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Encyclopedia > United States Treasury Department
Dept. of the Treasury
Seal of the Department of the Treasury
Established: September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years). There are 120 days remaining. September Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23... September 2, Years: 1786 1787 1788 - 1789 - 1790 1791 1792 Decades: 1750s 1760s 1770s - 1780s - 1790s 1800s 1810s Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century 1789 in art 1789 in literature 1789 in music 1789 in science List of state leaders in 1789 List of colonial governors in 1789 List of religious... 1789
Activated: September 11 is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years). There are 111 days remaining. It is usually the first day of the Coptic calendar (in the period 1900 to 2099 A.D.). The terms September 11th and 9/11 have been widely used in the Western... September 11, Years: 1786 1787 1788 - 1789 - 1790 1791 1792 Decades: 1750s 1760s 1770s - 1780s - 1790s 1800s 1810s Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century 1789 in art 1789 in literature 1789 in music 1789 in science List of state leaders in 1789 List of colonial governors in 1789 List of religious... 1789
The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. He or she is head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. Most of... Secretary: John William Snow (born August 2, 1939) is the current and 73rd United States Secretary of the Treasury who replaced departing Secretary Paul ONeill on February 3, 2003. Contents // 1 Career 2 Personal Life 3 Quotes 4 External link Career He was nominated by President George W. Bush on... John W. Snow
Deputy Secretary: Vacant
The Treasurer of the United States is the only position within the United States Department of the Treasury older than the Department itself. It was established on September 6, 1777. The Treasurer was originally charged with the receipt and custody of government funds, though many of these functions have been... Treasurer Anna Escobedo Cabral
Budget: $11.1 billion (2004)
Employees: 115,897 (2004)

The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. Members are seated according to order of precedence. The Cabinet is a part of the executive branch of the U.S. federal government consisting of the heads of federal executive departments. Despite having evolved as one of the most powerful organs of the contemporary... Cabinet department, a For the U.S. government securities, see Treasury security A treasury is the part of a government which manages all money and revenue. A treasurer is somebody who runs a treasury; although, in some systems (such as the US) the treasurer reports to a secretary of the treasury. Notable Treasuries... treasury, of the For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). The United States of America, also referred to as the United States, U.S.A., U.S., US, America¹, or the States, is a federal republic of fifty states, mostly in central North America. The U.S. has three land... United States Federal government of the United States ... government established by an Act of The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. It is established by Article One of the Constitution of the United States, which also deliniates its structure and powers. Congress is a bicameral legislature, consisting of the House of... U.S. Congress in Years: 1786 1787 1788 - 1789 - 1790 1791 1792 Decades: 1750s 1760s 1770s - 1780s - 1790s 1800s 1810s Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century 1789 in art 1789 in literature 1789 in music 1789 in science List of state leaders in 1789 List of colonial governors in 1789 List of religious... 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government.

Contents

Overview

It is administered by the The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. He or she is head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. Most of... United States Secretary of the Treasury and the The Treasurer of the United States is the only position within the United States Department of the Treasury older than the Department itself. It was established on September 6, 1777. The Treasurer was originally charged with the receipt and custody of government funds, though many of these functions have been... Treasurer of the United States who receives and keeps the monies of the United States. The Department prints and mints all the Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. Federal Reserve notes are legal tender currency notes. They are issued by the Federal Reserve Banks and have replaced United States notes which... Federal Reserve notes and Current US Coinage. Top row: Lincoln Cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Sacagawea Dollar. Middle row: Kennedy Half Dollar, Obverse of the Statehood Quarters. Bottom row: the Statehood Quarters of 1999: Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, and Connecticut. There are six denominations of United States coinage (or specie) currently in circulation... coins in circulation through the United States Department of the Treasury that primarily prints Federal Reserve notes for the Federal Reserve, but also produces a variety of other government security documents. The Federal Reserve notes are printed at the bureaus facilities in Washington, D.C. and Fort Worth, Texas. The BEP produces other government... Bureau of Engraving and Printing and the The United States Mint is responsible for producing and circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. The US Mint was created by Congress with the Coinage Act on April 2, 1792, within the Department of State, located in Philadelphia. It was the first building of... United States Mint. It also collects all A tax is an involuntary fee paid by individuals or businesses to a government. Taxes may be paid in cash or kind (although payments in kind may not always be allowed or classified as taxes in all systems). The means of taxation, and the uses to which the funds raised... taxes through the The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is the United States government agency that collects taxes and enforces the tax laws. It is a part of the Department of the Treasury. In 1862, during the Civil War, President Lincoln and Congress created the Commissioner of Internal Revenue and enacted an income tax... Internal Revenue Service.

