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Encyclopedia > United States Postal Service
United States Postal Service
Type Government agency
Founded 1776
Headquarters Washington, D.C.
Key people John E. Potter, Postmaster General
Industry Courier
Products First Class mail, Domestic Mail, Logistics
Revenue $72.65 billion USD (2006)
Operating income $966 million USD (2006)
Net income $900 million USD (2006)
Employees 800,000
Slogan We Deliver For You.
Website www.usps.gov

The United States Postal Service (USPS) is an independent establishment of the executive branch of the United States government (see 39 U.S.C. § 201) responsible for providing postal service in the U.S. Within the United States, it is colloquially referred to simply as "the post office." USPS can refer to: The United States Postal Service United States Power Squadrons, a non-profit boating organization This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Image File history File links United_States_Postal_Service_Logo. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... John E. Potter is the current Postmaster General of the United States Postal Service appointed in June 2001. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... A courier is a person or company employed to deliver messages, packages and mail. ... First Class mail is the most expensive type of mail and usually arrives the fastest. ... For other uses, see Mail (disambiguation). ... Look up Logistics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up revenue in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “USD” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), also known as operating income and operating profit, is a term used to describe a companys earnings. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “USD” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Net income is equal to the income that a firm has after subtracting costs and expenses from the total revenue. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “USD” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about work. ... Look up slogan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Title 39 of the United States Code outlines the role of United States Postal Service in the United States Code. ... A British pillar box The postal system is a system by which written documents typically enclosed in envelopes, and also small packages containing other matter, are delivered to destinations around the world. ...

Contents

History

Running pony logo used before 1970 before the "Department" became a "Service".
Running pony logo used before 1970 before the "Department" became a "Service".

The first postal service in America arose in February of 1692 when a grant from King William and Queen Mary empowered Thomas Neale "to erect, settle and establish within the chief parts of their majesties' colonies and plantations in America, an office or offices for the receiving and dispatching letters and pacquets, and to receive, send and deliver the same under such rates and sums of money as the planters shall agree to give, and to hold and enjoy the same for the term of twenty-one years." Image File history File links PostOffice!.PNG‎ Official seal of the Post Office Department Direct inquiries to User_talk:68. ... Image File history File links PostOffice!.PNG‎ Official seal of the Post Office Department Direct inquiries to User_talk:68. ... William III Mary II The phrase William and Mary usually refers to the joint sovereignty over the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland of King William III and his wife Queen Mary II. Their joint reign began in February, 1689, when they were called to the throne by... Thomas Neale is renowned as being the first postmaster general of the United States. ...


The United States Postal Service was created in Philadelphia under Benjamin Franklin on July 26, 1775 by decree of the Second Continental Congress. Based on a clause in the United States Constitution empowering Congress "To establish post offices and post roads," it became the Post Office Department in 1792. It was part of the Presidential cabinet and the postmaster general was the last person in the United States presidential line of succession. In 1971, the department was reorganized as a quasi-independent agency of the federal government and acquired its present name. The postmaster general is no longer in the presidential line of succession. For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence depicts the five-man drafting committee presenting the first draft of the Declaration of Independence to the Second Continental Congress. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... The Post Office Department was the former name of the United States Postal Service when it was a Cabinet department. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... The presidential line of succession defines who may become or act as President of the United States upon the incapacity, death, resignation, or removal from office (by impeachment and subsequent conviction) of a sitting president or a president-elect. ... Independent agencies of the United States government are those that exist outside of the departments of the executive branch. ... The presidential line of succession defines who may become or act as President of the United States upon the incapacity, death, resignation, or removal from office (by impeachment and subsequent conviction) of a sitting President or a President-elect. ...


From 1837 to 1970, the Postal Service used a running pony as its logo; that logo was replaced by an eagle. In the 1990s, the eagle was redesigned again so that it was just the head.[1]


The USPS is the third-largest employer in the United States (after the United States Department of Defense and Wal-Mart) and operates the largest civilian vehicle fleet in the world, with an estimated 260,000 vehicles, the majority of which are the easily identified Grumman LLV "mail truck", as shown in the pictures below. In an interview on NPR, a USPS official stated that for every penny increase in the national average price of gasoline, the USPS spends an extra $8 million to fuel its fleet.[citation needed] This implies that the fleet requires some 800 million gallons of fuel per year, and consumes an estimated fuel budget of $2 billion, were the national gasoline price to average $2.50. Some mail carriers use personal vehicles. Standard postal service vehicles do not have license plates; instead, a truck is identified by blue numbers on the front and back. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... United States Postal Service LLV, seen in Carson City, Nevada. ... “Petrol” redirects here. ... A Melbourne postie riding a motorbike A postwoman with her bicycle in China. ... A license plate (or licence plate), number plate or registration plate is a small plate attached to a vehicle. ...


Competition from e-mail and private operations such as United Parcel Service, FedEx, and DHL has forced USPS to adjust its business strategy and to modernize its products and services. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... Federal Express redirects here. ... A DHL Boeing 757. ...


The Department of Defense and the USPS jointly operate a postal system to deliver mail for the military; this is known as the Army Post Office (for Army and Air Force postal facilities) and Fleet Post Office (for Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard postal facilities). An army post office is a special military system to integrate the civil postal system to that of the military. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... USN redirects here. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the United States armed forces a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ...


On October 5, 2007, the United States Postal Service honored 5 journalists of the 20th century times: Martha Gellhorn; John Hersey; George Polk; Ruben Salazar; and Eric Sevareid. Postmaster General Jack Potter announced the stamp series at the Associated Press Managing Editors Meeting in Washington.[2] For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism. ... Martha Gellhorn Martha Gellhorn (8 November 1908 - 15 February 1998) was an American novelist and journalist considered one of the greatest war correspondents of the 20th century. ... John Hersey, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1958 John Richard Hersey (June 17, 1914 – March 24, 1993) was an American writer and journalist. ... George Polk, (1913 - 1948) was an American journalist for CBS who disappeared in Greece and was found dead shortly afterwards on Sunday May 16, 1948, shot at point blank range in the back of the head, and with hands and feet tied. ... Ruben Salazar Ruben Salazar (March 3, 1928 - August 29, 1970) was a Mexican-American news reporter killed by the police during the National Chicano Moratorium March against the Vietnam War on August 29, 1970 in Los Angeles, California. ... Pioneering broadcast journalist Eric Sevareid. ... A Postmaster General is the national politician in charge of the postal system of a country. ... A stamp is a distinctive mark or impression made upon an object, for instance those made on a piece of paper and used to indicate the prepayment of a fee or tax. ... In a general sense, a series is a related set of things that occur one after the other or are otherwise connected one after the other. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ...


Governance and organization

Full eagle logo from 1970 to the 1990s

The Board of Governors of the United States Postal Service sets policy, procedure, and postal rates for services rendered, and has a similar role to a corporate board of directors. Of the eleven members of the Board, nine are appointed by the President and confirmed by the United States Senate (see 39 U.S.C. § 202). The nine appointed members then select the United States Postmaster General, who serves as the board's tenth member, and who oversees the day to day activities of the service as Chief Executive Officer (see 39 U.S.C. § 202 and 39 U.S.C. § 203). The ten-member board then nominates a Deputy Postmaster General, who acts as Chief Operating Officer, to the eleventh and last remaining open seat. Image File history File links Uspslogo. ... Image File history File links Uspslogo. ... The Board of Governors of the United States Postal Service is an eleven-member board comparable to a board of directors of a private corporation, except in service of the American postal system. ... In relation to a company, a director is an officer (that is, someone who works for the company) charged with the conduct and management of its affairs. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Title 39 of the United States Code outlines the role of United States Postal Service in the United States Code. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... “Chief executive” redirects here. ... Title 39 of the United States Code outlines the role of United States Postal Service in the United States Code. ... Title 39 of the United States Code outlines the role of United States Postal Service in the United States Code. ... A Chief Operating Officer (COO) is a corporate officer responsible for managing the day-to-day activities of the corporation. ...


