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Encyclopedia > United States Whig Party

The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. The party was created in order to oppose the policies of Andrew Jackson and called itself the Whig Party by analogy with the English Whigs, who had opposed the power of the King in Restoration England. A political party is a political organization that subscribes to a certain ideology and seeks to attain political power within a government. ... Order: 7th President Vice President: John C. Calhoun (1829-1832) Martin Van Buren (1833-1837) Term of office: March 4, 1829 – March 3, 1837 Preceded by: John Quincy Adams Succeeded by: Martin Van Buren Date of birth: March 15, 1767 Place of birth: Waxhaws area of North Carolina Date of... This article is about the British Whig party. ...

Contents

Creation

The party was formed in the winter of 1833-1834 at Washington dinner parties by National Republicans such as Henry Clay and John Quincy Adams, as well as Southern States' Rights supporters such as W.P. Mangum. In its early form the Whig Party was united only by opposition to the policies of President Andrew Jackson, especially his removal of the deposits from the Bank of the United States. The Whigs also attracted the support of Southern states' rights supporters, such as John Tyler, offended by Jackson's strong nationalistic stand against South Carolina during the nullification crisis. The Whigs pledged themselves to Congressional supremacy, as opposed to the executive action taken by Jackson in removing deposits from the Bank without the consent of Congress, as well as his veto of the recharter of the Bank. Deriding "King Andrew," the American Whigs took their name from the English Whig Party, which had opposed the power of the monarchy and supported Parliamentary control. 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia- June 29, 1852 in Lexington, Kentucky) was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. ... Order: 6th President Vice President: John Caldwell Calhoun Term of office: March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829 Preceded by: James Monroe Succeeded by: Andrew Jackson Date of birth: July 11, 1767 Place of birth: Braintree, Massachusetts Date of death: February 23, 1848 Place of death: Washington, D.C. First Lady... In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, (i. ... Order: 7th President Vice President: John C. Calhoun (1829-1832) Martin Van Buren (1833-1837) Term of office: March 4, 1829 – March 3, 1837 Preceded by: John Quincy Adams Succeeded by: Martin Van Buren Date of birth: March 15, 1767 Place of birth: Waxhaws area of North Carolina Date of... John Tyler ( March 29, 1790 - January 18, 1862) of Virginia was the tenth ( 1841) Vice President of the United States, and the tenth ( 1841- 1845) President of the United States. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,012,012 (26th)  - Density 51. ... This article or section should be merged with nullification Toward the end of his first term in office, United States president Andrew Jackson was forced to confront the state of South Carolina on the issue of the protective tariff enacted in 1828 by the United States federal government to benefit... For related meanings see also Monarch (disambiguation) A monarchy, (from the Greek monos, one, and archein, to rule) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ... The debating chamber or hemicycle of the European Parliament in Brussels. ...


In 1836 the party was not yet sufficiently organised to run one nationwide candidate. Instead William Henry Harrison ran in the northern and border states, Hugh Lawson White ran in the South, and Daniel Webster ran in his home state of Massachusetts. It was hoped that between them they would win enough U.S. Electoral College votes to deny Martin Van Buren a majority and so throw the election into the House of Representatives and there select the most popular Whig candidate as President. This tactic did not succeed, but the various candidates did cut deeply into Martin Van Buren's votes across the country. 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about U.S. President William Henry Harrison. ... This is about the 19th century Tennessee politician; for the 20th century Mississippi politician, see Hugh L. White. ... Is dat zo? ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ...


Victory and catastrophe

In the years that followed, the Whigs began to develop a more comprehensive platform, favoring a protective tariff, the creation of a new Bank of the U.S., and use of the proceeds of public land sales to aid the states in internal improvements. In 1839, the Whigs held their first national convention, giving the nod to Harrison, who was elected president next year, largely as a result of the Panic of 1837 and subsequent depression. 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Panic of 1837 was an economic depression, one of the sharpest financial crises in the history of the United States. ...