Enlarge
Treasury Department official, surrounded by packages of newly minted currency, counting and wrapping dollar bills. Washington, D.C., 1907.

The basic functions of the Department of the Treasury include:

  • Managing Federal finances;
  • Collecting The tax, tariff and trade laws of a political region, state or trade bloc determine which forms of consumption and production tend to be encouraged or discouraged. All three are often changed by a trade pact. Typically all three types of laws must also be changed to implement any program... taxes, duties and monies paid to and due to the U.S. and paying all bills of the U.S.;
  • Producing all This 1974 stamp from Japan depicts a Class 8620 steam locomotive. A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. Usually a small paper rectangle which is attached to an envelope, signifying that the person sending the letter or package has paid for delivery, it is... postage stamps, For exchange rates, see ... here. A currency is a The word unit means any of several things: One, the first natural number. The natural or usual or smallest measure of something, of which there are multiples and of which there may be fractions. In most physical contexts, for example science... currency and coinage;
  • Managing Government accounts and the The U.S. public debt is the amount of money that the United States federal government (not the states or banks or corporations or individuals) owes. The calculation of the debt is subject to political manipulation and creative accounting, but the accounting assumptions behind any specific set of numbers can... U.S. public debt;
  • Supervising national For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). The essential function of a bank is to provide services related to the storing of value and the extending of credit. The evolution of banking dates back to the earliest writing, and continues in the present where a bank is a financial institution that... banks and thrift institutions;
  • Advising on domestic and international financial, This article or section should include material from Monetary policy of central banks Monetary policy is the process of managing a nations money supply to achieve specific goals—such as constraining inflation, achieving full employment or more well-being. Since the mid 1980s in most nations it has... monetary, In Governments Economic policies determine the set of actions that a government can take in terms of its expenditure, borrowing, setting of interest rates, etc. Such policies are often dictated or influenced by the IMF or World Bank as well as political belief systems and the consequent policies of parties... economic, An industrial policy is any government regulation or law that encourages the ongoing operation of, or investment in, a particular industry. It is often related to, or wholly determinant of, investment policy for that industry. An active intervention in industrial development is the policy of most if not all countries... trade and tax policy - Fiscal Policy is the economic term which describes the behaviour of governments in raising money to fund current spending and investment for collective social purposes and for transfer payments to citizens and residents of the territory for which the government is responsible. The money may be raised by taxation, by... fiscal policy being the sum of these, and the ultimate responsibility of The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. It is established by Article One of the Constitution of the United States, which also deliniates its structure and powers. Congress is a bicameral legislature, consisting of the House of... US Congress.
  • Enforcing Federal finance and tax laws;
  • Investigating and prosecuting This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance and tax mitigation. Tax evasion is the general term for efforts by individuals, firms, trusts and other entities to evade the payment of taxes by breaking the law. Tax evasion usually entails taxpayers deliberately misrepresenting or concealing the true state of their affairs... tax evaders, A counterfeit is an imitation that is made with the intent to deceptively represent its content or origins. The word counterfeit most frequently describes forged money or documents, but can also describe clothing, software, pharmaceuticals, or any other manufactured item. Contents // 1 History 2 Anti-counterfeiting measures 3 Money Art... counterfeiters, Forgery is the process of making or adapting objects or documents (see false document), with the intention to deceive (fraud is the use of objects obtained through forgery). Copies, studio replicas, and reproductions are not considered forgeries, though they may later become forgeries through knowing and willful mis-attributions. In... forgers, These lollipops, above, were found to contain heroin when inspected by the DEA. Smuggling is illegal transport, in particular across a border. Taxes are avoided, or the goods themselves are illegal, or people are transported to a place where they are not allowed to be. It has a long and... smugglers, Shine Road The name tells the history of this back road Hemingway, South Carolina The literal meaning of moonshine is the light of the moon, but because the activity of distilling whiskey unlawfully was usually done at night with as little light as possible, the word became both a verb... illicit spirits distillers, and gun law violators.

