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Encyclopedia > United States Republican Party
Republican Party
Party Chairman Ken Mehlman is the chair of the Republican National Committee. He served as the campaign manager for George W. Bushs 2004 re-election campaign, and was Bushs choice to replace Ed Gillespie as the chair of the Republican National Committee. Mehlman was elected to the post on January... Ken Mehlman
Senate Leader Bill Frist Dr. William Harrison Frist (born February 22, 1952 in Nashville, Tennessee) is a Republican U.S. Senator from Tennessee and a cardiac surgeon. On December 23, 2002 he was voted to succeed Trent Lott as Senate Majority Leader. Contents // 1 Childhood and medical career 2 Entering politics 3... Bill Frist
House Leader Thomas Dale DeLay (born April 8, 1947) is an American Republican politician from Texas and current Majority Leader of the U.S. House of Representatives. He is well-known for his conservative stances on foreign and domestic policy issues. Contents // 1 Biography and early political career 2 Congressional career 3... Tom DeLay
Founded February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 306 days remaining, 307 in leap years. February Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19... February 28, Years: 1851 1852 1853 - 1854 - 1855 1856 1857 Decades: 1820s 1830s 1840s - 1850s - 1860s 1870s 1880s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1854 in art 1854 in literature 1854 in music 1854 in rail transport 1854 in science 1854 in sports List of state leaders in 1854 List of... 1854
Headquarters 310 First Street SE
Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United States of America. Washington, D.C. is part of the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area, which also includes... Washington, D.C.
20003
Political Ideology Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. There are also a number of Conservative political parties in various countries. All of these are primarily (though not necessarily exclusively) identified with the political right. While the intellectual roots of conservatism date back centuries... Conservatism
International Affiliation The International Democrat Union is an international grouping of conservative and, in some cases, Christian democratic parties. Headquartered in London, its members include: CDU/CSU (Germany) Conservative Party of Canada Conservative and Unionist Party (United Kingdom) Hannara (Grand National Party, Republic of Korea) Kuomintang (Republic of China on Taiwan) Liberal... International Democrat Union
Colours Red re-directs here; for alternate uses see Red (disambiguation) #FF0000 Red is a color at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. Red light has a wavelength of roughly 700 nm. Oxygenated blood is red due to the presence of hemoglobin. Red light is the first... Red
Website http://www.gop.com

The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1] (http://www.gop.com/About/Default.aspx?Section=2), is one of the two major This article is part of the series on Politics Politics Political philosophy Political science Politics by country Political party: by country, by name, by ideology Election: calendar, by country Related topics A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues. In... political parties in the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States. The current Seal of the President of the United States, official impression The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. Under the U.S. Constitution, the President is also the chief executive of the federal government and commander-in-chief of the armed forces. Because... President of the United States, The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. George Walker Bush Order: 43rd President Term of Office: January 20, 2001–Present Predecessor: Bill Clinton Successor: Incumbent Date of Birth: July 6, 1946 Place of Birth: New Haven, Connecticut... George W. Bush, is a member of the party – and its de facto leader – and it currently has majorities in the The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. Together, they compose the legislative branch of the United States government. Seal of the Senate Each state elects two senators through statewide elections. The Constitution of the United States... Senate and the The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. Seal of the House of Representatives Contents // 1 Members 2 Activities 3 History 4 Composition During the 109th Congress (2005–2007) 5 A cable TV... House, as well as in governorships. In the modern political era, the GOP is the more Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. There are also a number of Conservative political parties in various countries. All of these are primarily (though not necessarily exclusively) identified with the political right. While the intellectual roots of conservatism date back centuries... conservative of the two major parties.


Organized in Ripon is a city located in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 6,828. The city is located within the Town of Ripon. Contents // 1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Birthplace of the Republican Party 5 See also... Ripon, Wisconsin on February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 306 days remaining, 307 in leap years. February Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19... February 28, Years: 1851 1852 1853 - 1854 - 1855 1856 1857 Decades: 1820s 1830s 1840s - 1850s - 1860s 1870s 1880s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1854 in art 1854 in literature 1854 in music 1854 in rail transport 1854 in science 1854 in sports List of state leaders in 1854 List of... 1854, as a party opposed to the expansion of Slavery is any of a number of related conditions involving control of a person against his or her will, enforced by violence or other clear forms of coercion. It almost always occurs for the purpose of securing the labour of the person or people concerned. A specific form, chattel slavery... slavery into new territories, it is not to be confused with the The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. In addition, some refer to the party as the Jeffersonian Republicans since Thomas Jefferson belonged to the party and had a major influence on its ideology; it is also referred... Democratic-Republican party of Thomas Jefferson Order: 3rd President Term of Office: March 4, 1801–March 3, 1809 Preceded by: John Adams Succeeded by: James Madison Date of birth: April 13, 1743 Place of birth: Shadwell, Virginia Date of death: July 4, 1826 Place of death: Charlottesville, Virginia First Lady: Martha Jefferson Political... Thomas Jefferson or the The National Republican Party was a United States political party that existed in the first half of the 19th century. During John Quincy Adamss presidency the United States Democratic-Republican Party began to split. Those who supported Adams became known as the National Republicans, while others supported Andrew Jackson... National Republican Party of Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia- June 29, 1852 in Lexington, Kentucky) was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. He also made four failed bids for the presidency, but was nevertheless extremely influential in U... Henry Clay. The first convention of the U.S. Republican Party was held on July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. July Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20... July 6, Years: 1851 1852 1853 - 1854 - 1855 1856 1857 Decades: 1820s 1830s 1840s - 1850s - 1860s 1870s 1880s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1854 in art 1854 in literature 1854 in music 1854 in rail transport 1854 in science 1854 in sports List of state leaders in 1854 List of... 1854, in Jackson is a city located in Jackson County, Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 36,316. It was founded in 1827. It is the birthplace of the Republican Party. One of the Apollo capsules is kept here at the Jackson Space Center. It... Jackson, Michigan. Many of its initial policies were inspired by the defunct The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. The party was created in order to oppose the policies of Andrew Jackson and called itself the Whig Party by analogy with the English Whigs, who had opposed the power of the King in Restoration England. Contents... Whig Party. Many of its early members came from the The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. Their main purpose was opposing the extension of slavery into the territories, as well as advocating the abolition of slavery itself. Contents // 1 Genesis 2 Positions 3... Free Soil Party and The Know-Nothing movement was a nativist American political movement of the 1850s. It grew up as a popular reaction to the large numbers of immigrants—mostly Irish Roman Catholics—entering the United States starting in the late 1840s, and was characterized by calls for a number of... American Party. Since its inception, its chief opposition has been the The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. The Party is currently ( as of 2005) the minority party in both the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, as well as in governorships and state legislative seats. Of the two... Democratic Party.


The Republican 2004 A political platform is a list of the principles which a political party supports in order to appeal to the general public for the purpose of having said partys candidates voted into office. This often takes the form of a list of support for, or opposition to, controversial topics... political platform A Safer World and a More Hopeful America expresses commitment to:

  • Winning the The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. Terrorism General Definition Conventions Counterterrorism Criticisms Lists Groups Incidents Types Nationalist Religious Left-wing Right-wing State Islamist Ethnic Narcoterrorism Domestic Anarchist Political Eco-terrorism Christian Tactics Hijacking Assassination Car bombing Suicide bombing Kidnapping... War on Terror
  • Ushering in an Ownership Era
  • Building an Innovative Economy to Compete in the World
  • Strengthening Our Communities and
  • Protecting Our Families.

Major policies that the party has supported recently include A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. Whether a given tax cut will increase or decrease total tax revenues is much discussed by both economists and politicians. The immediate effects of a tax cut are... tax cuts, changes to Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through a dedicated payroll tax. It is also known as the Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance program (OASDI), in reference to its three components. In the calendar year 2004, it paid out almost $500 billion in benefits... Social Security, and the The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. 2003 Invasion of Iraq Map of Iraq Date 02:30 UTC March 20, 2003–April 15, 2003 Place Iraq, Southwest Asia Asia Prelude Iraq disarmament crisis Targets Alleged weapons of mass destruction. President... 2003 invasion of Iraq, as well as allowing federal court jurisdiction in the case of Terri Schiavo (born Theresa Marie Schindler on December 3, 1963) is an American woman whose persistent vegetative state (PVS) has prompted an ongoing invasion of privacy debate. In 1990, Schiavo collapsed in her home and suffered irreversible brain damage after her heart stopped beating because of chemical imbalance brought on... Terri Schiavo; obviously, these positions all drew limited amounts of controversy within the party as well. The party holds Social conservatism is a belief in traditional morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. Social change is generally regarded as suspect, while social values based on tradition are generally regarded as tried, tested and true. It is... socially conservative stances on such issues as The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... gay rights and Abortion, in its most common usage, refers to the voluntary or induced termination of pregnancy, generally through the use of surgical procedures or drugs. As a result, birth does not take place. Medically, the term also refers to the early termination of a pregnancy by natural causes (spontaneous abortion or... abortion


The official symbol of the Republican Party is the Elephants Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Proboscidea Family: Elephantidae Genera and Species Loxodonta Loxodonta cyclotis Loxodonta africana Elephas Elephas maximus Proboscidea is an order including only one extant family, Elephantidae or the elephants, with three species: the Savannah Elephant and Forest Elephant (which were collectively known... elephant. Although the elephant had occasionally been associated with the party earlier, a This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. Editorial cartoons can be very... political cartoon by Thomas Nast Portrait from Harpers Weekly, 1867 Born September 27, 1840 Landau, Germany Died December 7, 1902 Guayaquil, Ecuador Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840–December 7, 1902) was a famous caricaturist and editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and is considered to be the father of American political... Thomas Nast, published in Harper's Weekly on November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. November Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20... November 7, Years: 1871 1872 1873 - 1874 - 1875 1876 1877 Decades: 1840s 1850s 1860s - 1870s - 1880s 1890s 1900s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1874 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1874, is considered the first important use of the symbol [2] (http://www.harpweek.com/09Cartoon/BrowseByDateCartoon.asp?Year=2003&Month=November&Date=7). In the early 20th century, the traditional symbol of the Republican Party in Midwestern states such as State of Indiana (Flag of Indiana) (Seal of Indiana) State nickname: The Hoosier State Other U.S. States Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Governor Mitch Daniels Official languages English Area 94,321 km² (38th)  - Land 92,897 km²  - Water 1,424 km² (1.5%) Population (2000... Indiana and State of Ohio (Flag of Ohio) (Seal of Ohio) State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8.7%) Population (2000... Ohio was the Eagle Closeup view of an Australian Wedge-tailed Eagle showing the hooked beak. Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves Order: Accipitriformes* Family: Accipitridae Genera Aquila Haliaeetus Pithecophaga Circaetus (*) Scientists argue whether Accipitriformes are a separate order, or belong to the Falconiformes. Eagles are large birds of prey, which... eagle, as opposed to the Democratic This article concerns biological roosters. For the Chinese zodiacal symbol, see Rooster (zodiac). A rooster from the Barred Plymouth Rock breed, caught in the act of crowing. A cock or rooster is a male chicken (the female is a hen), reputedly so named because it roosts over clutches of eggs... rooster. This symbol still appears on Indiana ballots.

Contents

Organization

For more information on how American political parties are organized, see This article is part of the series Politics of the United States Constitution Federal government Congress Senate House of Representatives Supreme Court President Vice President Cabinet Speaker of the House Senate Majority Leader Chief Justice Elections Political Parties - Republicans - Democrats Life in the United States Culture Politics Education Economy Arts... Politics of the United States.


The The Republican National Committee (RNC) of the United States provides national leadership for the United States Republican Party. It is responsible for developing and promoting the Republican political platform, as well as coordinating fundraising and election strategy. It is also responsible for the Republican National Convention. There are similar committees... Republican National Committee (RNC) of the United States is responsible for developing and promoting the Republican A political platform is a list of the principles which a political party supports in order to appeal to the general public for the purpose of having said partys candidates voted into office. This often takes the form of a list of support for, or opposition to, controversial topics... political platform, as well as for coordinating fundraising and election strategy. There are similar committees in every A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. The United States Constitution allocates power between the two levels... U.S. state and most United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. A county of the United States is a local level of government smaller than a state but generally larger than a city or town, in a U.S. state or territory. The actual term county describes them in 48 of the... U.S. counties (though in some states, party organization lower than state-level is arranged by legislative districts). It is the counterpart of the The Democratic National Committee is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. The committee was established in 1848 at that years Democratic National Convention. Its current leaders are: Chairman Terry McAuliffe Vice-Chairwoman Linda Chavez-Thompson, executive vice president of the AFL... Democratic National Committee. The chairman of the RNC, since January of Years: 2002 2003 2004 - 2005 - 2006 2007 2008 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan - Feb - Mar - Apr - May - Jun Jul - Aug - Sep - Oct - Nov - Dec 2005 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Politics Elections... 2005, is Ken Mehlman is the chair of the Republican National Committee. He served as the campaign manager for George W. Bushs 2004 re-election campaign, and was Bushs choice to replace Ed Gillespie as the chair of the Republican National Committee. Mehlman was elected to the post on January... Ken Mehlman.


The Republican Party also has fundraising and strategy committees for The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. Seal of the House of Representatives Contents // 1 Members 2 Activities 3 History 4 Composition During the 109th Congress (2005–2007) 5 A cable TV... House races ( The National Republican Congressional Committee is the Republican Hill committee for the United States House of Representatives, working to elect Republicans to that body. Its current chair is Rep. Tom Reynolds of New York. External link Official website ... National Republican Congressional Committee), The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. Together, they compose the legislative branch of the United States government. Seal of the Senate Each state elects two senators through statewide elections. The Constitution of the United States... Senate races ( The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) is the Republican Hill committee for the United States Senate, working to elect Republicans to that body. Its current chair is Senator Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina. In November 2004, Dole narrowly edged out Norm Coleman (28 votes to 27 within the Senate Republican... National Republican Senatorial Committee), and gubernatorial races ( The Republican Governors Association is an association for governors in the United States who belong to the United States Republican Party. Categories: Stub ... Republican Governors Association).