The USPS is often mistaken for a government-owned corporation (e.g., Amtrak), but as noted above is legally defined as an "independent establishment of the executive branch of the Government of the United States," (39 U.S.C. § 201) as it is wholly owned by the government and controlled by the Presidential appointees and the Postmaster General. As a quasi-governmental agency, it has many special privileges, including sovereign immunity, eminent domain powers, powers to negotiate postal treaties with foreign nations, and an exclusive legal right to deliver first-class and third-class mail. Indeed, in 2004, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the USPS was not a government-owned corporation and therefore could not be sued under the Sherman Antitrust Act.[3] For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Title 39 of the United States Code outlines the role of United States Postal Service in the United States Code. ... A Postmaster General is the national politician in charge of the postal system of a country. ... Sovereign immunity or crown immunity is a type of immunity that, in common law jurisdictions traces its origins from early English law. ... Eminent domain (United States), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Republic of Ireland), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (Canada, South Africa) in common law legal systems is the inherent power of the state to seize a citizens private property, expropriate property, or rights in property, without the owner... The Universal Postal Union (UPU, French: Union postale universelle) is an international organization that coordinates postal policies between member nations, and hence the world-wide postal system. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... John Sherman The Sherman Antitrust Act (Sherman Act[1], July 2, 1890, ch. ...


Statutory monopoly

The right of the United States government to engage in postal services is established by the Constitution. The USPS holds a statutory monopoly on non-urgent First Class Mail, outbound U.S. international letters[4] as well the exclusive right to put mail in private mailboxes[5], as described in the Private Express Statutes. According to a report from the Government Accountability Office, "The monopoly was created by Congress as a revenue protection measure for the Postal Service’s predecessor to enable it to fulfill its mission. It is to prevent private competitors from engaging in an activity known as “cream-skimming,” i.e., offering service on low-cost routes at prices below those of the Postal Service while leaving the Service with high-cost routes."[4] The law that prohibits anyone except the USPS from placing mail in a private mailbox (18 U.S.C. § 1725), was also passed for the purpose of preventing loss of revenue to the post office.[4] Besides the prevention of revenue loss, the 1934 legislation was passed for another reason, the second being, '...Congress sought to decrease the quantity of extraneous matter being placed in mail boxes. Until 1979, competition in all letter mail was prohibited. However, faced with imminent legislation to exempt "urgent" letter mail from the monopoly, the Post Office decided on its own to exempt "extremely urgent" letters.[6] Competition in "extremely urgent letters" is allowed under certain conditions: The private carrier must charge at least $3 or twice the U.S. postage, whichever is greater (other stipulations, such as maximum delivery time, apply as well); or, alternatively, it may be delivered for free.[7] This is where carriers such as FedEx compete by offering overnight delivery, as well as where bicycle messengers compete for intracity mail. However, the private carrier of the urgent letters must not use the standardized mailboxes marked "U.S. Mail." Hence, private carriers of urgent letters must either deliver packages directly to the recipient, leave them in the open near the recipient's front door, or place them in a special box dedicated solely to that carrier (a technique commonly used by small courier and messenger services). The United States is the only country that has such a mailbox monopoly according to the American Enterprise Institute of Public Policy Research, a private think tank. [8] A legal monopoly, statutory monopoly, or de jure monopoly is a monopoly that is protected by law from competition. ... First Class mail is the most expensive type of mail and usually arrives the fastest. ... The Private Express Statutes (PES) are, a group of federal civil and criminal laws in United States (Title 18 United States Code sec. ... General Accounting Office headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the non-partisan audit, evaluation, and investigative arm of Congress, and an agency in the Legislative Branch of the United States Government. ... Title 18 of the US Code deals with Crimes and Criminal Proceedings in five parts: Part I - Crimes Part II - Criminal Procedure Part III - Prisons and Prisoners Part IV - Correction of Youthful Offenders Part V - Immunity of Witnesses Title 18, specifically Part 1 > Chapter 113B > § 2331 and § 2332a(a)), is... Federal Express redirects here. ... Bicycle messenger in Atlanta doing a track stand. ... This article is about the institution. ...


Carriers, as well as mailers, are supposed to comply with the laws against using a competitor to mail an overnight letter that is not extremely urgent. A violation can occur at a home or a business where letters originate. But, since nonurgent letters can be mailed covertly through private carriers USPS has found it difficult to enforce. However, companies such as Bellsouth and Equifax have been investigated and fined for mailing nonurgent material through private overnight delivery services. Private carriers of overnight mail say that they do not inspect the mail of customers to determine if it the content is extremely urgent and suggest that the responsibility for ensuring that relies on the mailers themselves. Carriers do, however, have certain responsibilities under the regulations.[4] BellSouth Corporation was an American telecommunications holding company based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Equifax, Inc. ...


Since the mail monopoly only applies to nonurgent letter mail, the USPS is losing a significant amount of business to their competitors in other services, who offer lower rates. For example, FedEx and others have captured 90% of the overnight mail business.[5]


During the 1830s and 1840s several entrepreneurs started their own letter mail delivery companies, with the intent of ending the postal monopoly. These included Lysander Spooner and his American Letter Mail Company[9], Henry Wells (of Wells Fargo), and Alvin Adams. To begin with, they were financially successful. However they were forced out of business by several postal reforms leading to lower postage rates in the 1840s and 1850s as well as Congressional legislation enforcing the mail monopoly, or in the case of the Pony Express, became mail contractors.[10][11] The average price charged by the Post Office to mail a letter in 1845 was 14.5 cents, whereas the private postal systems generally charged between 5 and 6.5 cents. By 1851, the Post Office had cut their rates to 3 cents, which has been cited as the main factor in driving the private mail companies out of business. Another consequence of the rate cut was that by 1860, the formerly self-supporting Post Office depended on the Treasury for half its income. [12] Lysander Spooner (January 19, 1808 – May 14, 1887) was an American individualist anarchist political philosopher, abolitionist, and legal theorist of the 19th century. ... American Letter Mail Company stamps The American Letter Mail Company was started by Lysander Spooner in 1844 order to compete with the United States Postal Service monopoly. ... Henry Wells (December 12, 1805 - December 10, 1878) was an American businessman. ... An older Wells Fargo branch, located in Berkeley, California Wells Fargos corporate headquarters and main branch Wells Fargo & Co. ... Alvin Adams (June 16, 1804 – September 2, 1877) was the founder of Adams and Company, a forerunner to Adams Express, one of the first companies to act as a carrier for express shipments by rail in the United States. ... Frank E. Webner, pony express rider c. ...


Arguments against "mail monopoly"

The mail monopoly is not without its critics. Nobel Prize winning economist Milton Friedman said, "there is no way to justify our present public monopoly of the post office. It may be argued that the carrying of mail is a technical monopoly and that a government monopoly is the least of evils. Along these lines, one could perhaps justify a government post office, but not the present law, which makes it illegal for anybody else to carry the mail. If the delivery of mail is a technical monopoly, no one else will be able to succeed in competition with the government. If it is not, there is no reason why the government should be engaged in it. The only way to find out is to leave other people free to enter."[13] There are examples of postal competition in other countries.[14] Sam Ryan, a senior fellow at the Lexington Institute, says the reason stamp prices keep rising is because of the mail monopoly. He says that in a competitive industry, prices of products and services normally fall, rather than rise. However, when the "going gets tough" for the Post Office they raise prices instead of cutting costs as they would have to do if they were competing for business. He says "Imagine if the price of a phone call or sending an e-mail rose with inflation for 30 years."[15] Ryan points out they have proven themselves unable to take advantage of economies of scale and technology investments to lower stamp prices. He cites a study by leading experts of the Postal Rate Commission which concluded that "The doubling of overall volume coupled with scale economies should have resulted in the average price of the stamp dropping in real terms."[16] Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American Nobel Laureate economist and public intellectual. ... In economics, the term natural monopoly is used to refer to two different things. ... scheiiiißßßßßee!!!!!!!!!!!!!regional, local; for levels below the national, it is a local monopoly. ... The increase in output from Q to Q2 causes a decrease in the average cost of each unit from C to C1. ... The United States Postal Rate Commission is an independent regulatory agency created by the Postal Reorganization Act of 1970 to set the rates for different classes of mail by holding hearings on rates proposed by the United States Postal Service. ...


The Postal Service argues that the monopoly is necessary to fulfill its mission "to provide for an economically sound postal system that could afford to deliver letters between any two locations, however remote." Postal Service officials say that if private carriers are allowed to compete, then the Post Office would not be able to deliver mail to every American at the same price. Postmaster General Marvin Runyon said, when exiting his position in 1998, that he believes that the monopoly will become increasingly irrelevant, "not through legislative fiat, not through the power of PAC dollars. But through the natural forces of marketplace competition." He cites the rise of electronic mail. Jim Kelly of UPS says that the Post Office has an unfair advantage and should be subject to the same rules as private carriers, such as paying taxes, following state and local regulations, and being subject to antitrust laws.[17] Even though considered competitors, FedEx Express carries over 1 million pounds of USPS Express mail every night in their planes. [18] Marvin T. Runyon (September 16, 1924–May 3, 2004) was an American manager at Nissan and Ford who served as chairman of the Tennessee Valley Authority and as U.S. Postmaster General. ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... The Department of Justice building in Washington, D.C. is home to the United States antitrust enforcers United States antitrust law is the body of laws which prohibit anti-competitive behavior (monopoly) and unfair business practices. ... Federal Express redirects here. ...