The term Monetary reform is accounting reform that reaches more deeply into banking central bank, money supply and monetary policy. It affects how money is created and destroyed, and what constitutes a reliable measure of economic growth and measures of national income. In the United States, the Federal Reserve and Department of... Treasury reform usually refers narrowly to reform of This article or section should include material from Monetary policy of central banks Monetary policy is the process of managing a nations money supply to achieve specific goals—such as constraining inflation, achieving full employment or more well-being. Since the mid 1980s in most nations it has... monetary policy and related In Governments Economic policies determine the set of actions that a government can take in terms of its expenditure, borrowing, setting of interest rates, etc. Such policies are often dictated or influenced by the IMF or World Bank as well as political belief systems and the consequent policies of parties... economic policy and Accounting reform is change to accounting rules that goes beyond the enforcement of standard accounting practices and the elimination of creative accounting. It is advocated by those who consider the present standards and practices of the profession wholly inadequate to the task of measuring and reporting the activity, success, and... accounting reform. The broader term Monetary reform is accounting reform that reaches more deeply into banking central bank, money supply and monetary policy. It affects how money is created and destroyed, and what constitutes a reliable measure of economic growth and measures of national income. In the United States, the Federal Reserve and Department of... monetary reform usually involves changes to institutions created at the The Bretton Woods system of international economic management established the rules for commercial and financial relations among the major industrial states. The Bretton Woods system was the first example of a fully negotiated monetary order in world history intended to govern monetary relations among independent nation-states. Preparing to rebuild... Bretton Woods Conference of 1944, e.g. the World Bank, which govern the relationship of the The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. It is also widely used as a reserve currency outside of the United States. Currently, the issuance of currency is controlled by the Federal Reserve Banking system. The most commonly used symbol for the U.S. dollar is... US dollar to other global currencies.


History

The Office of the Treasurer is the only office in the Treasury Department that is older than the Department itself. It is an office that was originally created by the The Continental Congress was the federal legislature of the Thirteen Colonies and later of the United States from 1774 to 1789, a period that included the American Revolutionary War and the Articles of Confederation. There were two Continental Congresses. Contents // 1 The Continental Congress 2 Dates and Places of Sessions... Continental Congress in Years: 1772 1773 1774 - 1775 - 1776 1777 1778 Decades: 1740s 1750s 1760s - 1770s - 1780s 1790s 1800s Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century 1775 in art 1775 in literature 1775 in music 1775 in science List of state leaders in 1775 List of religious leaders in 1775 Contents // 1 Events... 1775. The Department of the Treasury was created by an Act of Congress passed on September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years). There are 120 days remaining. September Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23... September 2, Years: 1786 1787 1788 - 1789 - 1790 1791 1792 Decades: 1750s 1760s 1770s - 1780s - 1790s 1800s 1810s Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century 1789 in art 1789 in literature 1789 in music 1789 in science List of state leaders in 1789 List of colonial governors in 1789 List of religious... 1789:

Download high resolution version (834x422, 108 KB)US Treasury, government etching, public domain, large version 830x420 This work is in the public domain because it is a work of the United States federal Government. This applies worldwide. See Copyright. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete...
Download high resolution version (834x422, 108 KB)US Treasury, government etching, public domain, large version 830x420 This work is in the public domain because it is a work of the United States federal Government. This applies worldwide. See Copyright. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete... Enlarge
The US Treasury, Washington D.C.
And be it...enacted, That it shall be the duty of the Secretary of the Treasury to digest and prepare plans for the improvement and management of the revenue, and for the support of public credit; to prepare and report estimates of the public revenue, and the public expenditures; to superintend the collection of revenue; to decide on the forms of keeping and stating accounts and making returns, and to grant under the limitations herein established, or to be hereafter provided, all warrants for monies to be issued from the Treasury, in pursuance of appropriations by law; to execute such services relative to the sale of the lands belonging to the United States, as may be by law required of him; to make report, and give information to either branch of the legislature, in person or in writing (as he may be required), respecting all matters referred to him by the Senate or House of Representatives, or which shall appertain to his office; and generally to perform all such services relative to the finances, as he shall be directed to perform. [1] (http://www.ustreas.gov/education/fact-sheets/history/act-congress.html)

Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 – July 12, 1804) was an American statesman, journalist, and lawyer. One of Americas most prominent early constitutional lawyers, he was an influential delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention and the principal author of the Federalist Papers which successfully... Alexander Hamilton was sworn in as the first Secretary of the Treasury on September 11 is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years). There are 111 days remaining. It is usually the first day of the Coptic calendar (in the period 1900 to 2099 A.D.). The terms September 11th and 9/11 have been widely used in the Western... September 11, Years: 1786 1787 1788 - 1789 - 1790 1791 1792 Decades: 1750s 1760s 1770s - 1780s - 1790s 1800s 1810s Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century 1789 in art 1789 in literature 1789 in music 1789 in science List of state leaders in 1789 List of colonial governors in 1789 List of religious... 1789. The Treasury Building is on the back of the U.S. The old and new ten dollar bill The U.S. ten dollar bill ($10) is a denomination of United States currency. U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton is currently featured on the front side of the bill, while the U.S. Treasury is featured on the reverse side... $10 bill, the same bill with Alexander Hamilton's portrait.


Operating units

  • The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, shortened to Tax and Trade Bureau or TTB, is a part of the United States Department of the Treasury. It was established in January 2003, as part of a reorganization following the establishment of the United States Department of Homeland Security. The... Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB)
  • United States Department of the Treasury that primarily prints Federal Reserve notes for the Federal Reserve, but also produces a variety of other government security documents. The Federal Reserve notes are printed at the bureaus facilities in Washington, D.C. and Fort Worth, Texas. The BEP produces other government... Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP)
  • Bureau of the Public Debt
  • The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) maintains a comprehensive database of financial records created in 1990 as an arm of the United States Department of the Treasury to combat money laundering. Their primary purpose is to gather information on the movement of large or suspicious amounts of money, and to... Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN)
  • Financial Management Service (FMS)
  • The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is the United States government agency that collects taxes and enforces the tax laws. It is a part of the Department of the Treasury. In 1862, during the Civil War, President Lincoln and Congress created the Commissioner of Internal Revenue and enacted an income tax... Internal Revenue Service (IRS)
  • The United States Office of the Comptroller of the Treasury was established in 1863 and serves to charter, regulate and supervise all National banks and the federal branches and agencies of foreign banks. Headquartered in Washington D.C. with four district offices and a London office to supervise the international... Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC)
  • Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS)
  • The United States Mint is responsible for producing and circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. The US Mint was created by Congress with the Coinage Act on April 2, 1792, within the Department of State, located in Philadelphia. It was the first building of... United States Mint

