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Encyclopedia > United States Secret Service
United States Secret Service
USSS star logo
USSS star logo
Agency overview
Formed 1865
Jurisdiction Federal; investigating financial crime and providing Presidential protection
Employees 3,200 agents
1,200 uniformed officers
Agency Executive Director, Mark J. Sullivan
Website
www.secretservice.gov

The United States Secret Service is a United States federal government law enforcement agency that is part of the United States Department of Homeland Security. The sworn members are divided among the Special Agents and the Uniformed Division. Until March 1, 2003, the Service was part of the United States Department of Treasury.[1] NASAs Space Shuttle, officially called Space Transportation System (STS), is the United States governments current manned launch vehicle. ... Koltsovo International Airport (IATA: SVX, ICAO: USSS) is an airport near Koltsovo, Yekaterinburg, Russia. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Mark J. Sullivan is the current Director of the United States Secret Service. ... This article describes the government of the United States. ... For the band, see The Police. ... DHS redirects here. ... // Any federal criminal or non-criminal investigator or detective in the 1811, 1801, 2501 or similar job series as so titled according to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) handbook. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ...

Contents

Role

Secret Service Special Agents (foreground) protect the President of the United States.

The Secret Service has primary jurisdiction over the prevention and investigation of counterfeiting of U.S. currency and U.S. treasury bonds notes, as well as protection of the President, Vice President, President-elect, Vice President-elect, past Presidents and their spouses (except when the spouse re-marries), certain candidates for the offices of President and Vice President within 120 days of a general presidential election, children and grandchildren of current and former presidents until age 16, visiting foreign heads of state and government along with their spouses (all called "protectees"), other individuals as designated per Executive Order of the President, and National Special Security Events, when designated as such by the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. It also tracks suspicious people and investigates a wide variety of financial fraud crimes and identity theft and provides forensics assistance for some local crimes. The United States Secret Service Uniformed Division (UD) assists in the protection of foreign embassies, the United States Naval Observatory and the White House within Washington, D.C. Due to the necessary discretion of this organization, many details are currently unknown about the Secret Service. Like most law enforcement agencies, the Secret Service generally has a "no comment" policy on its actions and investigations. Image File history File links SecretServiceAgent. ... Image File history File links SecretServiceAgent. ... A counterfeit is an imitation that is made with the intent to deceptively represent its content or origins. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Identity theft is a catch-all term for crimes involving illegal usage of another individuals public identity. ... The word forensic (from Latin: forensis - forum) refers to something of, pertaining to, or used in a court of law. ... Aerial view of USNO. The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) is one of the oldest scientific agencies in the United States. ... ...


Appearance

Special Agents of the Secret Service wear attire that is appropriate for the surroundings. In many circumcisions, the attire is a conservative business suit, but attire can range from a tuxedo to blue jeans. Photographs often show them wearing sunglasses and a communication earpiece. The attire for UD Officers includes standard police uniforms, or utility uniforms and ballistic/identification vests for members of the countersniper team, Emergency Response Team (ERT), and canine officers. President Richard Nixon, after traveling through Europe, had his Secret Service agents wear elaborate uniforms to state functions. However, they were discontinued after being deemed too imperial.[citation needed] A suit, also known as a business suit, comprises a collection of matching clothing consisting of: a coat (commonly known as a jacket) a waistcoat (optional) (USA vest) a pair of trousers (USA pants) Though not part of a suit, a shirt and tie very frequently accompany it. ... Ray-Ban Wayfarer sunglasses (RB2132 901L) Sunglasses or sun glasses are a visual aid, variously termed spectacles or glasses, which feature lenses that are coloured or darkened to prevent strong light from reaching the eyes. ... In-ear headphones Headphones (also known as earphones, stereophones, headsets, or the slang term cans) is a transducer that receives an electrical signal from a media player or receiver and uses speakers placed in close proximity to the ears (hence the name earphone) to convert the signal into audible sound... Nixon redirects here. ...