History

Download high resolution version (864x1152, 301 KB)A photograph of the Little White Schoolhouse of Ripon, WI. Taken November 4 by User:Laharl. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version...
Download high resolution version (864x1152, 301 KB)A photograph of the Little White Schoolhouse of Ripon, WI. Taken November 4 by User:Laharl. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version... Enlarge
The Schoolhouse in Ripon, Wisconsin where the Republican Party was organized

John C. Frémont John Charles Frémont ( January 21, 1813– July 13, 1890), birth name John Charles Fremon [Harvey, p.192], was an American military officer, explorer, and the first candidate of the United States Republican Party for the office of President of the United States... John C. Frémont ran as the first Republican nominee for Seal of the President of the United States, official impression The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. Under the U.S. Constitution, the President is also the chief executive of the federal government and commander-in-chief of the armed forces. Because... President in 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). Events January 8 - Borax is discovered ( John Veatch). January 29 - Queen Victoria institutes the Victoria Cross February 18 - The American Party ( Know-Nothings) convene in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to nominate their first Presidential candidate, former President Millard Fillmore. March... 1856, using the A political slogan is a slogan used in a political context. A political slogan generally expresses a goal or aim (Workers of the world, unite!). Slogans are effective political devices especially in a heavily mediated context. They often summarize the essence of a platform effectively, as in 1884 when the... political slogan: " The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. Their main purpose was opposing the extension of slavery into the territories, as well as advocating the abolition of slavery itself. Contents // 1 Genesis 2 Positions 3... Free soil, free labor, free speech, free men, Frémont." Although Frémont's bid was unsuccessful, the party grew especially rapidly in Northeastern and Midwestern states, where slavery had long been prohibited, culminating in a sweep of victories in the Northern states. The ensuing election of Abraham Lincoln Order: 16th President Term of Office: March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865 Predecessor: James Buchanan Successor: Andrew Johnson Date of Birth: February 12, 1809 Place of Birth: Hardin County, Kentucky (site now in LaRue County) Date of Death: April 15, 1865 Place of Death: Washington, D.C... Abraham Lincoln in 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. Years: 1857 1858 1859 - 1860 - 1861 1862 1863 Decades: 1830s 1840s 1850s - 1860s - 1870s 1880s 1890s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1860 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - South Africa - Sport Lists of... 1860 ended the domination of the fragile coalition of pro-slavery southern Democrats and conciliatory northern Democrats which had existed since the days of Andrew Jackson Order: 7th President Vice President: John C. Calhoun (1829-1832) Martin Van Buren (1833-1837) Term of office: March 4, 1829 – March 3, 1837 Preceded by: John Quincy Adams Succeeded by: Martin Van Buren Date of birth: March 15, 1767... Andrew Jackson. Instead, a new era of Republican dominance based in the industrial north ensued.


With the end of the Military history of the United States Conflict American Civil War Date 1861– 1865 Place Principally in the southern United States; also in eastern, central and southwestern regions Result Defeat of seceding CSA Battles of the American Civil War Combatants United States of America USA flag 1861– 1863. 34... Civil War came the upheavals of In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the defeated Confederacy, which had seceded from the United States, were reintegrated into the Union. Contents // 1 Laws and legislation 2 Culture clashes 3 The constitutional amendments 4 Military... Reconstruction under The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. The Party is currently ( as of 2005) the minority party in both the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, as well as in governorships and state legislative seats. Of the two... Democratic Seal of the President of the United States, official impression The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. Under the U.S. Constitution, the President is also the chief executive of the federal government and commander-in-chief of the armed forces. Because... President Order: 17th President Term of Office: April 15, 1865 - March 3, 1869 Followed: Abraham Lincoln Succeeded by: Ulysses S. Grant Date of Birth December 29, 1808 Place of Birth: Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Death: July 31, 1875 Place of Death: near Elizabethton, Tennessee Wife: Eliza McCardle Johnson First Ladies... Andrew Johnson (who had bitter disputes with the Republicans in Congress, who eventually Impeachment is the process by which a legislative body formally levels charges against a high official of government. Impeachment does not necessarily mean removal from office; it comprises only a formal statement of charges, akin to an indictment in criminal law, and thus is only the first step towards possible... impeached him) and Ulysses S. Grant Order: 18th President Term of Office: March 4, 1869 – March 4, 1877 Followed: Andrew Johnson Succeeded by: Rutherford B. Hayes Date of Birth April 27, 1822 Place of Birth: Point Pleasant, Ohio Date of Death: July 23, 1885 Place of Death: Mount McGregor, New York First... Ulysses S. Grant, a Republican. For a brief period, Republicans assumed control of Southern politics (due especially to the former slaves receiving the vote while it was denied to many whites who had participated in the Confederacy), forcing drastic reforms and frequently giving former slaves positions in government. Reconstruction came to an end with the election of Rutherford B. Hayes Order: 19th President Term of Office: March 4, 1877 - March 4, 1881 Followed: Ulysses S. Grant Succeeded by: James Garfield Date of Birth October 4, 1822 Place of Birth: Delaware, Ohio Date of Death: January 17, 1893 Place of Death: Fremont, Ohio First Lady: Lucy Webb Hayes... Rutherford B. Hayes through the In United States politics, the Compromise of 1877 was a compromise made necessary by the disputed Election of 1876. While an Electoral Commission awarded the election to Rutherford B. Hayes, Southern Democrats planned to block the Commissions report via filibuster. The compromise resolved the constitutional crisis through a series... Compromise of 1877.


Though states' rights was a cause of both Northern and Southern states before the War, control of the federal government led the Republican Party to support an active role for the federal government. The patriotic unity that developed in the North because of the war led to a string of military men as President, and an era of international expansion and domestic protectionism. As the rural Northern postbellum economy mushroomed with industry and immigration, support for commerce and industry became a hallmark of Republican policy. From the Reconstruction era up to the turn of the century, the Republicans benefited from the The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. The Party is currently ( as of 2005) the minority party in both the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, as well as in governorships and state legislative seats. Of the two... Democrats' association with the For other meanings of confederate and confederacy, see confederacy (disambiguation) Confederate States of America (Confederate Flag) (Confederate Seal) National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861... Confederacy and dominated national politics – albeit with strong competition from the Democrats, especially during the 1880s. With the two-term presidency of Ulysses S. Grant, the party became known for its strong advocacy of commerce, industry, and veterans' rights.


During the 1880s and 1890s, the Republicans struggled against the Democrats' efforts, winning several close elections and losing two to Grover Cleveland Order: 22nd President 24th President Term of Office: March 4, 1885–March 4, 1889 March 4, 1893–March 4, 1897 Followed: Chester A. Arthur (1885) Benjamin Harrison (1893) Succeeded by: Benjamin Harrison (1889) William McKinley (1897) Date of Birth March 18, 1837 Place of Birth: Caldwell... Grover Cleveland (in Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican convention 3 Democratic convention 4 Greenback Party 5 Prohibition Party 6 Election results 7 See also 8 Other elections Summary In a campaign that featured mudslinging and personal acrimony on a level never before seen, on November 4, 1884 Democrat Grover Cleveland became the first... 1884 and Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican convention 3 Democratic convention 4 Other parties 5 Election results 6 Other elections Summary Held on November 8, 1892, New Yorks Grover Cleveland returned to defeat incumbent President Benjamin Harrison to become the first person to be elected to non-consecutive Presidential terms. Cleveland... 1892). The election of William McKinley Order 25th President Term of Office March 4, 1897 - September 14, 1901 Predecessor Grover Cleveland Successor Theodore Roosevelt Date of Birth January 29, 1843 Place of Birth Niles, Ohio Date of Death September 14, 1901 Place of Death Buffalo, New York Occupation Lawyer First Lady: Ida Saxton McKinley... William McKinley in Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican convention 3 Democratic convention 4 Other parties 5 Election results 6 Other elections Summary The election of 1896 is often considered a realigning election. Democrat nominee William Jennings Bryan was running against William McKinley, but the McKinley ticket ended up winning, getting an endorsement from... 1896 is widely seen as a resurgence of Republican dominance and is sometimes cited as a Realigning election is a term from political science. It describes any election which represents a bold departure from previous patterns of voting. Most specifically, it refers to any one of several United States presidential elections in which geographic bases of power for each of the two parties were significantly altered... realigning election. He relied heavily on industry for his support and cemented the Republicans as the party of business; his In United States and other democracies, political campaigns larger than a few individuals generally include a campaign manager whose role is to coordinate the campaigns operations. Apart from the candidate, they are often a campaigns most visible leader, However, modern campaign managers, particularly at the presidential level, are... campaign manager, Ohio's Marcus Alonzo Hanna (September 24, 1837 - February 15, 1904) was an American industrialist and politician from Cleveland, Ohio. Born in New Lisbon, Ohio, Mark Hanna made his fortune as a shipper and broker of iron and coal in Cleveland after briefly attending Western Reserve College, working in his fathers... Marcus Hanna, developed a detailed plan for getting contributions from the business world, and McKinley outspent his rival William Jennings Bryan, (March 19, 1860–July 26, 1925) born in Salem, Illinois, was a gifted orator and three-time United States presidential candidate. Bryan was trained as a lawyer at Northwestern University. He practiced law in Lincoln, Nebraska, and represented Nebraska in Congress. Bryan, a Populist, held fast... William Jennings Bryan by a large margin. This emphasis on business was in part mitigated by Theodore Roosevelt ( October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was the twenty-fifth ( 1901) Vice President and the twenty-sixth ( 1901- 1909) President of the United States, succeeding to the office upon the assassination of William McKinley. At 42, Roosevelt was the youngest person ever to serve as President of... Theodore Roosevelt, McKinley's successor after assassination, who engaged in Trust-busting refers to government activities designed to break up trusts or monopolies. Theodore Roosevelt is the U.S. president most associated with dissolving trusts, but his chosen successor, William Howard Taft, actually began the most anti-trust proceedings. Trusts were large business entities that largely succeeded in controlling a... trust-busting.


Roosevelt did not seek another term in Contents // 1 Major party conventions 2 Major party conventions 3 Election results 4 Notes 5 See also 6 Other elections 7 Notes 8 See also 9 Other elections Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. Prominent Republican candidates included House... 1908, instead endorsing Secretary of War William Howard Taft Order: 27th President Term of Office: March 4, 1909–March 4, 1913 Predecessor: Theodore Roosevelt Successor: Woodrow Wilson Date of Birth September 15, 1857 Place of Birth: Cincinnati, Ohio Date of Death: March 8, 1930 Place of Death: Washington, D.C. First Ladies: Helen Herron Taft... William Howard Taft as his successor, but the widening division between This article is part of or related to the Progressivism series Progressivism Progressive Movement Progressive Party Economic Progressivism Educational Progressivism Political Progressivism Social Progressivism Progressivism or political progressivism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. There are also a number of progressive political parties in various... progressive and Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. There are also a number of Conservative political parties in various countries. All of these are primarily (though not necessarily exclusively) identified with the political right. While the intellectual roots of conservatism date back centuries... conservative forces in the party resulted in a third-party candidacy for Roosevelt on the This article is part of or related to the Progressivism series Progressivism Progressive Movement Progressive Party Economic Progressivism Educational Progressivism Political Progressivism Social Progressivism The United States Progressive Party refers to three distinct political parties in 20th-century United States politics. Contents // 1 The first Progressive Party 2 The second... Progressive, or "Bull Moose" ticket in Contents // 1 Introduction 2 Republican nomination 3 Democratic nomination 4 General election 5 Election results 6 Further reading 7 Other elections Introduction The 1912 election was marked by hostility and division between the establishment and Progressive factions of the Republican Party. Republican nomination The Republican Convention was held in Chicago... the election of 1912. He finished ahead of Taft, but the split in the Republican vote resulted in a decisive victory for Democrat Dr. Thomas Woodrow Wilson ( December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 45th state Governor of New Jersey ( 1911- 1913) and later the 28th President of the United States ( 1913- 1921). He was the second Democrat to serve two consecutive terms in the White House ( Andrew Jackson was the... Woodrow Wilson, temporarily interrupting the Republican era.


The party controlled the presidency throughout the Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s - 1920s - 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s Years: 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 Referred to as the Roaring 20s. Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Technology 1.2 Science 1.3... 1920s, running on a platform of Isolationism is a diplomatic policy whereby a nation seeks to avoid alliances with other nations. Most nations are not in a political position to maintain strict isolationist policies for extended periods of time, even though most nations have historical periods where isolationism is popular. Contents // 1 United States Isolationism 2... isolationism and " Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. Laissez-faire economic... laissez-faire" economics, although economic isolationism (tariffs, etc.) and laissez-faire economics are mutually exclusive. (Many believe that true laissez-faire economic policy ended with the 1896 Democratic Candidacy of William Jennings Bryan) Warren Gamaliel Harding ( November 2, 1865 - August 2, 1923) was the 29th ( 1921- 1923) President of the United States and the sixth President to die in office. Hardings presidential legacy has never found a consensus among historians, nor among American citizens. Overshadowed by scandals instigated by three of his... Warren G. Harding, John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ( July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933) was the twenty-ninth ( 1921- 1923) Vice President and the thirtieth ( 1923- 1929) President of the United States, succeeding to that office upon the death of Warren G. Harding. Contents // 1 Biography 2 Presidency 2.1 Cabinet 2.2... Calvin Coolidge and Herbert Hoover Order: 31st President Term of Office: March 4, 1929 - March 4, 1933 Predecessor: Calvin Coolidge Successor: Franklin Delano Roosevelt Date of Birth Monday, August 10, 1874 Place of Birth: West Branch, Iowa Date of Death: Tuesday, October 20, 1964 Place of Death: New York City. New York First... Herbert Hoover were resoundingly elected in Contents // 1 Introduction 2 Republican nomination 3 Democratic nomination 4 Other candidates 5 General election 6 Election results 7 See also 8 Other elections Introduction By 1920, World War I was over. The wartime boom had collapsed. Diplomats and politicians were arguing over peace treaties and the question of America... 1920, Contents // 1 Introduction 2 Republican nomination 3 Democratic nomination 4 Other candidates 5 General election 6 Election results 7 See also 8 Other elections Introduction Incumbent President Coolidge was relatively popular, and the economy was booming. Republican nomination The Republican Convention was held in Cleveland from 10 June to 12... 1924, and Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Herbert Clark Hoover of California (W) 444 21,391,381 58.2 Republican Charles Curtis of Kansas (444) Alfred Emmanuel Smith of New York 87 15,016,443 40.9 Democrat Joseph Taylor Robinson of Arkansas (87) Others... 1928 respectively, but the The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. However, most of the remainder of the 1930s was spent recovering from the contraction, and it would be well after World War II when such indicators as industrial production, share prices and global GDP... Great Depression cost Hoover the presidency with the Presidential electoral votes by state. By the time of the U.S. presidential election of 1932, the effects of the 1929 Stock Market Crash and the Great Depression were being felt intensely across the country. Across the world, governments felt the pressure for radical - even Socialist or Fascist - solutions to... landslide election of This is the most common use of FDR. For other uses, see FDR (disambiguation). Franklin Delano Roosevelt ( January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), often referred to as FDR, was the 32nd ( 1933– 1945) President of the United States. He was elected to an unprecedented four terms, and died... Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1932 is a leap year starting on a Friday. Years: 1929 1930 1931 - 1932 - 1933 1934 1935 Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s - 1930s - 1940s 1950s 1960s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1932 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science Other... 1932. Roosevelt's The New Deal coalition was a diverse collection of groups of voters who supported the United States Democratic Party from 1932 until approximately 1964, and which made the Democratic Party the majority party during that time. The 1932 election brought about a major realignment in political party affiliation, and is... New Deal coalition controlled American politics for the next three decades, excepting the two-term presidency of Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (60,000 ft) into the air. August 9, 1945 World War II was a global conflict that started in 7 July 1937 in Asia and 1 September 1939 in Europe and lasted until 1945, involving the majority of the... World War II General Dwight D. Eisenhower Order: 34th President Term of Office: January 20, 1953–January 20, 1961 Predecessor: Harry S. Truman Successor: John F. Kennedy Date of Birth: Tuesday, October 14, 1890 Place of Birth: Denison, Texas Date of Death: Friday, March 28, 1969 Place of Death: Washington, D.C. First... Dwight Eisenhower.


