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Encyclopedia > United States Presidential election, 2008

The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. The election will coincide with the 2008 Senate elections, House of Representatives elections, and gubernatorial elections, as well as many state and local elections. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Senate Seats up for election:  Two Republican incumbents Republican incumbent Retiring Republican Democratic incumbent No election Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 4, 2008, with 34 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. ... Elections for the United States House of Representatives will be held on November 4, 2008, with all of the 435 seats in the House being contested. ... Seats up for election. ...


As laid out by the United States Constitution, the individual who receives a majority of votes for president in the Electoral College — 270 votes are needed for a majority — will be the president-elect of the United States, and the individual who receives a majority of electoral votes for vice president will be the vice president-elect of the United States. If no presidential candidate receives a majority in the Electoral College at that time, then the president-elect will be selected by a vote of the House of Representatives, with each state receiving a single vote. If no vice presidential candidate receives a majority, then the vice president-elect will be selected by a vote of the Senate. These situations, however, have not occurred since 1825 and 1837, respectively. Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent... A President-elect is a candidate who has officially been elected President, but who has not yet acceded to his Office, as it is still occupied by the out-going President. ... In the United States presidential election of 1824, John Quincy Adams was elected President on February 9, 1825 after the election was thrown into the House of Representatives. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


As in the 2004 presidential election, the allocation of electoral votes to each state will be partially based on the 2000 Census. The president-elect and vice president-elect are scheduled to be inaugurated on Tuesday, January 20, 2009. Presidential election results map. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

2008 presidential election characteristics

First election without incumbents in the primaries since 1928

When a United States President leaves office, his vice president is usually considered a leading candidate and likely nominee to succeed him. However, current Vice President Dick Cheney announced in 2001 that he would never run for president, a statement he re-iterated in 2004. While appearing on Fox News Sunday, Cheney stated: "I will say just as hard as I possibly know how to say... If nominated, I will not run; if elected, I will not serve."[1] The 2008 election will therefore mark the first time since the 1928 election in which there is neither an incumbent president nor an incumbent vice president running for his party's nomination in the presidential election.[1] The 1952 election was the last time neither the incumbent president nor incumbent vice president ran in the general election, after President Harry S. Truman bowed out following his loss in the New Hampshire primary and Vice President Alben Barkley then sought but failed to win the Democratic nomination.[2] (Truman's name was on the New Hampshire primary ballot but he did not campaign. He lost to Tennessee Senator Estes Kefauver and formally withdrew his name from consideration.) Look up Candidate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sherman pledge. ... The United States presidential election of 1928 pitted Republican Herbert Hoover against Democrat Alfred E. Smith. ... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877–April 30, 1956) was a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the thirty_fifth Vice President of the United States. ... For the victim of Mt. ... The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ...


In the three most recent presidential administrations featuring an outgoing two-term president — those of Eisenhower, Reagan, and Clinton — the incumbent vice president has immediately thereafter run for president. (Richard Nixon lost the 1960 election, George H. W. Bush won the 1988 election, and Al Gore effectively lost the 2000 election.)[3][4] The term Administration, as used in the context of government, differs according to jurisdiction. ... Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Reagan redirects here. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The United States presidential election of 1960 marked the end of Dwight D. Eisenhowers two terms as President. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... The United States presidential election of 1988 featured an open primary for both major parties. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... In the United States presidential election of 2000 Republican George W. Bush gained the US Presidency over Democrat Al Gore after the United States Supreme Court in Bush v. ...


In the 1968 election, Lyndon Johnson initially decided to seek re-election. He entered the New Hampshire primary and won. However, he had a national poll conducted, which yielded results against his favor. Therefore, in a nationally televised speech, Johnson announced to the public that he would not seek re-election. Incumbent Vice President Hubert Humphrey then chose to run and was the eventual Democratic nominee. Had LBJ stayed in the race and won (and completed his second elected term), he would have served more than 9 years. The 22nd Amendment didn't disqualify him for a second elected term, as he had served only 14 months of John F. Kennedy's unexpired term.[3] The other recent Vice Presidents, such as Dan Quayle and Walter Mondale, have also sought the office of president at various times. Mondale succeeded his President, the one-term Jimmy Carter, as his party's candidate, and Quayle was unsuccessful in winning the nomination for the country's highest office.[4] Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... (Redirected from 22nd Amendment) The Twenty-second Amendment of the United States Constitution establishes a two-term limit for the Presidency. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


Campaign costs

The reported cost of campaigning for President has increased significantly in recent years. One source reported that if the costs for both Democratic and Republican campaigns are added together (for the Presidential primary election, general election, and the political conventions) the costs have more than doubled in only eight years ($448.9 million in 1996, $649.5 million in 2000, and $1.01 billion in 2004).[5] In January 2007, Federal Election Commission Chairman Michael Toner estimated that the 2008 race will be a "$1 billion election," and that to be "taken seriously," a candidate will need to raise at least $100 million by the end of 2007. The United States presidential election of 2008 will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial election for President and Vice President of the United States, and is scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Presidential electoral votes. ... In the United States presidential election of 2000 Republican George W. Bush gained the US Presidency over Democrat Al Gore after the United States Supreme Court in Bush v. ... Presidential election results map. ... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... Michael E. Toner is the current chairman of the Federal Election Commission (FEC), the regulatory body that oversees campaign finance for United States federal elections. ...


Although he has said that he will not be running for president, published reports indicate that billionaire and New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg has been considering a presidential bid with $1 billion of his own fortune to finance it.[6] Should Bloomberg decide to run as an independent, he would not need to campaign in the primary elections or participate in the conventions, greatly reducing both the necessary length and cost of his campaign. A billionaire is a person who has a net worth of at least one billion units of currency, such as United States Dollars (USD), Pounds or Euros. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ...


Effect of the Internet

In late April, Huffington Post, Yahoo!, and Slate magazine announced that they would be hosting one Democratic and one Republican debate for Presidential hopefuls. The debates are proposed to be held after Labor Day and hosted by Charlie Rose. Of the debates, Arianna Huffington remarked "It was clear to me, the 2008 campaign was going to be dominated by what's happening online — new technologies, new media like never before."[7] The Huffington Post is a group weblog and news site started by Arianna Huffington on May 9, 2005. ... “Yahoo” redirects here. ... Slate is an online news and culture magazine created in 1996 by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley and owned by Microsoft (as part of MSN). ... Labour Day (or Labor Day) is an annual holiday that resulted from efforts of the labour union movement, to celebrate the economic and social achievements of workers. ... Charlie Rose Charles Peete Rose Jr. ... Arianna Huffington (born Arianna Stassinopoulos (Greek: Αριάννα Στασινόπουλου) on July 15, 1950 in Athens, Greece) is an author and nationally syndicated columnist in the United States. ...


CNN and YouTube hosted a debate between the Democratic presidential candidates on July 23, 2007, with questions coming from YouTube viewer submitted videos. The debate took place at The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina. In all, 39 questions were asked from the 3,000 submissions YouTube said it received. Different types of questions were asked of the candidates. Most observers agreed that none of the candidates debating particularly outshone their rivals, doing nothing to challenge Hillary Clinton's position as the Democratic race's front-runner[8]. A Republican debate was scheduled for September 17, 2007, in Florida[8], but has been rescheduled to November 28, 2007, at the Mahaffey Theatre in St. Petersburg.[9] The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in Pinellas County and the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country State County Pinellas County Founded 1876 Incorporated February 29, 1892 Government  - Mayor Rick Baker Area  - City  133. ...