Effective January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 341 days remaining (342 in leap years). January Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19... January 24, 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Years: 2000 2001 2002 - 2003 - 2004 2005 2006 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan... 2003 the US Firearms Legal Topics: Assault weapons ban Brady Handgun Act BATFE (law enforcement) Gun Control Act of 1968 Gun politics in the US National Firearms Act 2nd Amendment Straw purchase Sullivan Act (New York) Violent Crime Control Act The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATFE or ATFE) is... Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms was no longer a Bureau of the Department of the Treasury. The law enforcement functions of ATF have been transferred to the Dept. of Justice Established: June 22, 1870 Activated: July 1, 1870 Attorney General: Alberto Gonzales Deputy Atty. Gen.: James B. Comey Budget: $23.4 billion (2004) Employees: 112,557 (2004) The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the... Department of Justice. The tax and trade functions of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms remained with Treasury at the new Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.


On March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). There are 305 days remaining. March Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19... March 1, 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Years: 2000 2001 2002 - 2003 - 2004 2005 2006 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan... 2003 the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, the The United States Customs Service (now the United States Customs and Border Protection Service or CBP) was the portion of the US Federal Government dedicated to keeping illegal products outside of US borders. It also regulated what could leave the United States and was partially responsible for who could enter... United States Customs Service, and the The United States Secret Service is a United States federal government law enforcement agency that is part of the United States Department of Homeland Security (prior to the foundation of that department in 2002, it was under Treasury). The Secret Service has primary jurisdiction over counterfeiting of currency and US... United States Secret Service moved to the Dept. of Homeland Security Larger version Established: November 25, 2002 Activated: January 24, 2003 Secretary: Vacant Deputy Secretary: James M. Loy Budget: $36.5 billion (2004) Employees: 183,000 (2004) The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States... United States Department of Homeland Security.


The Office of the General Counsel for the Department of the Treasury is charged with supervising all legal proceedings involving the collection of debts due the United States, establishing regulations to guide customs collectors, issuing distress warrants against delinquent revenue collectors or receivers of public money, examining Treasury officers' official bonds and related legal documents, serving as legal adviser to the department and administered lands acquired by the United States in payment for debts. This office was preceded by the offices of the The Comptroller of the Treasury is a U.S. federal government official who examines accounts and signs drafts. This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. Categories: Government stubs | 1911 Britannica ... Comptroller of the Treasury (1789-1817), The Comptroller of the Treasury is a U.S. federal government official who examines accounts and signs drafts. This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. Categories: Government stubs | 1911 Britannica ... First Comptroller of the Treasury (1817-20), Agent of the Treasury (1820-30) and Solicitor of the Treasury 1830-1934.