The post-war emergence of the United States as one of two superpowers and rapid social change caused the Republican Party to divide into a conservative faction (dominant in the West and Southeast) and a This article or section should be merged with Republican Party Although now mostly associated with conservative political philosophy, the United States Republican Party has long had a liberal wing. In the late 20th century, those in this wing were often called Rockefeller Republicans, a reference to the former New York... liberal faction (dominant in This article is about the region in the United States of America. For other uses, see New England (disambiguation). Modern New England, the six northeastern-most states of the United States, indicated by red The New England region of the United States is located in the northeastern corner of the... New England) – combined with a residual base of inherited progressive Midwestern Republicanism active throughout the century. A Republican like U.S. Sen Robert Alphonso Taft I (September 8, 1889 - July 31, 1953), of the Taft family political dynasty of Ohio, was a United States Senator and Presidential candidate in the United States Republican Party. Robert Taft was educated at Yale University, got his law degree from Harvard University in 1913, and practiced... Robert Taft of Ohio represented the Midwestern wing of the party that continued to oppose The New Deal was President Franklin D. Roosevelts legislative agenda for rescuing the United States from the Great Depression. It was widely believed that the depression was caused by the inherent instability of the market and that government intervention was necessary to rationalize and stabilize the economy. Contents // 1... New Deal reforms and continued to champion Isolationism is a diplomatic policy whereby a nation seeks to avoid alliances with other nations. Most nations are not in a political position to maintain strict isolationist policies for extended periods of time, even though most nations have historical periods where isolationism is popular. Contents // 1 United States Isolationism 2... isolationism. Thomas Dewey Thomas Edmund Dewey ( March 24, 1902 – March 16, 1971) was the Governor of New York ( 1943- 1955) and the Republican candidate for the U.S. Presidency in two elections ( 1944 and 1948), losing both times. He was the first presidential candidate born in the twentieth century. Contents... Thomas Dewey represented the Northeastern wing of the party that was closer to Democratic liberalism and internationalism. In the end, the isolationists were marginalized by those who supported a strong U.S. role in opposing the Soviet Union throughout the world, as embodied by President Eisenhower. However, this development did not represent the end of the story. The seeds of conservative dominance in the Republican party were planted in the nomination of conservative Barry Goldwater Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 _ May 29, 1998) was a United States politician and a founding figure in the modern conservative movement in the USA. Goldwater personified the shift in balance in American culture from the Northeast to the West. A five_term United States Senator from... Barry Goldwater over In politics, the term liberal refers to: an adherent of the ideology of liberalism or a state or quality of this ideology. (Note: the words liberal or liberalism can have different meanings in different countries and may also vary with the political background of the user. Therefore, the terms have... liberal Nelson Rockefeller Order: 41st Vice President Term of Office: December 19, 1974 - January 20, 1977 Followed: Gerald Ford Succeeded by: Walter Mondale Date of Birth July 8, 1908 Place of Birth: Bar Harbor, Maine Wife: Margaretta Happy Rockefeller Profession: Governor of New York Political Party: Republican President: Gerald Ford Nelson... Nelson Rockefeller as the Republican candidate for the Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Lyndon Baines Johnson of Texas (W) 486 42,825,463 61.0% Democrat Hubert Horatio Humphrey of Minnesota (486) Barry Morris Goldwater of Arizona 52 27,146,969 38.4% Republican William Edward Miller of New York (52... 1964 presidential election.


One element of the New Deal coalition was the " The phrase Solid South describes the reliable electoral support of the U.S. Southern states for Democratic Party candidates from the Reconstruction era through much of the 20th century. Except for 1928, when Catholic candidate Al Smith ran on the Democratic ticket, the Democrats won heavily in the South in... Solid South", a term describing the Southern states' reliable support for Democratic presidential candidates. Goldwater's electoral success in the South, and Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew ( 1969– 1973), Gerald Ford ( 1973– 1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of... Nixon's successful In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states. It is also used in a more general sense, in which cultural (especially racial) themes are used in an... Southern strategy four years later, represented a significant political change, as Southern white The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. This article forms part of the series Christianity History of Christianity Christian Worldview Creeds · Philosophy &#183 Theology Creation · Fall · Original sin · Incarnation Salvation · End Times · Divine grace · Faith · Prayer · Liturgy · Fasting... protestants began moving into the party, largely in reaction to national Democratic Party's support for the Civil Rights Movement in the United States, political, legal, and social struggle to gain full citizenship rights for African American and to achieve racial equality. The civil rights movement was first and foremost a challenge to segregation, the system of laws and customs separating blacks and whites that whites used... Civil Rights Movement. The remaining pockets of liberal Republicanism in the northeast began to die out as the region turned solidly Democratic. In The Emerging Republican Majority, There are several people called Kevin Phillips: Kevin Phillips, political commentator and writer Kevin Phillips, England and Southampton football player This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link referred you here, you might want... Kevin Phillips, then a Nixon strategist, argued (based on the Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Richard Milhous Nixon of New York (W) 301 31,710,470 43.2% Republican Spiro Theodore Agnew of Maryland (301) Hubert Horatio Humphrey of Minnesota 191 30,898,055 42.6% Democrat Edmund Sixtus Muskie of Maine (191... 1968 election results) that support from Southern whites and growth in the Belt regions of the United States Bible Belt | Corn Belt | Grain Belt | Jello Belt | Rice Belt | Rust Belt | Sun Belt Categories: Stub | Belt regions of the United States ... Sun Belt, among other factors, was driving an enduring Republican electoral Realigning election is a term from political science. It describes any election which represents a bold departure from previous patterns of voting. Most specifically, it refers to any one of several United States presidential elections in which geographic bases of power for each of the two parties were significantly altered... realignment.


Any enduring Republican majority, however, was put on hold when the The Watergate building. The Watergate scandal (or just Watergate) was an American political scandal and constitutional crisis of the 1970s, which eventually led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. The affair was named after the hotel where the burglary that led to a series of investigations occurred. Contents // 1... Watergate Scandal forced Nixon to resign under threat of impeachment. Gerald Ford White House Portrait Order: 38th President Term of Office: August 9, 1974–January 20, 1977 Predecessor: Richard M. Nixon Successor: James E. Carter Date of Birth: Monday, July 14, 1913 Place of Birth: Omaha, Nebraska First Lady: Elizabeth Ann Betty (Bloomer) Ford Profession: Lawyer Political Party: Republican... Gerald Ford succeeded Nixon under the 25th Amendment and struggled to forge a political identity separate from his predecessor. The taint of Watergate and the nation's economic difficulties contributed to the election of Democrat James Earl Carter, Jr. Order: 39th President Term of Office: January 20, 1977–January 20, 1981 Preceded by: Gerald Ford Succeeded by: Ronald Reagan Date of birth: October 1, 1924 Place of birth: Plains, Georgia Date of death: Place of death: First Lady: Rosalynn Carter Political party: Democratic Vice... Jimmy Carter in Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. of Georgia (W) 297 40,825,839 50.1% Democrat Walter Frederick Mondale of Minnesota (297) Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. of Michigan 240 39,147,770 48.0% Republican Robert Joseph Dole of... 1976, a Washington outsider.


The trends Phillips described, however, could be seen in the Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Ronald Wilson Reagan of California (W) 489 43,901,812 50.7% Republican George Herbert Walker Bush of Texas (489) James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. of Georgia 49 35,483,820 41.0% Democrat Walter Frederick Mondale of... 1980 and Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Ronald Wilson Reagan of California (W) 525 54,455,472 58.77% Republican George Herbert Walker Bush of Texas (525) Walter Frederick Mondale of Minnesota 13 37,577,352 40.56% Democrat Geraldine Anne Ferraro of New York... 1984 elections of Ronald Reagan Order: 40th President Term of Office: January 20, 1981–January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles, California First Lady... Ronald Reagan - the latter being a landslide in which Reagan won nearly 59% of the popular vote and carried 49 of the 50 states - as well as the Newt Gingrich Newton Leroy Gingrich (born June 17, 1943) is an American politician who is best-known as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999. In 1995 he was named Time Magazines Man of the Year. He was born Newton McPherson in Harrisburg... Newt Gingrich-led "Republican Revolution" of 1994 and its The Contract with America was a document released during the 1994 Congressional election campaign by the United States Republican Party. It detailed the actions that the Republicans would take upon becoming the majority party in Congress. Contents // 1 Role and Uses of the Contract 2 Content of the Contract 2... Contract With America. The latter was the first time in 40 years that the Republicans secured control of both houses of Seal of the Congress. The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. It is established by Article One of the Constitution of the United States, which also delineates its structure and powers. Congress is a bicameral legislature, consisting... U.S. Congress, which, with the exception of the Senate during 2001-2002, has been retained through the present time.


That year, the GOP campaigned on a platform of major reforms of government with measures, such as a balanced budget amendment to the Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America and is... Constitution and welfare reform. These measures and others formed the famous The Contract with America was a document released during the 1994 Congressional election campaign by the United States Republican Party. It detailed the actions that the Republicans would take upon becoming the majority party in Congress. Contents // 1 Role and Uses of the Contract 2 Content of the Contract 2... Contract with America, which were subsequently considered by the Congress, although not all items passed. Democratic President William Jefferson Clinton Order: 42nd President Vice President: Al Gore Term of office: January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope... Bill Clinton opposed many of the social agenda initiatives, with Welfare reform is the name for a political movement in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to institute changes in that system, generally in a more conservative direction. Reasons usually invoked include: the perceived high cost of social welfare the alleged existence of people who live off welfare... welfare reform and a balanced federal budget notable exceptions. The Republican-controlled House of Representatives also failed to muster the two-thirds majority required to pass one of the most popular proposals – a Constitutional amendment to impose A term limit is a provision of a constitution, statute, or bylaw which limits the number of terms a person may serve in a particular elected office. An example would be the 22nd Amendment of the United States Constitution which says that no person can be elected President more than... term limits on members of Congress. In 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. It was the first year of the International Decade of the Worlds Indigenous People (1995- 2005): http://www.unesco.org/culture/indigenous/ Years: 1992 1993 1994 - 1995 - 1996 1997 1998 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s... 1995, a budget battle with Clinton led to the brief shutdown of the federal government, an event which contributed to Clinton's victory in the Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) William Jefferson Clinton of Arkansas (W) 379 47,402,357 49.24 Democratic, Liberal Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. of Tennessee (379) Robert Joseph Dole of Kansas 159 39,198,755 40.71 Republican, Conservative Jack French Kemp of... 1996 election.


With the victory of The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. George Walker Bush Order: 43rd President Term of Office: January 20, 2001–Present Predecessor: Bill Clinton Successor: Incumbent Date of Birth: July 6, 1946 Place of Birth: New Haven, Connecticut... George W. Bush in the closely contested Map The U.S. presidential election of 2000 took place on Election Day, Tuesday, November 7. The Republican candidate, George W. Bush won the election to the presidency, defeating Democratic candidate Al Gore. This election was the third time in United States history a candidate had won the necessary number... 2000 election, the Republican party gained control of the presidency and both houses of Congress for the first time since Years: 1949 1950 1951 - 1952 - 1953 1954 1955 Decades: 1920s 1930s 1940s - 1950s - 1960s 1970s 1980s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1952 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics Canada - Sport Lists of leaders: State leaders - Religious... 1952. When This article is about the U.S. state. For other meanings, see Vermont (disambiguation). State of Vermont (Flag of Vermont) (Seal of Vermont) State nickname: The Green Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Governor Jim Douglas Official languages None Area 24,923 km... Vermont Republican Senator James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. Contents // 1 Background 2 Political Career 2.1 From Republican to Independent 3 Further reading 4 External link Background Jeffords is the son of... James Jeffords switched parties, Republicans temporarily lost control of the Senate until 2002. In the wake of the The World Trade Center on fire Sep 11, 2001 attacks Timeline Background history Planning Execution September 11, 2001 Rest of September October Aftermath Victims Casualties Missing Persons Survivors Foreign casualties Rescue workers Effects U.S. government response World political effects World economic effects Airport security Closings and cancellations Movies and... September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States, however, Bush's popularity rose as he pursued a " The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. Terrorism General Definition Conventions Counterterrorism Criticisms Lists Groups Incidents Types Nationalist Religious Left-wing Right-wing State Islamist Ethnic Narcoterrorism Domestic Anarchist Political Eco-terrorism Christian Tactics Hijacking Assassination Car bombing Suicide bombing Kidnapping... War on Terrorism" that included the The United States, with support from the United Kingdom, Australia and the Northern Alliance, invaded Afghanistan in October 2001 as part of its War on Terrorism campaign. The military campaign, led by U.S. general Tommy Franks, was initially dubbed Operation Infinite Justice but quickly renamed Operation Enduring Freedom, due... invasion of Afghanistan and the This article needs cleanup. Please edit this article to conform to a higher standard of article quality. President Bush signs USA Patriot Act, October 26, 2001 The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (USA PATRIOT Act, H.R. 3162... USA Patriot Act.


The Republican Party fared well in the 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated: International Year of Ecotourism and Mountains National Science Year in the United Kingdom Autism Awareness Year in the United Kingdom Years: 1999 2000 2001 - 2002 - 2003 2004 2005 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s... 2002 midterm elections, solidifying its hold on the House and regaining control of the Senate, in the run-up to the The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. 2003 Invasion of Iraq Map of Iraq Date 02:30 UTC March 20, 2003–April 15, 2003 Place Iraq, Southwest Asia Asia Prelude Iraq disarmament crisis Targets Alleged weapons of mass destruction. President... war in Iraq. This marked just the third time since the Civil War that the party in control of the White House gained seats in both houses of Congress in a midterm election (others were 1902 and 1934). On November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. November Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20... November 2, 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) Elections were held in 73 countries during 2004. See a list of elections... 2004, Bush was re-elected to a second term. Bush received 51% of the popular vote, becoming the first presidential candidate to win a majority of the popular vote since 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. Years: 1985 1986 1987 - 1988 - 1989 1990 1991 Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1988 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation... 1988. Republicans gained additional seats in both houses of Congress, leaving Democrats again in the minority.