Law enforcement agencies

U.S. Postal Inspection Service

The U.S. Postal Inspection Service is one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the U.S. It was founded by Benjamin Franklin (See USPIS "Who We Are") The United States Postal Inspection Service or USPIS is the law enforcement arm of the United States Postal Service. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ...


The mission of the USPIS is to protect the U.S. Postal Service, its employees and its customers from criminal attack, and protect the nation's mail system from criminal misuse. The United States Postal Inspection Service (or USPIS) is the law enforcement arm of the United States Postal Service. ...


U.S. law provides for the protection of mail. Postal Inspectors enforce over 200 federal laws in investigations of crimes that may adversely affect or fraudulently use the U.S. Mail, the postal system or postal employees. The USPIS is a major federal law enforcement agency. Law Enforcement Agency (LEA) is a generic term used for local and state police, as well as federal agencies (such as the FBI, the BATF, DHS, Europol, Interpol, etc. ...


The USPIS has the power to enforce the law by conducting search and seizure raids on entities they suspect of sending non-urgent mail through overnight delivery competitors. For example: according to the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, a private think tank (http://aei.org) the USPIS raided Equifax offices to ascertain if the mail they were sending through FedEx was truly "extremely urgent." It was found that the mail was not, and Equifax was fined $30,000 to compensate the Postal Service for the postage that was lost to FedEx.[19] This article is about the institution. ... Equifax, Inc. ...

USPS Office of Inspector General

The USPS Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Postal Service was authorized by law in 1996. Prior to the 1996 legislation, the Postal Inspection Service performed the duties of the OIG. The Inspector General, who is independent of postal management, is appointed by and reports directly to the nine Presidential appointed Governors of the Postal Service. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Postal Service was authorized by law in 1996. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... A governor is an official who heads the government of a colony, state or other sub-national state unit. ...


The primary purpose of the OIG is to prevent, detect and report fraud, waste and program abuse, and promote efficiency in the operations of the Postal Service . The OIG has "oversight" responsibility for all activities of the Postal Inspection Service. The United States Postal Inspection Service is the oldest federal law enforcement agency in the USA. It originated in 1772, when colonial Postmaster General Benjamin Franklin appointed a surveyor or special agent to regulate and audit the mails – four years before the Declaration of Independence. ...

Types of postal facilities

Although its customer service centers are called post offices in regular speech, the USPS recognizes several types of postal facilities, including the following:

  • A main post office (formerly known as a general post office), which is the primary postal facility in a community. [3] [4]
  • A station or post office station, a postal facility that is not the main post office, but that is within the corporate limits of the community. [5]
  • A branch or post office branch, a postal facility that is not the main post office and that is outside the corporate limits of the community.
  • A classified unit, a station or branch operated by USPS employees in a facility owned or leased by the USPS.
  • A contract postal unit (or CPU), a station or branch operated by a contractor, typically in a store or other place of business.
  • A community post office (or CPO), a contract postal unit providing services in a small community in which other types of post office facilities have been discontinued.
  • A finance unit, a station or branch that provides window services and accepts mail, but does not provide delivery.
  • A processing and distribution center (P&DC, or processing and distribution facility, formerly known as a General Mail Facility), a central mail facility that processes and dispatches incoming and outgoing mail to and from a designated service area.
  • A sectional center facility (SCF), a P&DC for a designated geographical area defined by one or more three-digit ZIP code prefixes.
  • A bulk mail center (BMC), a central mail facility that processes bulk rate parcels as the hub in a hub and spoke network.
  • An auxiliary sorting facility (ASF), a central mail facility that processes bulk rate parcels as spokes in a hub and spoke network.

A Destination Sectional Center Facility (SCF) is a Processing and Distribution Center (P&DC) of the United States Postal Service (USPS) that serves a designated geographical area defined by one or more three-digit ZIP Code prefixes. ... Mr. ... The United States Postal Service defines bulk mail broadly as quantities of mail prepared for mailing at reduced postage rates. ... The Spoke-hub distribution paradigm (also known as a hub and spoke model or hub and spoke network) derives its name from a bicycle wheel, which consists of a number of spokes extending outward from a central hub. ...

Evolutionary Network Development (END) program

In February, 2006, the USPS announced that they plan to replace the nine existing facility-types with five processing facility-types:

  • Regional Distribution Centers (RDCs), which will process all classes of parcels and bundles and serve as Surface Transfer Centers;
  • Local Processing Centers (LPCs), which will process single-piece letters and flats and cancel mail;
  • Destination Processing Centers (DPC), sort the mail for individual mail carriers;
  • Airport Transfer Centers (ATCs), which will serve as transfer points only; and
  • Remote Encoding Centers (RECs).

Over a period of years, these facilities are expected to replace Processing & Distribution Centers, Customer Service Facilities, Bulk Mail Centers, Logistic and Distribution Centers, annexes, the Hub and Spoke Program, Air Mail Centers, Remote Encoding Centers, and International Service Centers. Logistics is the management of resources and their distribution. ... Airmail (or air mail) is mail that is transported by aircraft. ...


The changes are a result of the declining volumes of single-piece first-class mail, population shifts, the increase in drop shipments by advertising mailers at destinating postal facilities, advancements in equipment and technology, redundancies in the existing network, and the need for operational flexibility


While common usage refers to all types of postal facilities as "substations," the USPS Glossary of Postal Terms does not define or even list that word.


Temporary stations are often set up for applying pictorial cancellations. Pictorial cancellations, in philately, are cancellations in which part of the cancellation or postmark or a combination of the two contains some sort of picture or image; the term is sometimes used, loosely and perhaps technically incorrectly, for cancellations containing some sort of commemorative phrase in addition to the regular...


Addressing envelopes

For any letter addressed within the United States, the USPS requires two pieces of information on the envelope.

  1. Address of the recipient: Placed on the front (non opening) side of the envelope in the center. Generally, the name of the addressee should be included above the address itself. Additionally, a ZIP+4 code is not necessary.
  2. Postage indication: All parcels must include an indication that postage has been paid. In most cases, this is a stamp, though metered labels are also common. Members of the U.S. Congress, among others, have franking privileges, which only require a signature.
    • First-class mail costs 41¢ upwards, depending on the weight and dimensions of the letter and the class, and the indicia is supposed to be placed in the upper-right corner.

A third, and optional (but strongly suggested) addition is a return address. This is the address that the recipient may respond to, and, if necessary, the letter can be returned to if delivery fails. It is usually placed in the upper-left corner or occasionally on the back (though the latter is standard in some countries). Undeliverable mails that cannot be readily returned, including those without return addresses, are treated as dead mails at a Mail Recovery Center in Atlanta, Georgia or Saint Paul, Minnesota. Look up address in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mr. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... The franking privilege is a perk which grants an elected official the right to send mail through the postal system for free, often simply by signing his or her name where the postage stamp would normally be placed. ... Information Based Indicia refers to a system used by the United States Postal Service for labels or marks to be applied to the mail item to indicate electronic postage payment. ... In both conventional and electronic messaging, a return address is an explicit inclusion of the address of the person sending the message. ... Dead Letter is also colloqually applied to any set of instructions, especially a law, that has lost its authority without being formally abollished or repealed. ... Nickname: Location in Fulton County and the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State Counties Fulton, DeKalb Government  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area  - City  132. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ...

The formatting of the address is as follows
Line 1: Name of recipient
Line 2: Street address or P.O. Box
Line 3: City State (ISO 3166-2:US code or APO/FPO code) and ZIP+4 code
Example
MR JEFF GILBERT
1111 JOHNSON ST
NEW YORK NY  10036-4658

The USPS maintains a list of proper abbreviations. A Post Office box is a uniquely-addressable lockable box located on the premises of a Post Office station which allows people a semi-anonymous method of receiving mail. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... ISO 3166-2 codes for the United States of America cover 50 states, 1 district, 6 outlying areas (including 9 minor outlying islands under separate ISO 3166-1 country code UM). ...


The city and state designations are a redundant safety measure used in the case that the printed ZIP code is illegible or ambiguously written. Since the ZIP code system is such that there is only one street of any name for any ZIP code (ex. there is only one Johnson Street in the 10036 ZIP area), it is possible to exclude the city and state from a mailing label and still have the package delivered, assuming the label is legible.