Yahoo! Answers has become a platform for an ongoing Q & A process for voters to ask and answer questions posed by presidential candidates and US voters[10] Yahoo! Answers is a community-driven knowledge market website launched by Yahoo! on December 13, 2005 that allows users to ask and answer questions posed by other users. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States (often abbreviated to POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ...


Many of the presidential candidates have been trying to connect with younger voters, through YouTube[11], MySpace[12], and Facebook[12]. Currently Republican Ron Paul[13][14] and Democratic candidate Barack Obama are most actively courting the Internet.[15] MySpace is a social networking website offering an interactive, user-submitted network of friends, personal profiles, blogs, groups, photos, music, and videos. ... Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto Facebook is a social networking website that allows people to communicate with their friends and exchange information. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Ron Paul is a 10th-term Congressman, a physician (M.D.), and a 2008 presidential candidate from the state of Texas, seeking the nomination of the Republican Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This page is about a candidate running for the 2008 election; for the whole presidential election, click here. ...


Timeline

The following is a timeline of events leading up to the upcoming 2008 U.S. presidential election: // October 7 - Maureen Dowd writes article in New York Times entitled Can Hillary Upgrade? which claims that Hillary Clinton, serving as the junior Senator from New York, has mollified her criticism of the...

Early stages

Federal law requires reporting of funds spent and raised for elections. Potential candidates harboring serious intentions of running in the 2008 election had to create and register a campaign committee before receiving contributions. As the first candidates began filing the paperwork, other politicians felt a pressure to build support before a front-runner emerged, spurring on further declarations of candidacy. News media coverage and attendant "buzz" would increase around certain individuals, and those without an active campaign (and not just a legal status as a candidate) risked being regarded non-contenders. Most potential candidates formed exploratory committees or announced their candidacies outright by November 2006. The goals of these committees were media attention and fund-raising. Broadcast media discussions by various pundits and a series of events sponsored by the different parties during 2007, including debates, straw polls, and other events were staged to give voters a chance to get to know the candidates. The Democrats, for example, hosted a series of candidate forums and debates in Nevada, which began on February 21, as well as a debate in South Carolina on April 26. In the election politics of the United States, an exploratory committee is an organization established to help determine whether a potential candidate should run for an elected office. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Republican Party also planned events for the candidates, for example, the televised debate at the Ronald Reagan Library in California on May 3, was the first of a series that would last through the summer and fall, and after the traditional Ames Straw Poll in Iowa on August 11, Tommy Thompson withdrew from the race after faring poorly there. The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library The Ronald Reagan Presidential Library is the presidential library of Ronald Wilson Reagan, the 40th President of the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ames Straw Poll is a straw poll that takes place in Ames, Iowa on a Saturday in August of years in which the Republican presidential nomination is undecided (that is, in years without an incumbent Republican President). ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other people with similar names, see Thomas Thompson. ...


"Front runner" status is dependent on the news agency reporting, but by October 2007, the consensus listed about six candidates as leading the pack. For example, CNN lists Clinton, Edwards, Giuliani, Fred Thompson, Obama, and Romney as the front runners. [16] The Washington Post listed Clinton, Edwards and Obama as the Democratic frontrunners, "leading in polls and fundraising and well ahead of the other major candidates." [17] MSNBC's Chuck Todd christened Giuliani and McCain the Republican front runners after the second Republican presidential debate. [18] The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Chuck Todd is a political analyst and author, and political director and on-air analyst for NBC News. ...


Three candidates, Clinton, Obama, and Romney, raised over $20 million in the first three months of 2007, and three others, Edwards, Giuliani, and McCain, raised over $12 million, the next closest candidate was Bill Richardson, who raised over $6 million. [19] For other persons named William Richardson, see William Richardson (disambiguation). ...


According to a poll featured on ABC News and released February 2007, 65% of respondents stated that they are following the 2008 election closely, a very high number considering that the election was more than a year away.


Official primary and caucus dates

Delegates to national party conventions are selected through direct primary elections, state caucuses, and state conventions. The process continues through June, but in previous cycles, the Democratic and Republican candidates were effectively chosen by the March primaries. This is due to winning candidates collecting a majority of committed delegates to win their party's nomination. Most third parties select delegates to their national conventions through state conventions. The 2008 Democratic primaries will be the selection process by which the Democrats choose their candidates in the 2008 election for President and Vice President of the United States through a series of primaries and caucuses culminating in the 2008 Democratic National Convention, to be held from Monday, August 25... // The 2008 Republican primaries will be the selection process by which the Republicans elect delegates who will then elect the GOP candidate in the 2008 election for President and Vice President of the United States. ... Speeches by important party figures are key features of the convention; here, former President Jimmy Carter addresses the 2004 Democratic National Convention. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


The actual voting process begins in December 2007, when early voting begins in California and several other states, and the New Hampshire government is currently considering setting its primary date as early as the eleventh of that month. Both major parties have announced harsh penalties for states officially selecting delegates that early, but it seems that these will be ignored. Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


February 5, 2008, looks set to be a decisive date, one month before the traditional Super Tuesday, as up to twenty states, with half of the population of the United States among them, are moving to hold their primaries on what is being called Tsunami Tuesday, National Presidential Primary Day, Giga Tuesday, The Unofficial National Primary or Super Duper Tuesday.[20][21][22][23][24] is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the United States, Super Tuesday commonly refers to a Tuesday in early March of a presidential election year. ... States holding caucuses and primary elections on Super Duper Tuesday. ...


Later events

  • January 6, 2009: Electoral votes officially tallied before both Houses of Congress.

Constitution Party National Convention is held every 2-4 years. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... On December 21, 2006, the United States Libertarian Party announced that the 2008 Libertarian National Convention will be held between May 23 and May 26 at the Adam’s Mark Hotel in Denver, Colorado. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country State Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... The 2008 Democratic National Convention will be the 2008 United States presidential nominating convention of the Democratic Party. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country State Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... The 2008 Republican National Convention will take place at the Xcel Energy Center in Saint Paul, Minnesota from September 1 until September 4, 2008. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Election Day in the United States is the day when polls most often open for the election of certain public officials. ... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Inauguration Day 2005 of President George W. Bush on the west steps of the U.S. Capitol. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Candidates and potential candidates

Main article: United States presidential candidates, 2008

Politicians with ambition have begun to express formally their desire for the presidency in the form of "exploratory committees," which allow the hopeful to raise money and travel without having to follow certain financial restrictions mandated by federal law. With official events, such as debates and candidate forums, beginning as early as February 2007, the status of a candidate will be based on whether or not he or she is invited. Several minor candidates in the past have tried to litigate their way in, generating some publicity but little public support. The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial election for president and vice president of the United States. ... In the election politics of the United States, an exploratory committee is an organization established to help determine whether a potential candidate should run for an elected office. ...


Politicians who have expressed interest in a 2008 candidacy and have not ruled it out qualify for listing in the "Potential candidates" sections. Candidates marked with a † have not registered with the Federal Election Commission. The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ...