Harrison, after contracting pneumonia as the result of a two-hour inauguration speech, served only 31 days and became the first President to die in office. He was succeeded by John Tyler, a Virginian and states' rights Whig, who vetoed most of his own party's legislation and was expelled from the Whigs in 1841. Pneumonia (the ancient Greek word for lungs) is defined as an infection involving the alveoli of the lungs. ... John Tyler ( March 29, 1790 - January 18, 1862) of Virginia was the tenth ( 1841) Vice President of the United States, and the tenth ( 1841- 1845) President of the United States. ... In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, (i. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


However, the Whigs' internal disunity, and the increasing economic prosperity, which made the Whigs' activist economic program seem less necessary, led to a disastrous showing by the Whigs in the 1842 congressional elections, in which they lost control of the House. 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


A house divided

By 1844 the Whigs were beginning to recover from their disaster of two years earlier and nominated Henry Clay, who lost to Democrat James K. Polk in a closely contested race, with Polk's policy of western expansion (particularly the annexation of Texas) and free trade triumphing over Clay's protectionism and caution over the Texas question. The Whigs, both northern and southern, strongly opposed the war with Mexico, which many (including Whig Congressman Abraham Lincoln) saw as an unprincipled land grab, but they were split, as were the Democrats, by the anti-slavery Wilmot Proviso of 1846. In 1848 the Whigs, seeing no hope of succeeding by nominating Clay and pushing for their traditional economic policies, selected Zachary Taylor, a Mexican-American War hero, and adopted no platform at all. Taylor triumphed over the Democratic candidate (Lewis Cass) and the anti-slavery Free Soil Party, who had nominated former President Martin Van Buren. Van Buren's candidacy split the Democratic vote in New York, throwing that state to the Whigs; at the same time, however, the Free Soilers probably cost the Whigs several Midwestern states. 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia- June 29, 1852 in Lexington, Kentucky) was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. ... Order: 11th President Vice President: George M. Dallas Term of office: March 4, 1845 – March 3, 1849 Preceded by: John Tyler Succeeded by: Zachary Taylor Date of birth: November 2, 1795 Place of birth: Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Date of death: June 15, 1849 Place of death: Nashville, Tennessee First... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None. ... The Mexican-American War was a war fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ... In the United States, the Wilmot Proviso, first suggested in 1846 and attached to many bills but never passed, would have outlawed slavery in any U.S. territory gained from the Mexican Cession following the recently begun Mexican-American War. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Zachary Taylor ( November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. ... The Mexican-American War was a war fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782–June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


Had he lived, Taylor might have triggered the Civil War ten years earlier: He was firmly opposed to the Compromise of 1850, committed to the admission of California as a free state, and had proclaimed that he would take military action to prevent secession. But on July 4, 1850, Taylor contracted acute indigestion (probably the result of typhus or cholera) and five days later became the second president to die in office. Vice President Millard Fillmore assumed the Presidency and supported the Compromise. Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This is about the disease Typhus. ... distribution of cholera Cholera (also called Asiatic cholera) is an infectious disease of the gastrointestinal tract caused by the Vibrio cholerae bacterium. ... Millard Fillmore ( January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth ( 1850– 1853) President of the United States and the second President to succeed to the office from the Vice Presidency on the death of the predecessor. ...


Dissolution

Millard Fillmore, the last Whig president

The Compromise of 1850 fractured the Whigs along pro- and anti-slavery lines, with the anti-slavery faction having enough power to deny Fillmore the party's nomination in 1852. Attempting to repeat their earlier successes, the Whigs nominated popular General Winfield Scott, who lost decisively to the Democrats' Franklin Pierce. The Democrats won the election by a large margin. Pierce won 27 of the 31 states including Scott's home state of Virginia. Whig Representative Lewis Campbell of Ohio was particularly distraught by the defeat, exclaiming, "We are slayed. The party is dead--dead--dead!" File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Winfield Scott Winfield Scott (June 13, 1786 – May 29, 1866) was a United States general, diplomat, and presidential candidate. ... Franklin Pierce ( November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was the 14th ( 1853- 1857) President of the United States, and the first president to be born in the 19th century. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ...


In 1854 the Kansas-Nebraska Act divided the Whigs even further. Northern Whigs ran against the Act, and appealed to widespread Northern outrage over the repeal of the Missouri Compromise. The anti-immigration Know-Nothing Party cut deeply into the Whig vote, overwhelming the Whigs in the mid-term elections, and the newly formed Republican Party won support from disaffected Democrats and Whigs. 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Kansas–Nebraska Act was an Act of Congress in 1854 organizing the remaining territory within the Louisiana Purchase for settlement before its admission to the Union. ... The Know-Nothing movement was a nativist American political movement of the 1850s. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


In 1856 the remaining Whigs threw their support behind Fillmore, who by then had switched to the Know-Nothing Party (and who lost to Democrat James Buchanan), and in 1860 a few Whig diehards regrouped as the Constitutional Union Party and nominated John Bell. Bell finished third to ex-Whig Abraham Lincoln of the Republican Party and Southern Democrat John C. Breckinridge in a four-way race (with Northern Democrat Stephen Douglas fourth), triggering the American Civil War and bringing an end to the Whigs. 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Know-Nothing movement was a nativist American political movement of the 1850s. ... For the economist of this name, see James M. Buchanan. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... The Constitutional Union Party was a political party in the United States created in 1860. ... John Bell (February 15, 1797 – September 10, 1869) was a U.S. politician. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ... John Cabell Breckinridge (January 16, 1821–May 17, 1875) was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the fourteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Stephen A. Douglas Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 - June 3, 1861), American politician from Illinois, was one of the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860 (the other being John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky). ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ...