Thus, by Years: 2003 2004 2005 - 2006 (MMVI) - 2007 2008 2009 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan - Feb - Mar - Apr - May - Jun Jul - Aug - Sep - Oct - Nov - Dec 2006 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Politics Elections... 2006, Republicans will have controlled the White House for 26 of the previous 38 years, and the Congress since 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. Years: 1991 1992 1993 - 1994 - 1995 1996 1997 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1994 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art... 1994 (with the brief interruption in the Senate). Conservative commentators speculate, and Republicans hope, that this may constitute a permanent realignment. Karl Rove Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950 in Denver, Colorado) is an American political consultant, and (as of 2004) U.S. President George W. Bushs Senior Advisor and chief political strategist. On February 8, 2005, Rove was appointed deputy chief of staff. Karl Rove began his political... Karl Rove, President Bush's chief political advisor, has been reported to be a keen student of the Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican convention 3 Democratic convention 4 Other parties 5 Election results 6 Other elections Summary The election of 1896 is often considered a realigning election. Democrat nominee William Jennings Bryan was running against William McKinley, but the McKinley ticket ended up winning, getting an endorsement from... presidential election of 1896, in which Marcus Alonzo Hanna (September 24, 1837 - February 15, 1904) was an American industrialist and politician from Cleveland, Ohio. Born in New Lisbon, Ohio, Mark Hanna made his fortune as a shipper and broker of iron and coal in Cleveland after briefly attending Western Reserve College, working in his fathers... Mark Hanna helped William McKinley Order 25th President Term of Office March 4, 1897 - September 14, 1901 Predecessor Grover Cleveland Successor Theodore Roosevelt Date of Birth January 29, 1843 Place of Birth Niles, Ohio Date of Death September 14, 1901 Place of Death Buffalo, New York Occupation Lawyer First Lady: Ida Saxton McKinley... William McKinley construct a Republican majority that lasted for the next 36 years.


Some left-leaning commentators, such as Ruy Teixeira is a political consultant and commentator. Along with John Judis, he wrote The Emerging Democratic Majority, a book arguing that Democrats in the United States are demographically destined to become a majority party in the early 21st Century. He writes and edits the weblog Donkey Rising. ... Ruy Teixeira and John Judis (in The Emerging Democratic Majority, 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated: International Year of Ecotourism and Mountains National Science Year in the United Kingdom Autism Awareness Year in the United Kingdom Years: 1999 2000 2001 - 2002 - 2003 2004 2005 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s... 2002), see such prospects as unlikely, given that Republican voters are overwhelmingly white and often rural, two groups shrinking in relative demographic terms, while Democrats tend to win healthy majorities among Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture. According to the US Census Bureau, Hispanics form an... Hispanics, African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. The majority of African Americans are of African, European and Native American ancestry. Terms for African... African Americans, and city dwellers. Their conservative counterparts, however, point to Bush's relative success among Hispanic voters, winning 35% of their vote in 2000 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE55Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE60Fixes.css; /**/ 2000 From Wikipedia 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. Popular culture also holds the year 2000 as the first year of the 21st century and the 3rd... 2000 and 44% in 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) Elections were held in 73 countries during 2004. See a list of elections... 2004. (Among African American voters, Bush - like all recent Republican presidential candidates - lost overwhelmingly both times, though he did manage to increase his support from 9% in 2000 to 11% in 2004.) They also point to Republican strength in quickly growing The expression Exurbs was coined in the 1950s to describe the ring of prosperous rural communities beyond the suburbs that, due to availability via the new high-speed limited-access highways, were becoming dormitory communities for an urban area. Earlier exurbs had been reached through commuter rail and parkway systems... exurbs and in the booming metropolitan areas of the The U.S. South Location in the U.S. Population: 99,664,761 Total Area: 2,384,143 km² Largest City (proper): Houston, Texas 2,009,834 Highest Elevation: Guadalupe Peak 2,667 m Lowest Elevation: New Orleans -2.5 m Largest State: Texas 696,241 km² Smallest State: Delaware... South.


Factions of the Republican Party

It should be noted defining the views of any "faction" of any political party is difficult at best, and that any attempt to apply labels within a single political party is no more effective than the application of broad labels to political parties as a whole. Keeping that in mind, there are several ideological groups recognized by some in the modern-day GOP, including the The Religious Right, is a broad label applied to a number of political and religious movements with particularly conservative and right wing views. While such elements are found in many nations, this term is most commonly applied to groups within the United States. Sometimes the term Religious Right is used... religious right, The term paleoconservative (sometimes shortened to paleo or paleocon when the context is clear) refers to an American branch of conservative Old Right thought that stands against both the mainstream tradition of the National Review magazine and the neoconservatives. Many paleoconservatives readily identify themselves as classical conservatives, because the former... paleoconservatives, Neoconservatism is a somewhat controversial term referring to the political goals and ideology of the new conservatives in the United States. The newness refers either to being new to American conservatism (often coming from liberal or socialist backgrounds) or to being part of a new wave of conservative thought and... neoconservatives, Moderate in the sense meant here is an intermediate position between those generally classified as being left-wing and those seen as being right-wing. Moderate can be used both as an adjective describing such a position, and as a noun describing persons holding such a view. In politics, moderates... moderates, fiscal conservatives, and The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. This article is part of or related to the Liberalism series Liberalism Liberalism worldwide List of liberal parties Liberal International - ELDR Liberal democracy List of liberal theorists A short liberal bibliography... libertarians.


For more information on the factions in the Republican Party, see The Republican Party of the United States is composed of various different groups or factions. Although their interests at times conflict, they share enough in common to remain in the same party. It should be noted defining the views of any faction of any political party is difficult at best... Factions in the Republican Party (United States).