Major parties

Democratic Party

Main article: United States Democratic presidential candidates, 2008

Candidates for the Democratic Party: // These have filed (or announced plans to file) with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...


Active draft movement: This article is about the United States Senator from Delaware, for other uses of the name, see Biden. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... United States Democratic Senator Joe Biden of Delaware, announced his candidacy for president of the United States on the January 7, 2007 edition of Meet the Press. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the state. ... First Lady Laura Bush and former first ladies (from left to right) Rosalynn Carter, Sen. ... This page is about a candidate running for the 2008 election; for the whole presidential election, click here. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards[1] (born June 10, 1953), is an American politician who was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004 and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Presidential election results map. ... John Edwards campaigning in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on Labor day in 2007. ... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (IPA: ) (born May 13, 1930), is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska, having served for two terms, from 1969 to 1981. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) None[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ...   Mike Gravel, a former United States Senator from Alaska, on April 17, 2006 became a declared candidate for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in the 2008 election,[1] announcing his run in a speech to the National Press Club. ... Dennis John Kucinich (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party and a candidate for President of the United States in both 2004 and 2008. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Dennis Kucinich announced on December 26, 2006 that he would persue the nomination for the Democratic President of the United States. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... This page is about a candidate running for the 2008 election; for the whole presidential election, click here. ... For other persons named William Richardson, see William Richardson (disambiguation). ... This is a list of Governors of the state of New Mexico (est. ... Seal of the United States Department of Energy The United States Secretary of Energy, the head of the United States Department of Energy, is concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ...

Withdrawn candidates: This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ...

Thomas James Vilsack (born December 13, 1950) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and served as the 40th Governor of the state of Iowa. ... This is a list of Governors of Iowa: See also Iowa Iowa Territory Governors of Iowa Territory Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Iowa ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about Stephen Colbert, the actor. ... Stephen Colbert, star of The Colbert Report The Colbert Report (, or possibly Colbert Réport) is a television program announced by Comedy Central that will star Stephen Colbert, currently best-known as a correspondent for The Daily Show. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... The following is a list of political parties whose names (in English) include the word Democrat(s) or Democratic. For the phrase, see: Democrat Party Category: ...

Republican Party

Candidates for the Republican Party: This article lists both declared and potential Republican candidates for the President of the United States in the 2008 election. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...

Additional third tier candidates have filed with the FEC - See main article. Rudolph William Louis Giuliani III, (born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, prosecutor, businessman, and Republican politician from the state of New York. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... Former Mayor of New York City Rudy Giuliani’s 2008 presidential campaign began in October, 2005 when the “Draft Rudy Giuliani for President, Inc” was formed. ... Huckabee redirects here. ... This is a list of governors of Arkansas. ... Mike Huckabee, former Governor of Arkansas, officially announced his candidacy for the United States presidential election, 2008 on January 28, 2007. ... Duncan Lee Hunter (born May 31, 1948) is an American politician who has been a Republican member of the House of Representatives since 1981 from Californias 52nd congressional district in northern and eastern San Diego. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Fourteen-term Congressman and Vietnam War veteran Duncan Hunter of California has announced his intentions to run for the 2008 Republican nomination for President of the United States. ... Alan Keyes (born August 7, 1950) is an American political activist, author and former diplomat. ... This is a list of ambassadors from the United States. ... The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations assists the General Assembly in promoting international economic and social cooperation and development. ... “McCain” redirects here. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... John McCain, the senior United States Senator from Arizona, announced his formal candidacy for the presidency of the United States and in turn, his intention to seek the nomination of the Republican Party for the 2008 presidential election in Prescott Park on the waterfront of Portsmouth, New Hampshire on Wednesday... Ronald Ernest Paul (born August 20, 1935) is a 10th-term United States congressman from Lake Jackson, Texas, a member of the Republican Party, a pro-life physician, and a candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Libertarian Party can refer to several libertarian political parties, including: United States Libertarian Party Libertarian Party of Canada Movimiento Libertario of Costa Rica The Libertarianz of New Zealand Libertarian Party of Australia There are also political parties that hold some of the same policies as the above parties but do... Ron Paul is a 10th-term Congressman, a physician (M.D.), and a 2008 presidential candidate from the state of Texas, seeking the nomination of the Republican Party. ... Willard Mitt Romney (born March 12, 1947) was the 70th Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Mitt Romney is a Republican Party candidate in the 2008 United States presidential election. ... Thomas Gerard Tancredo (born December 20, 1945) is an American politician and member of the Republican Party. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the actor/politician. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Fred Thompson is an unannounced Republican Party primary candidate to represent his party in the 2008 United States presidential election. ...


Withdrawn candidates:

Samuel Dale Brownback (born September 12, 1956) is the senior United States senator from the U.S. state of Kansas. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... James Stuart Jim Gilmore III (born October 6, 1949) is a Republican politician who was Governor of Virginia from 1998 to 2002. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other people with similar names, see Thomas Thompson. ... Governors of Wisconsin: Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Wisconsin ... The United States Secretary of Health and Human Services is the head of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Ames Straw Poll is a straw poll that takes place in Ames, Iowa on a Saturday in August of years in which the Republican presidential nomination is undecided (that is, in years without an incumbent Republican President). ...

Third parties

Main article: United States third party presidential candidates, 2008

Third party is a term commonly used in the United States to refer to political parties other than the Republican and Democratic parties. ...

Constitution Party

Candidates for the Constitution Party: The Constitution Party is a conservative United States political party. ...

Donald J. Grundmann has been an American Independent Party National Committee member since 2006 and has run for public office on their ticket since 2000. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Diane Beall Templin (born May 23, 1947, Buffalo, New York) was a third-party candidate for President of the United States in both the United States presidential election, 1996 and the United States presidential election, 2004. ...

Green Party

Candidates for the Green Party (Official Press Release): This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ...

Potential candidates Flag Seal Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location Location of Washington, D.C., with regard to the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia. ... For the tax protester, see Edward and Elaine Brown. ... Jesse Johnson may refer to: Jesse Johnson, a guitarist with The Time and proponent of the Minneapolis sound. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The Mountain Party is a minor political party in the state of West Virginia. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... list of West Virginia Governors Arthur I. Boreman Republican 1863-1869 Daniel D. T. Farnsworth Republican 1869-1869 William E. Stevenson Republican 1869-1871 John J. Jacob Democratic 1871-1877 Henry M. Mathews Democratic 1877-1881 Jacob B. Jackson Democratic 1881-1885 Emanuel W. Wilson Democratic 1885-1890 Aretas B... This article is about the state. ... Cynthia Ann McKinney (born March 17, 1955) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Kent Mesplay is a scientist and political activist from San Diego, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Kat Swift is an American political activist, and co-chair of the Green Party of Texas. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...

Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Rebecca Rotzler is one of seven co-chairs of the Green Party of the United States, elected to that position on July 24, 2005 [1]. She is also currently deputy mayor and a trustee of New Paltz, New York, elected on May 6, 2003. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ...

Libertarian Party

Candidates for the Libertarian Party: The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on Dec. ...

Potential candidates: This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Steven Steve Wynn Kubby (born December 28, 1946) is a Libertarian Party activist who played a key role in the drafting and passage of California Proposition 215. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... This article is about the state. ... George Phillies (born 23 July 1947) is a Libertarian Party activist and professor of physics at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Wayne Root (more commonly known as Wayne Allyn Root) is a business mogul, television celebrity, TV producer, best-selling author, professional sports handicapper, and aspiring politician based in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ...