The shoulder patch of the USSS UD consists of the presidential seal on white or black depending on the garment to which it is attached. While there is no official patch indicating "Secret Service," Special Agents have occasionally designed and purchased unofficial patches to trade in their extensive collaborations with uniformed law enforcement officers.[2]


History

Secret Service Uniformed Division
Secret Service Uniformed Division

The Secret Service was commissioned on July 5, 1865 in Washington, D.C. as the "Secret Service Division," to suppress counterfeit currency, which is why it was established under the United States Department of the Treasury. At the time, the only other federal law enforcement agencies were the United States Park Police, U.S. Post Office Department - Office of Instructions and Mail Depredations, now known as the United States Postal Inspection Service, and the United States Marshals Service. The Marshals did not have the manpower to investigate all crime under federal jurisdiction, so the Secret Service was used to investigate everything from murder to bank robbery to illegal gambling. Prior to its formal establishment as a Treasury agency, during the Civil War the Secret Service, under the direction of detective Allan Pinkerton[citation needed], was the espionage and counterespionage agency of the United States. It was the first domestic intelligence and counterintelligence agency. It no longer has (and has not had for over a century) these responsibilities. After the assassination of President William McKinley in 1901, Congress informally requested Secret Service presidential protection. A year later, the Secret Service assumed full-time responsibility for protection of the President. In 1902, William Craig was the first Secret Service agent killed while riding in the presidential carriage, in a road accident. Image File history File links US_Secret_Service_officers. ... Image File history File links US_Secret_Service_officers. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Counterfeit (disambiguation). ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ... The United States Park Police is the oldest uniformed federal law enforcement agency in the United States. ... The United States Postal Inspection Service (or USPIS) is the law enforcement arm of the United States Postal Service. ... The United States Postal Inspection Service (or USPIS) is the law enforcement arm of the United States Postal Service. ... “U.S. Marshals” redirects here. ... Portrait of Allan Pinkerton from Harpers Weekly, 1884 Allan Pinkerton (August 25, 1819 – July 1, 1884) was a U.S. detective and spy, best known for creating the Pinkerton Agency, the first detective agency of the United States. ... Leon Czolgosz shoots President McKinley with a concealed revolver. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... William Craig (1855-1902) was the first Secret Service agent killed in the line of duty. ... Pittsfield redirects here. ...


In 1950, President Truman was residing in the Blair House, across the street from the White House, while the executive mansion was undergoing renovations. Two men approached the Blair House with the intent to assassinate President Truman. Oscar Collazo and Griselio Torresola, who were Puerto Rican nationalists, opened fire on Private Leslie Coffelt and other White House Police officers. Though mortally wounded by three shots from a 9 mm Luger to his chest and abdomen, Private Coffelt returned fire, killing Torresola with a single shot to his head. To this day, Coffelt is the only member of the Secret Service to die while defending a U.S. President against an assassination attempt. Collazo was also shot, but survived his injuries and served 29 years in prison before returning to Puerto Rico in 1979. Special Agent Tim McCarthy stepped in front of President Ronald Reagan during the assassination attempt of March 30, 1981 and took a bullet to the abdomen, but made a full recovery. Blair House is a guest house for state visitors to Washington, D.C. (in the United States of America). ... Oscar Collazo (1914 – February 21, 1994) born in Florida, Puerto Rico, was one of two Puerto Ricans who attempted to assassinate President Harry S. Truman. ... Griselio Torresola (1925 – November 1, 1950) born in Jayuya, Puerto Rico, was one of two Puerto Rican Nationalists who attempted to assassinate United States President Harry Truman. ... Leslie William Coffelt (August 15, 1910 – November 1, 1950), was an American law enforcement officer. ... Ball and hollowpoint 9mm Luger rounds The 9 mm Luger pistol cartridge (9 x 19 mm Parabellum, 9 x 19 mm NATO) was designed by firearms designer Georg Luger. ... Timothy J. McCarthy (born c1950) is the police chief of Orland Park, Illinois, but is most famous for leaping in front of US President Ronald Reagan and stopping one of John Hinckley, Jr. ... Reagan redirects here. ... The Reagan assassination attempt occurred on March 30, 1981, just 69 days into the presidency of Ronald Reagan. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...