The formatting of a return address is identical. A common myth is that a comma is required after the city name, but this is not true. (Some style manuals do recommend using the comma when typesetting addresses in other contexts, however.) The Post Office recommends use of all upper case block letters using the appropriate formats and abbreviations and leaving out all punctuation except for the hyphen in the ZIP+4 code to ease automated address reading and speed processing, particularly for handwritten addresses; if the address is unusually formatted or illegible enough, it will require hand-processing, delaying that particular item. The USPS publishes the entirety of their postal addressing standards. The term comma has various uses; comma is the name used for one of the punctuation symbols: , The term comma is also used in music theory for various small intervals that arise as differences between approximately equal intervals. ... Style guides generally give guidance on language use. ... This article is about the punctuation mark. ...


Mail sorting

Mail is collected into plastic tubs before being processed and distributed
Mail is collected into plastic tubs before being processed and distributed

Processing of standard sized envelopes and cards is highly automated, including reading of handwritten addresses. Mail from individual customers and public postboxes is collected by mail carriers into plastic tubs. The tubs are taken to a Processing and Distribution Center and emptied into hampers which are then automatically dumped into a Dual Pass Rough Cull System (DPRCS). As mail travels through the DPRCS, large items, such as packages and mail bundles, are removed from the stream. As the remaining mail enters the first machine for processing standard mail, the Advanced Facer-Canceler System (AFCS), pieces that passed through the DPRCS but do not conform to physical dimensions for processing in the AFCS (i.e. large envelopes or overstuffed standard envelopes) are automatically diverted from the stream. Mail removed from the DPRCS and AFCS is manually processed or sent to parcel sorting machines. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 556 pixelsFull resolution (2925 × 2032 pixel, file size: 771 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 556 pixelsFull resolution (2925 × 2032 pixel, file size: 771 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...


In contrast to the previous system, which merely canceled and postmarked the upper right corner of the envelope, thereby missing any stamps which were inappropriately placed, the AFCS locates indicia (stamp or metered postage mark), regardless of the orientation of the mail as it enters the machine, and cancels it by applying a postmark. Detection of indicia enables the AFCS to determine the orientation of each mailpiece and sort it accordingly, rotating pieces as necessary so all mail is sorted right-side up and faced in the same direction in each output bin. Mail is output by the machine into three categories: mail already affixed with a bar code and addressed (such as business reply envelopes and cards), mail with machine printed (typed) addresses, and mail with handwritten addresses. Additionally, machines with a recent Optical Character Recognition (OCR) upgrade have the capability to read the address information, including handwritten, and sort the mail based on local or outgoing ZIP codes. Preprinted marking on each piece of a bulk mailing which shows that postage has been paid by the sender. ... A British pillar box The postal system is a system by which written documents typically enclosed in envelopes, and also small packages containing other matter, are delivered to destinations around the world. ... An example of a postmark A postmark is a postal marking made on a letter, package, postcard or the like indicating the (more or less precise) date and time that the item was delivered into the care of the postal service. ... Wikipedia encoded in Code 128_B A barcode (also bar code) is a machine-readable representation of information in a visual format on a surface. ... Optical character recognition, usually abbreviated to OCR, is a type of computer software designed to translate images of handwritten or typewritten text (usually captured by a scanner) into machine-editable text, or to translate pictures of characters into a standard encoding scheme representing them (e. ...


Mail with typed addresses goes to a Multiline Optical Character Reader (MLOCR) which reads the ZIP Code and address information and prints the appropriate bar code onto the envelope. Mail (actually the scanned image of the mail) with handwritten addresses (and machine-printed ones that aren't easily recognized) goes to the Remote Bar Coding System, a highly advanced scanning system with a state of the art neural net processor which is highly effective at correctly reading almost all addresses, no matter how poorly written [6]. It also corrects spelling errors and, where there is an error, omission, or conflict in the written address, identifies the most likely correct address. When it has decided on a correct address, it prints the appropriate bar code onto the envelopes, similarly to the MLOCR system. RBCS also has facilities in place, called Remote Encoding Centers, that have humans look at images of mail pieces and enter the address data. The address data is associated with the image via an ID Tag, a fluorescent Barcode printed by mail processing equipment on the back of mail pieces. Multiline Optical Character Reader refers to a class of mail sorting machines that captures an image of the front of letter-sized mail, uses Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology to find and decode the entire address, looks up the ZIP+4 code and Delivery point, sprays a POSTNET barcode representing... Remote Bar Coding System (RBCS), also called Remote Video Encoding (RVE) is a method used by the United States Postal Service to encode the address of letter-sized mailpieces that are not decipherable by a Multiline Optical Character Reader (MLOCR). ... A neural network is an interconnected group of neurons. ... A Multiline Optical Character Reader, or MLOCR, is a type of mail sorting machine that uses Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology to determine how to route mail through the postal system. ... Fluorescence induced by exposure to ultraviolet light in vials containing various sized cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots. ... Wikipedia encoded in Code 128 Wikipedia encoded in Code 93 Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia encoded in the DataMatrix 2D barcode For the taxonomic method, see DNA barcoding. ...


If a customer has filed a change of address card and his or her mail is detected in the mailstream with the old address, the mailpiece is sent to a machine that automatically connects to a Computerized Forwarding System database to determine the new address. If this address is found, the machine will paste a label over the former address with the current address. The mail is returned to the mailstream to forward to the new location.


Mail with addresses that cannot be resolved by the automated system are separated for human intervention. If a local postal worker can read the address, he or she manually sorts it out according to the zip code on the article. If the address cannot be read, mail is either returned to the sender (first class mail with a valid return address) or is sent to one of three Mail Recovery Centers in the United States (formerly known as Dead Letter Offices, originated by Benjamin Franklin in the 1770s) where it receives more intense scrutiny, including being opened to determine if any of the contents are a clue. If no valid address can be determined, the items are held for 90 days in case of inquiry by the customer; and if they are not claimed then they are either destroyed or auctioned off at the annual Postal Service Unclaimed Parcel auction to raise money for the service. The United States Postal Service started a dead letter office in 1825 to deal with undeliverable mail. ...


Once the mail is bar coded, it is automatically sorted by a Delivery Bar Code System that reads the bar code and determines the destination of the mailpiece to postal stations. Items for local delivery are retained in the postal station while other items are trucked to either the appropriate station if it is within approximately 200 miles, or the airport for transport to more distant destinations. Mail is flown, usually as baggage on commercial airlines, to the airport nearest the destination station, then at a nearby processing center the mail is once again read by a Delivery Bar Code System which sorts the items into their local destinations, including grouping them by individual mail carrier. After the September 11, 2001 attacks, only letter-sized mail has been flown on passenger airlines. Packages are solely transported via cargo carriers, most notably FedEx. An Airbus A380 of Emirates Airline An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Federal Express redirects here. ...


Major products and services

USPS contractor-driven semi-trailer truck seen near Mendota, California
USPS contractor-driven semi-trailer truck seen near Mendota, California
USPS Flexible Fuel Vehicles parked at the post office in Conneaut, Ohio
USPS Flexible Fuel Vehicles parked at the post office in Conneaut, Ohio
USPS service delivery truck in a residential area of San Francisco, California
USPS service delivery truck in a residential area of San Francisco, California
A Long Life Vehicle or LLV used in suburban areas, seen in Carson City, Nevada
A Long Life Vehicle or LLV used in suburban areas, seen in Carson City, Nevada
USPS Dodge Caravan used for residential delivery in Omaha, Nebraska
USPS Dodge Caravan used for residential delivery in Omaha, Nebraska

The U.S. Postal Service announced changes to the classes of domestic mail and select postage rate increases effective July 1, 1996. Rates for single-piece first-class, single-piece Standard Mail (formerly third- and fourth-class), and international mail classes did not change. The following general description of each new mail class and the enclosed rate scales are provided for your information in determining postage costs for all mailings made on or after July 1, 1996. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (936x730, 138 KB) A United States Postal Service contractor-driven semi-trailer truck seen on Interstate 5 southbound, near Mendota, California. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (936x730, 138 KB) A United States Postal Service contractor-driven semi-trailer truck seen on Interstate 5 southbound, near Mendota, California. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Mendota is a city located in Fresno County, California. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1775x1420, 625 KB) Summary I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1775x1420, 625 KB) Summary I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A flexible-fuel vehicle or dual-fuel vehicle is an automobile or truck (lorry) that can accept a range of fuel mixtures. ... Port Conneaut waterfront showing lighthouse Conneaut (pronounced KAW-nee-ut) is a city located in Ashtabula County, Ohio. ... Download high resolution version (2312x1100, 484 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2312x1100, 484 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A residential area is a type of land use where the predominant use is residential. ... “San Francisco” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1458x1101, 323 KB)A small United States Postal Service truck seen in Santa Clara, California. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1458x1101, 323 KB)A small United States Postal Service truck seen in Santa Clara, California. ... United States Postal Service LLV, seen in Carson City, Nevada. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Motto: Proud of its Past. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... “Omaha” redirects here. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


U.S. Mail is delivered Monday through Saturday, with the exception of observed federal holidays.