  • Ed Thompson, former Tomah, Wisconsin mayor and 2002 Wisconsin gubernatorial candidate. [38]
  • Ron Paul of Texas, current Republican candidate. Ron Paul has repeatedly claimed that, after the difficulties he faced in his '88 campaign, he would not run as a libertarian or an independent. [citation needed]

This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Tomah is a city in Monroe County, Wisconsin, United States. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to 92° 53′ W Population  Ranked... Ronald Ernest Paul (born August 20, 1935) is a 10th-term United States congressman from Lake Jackson, Texas, a member of the Republican Party, a pro-life physician, and a candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ...

Socialist Party USA

The Socialist Party USA nominated Brian Moore of Florida for president, and Stewart Alexander of California for vice-president, at the party's St. Louis convention, October 19-21, 2007.[39] The Socialist Party USA (SP USA) is one of the heirs to the Socialist Party of America of Eugene V. Debs and Norman Thomas. ... Brian Moore Brian Moore is an independent candidate running on an anti-war campaign for Democratic incumbent Bill Nelsons Senate seat in Floridas 2006 Senate election. ...


Unity08 Party

No official candidates for the newly formed Unity08 Party have yet announced themselves, but the two most frequently mentioned candidates are Mayor of New York City Michael Bloomberg, and/or Nebraska Senator Chuck Hagel.[40] [41] Unity08 is an American political reform movement that aims to offer all voters an opportunity to directly engage in politics by ranking the most crucial issues facing the country, discussing them with the candidates and engaging in an online, secure vote to nominate a bipartisan alternative to the Democratic Party... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... Charles Timothy Chuck Hagel (born October 4, 1946) is the senior United States Senator from Nebraska. ...


Withdrawn candidates (minor parties)

Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Illinois 5th congressional district is a United States Congressional District that covers the north side of Chicago and parts of Cook County. ... Jerome R. Corsi (born August 31, 1946) is an American author, conservative activist, and candidate for the Constitution Partys 2008 Presidential nomination. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Douglas Gene Stanhope (born March 25, 1967) is an American stand-up comedian. ... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Independents

Candidates running as Independents:

Active draft movements Steve Adams (born July 17, 1966 in Middletown, Ohio) is an independent candidate for president of the United States in 2008. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Blake Ashby was a moderate Republican candidate for the U.S. Republican Party presidential nomination, 2004. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... John Taylor Bowles (born in 1957 in Maryland) is an American neo-nazi and is the NSMs candidate for the United States presidential election, 2008. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Joseph Charles Schriner (b. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...

Self-declared potential candidates Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...

Michael Moriarty (born April 5, 1941) is a Tony-winning and Emmy-winning American actor. ... Samuel Augustus Nunn, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...

Opinion polling

See also: Opinion polling for the Democratic Party (United States) 2008 presidential candidates
See also: Opinion polling for the Republican Party (United States) 2008 presidential candidates
See also: Opinion polling for the Democratic Party (United States) presidential primaries, 2008
See also: Opinion polling for the Republican Party (United States) presidential primaries, 2008

Main article: United States presidential election, 2008 This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the U.S. presidential election, 2008. ... Main article: Opinion polling for the United States presidential election, 2008 This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the 2008 Democratic presidential candidates. ... Main article: Opinion polling for the United States presidential election, 2008 This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the 2008 Republican presidential candidates. ... This is a collection of scientific, state-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the Democratic presidential primaries, 2008. ... This article is a collection of scientific, state-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the Republican presidential primaries, 2008 by State. ...

Possible electoral college changes

National Popular Vote Interstate Compact

The Compact, if passed by states representing a controlling majority of the electoral college, would require states cast their electoral votes for the national popular winner, essentially shifting the election to a popular vote. The existing system is argued to encourage candidates to cater to swing states, discourage voter turnout, and allow candidates not popularly elected to take office as happened in the elections of 1824, 1876, 1888 and 2000. Status of NPVIC related legislation acted on in 2007:  passed into law (1)  passed in both houses (0)  passed in one house (2)  passed in one committee (5)  failed in the legislature (4)  introduced (28)  no legislation pending (10 + DC) The National Popular Vote Interstate Compact is a proposed agreement... In the United States presidential election of 1824, John Quincy Adams was elected President on February 9, 1825 after the election was thrown into the House of Representatives. ... The United States presidential election of 1876 was one of the most disputed and intense presidential elections in American history. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... In the United States presidential election of 2000 Republican George W. Bush gained the US Presidency over Democrat Al Gore after the United States Supreme Court in Bush v. ...


DC Fair and Equal House Voting Rights Act of 2007

In 2007, Rep. Thomas M. Davis (R-VA) introduced the "DC Fair and Equal House Voting Rights Act of 2007" in the U.S. House. If enacted, the act would have the effect of increasing the size of the electoral college by one. The bill's primary purpose is to give House representation to the District of Columbia, alongside an additional electoral college vote award to Utah in order to balance the addition. The Congressional Research Service has determined that if passed, the bill would likely be found unconstitutional, on the suggested basis that Congress does not have the authority to grant a Representative to the District.[50] Thomas M. Tom Davis III (born January 5, 1949 in Minot, North Dakota) is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the Eleventh Congressional District of Virginia (map) in Northern Virginia. ... The District of Columbia has never had voting representation in the United States Congress, but efforts are currently under way to enact a statute that would give the District one vote in the House of Representatives, though not in the Senate. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Congressional Research Service is the public policy research arm of the United States Congress. ...


The bill also grants, for partisan balancing, an additional House seat to Utah, which very narrowly missed gaining another seat in the 2000 census, and increases Utah's electoral votes by 1, since Utah is likely to vote Republican and the District of Columbia is likely to vote Democratic. However, this will only be valid until the next census, when the extra seat will be reapportioned like all other seats. The District of Columbia's electoral vote count would remain unchanged at 3, as required by the 23rd amendment. The likely effect of the change, if enacted, on the 2008 presidential election would be to give a +1 advantage to the Republican candidate: Utah has not been carried by a Democratic presidential candidate since 1964, and in the most recent election gave the Republican 71% of the vote. Even though the size of the electoral college would increase to 539, a candidate would still need 270 electoral votes to win. This article is about the U.S. state. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The Twenty-third United States Census will be the next national census in the United States. ... Amendment XXIII in the National Archives Amendment XXIII was the twenty-third Amendment to the United States Constitution which permits the District of Columbia to choose Electors for President and Vice President. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential election results map. ...


Presidential Election Reform Act (California)

There is a proposed initiative in the state of California to alter, in time for the 2008 election, the way the state's electoral votes for president are distributed among presidential candidates. However, on September 27, 2007, its backers appeared to give up, and the proposal appears to be dead.[51] The Presidential Election Reform Act is a proposed initiative in the state of California to alter, in time for the 2008 U.S. presidential election, the way the states electoral votes for president are distributed among presidential candidates. ... A California ballot proposition is a method of amending either the California Constitution or California statutory law, under the initiative and referendum process. ...


Potential battleground states

Main article: Swing state

Pundits and political experts have identified certain battleground states whose close votes may be crucial to the election. These states include (but may not be limited to): Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... This article is about the US political term. ...