The Secret Service Presidential Protective Detail safeguards the President of the United States and his immediate family. They are heavily armed and work with state police and the military to safeguard the President when he travels, in Air Force One, Marine One, and by limousine in motorcades. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For the current aircraft, see Boeing VC-25. ... Marine One lifting off of the White House south lawn. ... For the song from the band: Brand New, see Limousine (MS Rebridge). ... Motorcade for the British Queen Elizabeth II in Koblenz 1964 A motorcade is a procession of cars carrying VIPs, especially political figures. ...


Although today this is the Secret Service's most visible role, personal protection is an anomaly in the responsibilities of an agency focused on fraud and counterfeiting. The reason for this combination of duties is that when the need for presidential protection became apparent in the early 20th century, there were a limited quantity of federal services with the necessary abilities and resources. The FBI, IRS, CIA, ATF, and DEA did not yet exist. The United States Marshals Service was the only other logical choice, and in fact the U.S. Marshals did provide protection for the President on a number of occasions. In the end, however, the job went to the Secret Service. F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... Seal of the Internal Revenue Service Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        IRS redirects here. ... CIA redirects here. ... The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (abbreviated ATF, sometimes BATF or BATFE) is a United States federal agency; more specifically a specialized law enforcement and regulatory organization within the United States Department of Justice. ... The DEAs enforcement activities may take agents anywhere from distant countries to suburban U.S. homes. ... “U.S. Marshals” redirects here. ...

Secret Service Uniformed Division suburban in Washington D.C.
Secret Service Uniformed Division suburban in Washington D.C.

The Secret Service has over 6,000 employees: 3,100 Special Agents, 1,200 Uniformed Division Officers, and 1,700 technical and administrative employees. Special agents either serve on protective details or investigate financial and homeland security-related crimes. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1704 × 2272 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1704 × 2272 pixel, file size: 1. ... // Any federal criminal or non-criminal investigator or detective in the 1811, 1801, 2501 or similar job series as so titled according to the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) handbook. ...


The United States Secret Service Uniformed Division is similar to the Capitol Police and is in charge of protecting the physical White House grounds and foreign diplomatic missions in the Washington, D.C. area. The Uniformed Division was originally a separate organization known as the White House Police Force, but was placed under the command of the Chief of the Secret Service in 1930. In 1970, the role of the force, then called the Executive Protective Service (EPS), was expanded. The name United States Secret Service Uniformed Division was adopted in 1977. The United States Capitol Police (USCP) is a police force charged with protecting the United States Congress within the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its territories. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


In 1968, as a result of presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy's assassination, Congress authorized protection of major presidential and vice presidential candidates and nominees (Public Law 90-331). Congress also authorized protection of the spouses of deceased presidents unless they remarry and of the children of former presidents until age 16. Robert Kennedy U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy was fatally wounded by a gunshot in Los Angeles on June 5, 1968, and passed away 25 hours later. ...


Congress passed legislation in 1994 stating that presidents elected to office after January 1, 1997 will receive Secret Service protection for 10 years after leaving office. Individuals elected to office prior to January 1, 1997 will continue to receive lifetime protection (Treasury Department Appropriations Act, 1995: Public Law 103-329). is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


The Service also investigates forgery of government checks, forgery of currency equivalents (such as travelers' or cashiers' checks), and certain instances of wire fraud (such as the so called Nigerian scam) and credit card fraud. An advance-fee fraud is a confidence trick in which the target is persuaded to advance relatively small sums of money in the hope of realizing a much larger gain. ...


The Secret Service also has concurrent jurisdiction for violation of federal computer crime laws. They have created a network of 24 Electronic Crimes Task Forces (ECTFs) across the United States. These task forces create partnerships between the Service, federal/state and local law enforcement, the private sector and academia aimed at combating technology based crimes.


In 1998, President Bill Clinton signed Presidential Decision Directive 62, which established National Special Security Events (NSSE). In that directive, it made the Secret Service the federal agency responsible for security at events given such a designation. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Presidential directives are a form of executive order issued by the President of the United States with the advice and consent of the National Security Council. ... United States Department of Homeland Security A National Special Security Event (NSSE) is declared by the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to assume federal control of security measures normally employed by local law enforcement. ...