External link


The United States Federal Executive Departments are among the oldest primary units of the executive branch of the federal government of the United States—the Departments of State, War, and the Treasury all being established within a few weeks of each other in 1789. The heads of the federal... United States Federal Executive Departments Download high resolution version (1520x800, 18 KB) This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons. Please see its description page there. Commons:File links The following pages link to this file: Abu Dhabi or Abu Zaby (Arabic language: أبوظبي) is the largest of the seven...
Dept. of State Larger version Established: July 27, 1789 Renamed: September 15, 1789 Secretary: Condoleezza Rice Deputy Secretary: Robert Zoellick Budget: $9.96 billion (2004) Employees: 30,266 (2004) The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of... State | Treasury | Dept. of Defense Established: July 26, 1947 Activated: September 18, 1947 Renamed: August 10, 1949 Secretary: Donald Rumsfeld Deputy Secretary: Paul Wolfowitz Budget: $375.2 billion (2004) Employees: 700,000 civilian 2.3 million military (2004) The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the... Defense | Dept. of Justice Established: June 22, 1870 Activated: July 1, 1870 Attorney General: Alberto Gonzales Deputy Atty. Gen.: James B. Comey Budget: $23.4 billion (2004) Employees: 112,557 (2004) The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the... Justice | Dept. of the Interior Larger version Established: March 3, 1849 Activated: March 8, 1849 Secretary: Gale Norton Deputy Secretary: J. Steven Griles Budget: $10.7 billion (2004) Employees: 71,436 (2004) The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages... Interior | Dept. of Agriculture Established: February 9, 1889 Activated: February 15, 1889 Secretary: Mike Johanns Deputy Secretary: Jim Moseley Budget: $77.6 billion (2004) Employees: 109,832 (2004) The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government... Agriculture | Dept. of Commerce Established: February 14, 1903 Activated: February 18, 1903 Renamed: March 4, 1913 Secretary: Carlos M. Gutierrez Deputy Secretary: Theodore W. Kassinger Budget: $6.2 billion (2004) Employees: 36,000 (2004) Main entrance of U.S. Department of Commerce The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet... Commerce | Dept. of Labor Established: March 4, 1913 Activated: March 5, 1913 Secretary: Elaine L. Chao Deputy Secretary: Steven J. Law Budget: $59.7 billion (2004) Employees: 17,347 (2004) The United States Department of Labor is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for occupational safety, wage and... Labor | Dept. of Health and Human Services Established: October 17, 1979 Activated: May 4, 1980 Secretary: Michael O. Leavitt Deputy Secretary: Claude A. Allen Budget: $543.2 billion (2004) Employees: 67,000 (2004) The United States Department of Health and Human Services, often abbreviated HHS, is a Cabinet department of the... Health and Human Services | Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Established: September 9, 1965 Activated: January 13, 1966 Secretary: Alphonso Jackson Deputy Secretary: Roy Bernardi Budget: $46.2 billion (2004) Employees: 10,600 (2004) The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States... Housing and Urban Development | Dept. of Transportation Established October 15, 1966 Activated April 1, 1967 Secretary Norman Mineta Deputy Secretary Kirk K. Van Tine (acting) Budget $58.0 billion (2004) Employees 58,622 (2004) The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transport. It... Transportation | Dept. of Energy Established: August 4, 1977 Activated: October 1, 1977 Secretary: Samuel W. Bodman Deputy Secretary: Kyle E. McSlarrow Budget: $21.5 billion (2004) Employees: 16,100 federal 100,000 contract (2004) The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government... Energy | Dept. of Education Established: October 17, 1979 Activated: May 4, 1980 Secretary: Margaret Spellings Deputy Secretary: Eugene W. Hickok Budget: $62.8 billion (2004) Employees: 4,487 (2004) The United States Department of Education was created in 1979 (by PL 96-88) as a Cabinet-level department of the United... Education | Dept. of Veterans Affairs Larger version Established: October 25, 1988 Activated: March 15, 1989 Secretary James Nicholson Deputy Secretary: Gordon H. Mansfield Budget: $60.3 billion (2004) Employees: 218,323 (2004) The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for... Veterans Affairs | Dept. of Homeland Security Larger version Established: November 25, 2002 Activated: January 24, 2003 Secretary: Vacant Deputy Secretary: James M. Loy Budget: $36.5 billion (2004) Employees: 183,000 (2004) The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States... Homeland Security

  Results from FactBites:
 
United States Department of the Treasury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (650 words)
1500 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department and the treasury of the United States government.
(a) The Department of the Treasury is an executive department of the United States Government at the seat of the Government.
This office was preceded by the offices of the Comptroller of the Treasury (1789-1817), First Comptroller of the Treasury (1817-20), Agent of the Treasury (1820-30) and Solicitor of the Treasury 1830-1934.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: United States Department of the Treasury (3000 words)
The Department of the Treasury was created by an Act of Congress passed on September 2, 1789: The Continental Congress is the label given to three successive bodies of representatives: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774 to October 26, 1774.
The United States Office of the Comptroller of the Treasury was established in 1863 and serves to charter, regulate and supervise all National banks and the federal branches and agencies of foreign banks.
The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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