Current swing states
  • Arkansas: Although a conservative state in the heart of the Bible Belt, the Democratic Party is a powerful force in Arkansas and Democrats tend to have a comfortable advantage in statewide races. Presently, the Governor, both U.S. Senators, and 3 out of 4 of the Arkansas' House members are Democrats, and Democrats control the state legislature by a large margin. The Arkansas Democratic Party tends to be more conservative than the national party, however, and as a result voters there tend to be open to Republican Presidential candidates. Though favorite son Bill Clinton won Arkansas easily both times he ran, Arkansas gave their electoral votes to George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004 by a fairly large margin. Early polling shows former Arkansas First Lady Hillary Clinton with a huge lead in the state, leading Giuliani 55-37. [52]
  • Colorado: The "Centennial State" is holding its second Democratic National Convention in Denver after 100 years. The election of Ken Salazar, a Hispanic-American to the U.S. Senate; Bill Ritter to the Governorship in 2006 and a U.S. House seat pick-up in 2006 made it a prized apple for the Democrats, prompting DNC Chairman Howard Dean to claim that the West holds the key to victory in 2008, which effectively made Denver the location of the Convention. Strong Hispanic-American concentration and the attention of issues such as immigration reform, labor union support and minimum wage have made this a possible Democratic state. However, Republicans still claim their title on this state because of their support of gun rights and their stance on social conservative issues, and pundits have put Colorado as the initial favorite for the Republicans. A poll conducted by Rasmussen Reports in August 2007 has Rudy Giuliani defeating Hillary Clinton 50-40.[53]
  • Florida: The key player in 2000, whose votes went to George W. Bush, making him the effective winner. Florida is situated in the South, which has become a Republican stronghold. Experts agree that the winner of Florida will have a significant advantage towards advancing to the White House. Florida has trended toward the Republican Party since 2000. For Democrats, the vote of the elderly is seen as a potential boon, due to the party's traditional stance on Medicare and Social Security, two key components of winning the elderly vote, in addition to tax cuts and values issues. As for Republicans, the business attention of tax cuts and Cuban-American attention has made it a strong contender. Also, Florida's recently-elected governor, Republican Charlie Crist, has enjoyed high approval ratings and has been mentioned as a possible vice presidential nominee on the 2008 GOP ticket. As of October 2007, Hillary Clinton leads Rudy Giuliani 49-43.[2]
  • Iowa: The first in the nation caucus is also first in the list for those who want to ensure their victory in the "Hawkeye State". Iowa has been a true battleground state, in the sense that it went for Al Gore in 2000 and George W. Bush in 2004; but, both times, the margin of victory was small, making it a pivotal destination. In 2006, Democrats retained control of the Governor's Mansion with the election of Chet Culver and the addition of 2 U.S. House seats. Also, for the first time in four decades, Democrats gained complete control of the state legislature, further enhancing the progress of the Democrats. Still, agriculture policies and conservative values make it a magnet for the Republicans. As of October 21, 2007, Hillary Clinton led Rudy Giuliani 48% to 43%.[3]
  • Kentucky: With a sure Democratic pick-up of the Governor's Manshion in November 2007, and a troubling State Republican Party, makes Kentucky a state that will be in play. Corrupt Republican Governor Ernie Fletcher is trailing in polls, and Senators Mitch McConnell and Jim Bunning's approval have dropped recently. McConnell, the Senate Minority Leader, is up for re-election in 2008. Pundits have put Kentucky in the Red column, but a October 2007 Survey USA has Clinton edging out Giuliani 47% to 45%.[4]
  • Michigan: The "Great Lakes State" has been a safe bet for the Democrats for a long time, giving its 17 electoral votes to Bill Clinton, Al Gore and John Kerry. However, with each election, the margin of victory has diluted, shifting it from the "safe" category to the "leaning" category for the Democrats, opening a window for the Republicans. Populist issues have dominated the state and made it a natural attraction for the Democrats, but Republicans have gained ground in advancing tax cuts and other social issues, following the "Reagan Democrat" movement. One point of contention is the recent landslide re-election victory for the Democratic governor Jennifer Granholm, who carries many Michiganders' blame of its declining economic situation. But still, pundits agree that even though the Democratic proclivity is high, there remains a significant vacuum that could be filled by the Republicans. An August Rasmussen Poll shows Clinton with a large lead in Michigan. According to the poll, Clinton defeats Giuliani 49-40. [54]
  • Minnesota: Minnesota has been a traditional Democratic state in recent decades, but in the past two presidential elections, the elections have been competitive between the GOP and Democratic candidates. The 2008 Minnesota U.S. Senate election is also stated to be competitive, with Republican Norm Coleman running for re-election and commentator Al Franken actively seeking the Democratic nomination. The Republicans are holding their National Convention in Saint Paul hoping to sway the election toward Republicans this time. The last Republican presidential candidate to win "North Star State" was President Richard Nixon in 1972; since then, it has generally been solid ground for the Democrats. But in 2000 and 2004, the margin of victory was small, encouraging multiple visits by candidates in both parties. In 2006, however, the DFL did pick up a house seat and gained 19 legislative seats and 6 state senate seats. A Survey USA poll of October 2007 has Clinton leading Giuliani 51% to 40%.[5]
  • Missouri: The "Show Me State" has been dubbed as the bellwether for the nation, determining the mood of the nation for a long time. It is the state who has determined the most winners for the Presidency. The home of President Harry Truman leans slightly Republican, granting its 11 electoral votes to Bush in both 2000 and 2004. Despite the relative strength of Republicans in this Midwestern state, it has a strong penchant for advancing populist causes, such as stem cell research and universal health coverage. In 2006, Missouri elected its first female U.S. Senator in Claire McCaskill. Continuing on that trend, the national mood souring over the War in Iraq makes this a strong contender for the Democrats. According to an October 2007 Survey USA poll, Clinton defeats Giuliani 50% to 43%[6] and Thompson 51% to 42%[7].
  • Nevada: The Democrats, on the lobbying of Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid and DNC Chairman Howard Dean changed the primary date to make it compatible with New Hampshire, Iowa and South Carolina. Even though Nevada has tended to vote for the Republicans, the high concentration of labor unions and Hispanic-American vote make it a potential battleground state. The 2006 Gubernatorial election was a competitive one, where Republican Jim Gibbons won by a slim margin; when the state has tended to support them. For Democrats, the Las Vegas metropolitan area and its exponential population increase are making it a Democratic attraction, and they are buoyed by the strong disapproval ratings of Governor Gibbons (29% approval rating as of March 2007) and President Bush (34% approval rating as of March 2007). [55] In the March Nevada poll by Research 2000, Rudy Giuliani led Hillary Clinton 46-38. In that same poll, Giuliani led Barack Obama 44-42. [56] In addition, Nevada has been won by the victor of every US Presidential election since 1912, with the single exception of 1976.
  • New Hampshire: Once very reliably Republican, New Hampshire became a swing state in the 1990s. Republicans still have somewhat of an edge in statewide elections, however the Democrats took control of the state legislature and both Congressional seats in 2006. The New Hampshire Republican Party tends to be more socially liberal than the national party, and as a result their behavior in national elections is harder to determine. Hillary Clinton leads Rudy Giuliani 44-40 in a August 2007 poll by Rasmussen Reports.[57]
  • New Mexico: New Mexico has been long eschewed as a nominal state, in that its status is insignificant and there is no benefit in visiting this low populated state; but that thinking has changed and changed dramatically. With elections being heavily contested and victories being decided by two or three states, New Mexico has become one of the centers of political fighting. In 2000, Al Gore won by a razor-thin margin and in 2004, George W. Bush won by a small, yet safe margin. These results have made experts conclude that New Mexico's 5 electoral votes, even though small in calculation, could make significant splashing and benefit the challenger who might lag behind in big states such as Ohio and Florida. Its penchant for populist streaks have made it an attraction for the Democrats, with Gov. Bill Richardson joining the crowd for the Democratic nomination, based on the calculation that Democrats need to win such Western states to advance their path towards succeeding George W. Bush. A June 2007 poll by SurveyUSA showed Hillary Clinton leading Rudy Giuliani 50-44, however, a October 2007 Survey USA poll has Giuliani leading Clinton by 1 point, 48% to 47%.[8]
  • Ohio: "I think 2008 is very likely to be a hotly contested race in Ohio," stated Eric Rademacher, director of the University of Cincinnati's Ohio Poll, for the Cincinnati Enquirer. [58] Its 20 electoral votes were critical to President Bush's reelection in 2004. In 2006, however, Ohio voters elected Democrats Ted Strickland and Sherrod Brown for Governor and U.S. Senator, respectively. A October 2007 poll by Survey USA had Hillary Clinton and Rudy Giuliani statistically tied, with Giuliani receiving 45% of the vote to Clinton's 47%.[9]
  • Oregon: A Democratic-leaning state, the belief of anti-big government along with strong opposition to central government control, makes Oregon a GOP favorite; however, intense beliefs in civil liberties and liberal ideology on social issues force it to side with the Democrats. The state has gone to the Democrats from the 1988 election onward. According to a October 2007 SurveyUSA poll, Clinton would get 50% of the vote and Giuliani 45%. [10] Clinton leads Thompson 54% to 40%. [11]
  • Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania Secretary of the Commonwealth Pedro A. Cortés stated on March 17, 2007, that "The commonwealth’s large number of electoral college votes and diverse population make Pennsylvania a key battleground state." [59] Pennsylvania has leaned Democratic since 1992, giving its electoral votes to Bill Clinton (1992 and 1996), Al Gore (2000) and John Kerry (2004). President George W. Bush visited the state more than 40 times during his 2004 campaign.[60] According to a August 2007 poll by Quinnipiac University has Hillary Clinton and Rudy Giuliani about tied 45-44. [61]
  • Virginia: No Democratic presidential candidate has won Virginia since Lyndon Johnson's landslide victory in 1964, and it was the only Southern state that went Republican in 1976. Virginia is no longer as reliably Republican as it once was, as evidenced by Democrat Tim Kaine's victory in 2005 for the Governor's Mansion and Jim Webb's narrow victory in the 2006 Senate race against incumbent Republican George Allen. Also the fast growing region of the state Northern Virginia tends to lean democratic. On September 13, 2007, former Virginia governor and Democrat Mark Warner informally announced he will run for the Senate in 2008 for the seat of retiring Senator John Warner. [7] This notion is supported by a September 2007 Rasmussen Reports poll in which Mark Warner leads former Republican governor Jim Gilmore 54% to 34% and Republican Congressman Tom Davis 57% to 30%. A SurveyUSA poll as of October 2007 has Hillary Clinton ahead of Rudy Giuliani 47% to 46%.[12] She also leads Fred Thompson by 51% to 43%,[13] and Mitt Romney by 51% to 41%.[14]
  • West Virginia: Although registed Democrats in the state outnumber registered Republicans, President Bush narrowly won the state in both the 2000 and 2004 elections with 52% and 56% of the vote respectively. President Clinton won the state in both 1992 and 1996. According to a poll by Fabrizio, McLaughlin & Associates in May 2007, Hillary Clinton leads Rudy Giuliani 42-36.[62]
  • Wisconsin: Among the closest states in the nation, Wisconsin very narrowly went to Al Gore in 2000 and John Kerry in 2004. These two results were much closer than the results in prior elections, so it could be possible Wisconsin is trending Republican in presidential elections, though John Kerry won by a slightly larger margin than Gore in 2000. A October 2007 Survey USA poll has Clinton leading Giuliani 48% to 41%.[15]