Effective March 1, 2003, the Secret Service was transferred from the Department of the Treasury to the newly established Department of Homeland Security. is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ... DHS redirects here. ...


Prior to the 2008 Presidential election, the Secret Service generally protected major candidates over the 120 days preceding an election. As a former First Lady, presidential candidate Hillary Clinton already has Secret Service protection. On May 3, 2007, the Secret Service announced that Senator Barack Obama would also have protection following a request from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.[3] The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... This article is about the use of the term first lady internationally. ... REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


Attacks on Presidents

Secret Service agent Clint Hill on the back of the presidential limousine moments after John F. Kennedy was shot
Secret Service agent Clint Hill on the back of the presidential limousine moments after John F. Kennedy was shot

Since the 1960s, Presidents John F. Kennedy, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan,[4] and George W. Bush have been attacked while appearing in public. President Ford was not injured, despite being attacked twice. President Reagan was seriously injured but survived, and President Kennedy died from the attack. President Bush was also not injured, when the hand grenade thrown towards the podium failed to detonate. [1] This is a list of U.S. Presidential assassination attempts. ... Image File history File links Altgens2. ... Image File history File links Altgens2. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Reagan redirects here. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


The Kennedy assassination spotlighted the bravery of two Secret Service agents. First, an agent protecting Mrs. Kennedy, Clint Hill, was riding in the car directly behind the Presidential Limousine when the attack began. While the shooting was taking place, Hill leapt from the running board of the car he was riding on and sprinted up to the car carrying the President and the First Lady. He jumped on to the back of the moving car and guided Mrs. Kennedy off the trunk she had climbed on and back into the rear seat of the car. He then shielded the President and the First Lady with his body until the car arrived at the hospital. President Kennedy with his wife, Jacqueline, and Texas Governor John Connally in the presidential limousine just moments before his assassination The assassination of John F. Kennedy, the thirty-fifth President of the United States, took place on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas, USA at 12:30 p. ... Secret Service agent Clint Hill riding behind the presidents limousine moments before Kennedy was shot. ...


The other agent whose bravery was spotlighted during the assassination was Rufus Youngblood, who was riding in the vice presidential car. When the shots were fired, he vaulted over the back of the front seat, threw his body over Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, who would become president, and sprawled over him to minimize chances he might be injured. Youngblood would later recall some of this in his memoir, Twenty Years in the Secret Service. That evening, Johnson called Secret Service Chief James J. Rowley and cited Youngblood's bravery.[5] LBJ redirects here. ... James Jose Rowley (1908 - 1992) was a U.S. administrator. ...

Agent Tim McCarthy on the ground after blocking a bullet headed for President Ronald Reagan.

The period following the Kennedy assassination was probably the most difficult in the modern history of the agency. Press reports indicated that morale among the agents was "low" for months following the assassination.[6] Nevertheless, the agency overhauled its procedures in the wake of the Kennedy killing. Training, which heretofore had been confined largely to "on-the-job" efforts, was systematized and regularized. Timothy J. McCarthy (born c1950) is the police chief of Orland Park, Illinois, but is most famous for leaping in front of US President Ronald Reagan and stopping one of John Hinckley, Jr. ... Reagan redirects here. ...


The Reagan assassination attempt also highlighted the bravery of several Secret Service agents, particularly agent Tim McCarthy, who leapt in front of Reagan after four bullets had been fired by the would-be assassin, John Hinckley, Jr. McCarthy took one .22-caliber round in the chest, which was successfully removed by surgeons at George Washington University Hospital (also where Reagan was taken and recovered). For his bravery, McCarthy received the NCAA Award of Valor in 1982. The Reagan assassination attempt occurred on March 30, 1981, just 69 days into the presidency of Ronald Reagan. ... Timothy J. McCarthy (born c1950) is the police chief of Orland Park, Illinois, but is most famous for leaping in front of US President Ronald Reagan and stopping one of John Hinckley, Jr. ... John Warnock Hinckley, Jr. ... The NCAA Award of Valor not presented by the NCAA on an annual basis, but is be presented to a current intercollegiate athletics coach or administrator or to a current or former varsity letter-winner at an NCAA institution who, when confronted with a situation involving personal danger, acted with...