First-class mail

First-class mail was retained in the 1996 restructuring, but divided into two new mail subclasses: Automation and Nonautomation.

  • The Automation mail subclass must be 100-percent delivery point barcoded and certified every six months for addressing and presort accuracy.
  • The Nonautomation mail subclass is the same as the previous first-class. However, bulk mailers are now required to certify the accuracy of the five-digit ZIP Codes at least once a year, and the customer address mail list must be updated at least every six months.

In 2007, First-Class Mail rates were restructured again, this time with rates based on shape along with weight.

  • Cards/Letters: Least changed. A card must be between 5" x 3.5" x .007" and 6" x 4.25" x .016" and is charged 26 cents. An envelope must be between 5" x 3.5" x .007" and 11.5" x 6.125" x .25". This rate is 41 cents for the first ounce and 17 cents for each ounce above that, up to 3.5 ounces. If any of these dimensions are above these, the mailpiece goes to the next higher rate, Large Envelope (Flats)
  • Large Envelope or Flat: If a mailpiece is too big for Letter Rate, it goes up to this rate. The maximum dimensions of this are 15" x 12" x .75" and is charged 80 cents for the first ounce and 17 cents for every ounce above that up to 13 ounces. If any one of the dimensions are exceeded for Large Envelope, or are too rigid, nonrectangular/square, or not uniformely thick must use parcel rates.
  • Packages or Parcels: If a mailpiece is too large for Large Envelope rate, it goes up to this rate. The length + width must not exceed 108 inches, and weight must not exceed 13 ounces. The rate for this level is $1.13 for the first ounce and 17 cents for every ounce thereafter.

Periodicals

Restructured from Second-Class Mail in 1996, the Periodicals class in general retains the same mailing requirements except for more stringent requirements to qualify for the automation rates. If the mail piece does not qualify for automation rates, the mailer must use the more expensive nonautomation rates for respective sorting levels. Mailers must change the second-class endorsement to Periodicals by July 1, 1996, in order to comply with reform requirements. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


Standard Mail

Restructured from Third-Class Mail and Fourth-Class Mail in 1996, and used mainly for businesses, Standard Mail has these requirements:

  • Minimum 200 pieces per mailing
  • Must weigh less than 1 lb (454 g)
  • No return service unless requested (an additional fee is charged for return service)
  • Not for personal correspondence, letters, bills, or statements
  • Annual fee

Third- and fourth-class mail was restructured in 1996 into Standard Mail (A) and Standard Mail (B): The pound or pound-mass (abbreviations: lb, lbm, or sometimes in the United States, #) is a unit of mass (sometimes called weight in everyday parlance) in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...


Standard Mail (A) consists of three new mail subclasses: Automation, Enhanced Carrier Route, and Regular. The minimum bulk mailing requirement of 200 addressed pieces or 50 pounds of addressed pieces remains the same as under previous third-class mail rules, but now requires mail list certification. The pound or pound-mass (abbreviations: lb, lbm, or sometimes in the United States, #) is a unit of mass (sometimes called weight in everyday parlance) in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

  • The Automation mail subclass must be 100-percent delivery point barcoded (11 digits) for letters. The ZIP+4 barcode is acceptable for flats. The carrier routes and coding accuracy for barcoded addresses must be certified quarterly and semi-annually, respectively.
  • The Enhanced Carrier Route mail subclass requires that the basic carrier route be in a line of travel sequence and that the high density and saturation rate mail be in walk sequence to qualify for the respective rates.
  • The Regular mail subclass must be certified annually for five-digit ZIP Code accuracy.

Standard Mail (B) consists of the following mail subclasses: Parcel Post, Bound Printed Matter, Special Standard Mail, Library Mail, and Nonprofit. The latter two subclasses are not authorized for government use. The mailing requirements for this mail class remain unchanged from fourth-class mail. However, the mail piece must bear the sender's return address, and the delivery address must include the correct ZIP Code. Special fourth-class mail was renamed Special Standard Mail, and the basic requirements for its use remain the same. [7] Printed matter is a term to describe printed material produced by printers or publishers, such as books, magazines, booklets, brochures and other publicity materials and in some cases, newspapers. ... A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ...


Bulk Mail

Used for businesses to send large quantities of mail.

  • Can be First-Class Mail, Standard Mail, Bound Printed Matter, Media Mail, or Parcel Post
  • Discounted rates
  • Annual fee required (For each mail class used)
  • Enforced rules about mailpiece quality, address format, and address quality.
  • May require additional work by the sender, such as certified address matching and pre-sorting by ZIP Code or walk sequence.
  • Mail must usually be brought to a Bulk Mail Entry Unit post office.

Parcel Post

Used to send packages weighing up to 70 pounds (31.75 kg) The pound or pound-mass (abbreviations: lb, lbm, or sometimes in the United States, #) is a unit of mass (sometimes called weight in everyday parlance) in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

  • Delivery standards are 2–9 business days except to Alaska and Hawaii, where container ships carry mail and may take as long as five weeks
  • Rates based on distance, weight, and shape
  • Delivery to every address in the United States, including PO Boxes and Military Addresses.

For other uses, see Weight (disambiguation). ... Look up shape in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Post Office box is a uniquely-addressable lockable box located on the premises of a Post Office station. ...

Media Mail

Formerly (and colloquially, still) known as "Book Rate", Media Mail is used to send books, printed materials, sound recordings, videotapes, CD-ROMs, diskettes, and similar, but cannot contain advertising. Maximum weight is 70 pounds (31.75 kg).

  • Delivery standards are 5–9 business days
  • Rates based on weight
  • Much cheaper than Parcel Post, and roughly the same transit time from point "A" to point "B"
  • Postage can be paid using any method except precanceled stamps

Library Mail

Same as Media Mail, but receives an additional discount and may be used only for books or recordings being sent to or from a public library, museum, or academic institution. Librarians and patrons in a typical larger urban public library. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... Academic institution is an educational institution dedicated to higher education and research, which grants academic degrees. ...


Bound Printed Matter

Same as Media Mail but it is used to mail permanently-bound sheets of advertising, promotional, directory or editorial material such as catalogs and phonebooks. It may be slightly cheaper than Media Mail rates. Observations:

  • Package can weigh up to 15 lb.
  • Sheets must be permanently-bound by secure fastenings such as staples, spiral binding, glue or stitching.
  • At least 90% of the sheets must be imprinted by any process other than handwriting or typewriting.
  • Mail must be marked "return service requested" to receive undeliverable back. Mail without this marking will be disposed of.
  • Postage may be applied by PC postage, permit imprint, or stamps, but cannot be bought at a retail counter, effective May 14, 2007.

Priority Mail

Priority Mail is an expedited mail service with a few additional features.

  • Average delivery time is 2–3 days, (not guaranteed)
  • Flat rate envelopes and boxes available (one rate for whatever you put in the envelope, though the envelope's seal must be the primary method of enclosure) [8]
  • Packages up to 70 pounds (31.75 kg).
  • Label can be printed online
  • Delivery to any address in the United States
  • Dimensional weight is used along with actual weight for all parcels above 1 cubic foot.

Registered Mail

According to the USPS's Domestic Mail Manual, Registered Mail is "the most secure service that the USPS offers"[9] and is used to send (often in combination with insurance) high-value items such as jewelry or coins, sensitive or irreplaceable paperwork, and DoD classified information up to the SECRET level.[10] Items sent via Registered mail are tracked via a system of receipts as they move through the mail system, and they can be tracked electronically by the sender via phone or through the USPS's web site. Items sent via Registered mail are transported to the Processing and Distribution Center in a sealed container, and once there are kept separate from all other mail in a location with secure access. Every time the item is handled, this is noted in a ledger. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An example of a U.S. classified document; page 13 of a U.S. National Security Agency report[1] on the USS Liberty incident, partially declassified and released to the public in July 2003. ...

