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Encyclopedia > United States Supreme Court building
Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C.
Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C.
United States of America
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United States Supreme Court Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 587 KB) Summary US Supreme Court Building Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 587 KB) Summary US Supreme Court Building Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties Libertarian Party State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body...


The Court
Decisions · Process
History · Building
Current membership
Chief Justice
John Roberts

Associate Justices
John Paul Stevens
Antonin Scalia
Anthony Kennedy
David Souter
Clarence Thomas
Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Stephen Breyer
Samuel Alito
This is a chronological list of notable cases decided by the Supreme Court of the United States. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the only court specifically established by the Constitution of the United States, implemented in 1789. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the only court specifically established by the Constitution of the United States, implemented in 1789; under the Judiciary Act of 1789, the Court was to be composed of six members—though the number of justices has been nine for almost all of... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... John Glover Roberts Jr. ... Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States. ... John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is an American jurist, and the senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... This page is about the Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. ... David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1990. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ...


Retired Associate Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor
Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ...

All members
List of all members
(By Court · By seat · By time in office)

List of Chief Justices
(By time in office)
A Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States is nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the U.S. Senate, with at least half of that body approving in the affirmative. ... In order to become a Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States, an individual must be nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the U.S. Senate, with at least half of that body approving in the affirmative. ... In order to become a Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States, an individual must be nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the U.S. Senate, with at least half of that body approving in the affirmative. ... This is a list of U.S. Supreme Court Justices by time in office. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... This is a list of U.S. Chief Justices by time in office. ...


All nominations
Unsuccessful nominations
To become a Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States, an individual must be nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the U.S. Senate, with at least half of that body approving in the affirmative. ... Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. ...


Court demographics The demographics of the Supreme Court of the United States have been raised as an issue in various contexts over the last century. ...


Other countries · Law Portal
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The building's facade underwent renovation during the summer of 2006.
The building's facade underwent renovation during the summer of 2006.
A scale model of the interior
A scale model of the interior

The Supreme Court building is the seat of the Supreme Court of the United States. It is situated in Washington D.C. at One First Street Northeast, on the block immediately east of the United States Capitol. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 584 pixel Image in higher resolution (1299 × 948 pixel, file size: 233 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The facade of the United States Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. underwent extensive renovation in the summer of 2006. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 584 pixel Image in higher resolution (1299 × 948 pixel, file size: 233 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The facade of the United States Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. underwent extensive renovation in the summer of 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties Libertarian Party State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... The United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ...

Contents

Historical

Prior to the establishment of the Federal City, the United States government resided briefly in New York City (where the Supreme Court met for the first time, in the Merchants Exchange Building) and Philadelphia (where the court first met in Independence Hall, then later in City Hall).[1] Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D...


After the federal government was established in Washington, the court was housed in a small, basement room in the United States Capitol.[2] It remained in the Capitol until 1935, with the exception of a period from 1812 to 1817, during which the Court was absent from Washington due to the War of 1812. The United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Combatants United States Native Americans United Kingdom, Canadian provincial forces First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war...


As the Senate expanded, it progressively outgrew its quarters, and the Court twice moved in to occupy a chamber abandoned by the Senate, first in 1810[3] (a space it was to share "with several other courts, among them the United States Circuit Court and the Orphans' Court of the District of Columbia"[4]), and again in 1860 when the Court moved to The Old Senate Chamber (as it is now known) where it remained until its move to the current Supreme Court building.[5] In 1929, Chief Justice William Howard Taft argued, successfully, for the Court to have its own building, to distance itself from Congress as an independent branch of government. Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, the 10th Chief Justice of the United States, a leader of the progressive conservative wing of the Republican Party in the early 20th century, a chaired professor at Yale Law... Congress in Joint Session. ...


The "temple of justice"

The Supreme Court building, located at 1, 1st St. N.E., Washington D.C., across the street from the U.S. Capitol, was designed by architect Cass Gilbert, and rises four stories (92 feet) above grade. The cornerstone was laid on October 13, 1932 and construction completed in 1935, having cost $9,740,000 — $94,000 under budget. "The building was designed on a scale in keeping with the importance and dignity of the Court and the Judiciary as a coequal, independent branch of the United States Government, and as a symbol of “the national ideal of justice in the highest sphere of activity.”"[6] The United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Woolworth Building (New York City), was the worlds tallest building at the time it was built, in 1909. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ...