As duties expanded, so did the agency, growing from about 300 agents in the early 1960s to over 3,200 today.


Protection of former Presidents and First Ladies

In 1962, Congress authorized the Secret Service (Public Law 89-186) to protect a former president and his or her spouse during their lifetime, unless they decline protection. In 1997, Congress enacted legislation that limits Secret Service protection for former presidents to ten years after leaving office. Under this new law, individuals who were in office before January 1, 1997 will continue to receive Secret Service protection for their lifetime. Individuals entering office after that time will receive protection for ten years after leaving office. Therefore, former President Bill Clinton will be the last president to receive lifetime protection, and President George W. Bush will be the first to receive protection for only ten years. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Barbara Bush, Rosalynn Carter, Hillary Clinton, Betty Ford, and Nancy Reagan continue to receive full-time protection as former First Ladies. For the daughter of President George W. Bush, see Barbara Pierce Bush. ... Eleanor Rosalynn Smith Carter (born August 18, 1927) is the wife of former President Jimmy Carter and was First Lady of the United States from 1977 to 1981. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... Betty Fords official White House portrait, painted in 1977 by Felix de Cossio Elizabeth Anne Bloomer Warren Ford (born April 8, 1918) is the widow of former United States President Gerald R. Ford and was the First Lady from 1974 to 1977. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of the former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ... This article is about the use of the term first lady internationally. ...


Protective operations and protective-function training and weaponry

Due to the importance of the Secret Service's protective function, the personnel of the agency receive the latest weapons and training. The agents of the Protective Operations Division receive the latest military technology (See: the Presidential Protection Assistance Act of 1976, codified in the notes of Title 18, Section 3056 of the U.S. Code Annotated). Due to specific legislation and directives, the United States military must fully comply with requests for assistance with providing protection for the president and all other people under protection, providing equipment, and even military personnel at no cost to the Secret Service. A weapon is a tool used to kill or incapacitate a person or animal, or destroy a military target. ... Training refers to the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and competencies as a result of the teaching of vocational or practical skills and knowledge that relates to specific useful skills. ... A weapon is a tool used to kill or incapacitate a person or animal, or destroy a military target. ... Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... The legislative acts of the European Union (EU) can have different forms: regulations, directives, decisions, recommendations and opinions. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... This page discusses common devices known as tools, for other meanings see Tool (disambiguation) Modern hammer A tool is, among other things, a device that provides a mechanical or mental advantage in accomplishing a task. ...


The Uniformed Division has three branches: the White House Branch, Foreign Missions and the Naval Observatory Branch. Together they provide protection for the following: The President and Vice President of the United States and their immediate families, the White House Complex, the Vice President’s Residence, the Main Treasury Department building and its annex facility, foreign diplomatic missions in the Washington DC metropolitan area. [2]


Special Agents and Uniformed Division Officers carry the SIG Sauer P229 pistol chambered for the .357 SIG cartridge. In addition to their primary weapon, they are also trained on several close-combat weapons such as the Remington Model 870 shotgun, the IMI Uzi, FN P90, and the HK MP5 (including the MP5KA4) submachine guns among others. They are also issued radios and surveillance kits in order to maintain communication with a central command post and other personnel.[7] The Schweizerische Industrie Gesellschaft (SIG)-Sauer P226 is a full-sized, service type pistol originally chambered for 9 mm Luger. ... The . ... The Remington Model 870 is a U.S.-made pump-action shotgun. ... Look up uzi in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “P90” redirects here. ... The MP5 is a 9 mm submachine gun of German design, developed in the 1960s by a group of engineers from the West German arms manufacturer Heckler & Koch GmbH (HK). ... The MP5 is a submachine gun, developed by German weapons designer Heckler und Koch (HK) in the 1960s. ...