Presidential tickets

Refer also to: For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. Seal of the President of the United States, official impression The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. Under the U.S. Constitution, the President is also the chief executive of... List of Presidents of the United States
[1] Assassinated.
[2] Lincoln was succeeded by Democrat Order: 17th President Term of Office: April 15, 1865 - March 3, 1869 Followed: Abraham Lincoln Succeeded by: Ulysses S. Grant Date of Birth December 29, 1808 Place of Birth: Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Death: July 31, 1875 Place of Death: near Elizabethton, Tennessee Wife: Eliza McCardle Johnson First Ladies... Andrew Johnson who ran on a Union ticket with him in 1864.
[3] Died while in office and was not replaced.
[4] Died of natural causes.
[5] Resigned.
Election year Result Nominees and office-holders President
President Vice President # Term
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Election Results 3 Other Elections 4 For More Information Summary President Franklin Pierce was defeated in his effort to be renominated by the Democrats, who instead selected James Buchanan of Pennsylvania. The Whigs meanwhile had disbanded but been largely replaced by the Republican Party, a new... 1856 Lost John C. Frémont John Charles Frémont ( January 21, 1813– July 13, 1890), birth name John Charles Fremon [Harvey, p.192], was an American military officer, explorer, and the first candidate of the United States Republican Party for the office of President of the United States... John Charles Frémont William Lewis Dayton (February 17, 1807 – December 1, 1864) was an American lawyer from Freehold Borough, New Jersey. He represented New Jersey in the United States Senate from 1842-1851 and in 1856 was the first Republican nominee for Vice-President of the United States. Preceded by: (none) Republican... William Lewis Dayton
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican Party nomination 3 Constitutional Union Party 4 Democratic Party nomination and split 5 Election results 6 Related topics 7 External links 8 Other elections Summary The election of 1860 is widely considered to be a realigning election. The United States had been divided through most... 1860 Won Abraham Lincoln Order: 16th President Term of Office: March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865 Predecessor: James Buchanan Successor: Andrew Johnson Date of Birth: February 12, 1809 Place of Birth: Hardin County, Kentucky (site now in LaRue County) Date of Death: April 15, 1865 Place of Death: Washington, D.C... Abraham Lincoln[1] Photographic portrait of Hannibal Hamlin Hannibal Hamlin (August 27, 1809–July 4, 1891) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. Hamlin served in the Maine Legislature and later the U.S. House of Representatives before being elected to the U.S. Senate. Hamlin was a... Hannibal Hamlin 16th 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. Years: 1858 1859 1860 - 1861 - 1862 1863 1864 Decades: 1830s 1840s 1850s - 1860s - 1870s 1880s 1890s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1861 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - South Africa - Sport Lists of... 1861 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. Years: 1862 1863 1864 - 1865 - 1866 1867 1868 Decades: 1830s 1840s 1850s - 1860s - 1870s 1880s 1890s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1865 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial... 1865
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican Party Nomination 3 Democratic Party Nomination 4 Election Results 5 For More Information 6 Other Elections Summary The election of 1864 was conducted in the middle of the Civil War, and as such the Confederate states did not participate. The war was taking a heavy... 1864 Won Order: 17th President Term of Office: April 15, 1865 - March 3, 1869 Followed: Abraham Lincoln Succeeded by: Ulysses S. Grant Date of Birth December 29, 1808 Place of Birth: Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Death: July 31, 1875 Place of Death: near Elizabethton, Tennessee Wife: Eliza McCardle Johnson First Ladies... Andrew Johnson[2]
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican Party Nomination 3 Democratic Party Nomination 4 Election Results 5 For More Information 6 Other Elections Summary The Civil War over, partisan politics immediately returned as U.S. Congress wrangled with the issue of reconstruction - the radical Republicans even going so far as to impeach... 1868 Won Ulysses S. Grant Order: 18th President Term of Office: March 4, 1869 – March 4, 1877 Followed: Andrew Johnson Succeeded by: Rutherford B. Hayes Date of Birth April 27, 1822 Place of Birth: Point Pleasant, Ohio Date of Death: July 23, 1885 Place of Death: Mount McGregor, New York First... Ulysses Simpson Grant Schuyler Colfax (March 23, 1823–January 13, 1885) was a Representative from Indiana and the 17th Vice President of the United States. Colfax was born in New York City. In 1836 he moved with his parents to New Carlisle, Indiana. He was appointed deputy auditor of St. Joseph County... Schuyler Colfax 18th 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). Years: 1866 1867 1868 - 1869 - 1870 1871 1872 Decades: 1830s 1840s 1850s - 1860s - 1870s 1880s 1890s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1869 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport... 1869 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January - April 1.2 May - August 1.3 September - December 1.4 Unknown date 2 Births 3 Deaths Events January - April January 1 - Queen Victoria proclaimed Empress of India by the Royal Titles... 1877
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican Convention 3 Liberal Republicans 4 Democratic Convention 5 Election Results 6 Other Elections Summary Incumbent President Ulysses S. Grant was easily elected to a second term in office despite a split within the Republican Party that resulted in a defection of many key Republicans to... 1872 Won Henry Wilson (February 16, 1812–November 22, 1875) was a Senator from Massachusetts and the eighteenth Vice President of the United States. Wilson was born Jeremiah Jones Colbath in Farmington, New Hampshire. In 1833 he had his name legally changed by the legislature to Henry Wilson. He moved to... Henry Wilson[3]
The U.S. presidential election of 1876 was perhaps the most disputed presidential election in American history. Samuel Tilden handily defeated Ohios Rutherford Hayes in the popular vote, and had 184 electoral votes to Hayes 165. However, 20 electoral votes were in dispute due to four states (Florida, Louisiana... 1876 Won Rutherford B. Hayes Order: 19th President Term of Office: March 4, 1877 - March 4, 1881 Followed: Ulysses S. Grant Succeeded by: James Garfield Date of Birth October 4, 1822 Place of Birth: Delaware, Ohio Date of Death: January 17, 1893 Place of Death: Fremont, Ohio First Lady: Lucy Webb Hayes... Rutherford Birchard Hayes William A. Wheeler Order: 19th Vice President Term of Office: March 4, 1877- March 4, 1881 Preceded: Henry Wilson Succeeded: Chester A. Arthur Date of Birth June 30, 1819 Date of Death: June 4, 1887 Place of Birth: Malone, New York Wife: Mary King Profession: Lawyer Political Party: Republican President... William Almon Wheeler 19th 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January - April 1.2 May - August 1.3 September - December 1.4 Unknown date 2 Births 3 Deaths Events January - April January 1 - Queen Victoria proclaimed Empress of India by the Royal Titles... 1877 Years: 1878 1879 1880 - 1881 - 1882 1883 1884 Decades: 1850s 1860s 1870s - 1880s - 1890s 1900s 1910s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1881 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1881
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican convention 3 Democratic convention 4 Greenback Labor Party 5 Election results 6 Other elections Summary Keeping a promise made during the 1876 campaign, incumbent President Rutherford Hayes did not seek re-election. The Republican Party eventually chose another Ohioan, James Abram Garfield, as their standard... 1880 Won James A. Garfield Order: 20th President Term of Office: March 4, 1881 - September 19, 1881 Followed: Rutherford B. Hayes Succeeded by: Chester A. Arthur Date of Birth November 19, 1831 Place of Birth: Moreland Hills, Ohio Date of Death: September 19, 1881 Place of Death: Elberon (Long Branch), New Jersey... James Abram Garfield[1] Chester Alan Arthur Order: Twenty_first Term of Office: September 20, 1881—March 4, 1885 Followed: James Garfield Succeeded by: Grover Cleveland Date of Birth October 5, 1829 Place of Birth: Fairfield, Vermont Date of Death: November 18, 1886 Place of Death: New York City Wife: Ellen Lewis Herndon Arthur... Chester Alan Arthur 20th Years: 1878 1879 1880 - 1881 - 1882 1883 1884 Decades: 1850s 1860s 1870s - 1880s - 1890s 1900s 1910s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1881 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1881
Chester Alan Arthur Order: Twenty_first Term of Office: September 20, 1881—March 4, 1885 Followed: James Garfield Succeeded by: Grover Cleveland Date of Birth October 5, 1829 Place of Birth: Fairfield, Vermont Date of Death: November 18, 1886 Place of Death: New York City Wife: Ellen Lewis Herndon Arthur... Chester Alan Arthur none 21st Years: 1878 1879 1880 - 1881 - 1882 1883 1884 Decades: 1850s 1860s 1870s - 1880s - 1890s 1900s 1910s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1881 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1881 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. Years: 1882 1883 1884 - 1885 - 1886 1887 1888 Decades: 1850s 1860s 1870s - 1880s - 1890s 1900s 1910s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1885 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - South Africa - Sport Lists of... 1885
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican convention 3 Democratic convention 4 Greenback Party 5 Prohibition Party 6 Election results 7 See also 8 Other elections Summary In a campaign that featured mudslinging and personal acrimony on a level never before seen, on November 4, 1884 Democrat Grover Cleveland became the first... 1884 Lost James G. Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830–January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. He also ran for President of the United States, obtaining the 1884 Republican nomination, but never won the... James Gillespie Blaine For the screenwriter John Logan, see John Logan (screenwriter). John Alexander Logan (February 8, 1826–December 26, 1886), American soldier and political leader, was born in what is now Murphysboro, Jackson County, Illinois. He had no schooling until age 14; he then studied for three years at Shiloh College... John Alexander Logan
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican convention 3 Democratic convention 4 Other parties 5 Election results 6 See also 7 Other elections Summary Held on November 6, 1888, incumbent President Grover Cleveland received the greatest number of popular votes, but Republican challenger Benjamin Harrisons 233 electoral votes topped Clevelands... 1888 Won This article is about the President. For the Angband member, see Ben Harrison Benjamin Harrison Order: 23rd President Term of Office: March 4, 1889 - March 4, 1893 Followed: Grover Cleveland Succeeded by: Grover Cleveland Date of Birth August 20, 1833 Place of Birth: North Bend, Ohio Date of Death: March... Benjamin Harrison Levi Parsons Morton. Levi Parsons Morton (May 16, 1824–May 16, 1920) was a Representative from New York and the twenty-second Vice President of the United States. Morton was born in Shoreham, Addison County, Vermont. He was a clerk in a general store in Enfield, Massachusetts, taught school... Levi Parsons Morton 23rd Years: 1886 1887 1888 - 1889 - 1890 1891 1892 Decades: 1850s 1860s 1870s - 1880s - 1890s 1900s 1910s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1889 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1889 Years: 1890 1891 1892 - 1893 - 1894 1895 1896 Decades: 1860s 1870s 1880s - 1890s - 1900s 1910s 1920s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1893 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Events January 1 - Japan accepts... 1893
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican convention 3 Democratic convention 4 Other parties 5 Election results 6 Other elections Summary Held on November 8, 1892, New Yorks Grover Cleveland returned to defeat incumbent President Benjamin Harrison to become the first person to be elected to non-consecutive Presidential terms. Cleveland... 1892 Lost Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor. He was the longtime editor of the New York Tribune. A Republican, he had an illustrious career as an ambassador, serving as U.S. ambassador to France from 1889 to 1892, and again as... Whitelaw Reid
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican convention 3 Democratic convention 4 Other parties 5 Election results 6 Other elections Summary The election of 1896 is often considered a realigning election. Democrat nominee William Jennings Bryan was running against William McKinley, but the McKinley ticket ended up winning, getting an endorsement from... 1896 Won William McKinley Order 25th President Term of Office March 4, 1897 - September 14, 1901 Predecessor Grover Cleveland Successor Theodore Roosevelt Date of Birth January 29, 1843 Place of Birth Niles, Ohio Date of Death September 14, 1901 Place of Death Buffalo, New York Occupation Lawyer First Lady: Ida Saxton McKinley... William McKinley[1] Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. He was born in Long Branch, Monmouth County, New Jersey, and graduated from Rutgers College in 1863. He was admitted to the bar, and practiced in Paterson, New Jersey. Hobart... Garret Augustus Hobart[3] 25th Years: 1894 1895 1896 - 1897 - 1898 1899 1900 Decades: 1860s 1870s 1880s - 1890s - 1900s 1910s 1920s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1897 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 2 Births... 1897 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January-March 1.2 April-June 1.3 July-September 1.4 October-December 1.5 unknown dates 2 Births 2.1 January-March 2.2 April-June 2.3 July-September 2... 1901
Contents // 1 Summary 2 Republican convention 3 Democratic convention 4 Other parties 5 Election results 6 Other elections Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. A rematch of the 1896 race between Republican President William McKinley and his Democratic challenger from Nebraska, William Jennings Bryan, the recent victory... 1900 Won Theodore Roosevelt ( October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was the twenty-fifth ( 1901) Vice President and the twenty-sixth ( 1901- 1909) President of the United States, succeeding to the office upon the assassination of William McKinley. At 42, Roosevelt was the youngest person ever to serve as President of... Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt ( October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was the twenty-fifth ( 1901) Vice President and the twenty-sixth ( 1901- 1909) President of the United States, succeeding to the office upon the assassination of William McKinley. At 42, Roosevelt was the youngest person ever to serve as President of... Theodore Roosevelt none 26th 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January-March 1.2 April-June 1.3 July-September 1.4 October-December 1.5 unknown dates 2 Births 2.1 January-March 2.2 April-June 2.3 July-September 2... 1901 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January – March 1.2 April – June 1.3 July – September 1.4 October – December 2 Births 3 Deaths 4 Nobel Prizes Events January – March January Su Mo Tu... 1909
Summary The election was held on November 8, 1904. The Incumbent president, Theodore Roosevelt, faced an early primary challenge from Mark Hanna, but this did not last long; Hanna died in 1904. Roosevelt was easily nominated. The Democrats nominated Alton B. Parker. Unlike the 1896 election, the Democrats decided to... 1904 Won Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852–June 4, 1918) was a Senator from Indiana and the twenty_sixth Vice President of the United States. He was born near Unionville Center, Union County, Ohio, and graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio, in 1872. Fairbanks was an agent of the Associated... Charles Warren Fairbanks
Contents // 1 Major party conventions 2 Major party conventions 3 Election results 4 Notes 5 See also 6 Other elections 7 Notes 8 See also 9 Other elections Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. Prominent Republican candidates included House... 1908 Won William Howard Taft Order: 27th President Term of Office: March 4, 1909–March 4, 1913 Predecessor: Theodore Roosevelt Successor: Woodrow Wilson Date of Birth September 15, 1857 Place of Birth: Cincinnati, Ohio Date of Death: March 8, 1930 Place of Death: Washington, D.C. First Ladies: Helen Herron Taft... William Howard Taft James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855–October 30, 1912) was a Representative from New York and the 27th Vice President of the United States. Sherman was born in Utica, New York and graduated from Hamilton College in 1878. He was admitted to the bar in 1880 and commenced practice... James Schoolcraft Sherman[3] 27th 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January – March 1.2 April – June 1.3 July – September 1.4 October – December 2 Births 3 Deaths 4 Nobel Prizes Events January – March January Su Mo Tu... 1909 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. (click on link for calendar) Years: 1910 1911 1912 - 1913 - 1914 1915 1916 Decades: 1880s 1890s 1900s - 1910s - 1920s 1930s 1940s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1913 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation... 1913
Contents // 1 Introduction 2 Republican nomination 3 Democratic nomination 4 General election 5 Election results 6 Further reading 7 Other elections Introduction The 1912 election was marked by hostility and division between the establishment and Progressive factions of the Republican Party. Republican nomination The Republican Convention was held in Chicago... 1912 Lost Nicholas Murray Butler
Electoral College results In 1916, Europe was embroiled in World War I. American sentiment leaned towards the Allied Powers due to the occupation of parts of France and Belgium by the German Empire, but most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war, and preferred a policy of strict... 1916 Lost Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State and Chief Justice of the United States Charles Evans Hughes Charles Evans Hughes (April 11, 1862–August 27, 1948) was a Governor of New York, a United States Secretary of State and Chief Justice of the United States. Hughes was a precocious... Charles Evans Hughes Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852–June 4, 1918) was a Senator from Indiana and the twenty_sixth Vice President of the United States. He was born near Unionville Center, Union County, Ohio, and graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio, in 1872. Fairbanks was an agent of the Associated... Charles Warren Fairbanks
Contents // 1 Introduction 2 Republican nomination 3 Democratic nomination 4 Other candidates 5 General election 6 Election results 7 See also 8 Other elections Introduction By 1920, World War I was over. The wartime boom had collapsed. Diplomats and politicians were arguing over peace treaties and the question of America... 1920 Won Warren Gamaliel Harding ( November 2, 1865 - August 2, 1923) was the 29th ( 1921- 1923) President of the United States and the sixth President to die in office. Hardings presidential legacy has never found a consensus among historians, nor among American citizens. Overshadowed by scandals instigated by three of his... Warren Gamaliel Harding[4] John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ( July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933) was the twenty-ninth ( 1921- 1923) Vice President and the thirtieth ( 1923- 1929) President of the United States, succeeding to that office upon the death of Warren G. Harding. Contents // 1 Biography 2 Presidency 2.1 Cabinet 2.2... John Calvin Coolidge 29th 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 2 Births 2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March 2.4 April 2.5 May 2.6 June 2.7 July 2.8 August 2.9 September 2.10 October 2.11 November... 1921 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January-June 1.2 July-September 1.3 October-December 1.4 Unknown dates 2 Year in topic 3 Births 3.1 January-February 3.2 March-April 3.3 May... 1923