The public façade of the Supreme Court building is made of marble quarried from Vermont, and that of the non-public-facing courtyards, Georgian marble. Most of the interior spaces are lined with Alabama marble, but for the Courtroom itself, which is lined with Spanish Ivory Vein marble.[7] For the Courtroom's 24 columns, "Gilbert felt that only the ivory buff and golden marble from the Montarrenti quarries near Siena, Italy" would suffice. To this end, in May 1933, he petitioned the Italian premier, Benito Mussolini, "to ask his assistance in guaranteeing that the Siena quarries sent nothing inferior to the official sample marble".[8] This page is not about the form of limonite clay called sienna. ... Mussolini holding a speech. ...


Not all the justices were thrilled by the new arrangements, the courtroom in particular. Harlan Fiske Stone complained it was "almost bombastically pretentious...Wholly inappropriate for a quiet group of old boys such as the Supreme Court." Another justice observed that he felt the court would be "nine black beetles in the Temple of Karnak," while still another complained that such pomp and ceremony suggested the Justices ought to enter the courtroom riding on elephants.[9] A wag noted at the time of its opening that it had high windows "to throw the New Deal out of". Harlan Fiske Stone (October 11, 1872 – April 22, 1946) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as the dean of Columbia Law School, Attorney General of the United States, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and later Chief Justice of the United States. ... Suborders Adephaga Archostemata Myxophaga Polyphaga See subgroups of the order Coleoptera Beetles are the most diverse group of insects. ... Map of Karnak, showing major temple complexes Interior of Temple First pylon of precinct of Amun viewed from the west Al-Karnak (Arabic الكرنك, in Ancient Egypt was named Ipet Sut, the most venerated place) is a small village in Egypt, located on the banks of the River Nile some 2. ... The New Deal was the name President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs between 1933–1938 with the goal of relief, recovery and reform of the United States economy during the Great Depression. ...


The west facade of the building (essentially, the "front" of the court, being the side which faces the Capitol) bears the motto "Equal Justice Under Law," while the east facade bears the motto "Justice, the Guardian of Liberty."


The building's facilities include:

  • In the basement: maintenance facilities, garage, on-site mailroom.
  • On the ground floor: Public information office, the clerk's office, the publications unit, exhibit halls, cafeteria, gift shop and administrative offices.
  • On the first floor: the Great Hall, the courtroom, the conference room, and all of the justices' chambers except Justice Ginsburg (she chose a roomier office on the second floor).
  • On the second floor: The justices' dining and reading rooms are on this floor. Also, the office of the reporter of decisions, the legal office and the offices of the law clerks.
  • On the third floor: The court library
  • On the fourth floor: The Supreme Court gym, including a basketball court, referred to jokingly as "the highest court in the land."[10]

The Supreme Court building is under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol. In addition, the Supreme Court building maintains its own police force, the Supreme Court Police. Separate from the Capitol Police, the force was created in 1935 to look after the building and its personnel. The Court operates on an annual budget of approximately $15m, and requested a budget of $16.7m for FY2006.[11] Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... A dining room is a room for eating. ... Modern-style library In its traditional sense, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ... Seal of the Supreme Court The Reporter of Decisions of the United States Supreme Court is the official charged with editing and publishing the Courts decisions both when announced and in the bound volumes of the United States Reports. ... In the United States and Canada, a law clerk is a person who provides assistance to a judge in researching issues before the court and in writing opinions. ... Fordham Law School Library, also a Government Document Depository. ... Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops. ... In basketball, the basketball court is the playing surface, consisting of a rectangular floor with baskets at either end. ... United States Capitol The Architect of the Capitol is responsible to the United States Congress for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, which includes the Capitol, the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the United States Supreme Court building, the United States... The Supreme Court of the United States Police is a small yet growing federal law enforcement agency in the District of Columbia, whose mission is to ensure the integrity of the Constitutional mission of the Supreme Court by protecting the United States Supreme Court building, the Justices, employees, guests, and...


The sculptural program

Cass Gilbert's design for the building and its environs included an ambitious beaux-arts styled sculptural program that included a large number and variety of both real and allegorical figures.

