in the United States, Media of the United States, Dance of the United States, Architecture of the United States, Holidays of the United States, and Lists of Americans

This article discusses the culture of the United States; for customs and way of life, see Culture of the United States. ... The media of the United States consists of several different types of communications media: television, radio, cinema, newspapers, magazines, and Internet-based Web sites. ... Closely related to the development of American music in the early 20th century was the emergence of a new, and distinctively American, art form -- modern dance. ... The United States has a history of architecture that includes a wide variety of styles. ... Holidays of the United States vary with local observance. ... // List of people by Ethnicity African Americans Albanian Americans American Indians Arab Americans Armenian Americans Australian Americans Austrian Americans Hispanic Americans Chinese Americans Cuban Americans Dutch Americans English Americans Estonian Americans Filipino Americans Finnish Americans French Americans German Americans Greek Americans Hungarian Americans Indian Americans Iranian Americans Irish Americans Italian...

See also

Main article: List of United States-related topics
Life in the United States
Arts and entertainmentCultureEconomyEducationEducational attainmentGeography • Health care • Holidays • Household incomeHuman rights
Labor unionsLanguagesMiddle classPassenger vehicle transportPoliticsPovertyRacismReligionSocial issuesSocial structureSportsStandard of living

This page aims to list articles on Wikipedia that are related to United States. ... This article discusses the culture of the United States; for customs and way of life, see Culture of the United States. ... American culture is a Western culture, with influences from Europe, Canada, the Native American peoples, African Americans and young groups of immigrants. ... The educational attainment of the US population is similar to that of many other industrialized countries with the vast majority of the population having completed secondary education and a rising number of college graduates that outnumber high school dropouts. ... Health care in the United States is provided by many separate legal entities. ... Holidays of the United States vary with local observance. ... The median household income in 2003 according to the US Census Bureau was determined to be $43,389 a year[1] with the median income per household member being $23,535. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Labor unions in the United States today function as legally recognized representatives of workers in numerous industries, but are strongest among public sector employees such as teachers and police. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... A 1979 Lincoln Continental with Town Car trim option. ... Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a federal presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of the United States is both head of state and head of government, and of a two-party legislative and electoral system. ... There has been significant disagreement about poverty in the United States; particularly over how poverty ought to be defined. ... An African-American drinks out of a water cooler designated for use by colored patrons in 1939 at a streetcar terminal in Oklahoma City. ... Social issues in the United States as perceived by social justice advocates and other groups and commentators include an unequal educational system, poverty, high rates of crime and incarceration, and lack of access to quality health care. ... The contemporary United States has no legally-recognized social classes. ... The standard of living in the United States is one of the highest in the world by almost any measure. ... The Articles of Confederation The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document of the United States of America. ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... The United States is a country occupying part of the North American continent ranging from the Pacific to the Atlantic Ocean and including outlying areas as well. ... // Economic A.T. Kearney/Foreign Policy Magazine: Globalization Index 2005, ranked 4 out of 62 countries IMD International: World Competitiveness Yearbook 2005, ranked 1 out of 60 economies (countries and regions) The Wall Street Journal: 2005 Index of Economic Freedom, ranked 12 out of 155 countries The Economist: The World... Columbia, late 19th century Representative symbol of the USA from a Columbia Records phonograph cylinder package Columbia is a poetic and the first popular name for the United States of America, dating from before the Revolution but which strangely fell out of use in the early 20th century. ... An American B-2 bomber in flight. ...

Notes

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  100. ^ All-Time Medal Standings 1896–2000. Information Please. Accessed 14 September 2006.
  101. ^ Athens 2004 Medal Table. Accessed 14 September 2006.