John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ( July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933) was the twenty-ninth ( 1921- 1923) Vice President and the thirtieth ( 1923- 1929) President of the United States, succeeding to that office upon the death of Warren G. Harding. Contents // 1 Biography 2 Presidency 2.1 Cabinet 2.2... John Calvin Coolidge none 30th 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January-June 1.2 July-September 1.3 October-December 1.4 Unknown dates 2 Year in topic 3 Births 3.1 January-February 3.2 March-April 3.3 May... 1923 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 May 1.5 June 1.6 July 1.7 August 1.8 September 1.9 October 1.10 November 1.11 December... 1929
Contents // 1 Introduction 2 Republican nomination 3 Democratic nomination 4 Other candidates 5 General election 6 Election results 7 See also 8 Other elections Introduction Incumbent President Coolidge was relatively popular, and the economy was booming. Republican nomination The Republican Convention was held in Cleveland from 10 June to 12... 1924 Won Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865–April 23, 1951) was the 30th Vice President of the United States. Dawes was born in Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, and graduated from Marietta College in 1884 and from the Cincinnati Law School in 1886. He was admitted to the bar in that... Charles Gates Dawes
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Herbert Clark Hoover of California (W) 444 21,391,381 58.2 Republican Charles Curtis of Kansas (444) Alfred Emmanuel Smith of New York 87 15,016,443 40.9 Democrat Joseph Taylor Robinson of Arkansas (87) Others... 1928 Won Herbert Hoover Order: 31st President Term of Office: March 4, 1929 - March 4, 1933 Predecessor: Calvin Coolidge Successor: Franklin Delano Roosevelt Date of Birth Monday, August 10, 1874 Place of Birth: West Branch, Iowa Date of Death: Tuesday, October 20, 1964 Place of Death: New York City. New York First... Herbert Clark Hoover Charles Curtis (January 25, 1860–February 8, 1936) was a Representative and a Senator from Kansas and the 31st Vice President of the United States. Curtis was of American Indian ancestry. His mother was Kaw. Charles spent part of his early life on a Kaw reservation, and was the... Charles Curtis 31st 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 May 1.5 June 1.6 July 1.7 August 1.8 September 1.9 October 1.10 November 1.11 December... 1929 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1.7 July 1.8 August 1.9 September 1.10 October 1.11 November... 1933
Presidential electoral votes by state. By the time of the U.S. presidential election of 1932, the effects of the 1929 Stock Market Crash and the Great Depression were being felt intensely across the country. Across the world, governments felt the pressure for radical - even Socialist or Fascist - solutions to... 1932 Lost
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Franklin Delano Roosevelt of New York (W) 523 27,751,597 60.8% Democratic John Nance Garner of Texas (523) Alfred Mossman Landon of Kansas 8 16,679,583 36.6% Republican William Franklin Knox of Illinois (8... 1936 Lost Alfred Mossman Alf Landon (September 9, 1887 - October 12, 1987) was an American Republican politician from Kansas, notable nationally for his 1936 nomination as the Republican opponent of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Born in West Middlesex, Pennsylvania, in 1887, Landon moved to Kansas and was a millionaire in the oil industry... Alfred Mossman Landon Frank Knox William Franklin Frank Knox (January 1, 1874–April 28, 1944) was the Secretary of the Navy under Franklin D. Roosevelt during most of World War II. He was also the Republican vice presidential candidate in 1936. William Franklin Knox was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He attended Alma... William Franklin Knox
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Franklin Delano Roosevelt of New York (W) 449 27,244,160 54.8 Democrat Henry Agard Wallace of Iowa (449) Wendell Lewis Willkie of New York 82 22,305,198 44.8 Republican Charles L. McNary of Oregon... 1940 Lost Wendell Lewis Willkie ( February 18, 1892 – October 8, 1944) was a lawyer, born in Elwood, Indiana, the only native of Indiana to be nominated as the presidential candidate for a national party, having never held any sort of high elected office. In 1940 he was the Republican nominee for... Wendell Lewis Willkie Charles Linza McNary (June 12, 1874 - February 25, 1944) was a U.S. Republican politician from Oregon, best known for serving as Minority Leader of the United States Senate from 1933 to 1944. McNary was born in Salem, Oregon and attended Stanford University. He became a lawyer, and served as... Charles Linza McNary
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Franklin Delano Roosevelt of New York (W) 432 25,602,504 53.5% Democrat Harry S Truman of Missouri (432) Thomas Edmund Dewey of New York 99 22,006,285 46.0% Republican John William Bricker of Ohio... 1944 Lost Thomas Dewey Thomas Edmund Dewey ( March 24, 1902 – March 16, 1971) was the Governor of New York ( 1943- 1955) and the Republican candidate for the U.S. Presidency in two elections ( 1944 and 1948), losing both times. He was the first presidential candidate born in the twentieth century. Contents... Thomas Edmund Dewey This article needs cleanup. Please edit this article to conform to a higher standard of article quality. John William Bricker (September 6, 1893 - March 22, 1986) was a United States politician from Ohio. He was a member of the Republican Party. Bricker was born on a farm near Mount Sterling... John William Bricker
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Harry S. Truman of Missouri (W) 303 24,105,695 49.7 Democrat Alben William Barkley of Kentucky (303) Thomas Edmund Dewey of New York 189 21,969,170 45.3 Republican Earl Warren of California (189) James... 1948 Lost Earl Warren Earl Warren (March 19, 1891–July 9, 1974) was a California district attorney and 30th Governor of California, but is best known as the 14th Chief Justice of the United States from 1953-1969. His term of office was marked by numerous rulings affecting among other things... Earl Warren
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Dwight David Eisenhower of New York (W) 442 33,778,963 55.3% Republican Richard Milhous Nixon of California (442) Adlai Ewing Stevenson II of Illinois 89 27,314,992 44.7% Democrat John Jackson Sparkman of Alabama... 1952 Won Order: 34th President Vice President: Richard Nixon Term of office: January 20, 1953 – January 20, 1961 Preceded by: Harry S. Truman Succeeded by: John F. Kennedy Date of birth: October 14, 1890 Place of birth: Denison, Texas Date of... Dwight David Eisenhower Richard Nixon Order: 37th President Term of Office: January 20, 1969–August 9, 1974 Predecessor: Lyndon B. Johnson Successor: Gerald R. Ford Date of Birth: January 9, 1913 Place of Birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of Death: April 22, 1994 Place of Death: New York, New York First Lady... Richard Milhous Nixon 34th 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. Years: 1950 1951 1952 - 1953 - 1954 1955 1956 Decades: 1920s 1930s 1940s - 1950s - 1960s 1970s 1980s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1953 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics... 1953 1961 (As MAD Magazine pointed out on its first cover for the year) was the first upside-down year - i.e., one that looked the same upside down - since 1881, and the last until 6009. Years: 1958 1959 1960 - 1961 - 1962 1963 1964 Decades: 1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s... 1961
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Dwight David Eisenhower of Pennsylvania (W) 457 35,581,003 57.4% Republican Richard Milhous Nixon of California (457) Adlai Ewing Stevenson II of Illinois 73 25,738,765 42.0% Democrat (Carey) Estes Kefauver of Tennessee (73... 1956 Won
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) John Fitzgerald Kennedy of Massachusetts(W) 303 34,226,731 49.72% Democrat Lyndon Baines Johnson of Texas (303) Richard Milhous Nixon of California 219 34,108,157 49.55% Republican Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. of Massachusetts (219... 1960 Lost Richard Nixon Order: 37th President Term of Office: January 20, 1969–August 9, 1974 Predecessor: Lyndon B. Johnson Successor: Gerald R. Ford Date of Birth: January 9, 1913 Place of Birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of Death: April 22, 1994 Place of Death: New York, New York First Lady... Richard Milhous Nixon Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (July 5, 1902 - February 27, 1985) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts, a U.S. ambassador, and a candidate for Vice President of the United States. He was the grandson of famous statesman Henry Cabot Lodge. Elected to the Senate as a Republican in 1936... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Lyndon Baines Johnson of Texas (W) 486 42,825,463 61.0% Democrat Hubert Horatio Humphrey of Minnesota (486) Barry Morris Goldwater of Arizona 52 27,146,969 38.4% Republican William Edward Miller of New York (52... 1964 Lost Barry Goldwater Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 _ May 29, 1998) was a United States politician and a founding figure in the modern conservative movement in the USA. Goldwater personified the shift in balance in American culture from the Northeast to the West. A five_term United States Senator from... Barry Morris Goldwater William Edward Miller (March 22, 1914 - June 24, 1983), was an American politician. He was the Republican Party nominee for Vice President of the United States in the 1964 election. Miller was born in Lockport, New York. He attended the University of Notre Dame and Albany Law School. He served... William Edward Miller
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Richard Milhous Nixon of New York (W) 301 31,710,470 43.2% Republican Spiro Theodore Agnew of Maryland (301) Hubert Horatio Humphrey of Minnesota 191 30,898,055 42.6% Democrat Edmund Sixtus Muskie of Maine (191... 1968 Won Richard Nixon Order: 37th President Term of Office: January 20, 1969–August 9, 1974 Predecessor: Lyndon B. Johnson Successor: Gerald R. Ford Date of Birth: January 9, 1913 Place of Birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of Death: April 22, 1994 Place of Death: New York, New York First Lady... Richard Milhous Nixon[5] Spiro Agnew Order: 39th Vice President Term of Office: January 20, 1969 - October 10, 1973 Followed: Hubert Humphrey Succeeded by: Gerald Ford Date of Birth November 9, 1918 Place of Birth: Baltimore, Maryland Date of Death September 17, 1996 Place of Death: Berlin, Maryland Wife: Judy Agnew Profession: Governor of... Spiro Theodore Agnew[5] 37th 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). For other uses, see Number 1969. For the movie, see 1969 (movie). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1... 1969 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). Years: 1971 1972 1973 - 1974 - 1975 1976 1977 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1974 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1974
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Richard Milhous Nixon of California (W) 520 46,740,323 60.7% Republican Spiro Theodore Agnew of Maryland (520) George Stanley McGovern of South Dakota 17 28,901,598 37.5% Democrat Robert Sargent Shriver of Maryland (17... 1972 Won
Gerald Ford White House Portrait Order: 38th President Term of Office: August 9, 1974–January 20, 1977 Predecessor: Richard M. Nixon Successor: James E. Carter Date of Birth: Monday, July 14, 1913 Place of Birth: Omaha, Nebraska First Lady: Elizabeth Ann Betty (Bloomer) Ford Profession: Lawyer Political Party: Republican... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. Nelson Rockefeller Order: 41st Vice President Term of Office: December 19, 1974 - January 20, 1977 Followed: Gerald Ford Succeeded by: Walter Mondale Date of Birth July 8, 1908 Place of Birth: Bar Harbor, Maine Wife: Margaretta Happy Rockefeller Profession: Governor of New York Political Party: Republican President: Gerald Ford Nelson... Nelson A. Rockefeller 38th 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). Years: 1971 1972 1973 - 1974 - 1975 1976 1977 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1974 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1974 For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). Years: 1974 1975 1976 - 1977 - 1978 1979 1980 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1977 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics... 1977
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. of Georgia (W) 297 40,825,839 50.1% Democrat Walter Frederick Mondale of Minnesota (297) Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. of Michigan 240 39,147,770 48.0% Republican Robert Joseph Dole of... 1976 Lost Bob Dole Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) is best known as a former Republican United States Senate Majority Leader and Senator from Kansas. He was also the unsuccessful Republican nominee for President in the 1996 election. Contents // 1 Early years 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 External links... Robert Joseph Dole
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Ronald Wilson Reagan of California (W) 489 43,901,812 50.7% Republican George Herbert Walker Bush of Texas (489) James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. of Georgia 49 35,483,820 41.0% Democrat Walter Frederick Mondale of... 1980 Won Ronald Reagan Order: 40th President Term of Office: January 20, 1981–January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles, California First Lady... Ronald Wilson Reagan George Herbert Walker Bush Order: 41st President Term of Office: January 20, 1989–January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts Date of death: Place of death: First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican... George Herbert Walker Bush 40th 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday. Years: 1978 1979 1980 - 1981 - 1982 1983 1984 Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1981 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science Other topics... 1981 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. Years: 1986 1987 1988 - 1989 - 1990 1991 1992 Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1989 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1989
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) Ronald Wilson Reagan of California (W) 525 54,455,472 58.77% Republican George Herbert Walker Bush of Texas (525) Walter Frederick Mondale of Minnesota 13 37,577,352 40.56% Democrat Geraldine Anne Ferraro of New York... 1984 Won
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate George H. W. Bush of Texas (W) 426 48,882,808 53.4% Republican James D. Quayle III of Indiana Michael S. Dukakis of Massachusetts 111 41,807,430 45.6% Democrat Lloyd M. Bentsen of Texas Lloyd M. Bentsen... 1988 Won George Herbert Walker Bush Order: 41st President Term of Office: January 20, 1989–January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts Date of death: Place of death: First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican... George Herbert Walker Bush Order: 44th Vice President Term of Office: January 20, 1989 - January 20, 1993 Followed: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: Al Gore Date of Birth February 4, 1947 Place of Birth: Indianapolis, Indiana Wife: Marilyn Tucker Profession: Publisher, Politician Political Party: Republican President: George H. W. Bush James Danforth Quayle... James Danforth Quayle III 41st 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. Years: 1986 1987 1988 - 1989 - 1990 1991 1992 Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1989 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1989 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003) Years: 1990 1991 1992 - 1993 - 1994 1995 1996 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st... 1993
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) William Jefferson Clinton of Arkansas (W) 370 44,908,254 42.93% Democrat, Liberal Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. of Tennessee (370) George Herbert Walker Bush of Texas 168 39,102,343 37.38% Republican, Conservative, Right To Life... 1992 Lost
Presidential Candidate Electoral Vote Popular Vote Pct Party Running Mate (Electoral Votes) William Jefferson Clinton of Arkansas (W) 379 47,402,357 49.24 Democratic, Liberal Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. of Tennessee (379) Robert Joseph Dole of Kansas 159 39,198,755 40.71 Republican, Conservative Jack French Kemp of... 1996 Lost Bob Dole Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) is best known as a former Republican United States Senate Majority Leader and Senator from Kansas. He was also the unsuccessful Republican nominee for President in the 1996 election. Contents // 1 Early years 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 External links... Robert Joseph Dole Jack French Kemp (born July 13, 1935) is an American politician and former professional football player. He was the Republican candidate for the Vice Presidency in the 1996 Presidential election. Kemp was born, raised and educated in Los Angeles, California. He is a graduate of Occidental College. Contents // 1 Football... Jack French Kemp
Map The U.S. presidential election of 2000 took place on Election Day, Tuesday, November 7. The Republican candidate, George W. Bush won the election to the presidency, defeating Democratic candidate Al Gore. This election was the third time in United States history a candidate had won the necessary number... 2000 Won The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. George Walker Bush Order: 43rd President Term of Office: January 20, 2001–Present Predecessor: Bill Clinton Successor: Incumbent Date of Birth: July 6, 1946 Place of Birth: New Haven, Connecticut... George Walker Bush Dick Cheney Order: 46th Vice President Term of Office: January 20, 2001–present Followed: Al Gore Date of Birth January 30, 1941 Place of Birth: Lincoln, Nebraska Wife: Lynne Cheney Profession: Businessman Political Party: Republican President: George W. Bush Richard Bruce Cheney (born January 30, 1941), widely known as... Richard Bruce Cheney 43rd 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. By strict interpretation of the Gregorian Calendar, 2001 is also the first year of the 21st century and the 3rd millenium. Popular culture, however, often views the year 2000 as holding this distinction. 2001 is also the year... 2001 Years: 2006 2007 2008 - 2009 - 2010 2011 2012 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century 2009 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. Contents // 1 Predicted Events 1.1 January 1.2 Feburary 1.3 March 1.4... 2009
Presidential electoral votes by state. Red denotes Bush/Cheney wins, Blue denotes Kerry/Edwards wins. The U.S. presidential election of 2004 took place on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2. The Republican candidate, George W. Bush, won re-election to the presidency over his Democratic rival, Senator John Kerry. Bush... 2004 Won
Presidential electoral votes by state The 2008 United States Presidential election is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. The allocation of electoral votes to each state will remain the same for this election as it was for the election in 2004, relying on the 2000 Census. Presidential Candidate Electoral... 2008 Presidential electoral votes by state The 2008 United States Presidential election is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. The allocation of electoral votes to each state will remain the same for this election as it was for the election in 2004, relying on the 2000 Census. Presidential Candidate Electoral... Potential nominees