Basic strategies include:

  • Shield the protectee from any threat.
  • Evacuate the protectee to a safe location.
  • Conduct extensive preparatory research in order to plan for all contingencies

The Counter Assault Team is a specially trained tactical unit of the United States Secret Service responsible for neutralizing attacks on high-risk protectees.[citation needed] These units typically operate in heavily-armed, five-man teams that augment an existing protective detail. In the event of an assault, their purpose is to engage the attacker(s) while the protective detail evacuates their principal to safety. Out of the generally 35 vehicles in the Presidential motorcade, anywhere from 2 - 6 Suburbans may contain CAT members, depending on the threat level that day. The purpose of a CAT is not to win a firefight, but to completely overwhelm the enemy right up until the point where the protectee has escaped. Then a local SWAT team (also travelling with the motorcade) will take over.


Secret Service involvement in rescue attempts during September 11, 2001 attacks

The Secret Service New York City Field office was located at 7 World Trade Center. Immediately after the attacks, Special Agents and other Secret Service employees stationed at the New York Field office were among the first to respond with first aid trauma kits. Sixty-seven Special Agents in New York City, at and near the New York Field Office, assisted local fire and Police rescue teams by helping to set up triage areas and evacuate people from the towers. One Secret Service employee, Master Special Officer Craig Miller,[3] died during the rescue efforts. 7 World Trade Center is a building in New York City located across from the World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan. ... Typical triage tag used for emergency mass casualty decontamination. ...


On August 20, 2002, Director Brian L. Stafford recognized the bravery and heroism of 67 Secret Service employees in the New York Field Office, by awarding the Director's Valor Award to employees who assisted in the rescue attempts in the World Trade Center on 9/11. is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Brian L. Stafford was the 20th Director of the United States Secret Service. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Directors

  1. William P. Wood (1865 – 1869)
  2. Herman C. Whitley (1869 – 1874)
  3. Elmer Washburn (1874 – 1876)
  4. James Brooks (1876 – 1888)
  5. John S. Bell (1888 – 1890)
  6. A.L. Drummond (1891 – 1894)
  7. William P. Hazen (1894 – 1898)
  8. John E. Wilkie (1898 – 1911)
  9. William J. Flynn (1912 – 1917)
  10. William H. Moran (1917 – 1936)
  11. Frank J. Wilson (1937 – 1946)
  12. James J. Maloney (1946 – 1948)
  13. U.E. Baughman (1948 – 1961)
  14. James J. Rowley (1961 – 1973)
  15. H. Stuart Knight (1973 – 1981)
  16. John R. Simpson (1981 – 1992)
  17. John Magaw (1992 – 1993)
  18. Eljay B. Bowron (1993 – 1997)
  19. Lewis C. Merletti (1997 – 1999)
  20. Brian L. Stafford (1999 – 2003)
  21. W. Ralph Basham (2003 – 2006)
  22. Mark J. Sullivan (2006-Present)

William P. Wood was the first Director of the United States Secret Service. ... John Elbert Wilkie (1860 – 13 December 1934) was an American journalist and head of the United States Secret Service from 1898 to 1911. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Frank J. Wilson (1887-June 22, 1970) was the Chief of the United States Secret Service and a former agent of the Internal Revenue Service, most notably in the 1931 prosecution of Chicago mobster Al Capone and federal representative in the Lindbergh kidnapping case. ... James Jose Rowley (1908 - 1992) was a U.S. administrator. ... John Magaw John W. Magaw (born 1935?) was a U.S. government administrator. ... Lewis C. Merletti was the 19th Director of the United States Secret Service. ... Brian L. Stafford was the 20th Director of the United States Secret Service. ... W. Ralph Basham, former Director of US Secret Service W. Ralph Basham is the current Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ... Mark J. Sullivan is the current Director of the United States Secret Service. ...

Field offices

The Secret Service has agents assigned to approximately 125 offices located in cities throughout the United States and in select foreign cities. US Secret Service Logo This Article is a list of Field and Resident Offices operated by the United States Secret Service, an agency of the United States Department of Homeland Security. ...