World Book Encyclopedia is, according to its publisher in the United States, the number-one selling print encyclopedia in the world [1]. The first edition (1917) contained 8 volumes. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 184 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The World Factbook is an annual publication by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with basic almanac-style information about the various countries of the world. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Looking down the Aleutians from an airplane. ... An uninhabited island is an island that has yet to be (or is not currently) populated by humans. ... The Hawaiian island chain. ... The Heritage Foundation, a think tank located in Washington, D.C., is an influential public policy research institute whose stated mission is to formulate and promote conservative public policies based on the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, traditional American values, and a strong national defense. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... Country Italy Region Toscana Province Pisa (PI) Mayor Paolo Fontanelli (since May 25, 2003) Elevation 4 m Area 185 km² Population  - Total (as of December 31, 2005) 90,482  - Density 462/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Pisani Dialing code 050 Postal code 56100 Frazioni Marina di Pisa... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

United States Portal
  • Johnson, Paul M. A History of the American People. 1104 pages. Harper Perennial: March 1, 1999. ISBN 0-06-093034-9.
  • Litwak, Robert S. Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy : Containment after the Cold War. 300 pages. Woodrow Wilson Center Press: February 1, 2000. ISBN 0-943875-97-8.
  • Nye, Joseph S. The Paradox of American Power : Why the World's Only Superpower Can't Go It Alone. 240 pages. Oxford University Press, USA; New Ed edition: 1 May 2003. ISBN 0-19-516110-6.
  • Susser, Ida (Editor), and Patterson, Thomas C. (Editor). Cultural Diversity in the United States: A Critical Reader. 476 pages. Blackwell Publishers: December 2000. ISBN 0-631-22213-8.
  • Whalen, Edward. The United States Of Europe: The New Superpower and the End of American Supremacy. 320 pages. The Penguin Press HC: 4 November 2004. ISBN 1-59420-033-5.
  • Pierson, Paul. Politics in Time : History, Institutions, and Social Analysis. 208 pages. Princeton University Press: 9 August 2004. ISBN 0-691-11715-2.

Image File history File links Portal. ...

External links

Find more information on United States by searching Wikipedia's sister projects:

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Government

Overviews

  • U.S. Census Housing and Economic Statistics Updated regularly by U.S. Bureau of the Census.
  • Portrait of the United States - Published by the United States Information Agency, September 1997.
  • CIA World Factbook Entry for United States
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica, United States - Country Page
  • Info links for each state
  • Population, employment, income, and farm characteristics by State
  • Tours to USA

History

  • Historical Documents
  • National Motto: History and Constitutionality
  • Historicalstatistics.org - Links to historical statistics of USA

Maps

  • WikiSatellite view of United States at WikiMapia
  • The National Atlas of the United States.
  • United States map

Hotspots outline the Egyptian pyramids on WikiMapia. ...

Immigration

  • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services USCIS.gov.
  • U.S. citizenship sample civics questions for naturalization interview Immihelp.com - from an immigrant to future immigrants.
  • Civic Orientation - Sample Questions for Naturalization