The potential battleground states listed above control a total of 177 electoral votes. Of the states that are not expected to be competitive, 170 electoral votes (AL, AK, AZ, GA, ID, IN, KS, LA, MS, MT, NE, NC, ND, OK, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, WY) are currently expected to go to the Republican party, while 183 (CA, CT, DC, DE, HI, IL, ME, MD, MA, NJ, NY, RI, VT, WA) are expected to go to the Democrats. Any of these may, of course, become competitive as the election progresses. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... The approximate extent of the Bible Belt, indicated in red The Bible Belt is an informal term for an area of the United States of America in which socially conservative Christian Evangelical Protestantism is a dominant part of the culture. ... For other uses, see Favorite Son. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... Kenneth Lee Salazar (born March 2, 1955) is an American politician, rancher, and environmentalist from the U.S. state of Colorado. ... Bill Ritter may refer to: Bill Ritter (news anchor), a New York City news anchor Bill Ritter (politician), Governer-Elect of Colorado Category: ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... President Johnson signing the Medicare amendment. ... Social security primarily refers to social welfare service concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment and others. ... Cuban American is a United States citizen whose trace their ancestry to Cuba. ... Charles Joseph (Charlie) Crist, Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Chester John Chet Culver (born January 25, 1966) is the current Governor of the U.S. state of Iowa, having recently won the 2006 election. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since December 9, 2003. ... Addison Mitchell Mitch McConnell, Jr. ... James Paul David Jim Bunning (born October 23, 1931 in Southgate, Kentucky) is an American politician who was a Hall of Fame pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1955 to 1971. ... The Senate Minority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... The term Reagan Democrat is used by political commentators to denote traditionally Democratic voters, especially white working-class Northerners, who defected from their party to support President Ronald Reagan, in both the 1980 and 1984 elections. ... Jennifer Mulhern Granholm (born February 5, 1959) is a Canadian-born American politician and the current Governor of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... See Norman Jay Coleman for the former secretary of Agriculture. ... Alan Stuart Al Franken (born May 21, 1951) is an Emmy Award–winning American comedian, actor, author, screenwriter, political commentator, radio host and, recently, politician. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) was created on April 15, 1944 when the Minnesota Democratic Party and Farmer-Labor Party merged to create the DFL. Hubert H. Humphrey was instrumental in this merger. ... The Minnesota House of Representatives is the lower house in the Minnesota State Legislature. ... The Minnesota Senate is the upper house in the Minnesota Legislature. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Mean center of population for the United States, 1790–2000 (U.S. Census Bureau) The Missouri bellwether is a political phenomenon that notes that the state of Missouri has voted for the winner in every U.S. Presidential election since 1904 except in 1956. ... For the victim of Mt. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... Claire McCaskill (born July 24, 1953) is an American Democratic politician, currently the junior United States Senator from the state of Missouri and former State Auditor of Missouri. ... There have been three conflicts in the late 20th century and early 21st century called Gulf War, all of which refer to conflicts in the Persian Gulf region: Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988) (aka First Gulf War). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... Hispanics in the United States, or Hispanic Americans, are American citizens or residents of Hispanic ethnicity who identify themselves as having Hispanic Cultural heritage. ... James Arthur Jim Gibbons (born December 16, 1944) is the 28th Governor of the U.S. state of Nevada. ... The Las Vegas metropolitan area, includes the Las Vegas Valley a 600 square mile (1600 km²) basin, and surrounding areas, that are part of Clark County in southern Nevada. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... For other persons named William Richardson, see William Richardson (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The Cincinnati Enquirer is a daily morning newspaper published at Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Ted Strickland, Ph. ... Sherrod Campbell Brown (born November 9, 1952) is the Democratic Junior United States Senator from the state of Ohio. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... SurveyUSA is a major polling firm in the United States. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... SurveyUSA is a major polling firm in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to 92° 53′ W Population  Ranked...