References

  1. ^ Secret Service History (HTML). United States Secret Service. Retrieved on 2008-03-09.
  2. ^ http://americanhistory.si.edu/presidency/2b4_b.html
  3. ^ http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/05/03/obama.protection/index.html
  4. ^ Along with Clint Hill, James Rowley, William Greer, and Roy Kellerman, one of the more distinguished Secret Service agents was Robert DeProspero, the Special Agent In Charge (SAIC) of Reagan's Presidential Protective Division (PPD) from Jan 1982 to April 1985. DeProspero was the deputy to Jerry S. Parr, the SAIC of PPD during the Reagan assassination attempt on 3/30/81: "Standing Next To History" (2005) by former Secret Service agent Joseph Petro, pages 140-141 & 202-204. See also: http://alumni.wvu.edu/awards/academy/1995/robert_deprospero/ and http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/secretservice/pdf/interview_parr.pdf
  5. ^ http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,875362-2,00.html Time Magazine, Nov., 29, 1963
  6. ^ "Twenty Years In The Secret Service" by Rufus Youngblood, pages 147-149. Vince Palamara interviews with former agent Rufus Youngblood on 10/22/92 and 2/8/94---please see: http://www.assassinationresearch.com/v4n1.html
  7. ^ http://cryptome.org/sstsd-eyeball.htm

2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Secret Service agent Clint Hill riding behind the presidents limousine moments before Kennedy was shot. ... James Jose Rowley (1908 - 1992) was a U.S. administrator. ... The Presidential limousine shortly before Kennedys assassination. ... Roy Kellerman was a U.S. Secret Service Agent and witness to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. ... Robert DeProspero (full name Robert Lee DeProspero, a. ... Vince Palamara is a civilian authority on the United States Secret Service, especially with regards to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. ...

See also

The Commander-in-Chiefs Guard, commonly known as Washingtons Life Guard, was a unit of the Continental Army that protected George Washington during the American Revolutionary War. ... This article is about military actions only. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Presidential Limousine. ... For the current aircraft, see Boeing VC-25. ... Marine One lifting off of the White House south lawn. ... See also the Bureau of Diplomatic Security // The Diplomatic Security Service is the law enforcement arm of the U.S. State Department. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Presidential Security Service or PSS is a title which exists in the Russian Federation and the Republic of Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The senior police officer from the Metropolitan Police responsible for the personal security of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. ... Personal Protection Officers are officers of the London Metropolitan Police Royalty and Diplomatic Protection Department who are assigned for the personal protection of members of the Royal Family. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ... Federal Protective Service vehicle. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The National Protective Security Program is part of the Protective Policing provided by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. ... William Craig (1855-1902) was the first Secret Service agent killed in the line of duty. ... The White House Communications Agency, WHCA is responsible for providing communications services to the President and Vice President of the United States. ... The United States Secret Service uses code names for U.S. Presidents, First Ladies, and other persons and locations. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... The Special Protection Group (SPG) is the agency responsible for the protection of Indias Prime Minister and his/her immediate family members. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Indonesia. ... Paspampres is the name of the Indonesian Presidential Security Forces. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Image File history File links US_Department_of_Homeland_Security_Seal. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fifth Circuit Opinion On Appeal (3423 words)
But, it held that the Secret Service did not "intercept" the E-mail in violation of Title I of the ECPA, 18 U.S.C. s 2511(1)(a), because its acquisition of the contents of the electronic communications was not contemporaneous with the transmission of those communications.
As stated, the sole issue is a very narrow one: whether the seizure of a computer on which is stored private E-mail that has been sent to an electronic bulletin board, but not yet read (retrieved) by the recipients, constitutes an "intercept" proscribed by 18 U.S.C. s 2511(1)(a).
As stated, the district court found that the Secret Service violated s 2701 when it intentionally accesse[d] without authorization a facility [the computer] through which an electronic communication service [the BBS] is provided...
secret service: Definition and Much More From Answers.com (3062 words)
The United States Secret Service is a United States federal government law enforcement agency that is part of the United States Department of Homeland Security (prior to the founding of that department in 2003, it was under the United States Department of the Treasury).
The Secret Service was commissioned on July 5th, 1865 in Washington, D.C., to suppress counterfeit currency, which is why it was established under the United States Department of the Treasury.
The United States Secret Service Uniformed Division is similar to the Capitol Police and is in charge of protecting the physical White House grounds and foreign diplomatic missions in the Washington, D.C. area.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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