  • Supreme Court Flagpole Bases, and bronze doors in the east and west facades by John Donnelly.
  • West pediment - Equal Justice Under the Law by Robert Aitken This work includes a portrait of Cass Gilbert in the far left of the pediment.
  • Seated figures - The Authority of Law and The Contemplation of Justice by James Earle Fraser

The Standing Liberty Quarter has the initial of designer Hermon Atkins MacNeil on its face above the date Hermon Atkins MacNeil (1866-1947) was an American sculptor born at Chelsea, Massachusetts. ... Robert Aitken, His Bible, sometimes referred to as The Bible of the Revolution, was the first known English-language Bible to be printed in America and was is the only Bible to receive Congressional approval. ... Woolworth Building (New York City), was the worlds tallest building at the time it was built, in 1909. ... End of the Trail James Earle Fraser (November 4, 1876 – October 11, 1953) was an American sculptor, born in Winona, Minnesota. ... BC may stand for: Before Christ (see Anno Domini) : an abbreviation used to refer to a year before the beginning of the year count that starts with the supposed year of the birth of Jesus. ... Menes was an Egyptian pharaoh of the First dynasty, to some authors the founder of this dynasty, to others the Second. ... This diorite head is believed to represent Hammurabi Hammurabi (Akkadian from Amorite ˤAmmurāpi, the kinsman is a healer, from ˤAmmu, paternal kinsman, and Rāpi, healer; 1810 BC?–1750 BC) also rarely transliterated Ammurapi, Hammurapi, or Khammurabi) was the sixth king of Babylon. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... King Solomon Latin name (Hebrew: שְׁלֹמֹה, (Shlomo) Standard Tibe88rian ; Arabic: سليمان, Sulayman; all essentially meaning peace) is a figure described in Middle Eastern scriptures as a wise ruler of an empire centred on the united Kingdom of Israel. ... In Ancient Greece and/or Greek mythology, the name Lycurgus/Lykurgus can refer to: An alternate name for Lycomedes. ... Solon Solon (Greek: , ca. ... Look up Draconian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Confucius (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kung-fu-tzu, lit. ... { Augustus (Latin: IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS;[1] September 23, 63 BC–August 19, AD 14), known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (English Octavian; Latin: C•IVLIVS•C•F•CAESAR•OCTAVIANVS), for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, was the first and among the most important of... Dionysius Exiguus invented Anno Domini years to date Easter. ... Justinian may refer to: Justinian I, a Roman Emperor; Justinian II, a Byzantine Emperor; Justinian, a storeship sent to the convict settlement at New South Wales in 1790. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... John deer hunting, from a manuscript in the British Library. ... Louis IX or Saint Louis (April 25, 1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... Hugo Grotius (Huig de Groot, or Hugo de Groot; Delft, 10 April 1583 – Rostock, 28 August 1645) worked as a jurist in the Dutch Republic and laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. ... William Blackstone as illustrated in his Commentaries on the Laws of England. ... John Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was an American statesman and jurist who shaped American constitutional law and made the Supreme Court a center of power. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...

Miscellaneous

Ten Commandments in the Courtroom
Ten Commandments in the Courtroom
  • On November 28, 2005, a basketball-sized chunk of marble weighing approximately 172 lbs. fell four stories from the façade onto the steps of the Court; it had previously been part of the parapet above the word UNDER (as in, "Equal justice UNDER law", engraved on the court's façade ), and immediately above the figure of a Roman centurion carrying a fasces. The falling piece did not appear to be related to restoration work that was underway in the building at the time.[12]
  • The Courtroom frieze depicts the history of law, including the Ten Commandments. The commandments, written in Hebrew, are shown held by Moses, although only commandments six through ten, usually considered the more secular commands, are visible. Further, Moses' beard obscures some of the words so that instead of reading "Thou Shalt Not Steal," it says "Steal," and similarly appears to command viewers to murder and commit adultery. There are also other figures engraved in the chambers, including the Muslim prophet Muhammad and a larger-than-life frieze of Napoleon Bonaparte among the 18 marble likenesses on the courtroom's north and south walls.[13]
  • In 1997, the Council on American-Islamic Relations demanded the Supreme Court remove the image of Muhammad from the marble frieze of the façade. While appreciating the fact that Muhammad was included in the court’s pantheon of 18 prominent lawgivers of history, CAIR noted that Islam discouraged its followers from portraying any prophet in paintings, sculptures or other artistic representations. CAIR also objected that the prophet was shown with a sword, reinforcing long-held stereotypes of Muslims as intolerant conquerors. Chief Justice William Rehnquist rejected the request to sandblast Muhammad, saying the artwork “was intended only to recognize him, among many other lawgivers, as an important figure in the history of law; it is not intended as a form of idol worship.’’ The court later added a footnote to tourist materials describing the frieze, calling it a “a well-intentioned attempt by the sculptor to honor Muhammad.’’[1].