Other noted Republicans

Present-day

  • Howard Baker Howard Henry Baker, Jr. (born November 15, 1925) is the United States ambassador to Japan. He was appointed by President George W. Bush in 2001. Baker, a Republican from Tennessee, was formerly a US Senator. Baker served in the US Senate from 1967-1985, with two terms as... Howard Baker, Ambassador to 日本国 (Nihon/Nippon-koku)  listen? ( Flag of Japan) ( Imperial Seal) Official language Japanese Capital Tokyo Largest City Tokyo Emperor Akihito Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 60th 377,835 km² 0.8% Population  - Total ( 2004)  - Density Ranked 10th 127,333... Japan
  • Jeb Bush John Ellis Jeb Bush (born February 11, 1953) is the forty-third and current Governor of Florida. He is a prominent member of the Bush family: the younger brother of President George W. Bush, older brother of Neil Bush, and second son of former President George H. W... Jeb Bush, List of Governors of Florida: Contents // 1 Florida Governors 1.1 Military Government 1.2 Territorial Government 1.3 Statehood Florida Governors Military Government # Name Took Office Left Office 1 Andrew Jackson 10 March 1821 12 November 1821 Territorial Government # Name Took Office Left Office Appointed By 1st William P... Governor of Florida
  • Ben Nighthorse Campbell (born April 13, 1933) is an American politician. He was a U.S. Senator from Colorado from 1993 until 2005 and was for some time the only Native American serving in the U.S. Congress. Campbell was a U.S. Representative from 1987 to 1993, when he... Ben Nighthorse Campbell, Senator from There are also three Colorado Rivers: two in the United States and one in Argentina. State of Colorado ( Flag of Colorado) ( Seal of Colorado) State nickname: The Centennial State Other U.S. States Capital Denver Largest city Denver Governor Bill Owens Official languages English Area 269,837 km... Colorado until 2005
  • C. Saxby Chambliss (born November 10, 1943) is the senior United States Senator from Georgia. He is a member of the Republican Party. Saxby Chambliss began his political career as an attorney. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1994, as one of the new conservative... Saxby Chambliss, Senator from State nickname: Peach State / Empire State of the South Other U.S. States Capital Atlanta Largest city Atlanta Governor Sonny Perdue Official languages English Area 154,077 km² (24th)  - Land 150,132 km²  - Water 3,945 km² (2.6%) Population ( 2000)  - Population... Georgia
  • Dick Cheney Order: 46th Vice President Term of Office: January 20, 2001–present Followed: Al Gore Date of Birth January 30, 1941 Place of Birth: Lincoln, Nebraska Wife: Lynne Cheney Profession: Businessman Political Party: Republican President: George W. Bush Richard Bruce Cheney (born January 30, 1941), widely known as... Dick Cheney, Dick Cheney 46th and current Vice President (2001- ) The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is a heartbeat from the presidency. As first in the presidential line of succession, the Vice President becomes the new President... Vice President
  • Thomas Dale DeLay (born April 8, 1947) is an American Republican politician from Texas and current Majority Leader of the U.S. House of Representatives. He is well-known for his conservative stances on foreign and domestic policy issues. Contents // 1 Biography and early political career 2 Congressional career 3... Tom DeLay, The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (at least 218 of the 435 seats). The Majority Leader works with the Speaker of the House and the Majority Whip to... House Majority Leader, from State of Texas (Flag of Texas) (Seal of Texas) State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None Area 696,241 km² (2nd)  - Land 678,907 km²  - Water 17,333 km² (2.5%) Population (2000... Texas
  • Sen. Elizabeth Dole Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) was elected to the United States Senate in 2002 to represent North Carolina for a term ending in 2009. She is a Republican. Born Elizabeth Hanford in Salisbury, North Carolina, she attended Duke University, graduating in 1958, obtaining a... Elizabeth Dole, Senator from State of North Carolina (Flag of North Carolina) (Seal of North Carolina) State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9... North Carolina, former The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. Previously there was one Secretary of Commerce and Labor, uniting this department with the Department of Commerce, which is now headed by a separate... Labor Secretary and The United States Secretary of Transportation is the head of the United States Department of Transportation. The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. The current Secretary is Norman Mineta, the only Democrat in the cabinet of President George W. Bush. Secretaries of Transportation Name Term of Office... Transportation Secretary, and former presidential candidate
  • Bill Frist Dr. William Harrison Frist (born February 22, 1952 in Nashville, Tennessee) is a Republican U.S. Senator from Tennessee and a cardiac surgeon. On December 23, 2002 he was voted to succeed Trent Lott as Senate Majority Leader. Contents // 1 Childhood and medical career 2 Entering politics 3... Bill Frist, The Senate Majority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesman for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. By custom, the Presiding... Senate Majority Leader, from State of Tennessee (Flag of Tennessee) (Seal of Tennessee) State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2.2%) Population (2000)  ... Tennessee
  • Newt Gingrich Newton Leroy Gingrich (born June 17, 1943) is an American politician who is best-known as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999. In 1995 he was named Time Magazines Man of the Year. He was born Newton McPherson in Harrisburg... Newt Gingrich, former The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). In most cases a speaker is elected from amongst the members of the assembly by the members, and no... Speaker of the House, from State nickname: Peach State / Empire State of the South Other U.S. States Capital Atlanta Largest city Atlanta Governor Sonny Perdue Official languages English Area 154,077 km² (24th)  - Land 150,132 km²  - Water 3,945 km² (2.6%) Population ( 2000)  - Population... Georgia
  • William Philip Phil Gramm (born July 8, 1942 in Fort Benning, Georgia) served as a Democratic Congressman (1978-1983), a Republican Congressman (1983-1984), and a Republican Senator from Texas (1985-2002). In 1967, he received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Georgia. After earning his Ph... Phil Gramm, former Senator from Texas
  • Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III, KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. He is currently Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Giuliani Partners LLC, which he founded in January 2002. Born and raised in Brooklyn... Rudy Giuliani, former For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. Mayors of New York City Contents // 1 1665-1766 2 1766-1866 3 1866-1966... Mayor of New York
  • Alexander Meigs Haig, Jr. (born December 2, 1924) was a general in the United States Army who commanded an infantry division in Vietnam, then returned stateside in 1969 to become a member of Henry Kissingers national security council staff. Haig helped South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu to negotiate... Alexander Haig, former Secretary of State
  • John Dennis Hastert (born January 2, 1942), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1987, representing the 14th District of Illinois. He has been Speaker of the House since 1999. Hastert was born in Aurora, Illinois, was educated at Wheaton College and... Dennis Hastert, Speaker of the House, from State of Illinois (Flag of Illinois) (Seal of Illinois) State nickname: The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4.0%) Population (2000... Illinois
  • This article needs cleanup. Please edit this article to conform to a higher standard of article quality. Jesse Alexander Helms (born October 18, 1921, Monroe, North Carolina) is a former U.S. Senator. Helms attended Wingate (NC) Junior College and Wake Forest College. He holds honorary Doctor of Law degrees... Jesse Helms, former Senator from State of North Carolina (Flag of North Carolina) (Seal of North Carolina) State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9... North Carolina
  • Thomas Kean Thomas Howard Kean (born April 21, 1935 in New York City) was the Republican Governor of New Jersey from 1982 to 1990. In December 2002, Kean was appointed by President George W. Bush to lead the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, a high-profile... Thomas Kean, former Governor from State of New Jersey (Flag of New Jersey) (Seal of New Jersey) State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey Official languages None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378 km... New Jersey
  • Henry Kissinger Henry Alfred Kissinger (born May 27, 1923) is a German-born American diplomat and Nobel Peace Prize winner who played an important part in foreign affairs through the positions he held in several Republican administrations between 1969 and 1977. Kissinger is a controversial figure because of many of... Henry Kissinger, former Secretary of State
  • Trent Lott Chester Trent Lott Jr. (born Oct. 9, 1941) is a U.S. Senator from Mississippi and a member of the Republican Party. He was United States Senate Majority Leader from June 12, 1996 through Jan. 3, 2001. Vice President Albert A. Gore Jr.s deciding vote gave Democrats... Trent Lott, former Senate Majority Leader, from State of Mississippi (Flag of Mississippi) (Seal of Mississippi) State nickname: Magnolia State Other U.S. States Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Governor Haley Barbour Official languages English Area 125,546 km² (32nd)  - Land 121,606 km²  - Water 3,940 km² (3%) Population (2000)  - Population... Mississippi
  • Alternative meanings: John S. McCain, Sr., John S. McCain, Jr. John McCain John Sidney McCain III (born August 29, 1936) is an American politician. Considered a maverick Republican, McCain has been a U.S. Senator from Arizona since 1987, winning re-election in 1992, 1998, and 2004. He was a... John McCain, Senator from State of Arizona (Flag of Arizona) (Seal of Arizona) State nickname: The Grand Canyon State, The Copper State Other U.S. States Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Governor Janet Napolitano Official languages English Only State Area 295,254 km² (6th)  - Land 294,312 km²  - Water 942... Arizona and former presidential candidate
  • George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is the current governor of the U.S. state of New York (since 1995). He is a member of the Republican Party and has Hungarian, Irish, and Italian ancestry. George Pataki was born in Peekskill, New York. He is a 1967 graduate of... George Pataki, This is a list of the Governors of New York. The Governor of the U.S. state of New York is the highest executive officer of the state, was originally chosen for a term of two years. In 1877 it was extended to three years, in 1895 reduced back to... Governor of New York
  • Colin Luther Powell (pronounced Coe-lin, born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 26, 2005 under President George W. Bush. Nominated by Bush on December 16, 2000 and unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate, Powell became the... Colin Powell, former The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. Contents // 1 History 2 Functions 3 Lists of Secretaries of State 3.1 Secretaries of State 3.2 Acting Secretaries... Secretary of State
  • Order: 44th Vice President Term of Office: January 20, 1989 - January 20, 1993 Followed: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: Al Gore Date of Birth February 4, 1947 Place of Birth: Indianapolis, Indiana Wife: Marilyn Tucker Profession: Publisher, Politician Political Party: Republican President: George H. W. Bush James Danforth Quayle... Dan Quayle, former Vice President
  • Tom Ridge Thomas Joseph Ridge (born August 26, 1946) is a former Governor of Pennsylvania and the first United States Secretary of Homeland Security. On November 30, 2004, he announced his resignation from the position, effective February 1, 2005. Born in Munhall, Pennsylvania, in Pittsburghs Steel Valley, the son... Tom Ridge, former The United States Secretary of Homeland Security is the head of the United States Department of Homeland Security, the body concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. The position was created following the terrorist attacks... Homeland Security Secretary
  • Order 66th Secretary of State Term of Office January 26, 2005 - Predecessor Colin Powell Date of Birth November 14, 1954 Place of Birth Birmingham, Alabama Profession University Professor Political Party Republican Condoleezza Condi Rice, Ph.D. (born November 14, 1954), is the United States Secretary of State under US President... Condoleezza Rice, Secretary of State
  • Dana Rohrabacher (born June 21, 1947), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1989, representing the 46th District of California. He was born in Coronado, California. He graduated from Palos Verdes High School, attended Harbor Junior College and received his bachelors... Dana Rohrabacher, Representative from California
  • Donald Rumsfeld Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is the current Secretary of Defense of the United States, since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. His current term of office is as the 21st Secretary of Defense, and he is the oldest person to have held that... Donald Rumsfeld, The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and military matters. The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. This position was created in 1947 when the Navy, Army, and newly created Air Force were... Secretary of Defense
  • Richard John Rick Santorum (born May 10, 1958) is a Republican U.S. Senator representing Pennsylvania. Among other responsibilities, he is the chairman of the Senate Republican Conference, the number three job in the partys leadership. Contents // 1 Personal background 2 Legislation 3 Remarks about homosexuality 4 Tuition controversy... Rick Santorum, Senator from Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (Flag of Pennsylvania) (Seal of Pennsylvania) State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2.7%) Population (2000... Pennsylvania and chairman of the The Senate Republican Conference is the formal organization of the (currently) 51 Republican Senators in the United States Senate. Over the last century, the mission of the Conference has expanded and been shaped as a means of informing the media of the opinions and activities of Senate Republicans. Today the... Senate Republican Conference
  • Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. George Pratt Shultz (born December 13, 1920) served as the U.S. Secretary of State from 1982 to 1989 and as the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury from 1972 to 1974 and United States Secretary of Labor from 1969 to 1970... George P. Shultz, former Secretary of State and Secretary of the Treasury
  • Senator Arlen Specter Arlen Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Republican Party, and is widely considered to be one of the most liberal Senate Republicans, along with Lincoln Chafee (R-RI), Olympia Snowe (R-ME), and Susan Collins... Arlen Specter, Senator from Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (Flag of Pennsylvania) (Seal of Pennsylvania) State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2.7%) Population (2000... Pennsylvania
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger as governor of California, with the gubernatorial seal in the background. Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian- American actor, politician, bodybuilder, and businessman, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. He was elected on October 7, 2003 in a special recall election which... Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis with President George W. Bush (2003) The Governor of California is the highest executive authority in the state government, whose responsibilities include making yearly State of the State addresses to the California State Legislature, submitting the budget, attending a grand meeting with all the... Governor of California
  • Caspar Willard Weinberger (born August 18, 1917) is best known as United States Secretary of Defense under President Ronald Reagan from 1982 through 1987, and for his related roles in the Strategic Defense Initiative program (popularly known as Star Wars), and in the Iran-Contra Affair. Contents // 1 Early life... Caspar Weinberger. former Secretary of Defense
  • Christine Todd Whitman Christine Todd Christie Whitman (born September 26, 1946) is an American politician. Ms. Whitman was born Christine Todd, in New York City. She was raised in New Jersey and attended the Chapin School in New York City. She graduated from Wheaton College in 1968. After graduating, she... Christine Todd Whitman, former This is a list of governors of New Jersey. Contents // 1 Governors under the Proprietors (1665-1674) 2 Governors of East Jersey and their Deputies (1674-1702) 3 Governors of West Jersey and their Deputies (1680-1702) 4 Governors under Royal Government (1703-1776) 4.1 Governors of New York... Governor of New Jersey and former administrator of the The mission of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to protect human health and to safeguard the natural environment: air, water, and land. The EPA began operation on December 2, 1970. The EPA is not a cabinet agency, but its administrator is normally given cabinet rank. Stephen L... Environmental Protection Agency
  • Pete Wilson Peter Barton Wilson (born August 23, 1933) is an American Republican politician from California. Born in Lake Forest, Illinois, he attended private school in St. Louis, Missouri and graduated from Yale University in 1956. From 1955 to 1958 he served in the United States Marine Corps as an... Pete Wilson, former Governor of California
  • Tim Pawlenty Tim Pawlenty (born November 27, 1960) is a Polish-American politician. He is the 39th governor of Minnesota starting his term on January 6, 2003. He had served as the majority leader in the Minnesota House of Representatives prior to being elected governor, beginning his term in the... Tim Pawlenty, The Governor of Minnesota is the chief executive of the U.S. state of Minnesota. Historically, there were also three governors of Minnesota Territory. Thirty-eight different people have been governors of the state. Another two distinct people were territorial governors, although three people took that role—Alexander Ramsey... Governor of Minnesota