  • Delivery time is about the same or longer than First Class, and is not guaranteed
  • Parcels or letters must meet the mailing standards for First Class mail, including minimum size
  • Must be presented to a clerk in person at a Post Office, cannot be put into an on-street box or rural pickup box
  • Cannot be Business Reply Mail

Express Mail

Express Mail is the fastest mail service. In most postal systems Express mail refers to an accelerated delivery service for which the customer pays a surcharge and receives faster delivery. ...

  • Typically overnight or second-day delivery
  • Delivery to most, but not all, US locations 365 days a year
  • Flat rate envelope available
  • Packages up to 70 pounds (31.75 kg)
  • Delivery to most addresses in the United States
  • Guaranteed on-time delivery or the postage is refunded subject to conditions

Postal money orders

  • Provide a safe alternative to sending cash through the mail
  • Money orders are cashable only by the recipient, just like a bank check. One of the reasons for the growing popularity of money orders is that, unlike a personal bank check, they are pre-paid and therefore cannot bounce.[citation needed]
  • Money orders are a declining business for the USPS, as companies like PaidByCash and others are offering electronic replacements through the MasterCard and Visa systems.[citation needed]

For other uses, see Cash (disambiguation). ... A money order is a payment order for a pre-specified amount of money. ... A cashiers check (also known as a bank check, official check, tellers check, or treasurers check) is a check issued by a bank on its own account for the amount paid to the bank by the purchaser with a named payee, and stating the name of the... PaidByCash is a cash payment system for Internet retailers allowing them to easily accept cash payment from their e-commerce customers. ... MasterCard Worldwide (NYSE: MA) is a membership organization owned by the 25,000+ financial institutions that issue its card. ... Visa or VISA has several meanings: Look up visa in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Visa (document) — a document required to enter a specific country. ...

Global services

Airmail (Letter Post), Global Priority, Global Express, and Global Express Guaranteed Mail are offered to ship mail and packages to almost every country and territory on the globe. Ironically, much of this service is provided by FedEx. [11] On May 14, 2007, the United States Postal Service canceled all outgoing international surface mail (sometimes known as "sea mail") from the United States, citing increased costs and reduced demand due to competition from airmail services such as FedEx and UPS. [12] The decision has been criticized by the Peace Corps and military personnel overseas, as well as independent booksellers and other small businesses who rely on international deliveries.


Airline and rail division

The United States Postal Service does not directly own or operate any aircraft or trains. The mail and packages are flown on airlines with which the Postal Service has a contractual agreement. The contracts change periodically. Depending on the contract, aircraft may be painted with the USPS paint scheme. Contract airlines have included: Emery Worldwide, Ryan International Airlines, FedEx Express, Rhoades Aviation, and Express One International. The Postal Service also contracts with Amtrak to carry some mail between certain cities such as Chicago and Minneapolis-St. Paul. Emery Worldwide was a cargo airline that was one of the main carriers in the cargo airlines world. ... Ryan International Airlines is an American FAR 121 supplemental airline. ... FedEx Express is the worlds largest cargo airline based in Memphis, Tennessee, USA. It is a subsidiary of the FedEx Corporation and delivers packages and freight to 220 countries each day. ... Express One International is a cargo airline based in Irving, Texas, USA. It operates all-cargo contract charter services on behalf of the United States Postal Service from Indianapolis and for DHL. It also operates domestic and international cargo services and charter passenger flights throughout the USA, Canada, Mexico and... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... A map of the Twin Cities metropolitan area. ...


Sunday mail delivery

Until 1912, mail was delivered 7 days a week. As the postal service grew in popularity and usage in the 1800s, local religious leaders were noticing a decline in Sunday morning church attendance due to local post offices doubling as gathering places. These leaders appealed to the government to intervene and close post offices on Sundays.[13]


This is a matter of some controversy. Many believe that the post office is closed to prevent a government subsidized agency from forcing Christians to work on Sunday, a protection of religious freedom. Others believe the government used its power to take "competition" away from churches, and point out that Christians and those of any other belief work for the post office voluntarily (and that no exemption has been put in place for the holy days of other faiths); therefore, it is seen by some as a violation of separation of church and state. Freedom of religion is the individuals right or freedom to hold whatever religious beliefs he or she wishes, or none at all. ... Constantines Conversion, depicting the conversion of Emperor Constantine the Great to Christianity, by Peter Paul Rubens. ...


As a result of this intervention by the government, U.S. Mail (with the exception of Express Mail[14]) is not delivered on Sunday, with the exception of a few towns in which the local religion has had an effect on the policy. U.S. Mail is delivered Monday through Saturday, with the exception of observed federal holidays.


Add-on services

The Postal Service offers additional services for some types of mail.


Signature confirmation

  • Confirms delivery with signature
  • Recipient's first initial and last name is typographically displayed online
  • Recipient's signature is kept on file
  • Only available with First Class Mail parcels, Priority Mail, and Package Services (Media Mail, Parcel Post, and Bound Printed Matter)

Insurance

  • Provides package with insurance from loss or damage while in transit
  • Available for amounts up to $5,000
  • Covers material losses only minus depreciation

Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ...

Certified Mail

  • Provides proof of mailing, and a delivery record
  • Available for First Class Mail and Priority Mail
  • Available for sending U.S. Government classified information, up to the CONFIDENTIAL level.

An example of a U.S. classified document; page 13 of a U.S. National Security Agency report[1] on the USS Liberty incident, partially declassified and released to the public in July 2003. ...

Collect On Delivery (C.O.D.)

  • Allows merchants to offer customers an option to pay upon delivery
  • Insurance comes included with fee
  • Amount to be collected cannot exceed $1,000
  • Available for First-Class Mail, Express Mail, Priority Mail, and Package Services (Parcel Post, Bound Printed Matter, and Media Mail).

Air Mail and Pony Express trademarks

Postal Service's trademarked Pony Express logo.
Postal Service's trademarked Pony Express logo.

In 2006 the Postal Service registered traditional trademarks Pony Express and Air Mail.[20] Image File history File links Pony-trademark. ... Image File history File links Pony-trademark. ... Frank E. Webner, pony express rider c. ... Airmail (or air mail) is mail that is transported by aircraft. ...


Postage stamps

All unused U.S. postage stamps issued since 1861 are still valid as postage at their indicated value. Stamps with no value shown or denominated by a letter are also still valid at their purchase price. 48-star flag, 1957 This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of the United States. ...


The cost of mailing a letter increased to 41 cents in 2007, but the Post Office now offers a "forever" stamp. This stamp will be sold at the standard rate, but will always be valid for 1st class mail, no matter how rates rise in the future. [21] Non-denominated postage is postage that does not lose its value after a postal rate increase. ...


Copyright and reproduction

All U.S. postage stamps and other postage items that were released before 1978 are in the public domain. The postal service holds copyright to such materials released after 1978 under Title 17 of the United States Code. Written permission is required for use of copyrighted postage stamp images. [15] The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The United States Code (U.S.C.) is a compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal law of the United States. ...


Postage meters

See also Postage meter A postage meter is a electro-mechanical device for producing evidence of postage (see mail). ...


PC postage

In addition to using standard stamps, postage can now be printed from a personal computer using a system called Information Based Indicia. Authorized providers of PC Postage are: Information Based Indicia refers to a system used by the United States Postal Service for labels or marks to be applied to the mail item to indicate electronic postage payment. ...

Screenshot from www. ... Pitney Bowes (NYSE: PBI), the worlds biggest maker of postal meters and mailing equipment and provider of mailing and delivery software and services to companies, is ranked 394th in the 2006 Fortune 500, with $5. ... eBay headquarters in San Jose eBay North First Street satellite office campus (home to PayPal) eBay Inc. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

Customized postage

The text on the back of this stamp reads: "Our customers include 54 million urban and 12 million rural families, plus 9 million businesses."
The text on the back of this stamp reads: "Our customers include 54 million urban and 12 million rural families, plus 9 million businesses."

Customers can also use their own pictures or images to print their very own customized postage products using one of the vendors listed below. Customized postage is valid U.S. postage and can be used just like a stamp. Customized postage can be ordered in all first-class rates, as well as in the Priority Mail rate. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Affiliation with Online Postage Providers

In addition to the USPS Click-N-Ship service, the USPS has partnered with other companies such as Pitney Bowes which allows PayPal to offer postage label printing with the services the site has to offer. In PayPal's case, a user can print postage on PayPal and have the costs deducted from their PayPal account or a linked bank account. The seller may then drop off the parcel at a location accepting parcels or request pick-up at the address of origin. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Pitney Bowes (NYSE: PBI), the worlds biggest maker of postal meters and mailing equipment and provider of mailing and delivery software and services to companies, is ranked 394th in the 2006 Fortune 500, with $5. ... eBay North First Street satellite office campus (home to PayPal) PayPal is an e-commerce business allowing payments and money transfers to be made through the Internet. ...