State Polling

Democratic

  • Washington: Democrats in Washington outnumber Republicans 2 to 1, but polling by Survey USA has Clinton with a lead of 50% to 43% against Giuliani. [16]
  • New York: With both Clinton and Giuliani from New York, this state will be fought hard by both. October 2007 polling has Clinton defeating Giuliani 59%-35%. [18]
  • California: Clinton beats Giuliani 55%-39%. [19]
  • Florida: Clinton beats Giuliani 49%-45%. [20]

For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ...

Republican

  • Kansas: Republicans hold both of Kansas's Senate seats, and control 2 out of it's 4 house seats. Kansas's Governor, Kathleen Sebelius, is a Democrat. One of Kansas's popular U.S Senator's, Pat Roberts is up for re-election in 2008 as well. Giuliani leads Clinton here 54% to 37%. [21]
  • Alabama: A Republican stronghold has Giuliani leads Clinton 52% to 44% [22]. Thompson leads Clinton as well 51% to 45% [23]
  • Oklahoma: A strong Republican state, Giuliani barely edges Clinton 47-44. [24]

Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Kathleen Gilligan Sebelius (born May 15, 1948 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American Democratic politician who currently serves as the 44th Governor of Kansas. ... Charles Patrick Pat Roberts (born April 20, 1936) is a United States Senator from Kansas. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ...

See also

This article covers the history of the United States from 1988 to present. ... The 2008 Democratic Presidential Debates are a series of political debates that will take place prior to the 2008 Democratic Primaries. ... The 2008 Republican Presidential Debates are political debates before the 2008 Republican Primaries. ... On November 4, 2008, the United States has a general election. ...