Presidents from the Whig Party

Presidents of the United States, dates in office President of the United States - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...

  1. William Henry Harrison (1841)
  2. John Tyler (see note) (1841-1845)
  3. Zachary Taylor (1849-1850)
  4. Millard Fillmore (1850-1853)

Note: Although Tyler was elected vice president as a Whig, his policies soon proved to be opposed to most of the Whig agenda, and he was officially expelled from the party in 1841, a few months after taking office. Additionally, John Quincy Adams, elected President as a Democratic Republican, later became a Whig when he was elected to the House of Representatives. This article is about U.S. President William Henry Harrison. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... John Tyler ( March 29, 1790 - January 18, 1862) of Virginia was the tenth ( 1841) Vice President of the United States, and the tenth ( 1841- 1845) President of the United States. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Zachary Taylor ( November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Millard Fillmore ( January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth ( 1850– 1853) President of the United States and the second President to succeed to the office from the Vice Presidency on the death of the predecessor. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is a heartbeat from the presidency. As first in the presidential line of succession, the Vice President becomes the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Order: 6th President Vice President: John Caldwell Calhoun Term of office: March 4, 1825 – March 3, 1829 Preceded by: James Monroe Succeeded by: Andrew Jackson Date of birth: July 11, 1767 Place of birth: Braintree, Massachusetts Date of death: February 23, 1848 Place of death: Washington, D.C. First Lady... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ...


Candidates

William Henry Harrison/Francis Granger - 1836 (lost) This article is about U.S. President William Henry Harrison. ... Francis Granger (December 1, 1792 - August 31, 1868) was a Representative from New York. ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Hugh Lawson White/John Tyler - 1836 (lost) This is about the 19th century Tennessee politician; for the 20th century Mississippi politician, see Hugh L. White. ... John Tyler ( March 29, 1790 - January 18, 1862) of Virginia was the tenth ( 1841) Vice President of the United States, and the tenth ( 1841- 1845) President of the United States. ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Daniel Webster/Francis Granger - 1836 (lost) Is dat zo? ... Francis Granger (December 1, 1792 - August 31, 1868) was a Representative from New York. ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


William Henry Harrison/John Tyler - 1840 (won) This article is about U.S. President William Henry Harrison. ... John Tyler ( March 29, 1790 - January 18, 1862) of Virginia was the tenth ( 1841) Vice President of the United States, and the tenth ( 1841- 1845) President of the United States. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Henry Clay/Theodore Frelinghuysen - 1844 (lost) Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia- June 29, 1852 in Lexington, Kentucky) was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. ... This article incorporates facts obtained from the public domain Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Zachary Taylor/Millard Fillmore - 1848 (won) Zachary Taylor ( November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. ... Millard Fillmore ( January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth ( 1850– 1853) President of the United States and the second President to succeed to the office from the Vice Presidency on the death of the predecessor. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Winfield Scott/William Graham - 1852 (lost) Winfield Scott Winfield Scott (June 13, 1786 – May 29, 1866) was a United States general, diplomat, and presidential candidate. ... William Graham may refer to: William Alexander Graham, Governor and Senator from North Carolina William Graham, Representative from Indiana William Graham, American Revolution militia leader at the Battle of Kings Mountain William Graham, a British statesman who eventually presided over the Board of Trade William Graham, Welsh Assembly member... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


See also: List of political parties in the United States Political parties in the United States lists political parties in the United States. ...


Further reading

  • Holt, Michael. The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party: Jacksonian Politics and the Onset of Civil War. Oxford University Press, 2003. ISBN 0-195-16104-1.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Whig Party (United States) - MSN Encarta (595 words)
The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy.
Antislavery Whigs, known as Conscience Whigs, in Massachusetts opposed the so-called Cotton Whigs in the proslavery states.
Despite the dissension, the Whig party, with the popular general Zachary Taylor as its candidate, was successful in the presidential election of 1848.
Whig Party (United States) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2613 words)
The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy.
Tyler vetoed the Whig economic legislation and was expelled from the Whig party in 1841.
Whig Representative Lewis Davis Campbell of Ohio was particularly distraught by the defeat, exclaiming, "We are slayed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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