Historical

  • John Bowden Connally, Jr. (February 27, 1917 - June 15, 1993) was an American politician from the state of Texas. He was a member of both the Democratic Party and the Republican Party during his life. Connally was born in Floresville, Texas, and graduated from the University of Texas School of... John Connally ( 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January-February 1.2 March-April 1.3 May-October 1.4 November 1.5 December 1.6 Unknown dates 1.7 Ongoing events 2 Births 2.1 January-March 2.2 April... 1917 - 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003) Years: 1990 1991 1992 - 1993 - 1994 1995 1996 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st... 1993), a In politics, Governor of Texas is the title given to the chief executive of the state of Texas. Governors of Texas # Name Took Office Left Office Party Texas County Named After 1 James Pinckney Henderson 19 February 1846 21 December 1847 Democrat Henderson County 2 George T. Wood 21 December... Governor of Texas
  • U.S. Congresman Joseph Gurney Cannon, smoking a cigar, 1920. Joseph Gurney Cannon (May 7, 1836-November 12, 1926) was a United States politician who served as Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1903 through 1911. Joseph Cannon at the 1904 Republican Convention He was born in... Joseph Gurney Cannon ( Years: 1833 1834 1835 - 1836 - 1837 1838 1839 Decades: 1800s 1810s 1820s - 1830s - 1840s 1850s 1860s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1836 in art 1836 in literature 1836 in rail transport 1836 in science 1836 in music 1836 in sports List of state leaders in 1836 List of... 1836 - Years: 1923 1924 1925 - 1926 - 1927 1928 1929 Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s - 1920s - 1930s 1940s 1950s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1926 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science Other topics Canada - Ireland - South Africa - Sport Lists of leaders... 1926), Speaker of the House
  • Charles Curtis (January 25, 1860–February 8, 1936) was a Representative and a Senator from Kansas and the 31st Vice President of the United States. Curtis was of American Indian ancestry. His mother was Kaw. Charles spent part of his early life on a Kaw reservation, and was the... Charles Curtis ( 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. Years: 1857 1858 1859 - 1860 - 1861 1862 1863 Decades: 1830s 1840s 1850s - 1860s - 1870s 1880s 1890s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1860 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - South Africa - Sport Lists of... 1860 - 1936 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January-February 1.2 March-April 1.3 May-June 1.4 July-September 1.5 October 1.6 November 1.7 December 1.8 Unknown Dates 2 Year in topic... 1936), -1... Vice President
  • Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865–April 23, 1951) was the 30th Vice President of the United States. Dawes was born in Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, and graduated from Marietta College in 1884 and from the Cincinnati Law School in 1886. He was admitted to the bar in that... Charles G. Dawes ( 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. Years: 1862 1863 1864 - 1865 - 1866 1867 1868 Decades: 1830s 1840s 1850s - 1860s - 1870s 1880s 1890s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1865 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial... 1865 - Years: 1948 1949 1950 - 1951 - 1952 1953 1954 Decades: 1920s 1930s 1940s - 1950s - 1960s 1970s 1980s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1951 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics Canada - Sport Lists of leaders: State leaders - Religious... 1951), Vice President
  • George Frisbie Hoar (29 August 1826–30 September 1904) was a prominent United States politician. Hoar was born in Concord, Massachusetts. Through his mother he was a grandson of Roger Sherman, a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence. His father, Samuel Hoar, was a prominent lawyer who... George Frisbie Hoar ( Years: 1823 1824 1825 - 1826 - 1827 1828 1829 Decades: 1790s 1800s 1810s - 1820s - 1830s 1840s 1850s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1826 in art 1826 in literature 1826 in rail transport 1826 in science 1826 in music 1826 in sports List of state leaders in 1826 List of... 1826 - 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). Years: 1901 1902 1903 - 1904 - 1905 1906 1907 Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1904 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and... 1904), A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. The word senate is derived from the Latin word senex (old man), via the Latin word senatus (senate). The Latin word senator has been adopted by English with no change in spelling. Its meaning comes... Senator from Commonwealth of Massachusetts (Flag of Massachusetts) (Seal of Massachusetts) State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25.7%) Population (2000)  ... Massachusetts
  • Colonel Robert G. Ingersoll (August 11, 1833 - July 21, 1899) was an American political leader and orator, noted for his broad range of culture and his defense of agnosticism. He was prominent during the Golden Age of Freethought. His father, John Ingersoll, was an abolitionist preacher. Ingersoll was born in... Robert G. Ingersoll ( Years: 1830 1831 1832 - 1833 - 1834 1835 1836 Decades: 1800s 1810s 1820s - 1830s - 1840s 1850s 1860s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1833 in art 1833 in literature 1833 in rail transport 1833 in science 1833 in music 1833 in sports List of state leaders in 1833 List of... 1833 - 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 June 1.5 July 1.6 September 1.7 October 1.8 December 2 Births 2.1 January 2.2 February 2.3 March... 1899), political activist
  • Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 - February 27, 1924), was a Republican statesman and noted historian. Henry Cabot Lodge Lodge was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the great-grandson of George Cabot. He was the first student of Harvard University to graduate with a Ph.D. in political science (1876). Lodge... Henry Cabot Lodge ( Years: 1847 1848 1849 - 1850 - 1851 1852 1853 Decades: 1820s 1830s 1840s - 1850s - 1860s 1870s 1880s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1850 in art 1850 in literature 1850 in music 1850 in rail transport 1850 in science 1850 in sports List of state leaders in 1850 List of... 1850- 1924 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1.7 August-October 1.8 November 1.9 December 2 Unknown date 3 Births... 1924) Senator from Commonwealth of Massachusetts (Flag of Massachusetts) (Seal of Massachusetts) State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25.7%) Population (2000)  ... Massachusetts
  • Joseph McCarthy This article is about the American politician. For other people with the same name, see Joseph McCarthy (disambiguation). Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 15, 1908 - May 2, 1957) was an American politician of the Republican Party. McCarthy served as a U.S. Senator from the U.S. state of... Joseph McCarthy ( 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Years: 1905 1906 1907 - 1908 - 1909 1910 1911 Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1908 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology... 1908 - 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 Environmental change 1.2 Undated 1.3 January 1.4 February 1.5 March 1.6 April 1.7 May 1.8 June 1.9 July 1.10 August 1.11... 1957), Senator from One of the periods of glaciation was also termed the Wisconsin glaciation. State of Wisconsin (Flag of Wisconsin) (Seal of Wisconsin) State nickname: Badger State State motto: Forward Other U.S. States Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Governor Jim Doyle Official languages None Area 169,790 km² (23rd... Wisconsin and noted Anti-communism is opposition to communist ideology, organization, or government, on either a theoretical or practical level. In some of the earlier 19th century usages anti-communism referred to people opposed to the growth of independent, self-reliant and often religious communities such as the Oneida and Amana communities. After... anti-communist
  • Thomas Brackett Reed (October 18, 1839 - December 7, 1902) was a U.S. Representative from Maine. Born in Portland, Maine; attended the public schools; graduated from Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine, in 1860; studied ballroom dancing; acting assistant paymaster, United States Navy, from April 19, 1864, to November 4, 1865; was... Thomas Brackett Reed ( 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 Undated 2 Births 3 Deaths Events January 9 - The French Academy of Sciences announces the Daguerreotype photography process. January 19 - British East India Company captures Aden January 20 - In the Battle of Yungay... 1839 - Years: 1899 1900 1901 - 1902 - 1903 1904 1905 Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1902 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics Canada - Sport Lists of leaders: State leaders - Religious... 1902), Speaker of the House
  • Nelson Rockefeller Order: 41st Vice President Term of Office: December 19, 1974 - January 20, 1977 Followed: Gerald Ford Succeeded by: Walter Mondale Date of Birth July 8, 1908 Place of Birth: Bar Harbor, Maine Wife: Margaretta Happy Rockefeller Profession: Governor of New York Political Party: Republican President: Gerald Ford Nelson... Nelson Rockefeller ( 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Years: 1905 1906 1907 - 1908 - 1909 1910 1911 Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1908 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology... 1908 - 1979 is a common year starting on Monday. Years: 1976 1977 1978 - 1979 - 1980 1981 1982 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1979 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics... 1979), Vice President, This is a list of the Governors of New York. The Governor of the U.S. state of New York is the highest executive officer of the state, was originally chosen for a term of two years. In 1877 it was extended to three years, in 1895 reduced back to... Governor of New York, and repeated presidential candidate
  • Leland Stanford Born March 9, 1824 Watervliet, New York Died June 21, 1893 Palo Alto, California Amasa Leland Stanford (March 9, 1824–June 21, 1893) was an American business tycoon, politician and founder of Stanford University. He was born in Watervliet, New York, one of eight children of Josiah... Leland Stanford ( 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 2 Ongoing events 3 Births 4 Deaths Events January 22 - Ashantis crush British forces in the Gold Coast Cimetière du Montparnasse established The Dutch sign the Masang Agreement temporarily ending hostilities in the... 1824 - Years: 1890 1891 1892 - 1893 - 1894 1895 1896 Decades: 1860s 1870s 1880s - 1890s - 1900s 1910s 1920s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1893 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Events January 1 - Japan accepts... 1893), Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis with President George W. Bush (2003) The Governor of California is the highest executive authority in the state government, whose responsibilities include making yearly State of the State addresses to the California State Legislature, submitting the budget, attending a grand meeting with all the... Governor of California, Senator, and founder of Die Luft der Freiheit weht. (The wind of freedom blows.) Established 1891 School type Private President John L. Hennessy Location Stanford, California Campus Suburban, 8,180 acres (32 km²) Enrollment 13,800 For other meanings of Stanford, see Stanford (disambiguation). The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University... Stanford University
  • Robert Alphonso Taft I (September 8, 1889 - July 31, 1953), of the Taft family political dynasty of Ohio, was a United States Senator and Presidential candidate in the United States Republican Party. Robert Taft was educated at Yale University, got his law degree from Harvard University in 1913, and practiced... Robert Alphonso Taft ( Years: 1886 1887 1888 - 1889 - 1890 1891 1892 Decades: 1850s 1860s 1870s - 1880s - 1890s 1900s 1910s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1889 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1889 - 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. Years: 1950 1951 1952 - 1953 - 1954 1955 1956 Decades: 1920s 1930s 1940s - 1950s - 1960s 1970s 1980s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1953 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics... 1953), Senator and former presidential candidate
  • Strom Thurmond James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902–June 26, 2003), known as Strom Thurmond, was the oldest and longest serving United States Senator, who represented South Carolina from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican... Strom Thurmond ( Years: 1899 1900 1901 - 1902 - 1903 1904 1905 Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1902 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics Canada - Sport Lists of leaders: State leaders - Religious... 1902 - 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Years: 2000 2001 2002 - 2003 - 2004 2005 2006 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan... 2003), the oldest serving Senator in history (from State of South Carolina (Flag of South Carolina) (Seal of South Carolina) State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population... South Carolina)
  • Arthur Hendrick Vandenberg (March 22, 1884–April 18, 1951) was a Republican Senator from the state of Michigan who participated in the creation of the United Nations. Born and raised the city of Grand Rapids, Michigan, Vandenberg attended public schools there and studied law at the University of Michigan... Arthur H. Vandenberg ( 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). Years: 1881 1882 1883 - 1884 - 1885 1886 1887 Decades: 1850s 1860s 1870s - 1880s - 1890s 1900s 1910s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1884 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science... 1884 - Years: 1948 1949 1950 - 1951 - 1952 1953 1954 Decades: 1920s 1930s 1940s - 1950s - 1960s 1970s 1980s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1951 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television Other topics Canada - Sport Lists of leaders: State leaders - Religious... 1951), Senator from State nickname: Wolverine State or Great Lakes State Other U.S. States Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Governor Jennifer Granholm Official languages English Area 250,941 km² (11th)  - Land 147,255 km²  - Water 103,687 km² (41.3%) Population ( 2000)  - Population 9... Michigan
  • Earl Warren Earl Warren (March 19, 1891–July 9, 1974) was a California district attorney and 30th Governor of California, but is best known as the 14th Chief Justice of the United States from 1953-1969. His term of office was marked by numerous rulings affecting among other things... Earl Warren ( 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 2 Births 3 Deaths 4 Fictional events of the year Events January 1 - Paying of old age pensions begins in Germany January 20 - James Hogg becomes the first native Texan to be governor of that... 1891 - 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). Years: 1971 1972 1973 - 1974 - 1975 1976 1977 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1974 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1974), Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis with President George W. Bush (2003) The Governor of California is the highest executive authority in the state government, whose responsibilities include making yearly State of the State addresses to the California State Legislature, submitting the budget, attending a grand meeting with all the... Governor of California and -1... Chief Justice of the United States

Lists

  • List of Republican parties of U.S. state: Alabama Republican Party Republican Party of Alaska Arizona Republican Party Republican Party of Arkansas California Republican Party Colorado Republican Party Connecticut Republican Party Republican State Committee of Delaware Republican Party of Florida Georgia Republican Party Hawaii Republican Party Idaho Republican Party Illinois... List of state Republican Parties in the U.S.
  • This is a list of United States Republican Party presidential nominating conventions. Year Location Presidential Nominee Vice Presidential Nominee 1856 Philadelphia John C. Frémont of California William L. Dayton of New Jersey 1860 Chicago Abraham Lincoln of Illinois Hannibal Hamlin of Maine 18641 Baltimore Abraham Lincoln of Illinois Andrew... List of Republican National Conventions
  • This article or section should be merged with Republican Party Although now mostly associated with conservative political philosophy, the United States Republican Party has long had a liberal wing. In the late 20th century, those in this wing were often called Rockefeller Republicans, a reference to the former New York... List of liberal U.S. Republicans
  • This article needs cleanup. Please edit this article to conform to a higher standard of article quality. This list of celebrities with links to the US Republican Party includes living Americans widely renowned outside of politics who are or have been supporters of candidates of the United States Republican Party... List of Republican celebrities

See also

  • The Republican National Convention, the presidential nominating convention of the United States Republican Party, is held every four years to determine the partys candidate for the coming Presidential election and the partys platform. In the past this issue was often contentious and the convention could make or break... Republican National Convention
  • The Republican Liberty Caucus is a political organization dedicated to electing and supporting what they call liberty-minded, limited-government individuals within the Republican Party. It can be considered the libertarian wing of the Republican Party. It also operates a political action committee. The RLC is a nationwide organization which... Republican Liberty Caucus
  • A Log Cabin Republican poster, with the typical use of Abraham Lincoln The Log Cabin Republicans is a political organization in the United States, consisting of gay, lesbian and bisexual supporters of the Republican Party. Contents // 1 History 2 Agenda 3 See also 4 External links History The name of... Log Cabin Republicans
  • The Ripon Society is a centrist Republican think tank, founded in 1964. The name is a reference to Ripon, Wisconsin, the birthplace of the Republican Party; the Society sees itself as urging a return to the partys founding principles. Its first public statement was written in the weeks following... Ripon Society
  • In the United States, the term Rockefeller Republican refers to those members of the Republican party who hold moderate views similar to those of the late Nelson Rockefeller, governor of New York from 1959 to 1973 and vice president of the United States under President Gerald Ford in the mid... Rockefeller Republican
  • Radical Republicans were certain Republicans in Congress and other federal and state leaders during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras in U.S. history. Radical Republicans believed in total emancipation and that freed slaves should have equality with all other citizens. In addition, they believed that punitive measures should... Radical Republican
  • The International Democrat Union is an international grouping of conservative and, in some cases, Christian democratic parties. Headquartered in London, its members include: CDU/CSU (Germany) Conservative Party of Canada Conservative and Unionist Party (United Kingdom) Hannara (Grand National Party, Republic of Korea) Kuomintang (Republic of China on Taiwan) Liberal... International Democrat Union, of which the Republican Party is a member

External links

Political Parties in the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States Download high resolution version (1520x800, 18 KB) This picture/multimedia file is now available on Wikimedia Commons as Image:us flag large.png. Subject: Flag of the United States. Source: Created by Jacobolus using Adobe Illustrator and Rasterized with better antialiasing by Cantus This version licensed under the GNU Free...

A two-party system is a type of party system where only two political parties have a realistic chance of winning an election. Usually this means that all, or nearly all, elected offices are held only by the candidates of the two parties that get the most votes. Coalition governments... Major parties: The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. Unofficial Democratic Party logo depicts a stylized donkey in red, white, and blue. Democratic Party Founded: Colors: Blue (sometimes Red) Political ideology: Leans Center-Left The Democratic Party is one of... Democratic Party | Republican Party

In the context of the United States political system, a third party is any political party organized in at least some states, other than the two current leading parties, which since the time of the American Civil War have always been the Democratic and the Republican parties. Contents // 1 History... Third parties: It is requested this article be expanded. Please improve it according to its listing on Wikipedia:Requests for expansion, or in any other way that you see fit. Once the requested improvements have been completed, you may remove this notice and the pages listing. Constitution Party Founded: 1992 Colours... Constitution Party | Green Party Founded: 1980s Colours: Green Political ideology: green or social democratic International alignment: Global Greens In American politics, the Green Party is a third party which has been active in some areas since the 1980s, but first gained widespread public attention for Ralph Naders presidential runs in 1996... Green Party | Libertarian Party The current LP logo depicts a stylized Statue of Liberty. Founded: 1971 Colors: Blue (unofficial) Political ideology: libertarian International alignment: None The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. It claims to be the largest third party in the United States although others dispute... Libertarian Party | Reform Party logo Reform Party USA Founded: 1995 Colours: None commonly used Political ideology: radical middle International alignment: None The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 under the... Reform Party


  Results from FactBites:
 
Republican Party (United States) - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (8546 words)
During the 109th Congress, the Republican Party was the majority party in the United States Senate and the House of Representatives.
The Republican Party was established in 1854 by a coalition of former Whigs, Northern Democrats, and Free-Soilers who opposed the expansion of slavery and held a vision for modernizing the United States.
In the early 20th century, the usual symbol of the Republican Party in Midwestern states such as Indiana and Ohio was the eagle, as opposed to the Democratic donkey.
Republican Party (United States) information - Search.com (8197 words)
The Republican Party was established in 1854 by a coalition of former Whigs, Northern Democrats, and Free-Soilers who opposed the expansion of slavery and held a Hamiltonian vision for modernizing the United States.
The Republican Party has demanded reforms in the UN and opposes the Kyoto Protocol because of the Protocol's uneven application to countries around the world, because they believe it is likely to slow economic growth and the reduction of poverty, and because of disputes concerning the science behind it.
In the early 20th century, the usual symbol of the Republican Party in Midwestern states such as Indiana and Ohio was the eagle, as opposed to the Democratic rooster.
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