References

  1. ^ Transcript: Vice President Cheney on 'FOX News Sunday' (Reprint). FOX News Sunday. FOXNews.com (2005-02-07). Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  2. ^ "Alben W. Barkley", Mark O. Hatfield, with the Senate Historical Office. Vice Presidents of the United States, 1789-1993 (Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1997), pp. 423-429.
  3. ^ a b "Historical Election Results: Electoral College Box Scores 1789-1996", U.S. Electoral College / Office of the Federal Register, U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.
  4. ^ a b "Historical Election Results: Electoral College Box Scores 2000-2004", U.S. Electoral College / Office of the Federal Register, U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.
  5. ^ Kennedy, Helen. "Wanna be Prez? First get $100M", New York Daily News, 2007-01-14. Retrieved on 2007-02-01. 
  6. ^ Smith, Ben. "Billion-Dollar elephant inches toward run", 'The Politico', The Politico, June 19, 2007. Retrieved on July 19, 2007. 
  7. ^ "Presidential debates set for cyberspace", Beth Fouhy, AP (and found at Msnbc.com), April 23, 2007.
  8. ^ a b "Questions, not answers, highlight YouTube debate", CNN, 2007-07-27. Retrieved on 2007-07-25. 
  9. ^ The Trail: The GOP YouTube Debate is Back On
  10. ^ ""Obama follows Clinton, McCain to Yahoo Answers", CNET News.com, 2007-03-27. "
  11. ^ "Questions, not answers, highlight YouTube debate", CNN, July 24, 2007.
  12. ^ a b "Candidates court young voters online", Stephanie Garry, St. Petersburg Times, June 8, 2007.
  13. ^ Ron Paul's Web of support: He's an 'online natural' USA Today
  14. ^ Ron Paul's Online Rise US News
  15. ^ http://www.hitwise.com/political-data-center/key-candidates.php Hitwise political data center
  16. ^ Rall, Ted. "Frontrunners by default", Columbia City Paper, 2007-05-17. Retrieved on 2007-05-30. 
  17. ^ Balz, Dan. "Candidates Unite in Criticizing Bush", The Washington Post, 2007-04-27. Retrieved on 2007-05-30. 
  18. ^ "Winners & Losers", Chuck Todd, MSNBC, May 15, 2007.
  19. ^ "Campaign Finance: First Quarter 2007 FEC Filings", The Washington Post 2007.
  20. ^ Chuck Todd. "Will Tsunami Tuesday be an Afterthought?", 2007-05-10. Retrieved on 2007-05-31. 
  21. ^ Dick Morris. "Only Strong Will Survive This Big Bang", 2007-03-02. Retrieved on 2007-03-05. 
  22. ^ Cameron, Carl. "Feb. 5: National Presidential Primary Day?", Fox News, 2007-02-26. Retrieved on 2007-03-06. 
  23. ^ Ball, Molly. "2008 Nomination: GOP feeling need to compete", Las Vegas Review-Journal, 2007-03-01. Retrieved on 2007-03-06. 
  24. ^ Dougherty, Danny. "Presidential primary and caucus dates", Stateline.org, 2007-09-27. Retrieved on 2007-10-11. 
  25. ^ "America for Gore". Retrieved on 2007-10-08. 
  26. ^ "Al Gore rules out presidential run after Nobel prize", Agence France-Presse, 17 October 2007. Retrieved on 2007-10-17. 
  27. ^ Beaumont, Thomas. "Vilsack drops out of prez race", Des Moines Register, 2007-02-23. Retrieved on 2007-02-26. 
  28. ^ http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/politics/blog/2007/10/ron_paul_tear_down_missiles_mr.html
  29. ^ "Gilmore drops longshot bid for presidential nomination", Warren Fiske, The Virginian-Pilot, July 14, 2007.
  30. ^ "Rudy Giuliani Picks Up Endorsement For President From Former Governor Tommy Thompson", JoinRudy2008.com, October 12, 2007.
  31. ^ Candidate Profile: Bryan Malatesta. TheAmericanVoters.com. Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  32. ^ Escondido Attorney Makes Another Attempt at White House, Metropolitan News-Enterprise 2007-08-07
  33. ^ Party, Green. "Elaine Brown to Seek Green Party Presidential Ticket", Green Line, 2007-02. 
  34. ^ http://www.mercurynews.com/breakingnews/ci_7202195
  35. ^ http://query.nictusa.com/cgi-bin/fecimg/?P80004930
  36. ^ "Nader Ponders Run, Calls Clinton 'Coward'", Roger Simon, The Politico, June 21, 2007.
  37. ^ "Tulsa Blogged!", Green Pages, 2005.
  38. ^ Steve (2007-07-31). Ed Thompson considering presidential bid. Gordon Unleashed. Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  39. ^ http://www.ballot-access.org/2007/10/20/socialist-party-ticket-is-moore-alexander/
  40. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/25/AR2007042502379.html
  41. ^ http://wcbstv.com/topstories/local_story_170181024.html
  42. ^ "Augustson to Target Emanuel's House Seat", Augustson2008.us .
  43. ^ "Corsi declines Constitution Party bid", WorldNetDaily, 2007-07-14. Retrieved on 2007-10-05. 
  44. ^ Stanhope, Doug (2007-05-03). Stanhope in '08 has Quit in '07!. Stanhope in 2008. Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  45. ^ Chan, Sewell. "Bloomberg Leaving Republican Party", City Room, The New York Times, 2007-06-19. Retrieved on 2007-10-05. 
  46. ^ "Nader Ponders Run, Calls Clinton 'Coward'", Roger Simon, The Politico, June 21, 2007.
  47. ^ I'm running for President in 2008 by Michael Moriarty, Enter Stage Right 2005-05-30
  48. ^ An Interview with Emmy-Winning Actor Michael Moriarty, Presidential Candidate, TheConservativeVoice.com 2006-08-16
  49. ^ Towery, Matt. "As Insider First Reported, Sam Nunn's Being Court For Independent Bid - And Now He Confirms Interest", InsiderAdvantage Georgia. 
  50. ^ Sheridan, Mary Beth. "Report Questions Constitutionality of Giving D.C. a Vote", The Washington Post, 2007-02-13. Retrieved on 2007-03-01. 
  51. ^ Dan Morain, "GOP electoral initiative dealt major blows," Los Angeles Times, September 28, 2007; Carla Marinucci, "GOP-backed bid to reform California's electoral process collapsing," San Francisco Chronicle, September 28, 2007.
  52. ^ "Clinton Enjoys Big Lead in Arkansas", Rasmussen Reports.
  53. ^ "Giuliani Leads Clinton in Colorado", Rasmussen Reports.
  54. ^ "Michigan: Clinton Leads GOP Hopefuls by 9-13 points"
  55. ^ "Poll: Gibbons Lagging Bush", Molly Ball, Las Vegas Review-Journal, March 14, 2007.
  56. ^ "Nevadans in New York state of mind with Giuliani, Clinton at top of poll", AP, March 12, 2007.
  57. ^ "Clinton Leads Top Republicans in New Hampshire", Rasmussen Reports.
  58. ^ Intense 2008 election forecast for Ohio
  59. ^ "Rendell Administration Supports Giving Pennsylvanians a Voice in Presidential Primary", Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of State, March 13, 2007.
  60. ^ Bush, Kerry in Reach of Electoral Win, Washington Post, 10/30/2004.
  61. ^ "August 8, 2007 - Clinton Leads Or Ties In Three Swing States, Gay Support Costs Votes, Quinnipiac University Poll Finds --- FLORIDA: Clinton 46 - Giuliani 44; OHIO: Clinton 43 - Giuliani 43; PENNSYLVANIA: Clinton 45 - Giuliani 44 ", Quinnipiac University, August 8, 2007.
  62. ^ "Research shows West Virginia is tilting back toward blue for the 2008 presidential race. ", Fabrizio, McLaughlin and Associates.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark Odom Hatfield (born July 12, 1922) is an American politician from Oregon. ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) provides printed (and now electronic) copies of documents produced by and for all federal agencies, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and EPA. Court... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... The Office of the Federal Register is an agency of the United States Government within the National Archives and Records Administration. ... The United States National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government charged with preserving and documenting government and historical records. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... The Office of the Federal Register is an agency of the United States Government within the National Archives and Records Administration. ... The United States National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is an independent agency of the U.S. federal government charged with preserving and documenting government and historical records. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... AP may refer to: Andhra Pradesh, A state in the Republic of India Associated Press, an American news agency AP, the United States postal abbreviation for U.S. military personnel in the Pacific Ocean region AP, the U.S. Navy hull classification symbol for transport support ships A&P, the... MSNBC logo MSNBC (Microsoft & National Broadcasting Company) is a 24-hour news channel in the United States. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Logo of the St. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Hitwise provides insights into the performance of websites within the selected industry. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chuck Todd is a political analyst and author, and political director and on-air analyst for NBC News. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Chuck Todd is a political analyst and author, and political director and on-air analyst for NBC News. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dick Morris (born November 28, 1948 in New York City) is an American political author, newspaper columnist, and commentator who previously worked as a pollster, political campaign consultant, and general political consultant. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... AFP logo Paris headquarters of AFP Charles Havas Agence France-Presse (AFP) is the oldest news agency in the world, and one of the three largest with Associated Press and Reuters. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Des Moines Register is the daily morning newspaper of Des Moines, Iowa, in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Roger Simon may refer to: Roger Simon, 2nd Baron Simon of Wythenshawe (1913-2002), a solicitor and left wing journalist and political activist Roger L. Simon, a mystery author, blogger and screenwriter Category: ... The Politico is a Washington, D.C.-based political journalism organization that distributes its content via television, the internet, newspaper, and radio. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Roger Simon may refer to: Roger Simon, 2nd Baron Simon of Wythenshawe (1913-2002), a solicitor and left wing journalist and political activist Roger L. Simon, a mystery author, blogger and screenwriter Category: ... The Politico is a Washington, D.C.-based political journalism organization that distributes its content via television, the internet, newspaper, and radio. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rasmussen Reports is an American public opinion polling firm. ... Rasmussen Reports is an American public opinion polling firm. ... The Las Vegas Review-Journal, also known as The R-J, is published in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... AP may refer to: Andhra Pradesh, A state in the Republic of India Associated Press, an American news agency AP, the United States postal abbreviation for U.S. military personnel in the Pacific Ocean region AP, the U.S. Navy hull classification symbol for transport support ships A&P, the... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Rasmussen Reports is an American public opinion polling firm. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 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External links

  • 2008 Presidential Candidates and Campaigns at the Open Directory Project
  • Wikia:campaigns:United States presidential election, 2008 and Wikia:campaigns:Category:2008 US Presidential candidates
  • Who Is Who in the 2008 ELections
  • Candidate Videos at Election.tv
  • Glance on the USA : comments, biography of all the candidates, polls...
  • List of all presidential candidates for 2008 election
  • Campaign Contributions to Presidential Candidates in the '08 Election
News media

  Results from FactBites:
 
United States Presidential Election - 2008 Election For President, Presidential Candidates (1969 words)
United States presidential elections determine who serves as president and vice president of the United States for four-year terms, starting at midday on Inauguration Day, which is January 20 of the year after the election.
The elections are run by local election boards who ensure the fair and impartial nature of the election and prevent tampering of the results.
In fact, the 2008 election is an open race, and it is the first time since the 1952 election and only the second time since the 1928 election in which neither a vice president nor a sitting President will be either party's nominee.
United States presidential election, 2008 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1670 words)
As in the 2004 Presidential election the allocation of electoral votes to each state will be based on the 2000 Census.
Should Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice (who has also denied any desire to seek the presidency, though she is the current frontrunner in some public opinion polls) receive the Republican Party's nomination in 2008, she would revive an old practice that was the norm for the first fifty years of United States history.
Federal election laws require the reporting of funds raised for the primary elections, and in the past the media has anointed "front-runners" on the basis of reported fund-raising totals.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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