Sponsorships

Beginning in 1996, the USPS was head sponsor of a professional cycling team bearing its name. The team featured Lance Armstrong, seven-time winner of the Tour de France. The sponsorship ended in 2004, when the Discovery Channel stepped in as the main sponsor and renamed the team as the Discovery Channel Pro Cycling Team. The US Postal Service Pro Cycling Team presented by Berry Floor operated from 1996 through 2004, and during its time fielded one of the biggest names in modern cycling: Lance Armstrong. ... Lance Armstrong (born Lance Edward Gunderson on September 18, 1971) is a retired American professional road racing cyclist. ... For other uses, see Tour de France (disambiguation). ... Discovery Channel is a cable and satellite TV channel founded by John Hendricks which is distributed by Discovery Communications. ... Discovery Channel Pro Cycling Team (UCI Team Code: DSC) is a US-based professional road bicycle racing team. ...


Employment in the USPS

The USPS employs more people than any company in the United States except Wal-Mart. It employed 790,000 personnel in 2003, divided into offices, processing centers, and actual post offices. USPS employees are divided into three major crafts according to the work they engage in: Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ...

  • Letter Carriers, also referred to as mailmen or mail-carriers; are the public face of the USPS. As the front line, carriers are routinely pressured to move faster, work harder, and perform more tasks in a timed manner. The most stressful of crafts, carriers are watched, timed and inspected more than any other employees.
  • Mail handlers and processors often work in the evening and night to prepare mail and bulk goods for the carriers to deliver. Work is physically strenuous, especially for mail handlers; many mailbags loaded from and onto trucks weigh as much as 70 pounds (32 kg).
  • Clerks sort and/ or case first and second class mail as well as standard and bulk rate mail. Clerks also work in the post offices, handling customer needs, receiving express mail, and selling stamps.

Other positions outside the main three crafts include:

  • DCOs (Data Conversion Operators), who type out address information and forward mail to their destinations.
  • Maintenance and Custodians, who see to the overall operation and cleaning of mail sorting machines, work areas, public parking and genreal facility operations.
  • Casuals and TEs (Temporary Employees), who are hired in seasonal intervals as part-time workers with lower wages, no benefits, and can often work up to 12hrs a day, 7 days a week if needed.

Though USPS employs many individuals, as more Americans send information via electronic mail, fewer postal workers are needed to work dwindling amounts of mail. Post offices and mail facilities are constantly downsizing, replacing craft positions with new machines and elimating mail routes. Thus, postal hiring has been criticized as sporadic. Competition for new, full-time, salaried positions can be highly intense.


Public reputation

As violent ("Going Postal")

History

In the early 1990s, there was a widely publicized wave of workplace shootings by disgruntled employees at USPS facilities, which led to a postal regulation that prohibits the possession of firearms in all postal facilities. Due to media coverage, postal employees gained a reputation among the general public as being mentally ill. The USPS Commission on a Safe and Secure Workplace found that "Postal workers are only a third as likely as those in the national workforce to be victims of homicide at work." Of course, the term "going postal" refers to the perceived tendency of postal workers to kill others, not the danger to the postal workers themselves. This stereotype in turn has influenced American culture, as seen in the slang term "going postal" (see Patrick Sherrill for information on his August 20, 1986, rampage) and the computer game Postal. Also, in the opening sequence of Naked Gun 33⅓: The Final Insult, a yell of "Disgruntled postal workers" is heard, followed by the arrival of postal workers with machine guns. In an episode of Seinfeld, the character Newman, who is a mailman, explained in a dramatic monologue that postal workers "go crazy and kill everyone" because the mail never stops. A mental illness or mental disorder refers to one of many mental health conditions characterized by distress, impaired cognitive functioning, atypical behavior, emotional dysregulation, and/or maladaptive behavior. ... Memorial of the 1986 post office incident in Edmond, Oklahoma. ... Patrick Sherrill - first to go postal Patrick Henry Sherrill was a US Postal Service employee who, on August 20, 1986 in Edmond, Oklahoma, shot and killed 14 employees at his work place before turning one of his several guns on himself and committing suicide. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Postal is an ultraviolent and controversial computer game made by Running With Scissors and published by Ripcord Games in 1997. ... Seinfeld can refer to: Seinfeld - a popular TV series that ran 1989-1998. ... Information Age 30s Occupation Mailman Portrayed by Wayne Knight Created by Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David Newman is a recurring character on the television show Seinfeld, played by Wayne Knight from 1991 until the shows finale in 1998. ...


Response

The Setting the Record Straight section of USPS.com features letters to newspaper editors, television producers, and other media representatives which USPS has sent in response to criticism of the Postal Service and to uses of the term "going postal."


As dedicated (Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night...)

Lines supposedly from the Ancient Greek historian Herodotus, "Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds," are engraved on the exterior of the U.S. Postal Service building in New York City; they are often erroneously cited as the official motto of the USPS. The translation may be a slightly more poetical rendition of the original text, though the same sentiment is expressed.[22] Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: Hērodotos Halikarnāsseus) was a Greek historian from Ionia who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ...


The postman in the animated television program Garfield and Friends is so dedicated to delivering mail past Garfield's elaborate traps that he attempts to deliver the mail in a tank. He professes a simple love of being greeted as he delivers the mail. There was also an unrelated childrens television series, titled Garfield Goose and Friends, that ran from the 1950s through the 1970s. ...


On the popular television show Cheers, Cliff Clavin has portrayed himself as a dedicated postal worker on many occasions. The misconception of postal workers always drinking led to new postal regulations that made drinking in a bar while in uniform a fireable offense. This article is about the TV series. ... Clifford C. Clavin, Jr. ...


In Lucifer's Hammer a dedicated postal worker goes about his rounds even though a comet has just hit the earth. Lucifers Hammer is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, first published in 1977. ...


In The Postman the titular character catalyzes a rebirth of civilization by donning the uniform and pretending to be a letter carrier from a post-apocalyptic United States government. For other uses, see Postman (disambiguation). ...


In contrast, on the popular television program Seinfeld, Jerry's neighbor Newman, a letter carrier, refused to deliver mail when it rained. This is much to the dismay of George Costanza, who is unable to remember the whole of the quotation but does point out to Newman that rain is the first weather phenomena mentioned. Seinfeld can refer to: Seinfeld - a popular TV series that ran 1989-1998. ... Information Age 30s Occupation Mailman Portrayed by Wayne Knight Created by Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David Newman is a recurring character on the television show Seinfeld, played by Wayne Knight from 1991 until the shows finale in 1998. ... George Louis Costanza (b. ...


Trivia

  • In the 1947 classic, Miracle on 34th Street, the identity of Kris Kringle (played by Edmund Gwenn), as the one and only "Santa Claus" was validated by a Federal Court, based on the delivery of 21 bags of mail (famously carried into the courtroom) to the character in question. The contention was that it would have been illegal for the United States Post Office to deliver mail that was addressed to "Santa Claus" to the character "Chris Kringle", unless he was, in fact, the one and only Santa Claus. Judge Henry X. Harper (played by Gene Lockhart), ruled that since the US Government had demonstrated (through the delivery of the bags of mail) that Kris Kringle was Santa Claus, then the State of New York did not have the authority to overrule that decision.
  • In promoting the issuance of a new stamp series based on the Star Wars films, the United States Postal Service is decorating many of their mail collection boxes in some 200 cities to look like R2-D2. [16]
  • In the 1996 movie Jingle All The Way, Arnold Schwarzenegger stars as a father competing against a deranged postal worker (played by Sinbad), as well as con-artist Santas, the police, and almost every parent in town, to get his son a cherished Turbo Man toy. Sinbad regularly resorts to fighting, tricks, and threats of going postal to achieve his goal.
  • Film directors John Singleton and Keenan Ivory Wayans have both had director cameos in a number of films as letter carriers. Singleton also wrote and directed the 1993 film Poetic Justice about a hairdresser (played by Janet Jackson) who falls in love with a mail carrier (played by the late Tupac Shakur) on an overnight delivery run.
  • In the novel Going Postal, by Terry Pratchett, the motto of the Ankh Morpork Post Office is "Neither rain nor snow nor gloom of night can stay these messengers about their duty." which is very similar to the United States Postal Service motto.
  • In Seinfeld, Newman is an employee at the USPS, which is portrayed in the series as a powerful, nefarious organization. He claims that ZIP codes are meaningless, no mail carrier has successfully delivered more than 50% of their mail, a feat he compares to the 3-minute mile, and that several postal workers go on killing sprees because, as he puts it, "the mail never stops," and it is implied that this was the inspiration for the Son Of Sam killings. In one episode, Cosmo Kramer was abducted by Post Office security men for running an anti-mail campaign after he realizes the Postal Service has become obsolete. Newman attempted earlier to change Kramer's mind by pleading, "You don't know the half of what goes on here!" At the end of the episode, for his efforts to save Kramer, Newman is seen escorted by Postal Service employees with a bucket on his head, pleading of Kramer to "tell the world my story."