Other

  • Voter turnout, Gender quotas, Electoral system design and Political party financing in United States
United States: Membership in International Organizations US Flag
AfDBANZUSAPECARFAsDBASEAN (dialogue partner) • Australia GroupBISCE (observer) • CERN (observer) • CP • EAPC • EBRDFAOG5G7G8G10 • IADB • IAEAIBRDICAOICCICCt (signatory) • ICFTUICRMIDAIEAIFADIFCIFRCSIHOILOIMFIMOInterpolIOCIOMISOITUMIGAMINUSTAHNAM (guest) • NATONEANSGOASOECDOPCW • OSCE • Paris ClubPCAUnited NationsUN Security Council (permanent member) • UNCTADUNESCOUNHCRUNITARUNMEEUNMIKUNMILUNMOVICUNOMIGUNRWAUNTSOUPUWCLWCOWHOWIPOWMOWorld Trade OrganizationZC
History Timeline ( Colonial Era | American Revolution | Westward Expansion | Civil War | World War I | Great Depression | World War II | Cold War | Vietnam War | Civil Rights) | Foreign relations | Military | Demographic and Postal history
Politics Law ( Constitution and Bill of Rights | Declaration of Independence) | Political parties ( Democrats & Republicans) | Elections (Electoral College) | Political scandals | Political divisions | Red state vs. blue state divide
Government Federal agencies | Legislative branch (Congress: House | Senate) Executive branch ( President & Vice-President | Cabinet | Attorney-General | Secretary of State) | Law enforcement ( FBI | Intelligence:CIA | DIA | NIMA | NRO | NSA) | Judicial branch ( Supreme Court) | Military ( Army | Navy | Marines | Air Force | Coast Guard )
Geography Appalachian Mtns. | Rocky Mtns. | Grand Canyon | Great Plains | Midwest | The South | Mississippi River | New England | Mid-Atlantic | Pacific Northwest | Mountains | Valleys | Islands | Rivers | States | Cities | Counties | Regions | Extreme points | National Park System
Economy Banking | Companies | Standard of living | U.S. Dollar | Wall Street | Household income | Poverty | Federal Reserve
Society Demographics | U.S. Census Bureau | Languages | Religion | Social structure | Standard of living | Media | Education | Holidays | Folklore | Middle class | Educational attainment | Professional and working class conflict
Arts Music ( Classical | Folk | Popular) | Film & TV (Hollywood) | Literature ( Poetry | Transcendentalism | Harlem Renaissance | Beat Generation) | Visual arts ( Abstract expressionism) | Cuisine | Dance | Architecture
Other United States territory | Communications | Transportation ( Highways and Interstates | Railroads) | Uncle Sam | Flag | American Dream | Media | Education | Tourism | Social issues ( Immigration | Affirmative action | Racial profiling | Human rights | War on Drugs | Pornography | Same-sex marriage | | Prisons | Capital punishment) | Anti-Americanism | American exceptionalism | American Folklore | American English | United States Mexico barrier | Passenger vehicle transport
United States
Political divisions
Capital District of Columbia
States Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | Florida | Georgia | Hawaii | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming
Insular areas American Samoa | Guam | Northern Mariana Islands | Puerto Rico | Virgin Islands
Minor outlying
islands
Baker Island | Howland Island | Jarvis Island | Johnston Atoll | Kingman Reef | Midway Atoll | Navassa Island | Palmyra Atoll | Wake Island

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... FDR redirects here. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice-President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States of America (1989–1993). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Soviet_Union. ... Stalin redirects here. ... Georgy (Georgii) Maximilianovich Malenkov (Russian: , his first name then surname pronounced GHYOR-ghee mah-leen-KOF; January 8 [O.S. December 26, 1901] 1902 – January 14, 1988) was a Soviet politician, Communist Party leader and close collaborator of Joseph Stalin. ... (Russian: , Nikita Sergeevič Hruščëv; surname commonly romanized as Khrushchev, IPA: ; April 17, 1894 – September 11, 1971) was the leader of the Soviet Union after the death of Joseph Stalin. ... Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev Russian: ; December 19 [O.S. January 1 1907] 1906 – November 10, 1982) was the effective ruler of the Soviet Union from 1964 to 1982, though at first in partnership with others. ... Yuri Vladimirovich Andropov (Russian: Ю́рий Влади́мирович Андро́пов; 15 June [O.S. 2 June] 1914 – February 9, 1984) was a Soviet politician and General Secretary of the CPSU from November 12, 1982 until his death just sixteen months later. ... Konstantin Ustinovich Chernenko (Russian: ; September 24, 1911 – March 10, 1985) was a Soviet politician and General Secretary of the CPSU who led the Soviet Union from February 13, 1984 until his death just thirteen months later. ... (Russian: , Mihail Sergeevič Gorbačëv, IPA: , commonly anglicized as Gorbachev; born March 2, 1931) was leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
USA States . com - US states Portal (651 words)
During the 19th and 20th centuries, 37 new states were added to the original 13 as the nation expanded across the North American continent and acquired a number of overseas possessions.
The United States of America is a federal republic composed of 50 states, of which all except one - Hawaii islands - are in mainland America.
The United States of America, which covers the central part of North America, grew out of the British colonies that were established in the north America in the first half of the 17th century.
Hotels United States - Motels United States - Rooms United States - Bed & Breakfast United States (845 words)
United States of America is a country of the western hemisphere, comprising fifty states and several territories.
Forty-eight contiguous states lie in central North America between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, bounded on land by Canada to the north and Mexico to the south; Alaska is in the northwest of the continent with Canada to its east, and Hawaii is in the mid-Pacific.
The United States is a federal constitutional republic with Washington, D.C. its capital.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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