Image File history File links Sc_ten_commandments. ... Image File history File links Sc_ten_commandments. ... Image File history File links Muhammad-supcourt. ... Image File history File links Muhammad-supcourt. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... The Qurān [1] (Arabic: ‎, literally the recitation; also called ‎ The Noble Qurān; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... Centurion can mean: In the military: Centurion (Roman army), a professional officer of the Roman army who commanded a large amount of men. ... Roman fasces. ... This 1768 parchment (612x502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated the 1675 Decalogue at Amsterdam Esnoga synagogue. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Turkish: Müslüman, Persian and Urdu: مسلمان, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of Islam. ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) is an advocacy group which seeks to enhance understanding of Islam, encourage dialogue, protect civil liberties, empower American Muslims, and build coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding. ... William Hubbs Rehnquist (October 1, 1924 – September 3, 2005) was an American lawyer, jurist, and a political figure, who served as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States and later as the Chief Justice of the United States. ...

Footnotes and references

  1.   About the Supreme Court Building, Supreme Court publication. Format PDF.
  2.   W. Rehnquist, The Supreme Court, p.24.
  3.   Senate Virtual Tour, part 1.
  4.   Skefos, The Supreme Court Gets a Home.
  5.   Senate Virtual Tour, part 2.
  6.   SCOTUS building, supra n1.
  7.   Homes of the Court, Supreme Court Historical Society.
  8.   Skefos, supra n4.
  9.   Homes, supra n7.
  10.   United States Government: Democracy in Action---Richard C. Remy, Ph. D Glencoe website
  11.   Justices Kennedy & Thomas, Testimony to the House Appropriations Subcommittee, 4/12/2005.
  12.   Legal Times, Tony Mauro, "The Supreme Court's Own Commandments," 03-02-2005.

External links

United States Capitol Complex
  United States Capitol
House: Cannon | Ford | Longworth | O'Neill | Rayburn
Senate: Dirksen | Hart | Russell
Library of Congress: Adams Building | Jefferson Building | Madison Building
Others: Botanic Garden | Power Plant | Reflection Pool | Supreme Court | Visitor Center

Coordinates: 38°53′27″N, 77°00′16″W PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in leap years). ... Aerial view of the United States Capitol Complex from the northweat The United States Capitol Complex is group of about a dozen buildings and facilities in Washington D.C. that are used by the Federal government of the United States. ... The United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... The Cannon House Office Building, completed in 1908, is the oldest congressional office building as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ... The Ford House Office Building is one of the four office buildings containing U.S. House of Representatives staff on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. It is the only House Office Building that is not connected underground to either one of the other office buildings or to the Capitol itself. ... The Longworth House Office Building The Longworth House Office Building (LHOB) is one of three office buildings used by the United States House of Representatives. ... The ONeill House Office Building is the name of a former Congressional Office Building, located near the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. It was named after former Speaker of the House Thomas Tip ONeill (December 9, 1912 – January 5, 1994). ... The Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB), named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, is located between South Capitol Street and First Street in Southwest Washington, D.C. // History The newest of three U.S. House of Representatives office buildings, the Rayburn House Office Building was completed in early... This Washington, DC congressional office building is named for former Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL). ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ... This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E. The Russell Senate Office Building (built 1903-1908) is the oldest of the United States Senate office buildings as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ... The John Adams Building of the Library of Congress The John Adams Building is one of three library buildings of the Library of Congress in the United States. ... The Thomas Jefferson Building at the Library of Congress The oldest of the three United States Library of Congress buildings, the Thomas Jefferson Building opened in 1897. ... The James Madison Memorial Building The James Madison Memorial Building is one of three buildings that make up the Library of Congress and is part of the United States Capitol Complex. ... The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is a botanic garden run by the Congress of the United States. ... The Capitol Power Plant The Capitol Power Plant is power plant which provides steam, and cooled water for the United States Capitol and other buildings in the Capitol Complex. ... Capitol Reflection Pool The Capitol Reflection Pool lies to the west of the United States Capitol Building, and is the western most element of the Capitol Grounds. ... ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


 
 

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