Miracle on 34th Street (also titled The Big Heart in the UK) is a 1947 film written by Valentine Davies, directed by George Seaton, and starring Maureen OHara, John Payne, and Edmund Gwenn. ... Edmund Gwenn (September 26, 1877–September 6, 1959) was a British theatre and film actor. ... Gene (Eugene) Lockhart (July 18, 1891 – March 31, 1957) was a Canadian Academy Award-nominated character actor, singer, playwright and popular composer. ... This article is about the series. ... R2-D2 (called R2, or Artoo for short), is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... Seinfeld can refer to: Seinfeld - a popular TV series that ran 1989-1998. ... Information Age 30s Occupation Mailman Portrayed by Wayne Knight Created by Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David Newman is a recurring character on the television show Seinfeld, played by Wayne Knight from 1991 until the shows finale in 1998. ... Mr. ... “Son of Sam” redirects here. ... Cosmo Kramer is a fictional character on the United States based television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Michael Richards. ...

See also

The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... Sources History of First-Class Stamp Rates The History of Postage Rates in the United States ... Rural delivery service, formerly known as Rural Free Delivery (RFD), is the service by which the U.S. post office delivers mail directly to residents in rural areas. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rural delivery service. ... The United States Postal Service has no official creed or motto. ... scheiiiißßßßßee!!!!!!!!!!!!!regional, local; for levels below the national, it is a local monopoly. ... The United States Postal Inspection Service (or USPIS) is the law enforcement arm of the United States Postal Service. ... 48-star flag, 1957 This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of the United States of America (USA). ... Available US stamp denominations: // Regular Postage Single or Sheet (panes of up to 100) $0. ... The United States Postal Service administers a number of examinations for employee applicants to be considered for employment. ... An army post office is a special military system to integrate the civil postal system to that of the military. ... A DHL Boeing 757. ... Royal TPG Post wall box TNT N.V. (Euronext: TNT, NYSE: TP) is a provider of global express delivery, logistics, and mail services. ... Federal Express redirects here. ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... A courier is a person or company employed to deliver messages, packages and mail. ... Package delivery is the shipping of packages and parcels (and in some instances high value mail) as single shipments. ... Canada Post Corporation (French: Société canadienne des postes) is a Canadian postal service operated as a crown corporation. ... Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ... “UK” redirects here. ... Close examination of the Penny Red, left, reveals a 148 in the margin, indicating that it was printed with plate #148. ...

Unions of the U.S. Postal Service

The American Postal Workers Union (APWU) is a labor union in the United States. ... The National Association of Letter Carriers is a labor union for employees of the United States Postal Service who serve as letter carriers (informally, mail carriers, mailmen, or postmen, although many are now in fact female). ... The National Postal Mail Handlers Union (NPMHU.ORG) is a progressive labor union representing more than 50,000 Mail Handler craft members in United States Postal Service facilities across the United States. ...

Gallery of USPS post offices

Gallery of USPS mailboxes

References

  1. ^ Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Postal Museum
  2. ^ Afp.google.com, Stamps Honor Distinguished Journalists
  3. ^ United States Postal Serv. v. Flamingo Indus. (USA) Ltd., 540 U.S. 736 (2004).
  4. ^ a b c d Postal Service Reform: Issues Relevant To Changing Restrictions on Private Letter DeliveryPDF (674 KiB), United States General Accounting Office, September 1996, GAO/GGD-96-129B Volume II Private Express Statutes
  5. ^ a b McEachen, William A. Economics, Thomson South-Western (2005), page 208
  6. ^ Cohen, Ferguson, Waller, and Xenakis, Universal Service Without a Monopoly?PDF (1.74 MiB), Office of Rates, Analysis and Planning, U.S. Postal Rate Commission, November 1999
  7. ^ Understanding the Private Express StatutesPDF (146 KiB) USPS Publication 542 (June 1998)
  8. ^ Geddes, Rick. Opportunities for Anticompetitive Behavior in Postal Services, American Enterprise Institute AEI Online (http://aie.org) (2003)
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ Hull, Gary. The Abolition of Antitrust, Transaction Publishers, 2005, p. 76
  11. ^ USPS History: The Pony Express
  12. ^ [2]
  13. ^ Friedman, Milton & Rose D. Capitalism and Freedom, University of Chicago Press, 1982, p. 29
  14. ^ Frycklund, Jonas Private Mail in SwedenPDF (511 KiB), Cato Journal Vol. 13, No. 1 (1993)
  15. ^ "Privatize This" by Sam Ryan, in The National Review, online March 7, 2005,
  16. ^ Postal Regulation and Worksharing in the U.S., Robert H. Cohen, Matthew Robinson, Renee Sheehy, John Waller, Spyros Xenakis, December 2004
  17. ^ Postmaster general foresees end to mail monopoly, Randolph E. Smith, Associated Press, Athens Daily News (Online Athens)
  18. ^ http://money.cnn.com/2001/01/10/deals/fedex/
  19. ^ Geddes, Rick. Opportunities for Anticompetitive Behavior in Postal Services, AIE Online (http://aie.org) (Washington) June 1, 2003
  20. ^ U.S. Postal Service Expands Licensing Program News Release #06-043 June 20, 2006
  21. ^ Postal Rates Set to Go Up on May 14. March 20, 2007.
  22. ^ Presky, Michael. Persian invention of postal service, Herodotus. galileolibrary.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-10.

“PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... “PDF” redirects here. ... A mebibyte (a contraction of mega binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, abbreviated MiB. 1 MiB = 220 bytes = 1,048,576 bytes = 1,024 kibibytes 1 MiB = 1024 (= 210) kibibytes (KiB), and 1024 MiB equal one gibibyte (GiB). ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • USPS Official website
  • Mailbox Locator: Searchable database of USPS collection stations (blue mailboxes) throughout the US.
  • USPS Glossary of Postal Terms (Publication 32)PDF (519 KiB)
  • USPS Postal Addressing Standards (Publication 28)
  • History of the United States Postal Service
  • U.S. Postal Inspection Service Official website
  • USPS Office of the Inspector General Official website
  • Read Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports regarding the US Postal Service
  • Understanding the Private Express StatutesPDF (146 KiB) USPS Publication 542 (June 1998)
  • USPS Employee Uniform Program
  • USPS Board of Governors
  • Postal Regulatory Commission
  • U.S. Postal Service cycling team
  • "Father of 3-cent Stamp" Spooner fought Post Office Account of Lysander Spooner's fight against USPS monopoly
  • The Unconstitutionality of the Laws of Congress Prohibiting Private Mails by Lysander Spooner
  • The Post Office and Private Mail Service 19th century American individualist anarchist Benjamin Tucker opposes USPS monopoly
  • America's Post Office Challenges The Digital Age An argument in support of ending the government monopoly
  • Time for the Mail Monopoly to Go
  • Postal Service Privatization Dr. Edward L. Hudgins, of the Cato Institute, speaks to Appropriations Subcommittee on Treasury, Postal Service, and General Government
  • Photos of post offices around the world
  • USPS Approved Mail Products and Mailboxes
  • U.S. Mail holidays - UPS holidays - FedEx holidays - Internet Accuracy Project
  • Postal Service Meeting Notices and Rule Changes from The Federal Register RSS Feed
  • Are you true to blue?
  • Neither Snow nor Sleet . . . Can Dampen This Monopoly Rick Geddes from the Hoover Institution talks about rural subsidies
  • New rates and fees
  • FAQ On Recent Changes
  • United States Postal Service Annual Report 2006
  • US Post Office Locations

  Results from FactBites:
 
United States Postal Service (1097 words)
United States Postal Service (USPS) is the United States government organization responsible for providing postal service in the United States and is generally referred to as "the post office." It was created to fulfill the mandate in the United States Constitution that there must be a federal postal service.
The USPS is headed by a Board of Governors or Governor of the United States Postal Service, appointed by the President and confirmed by the senate, who serve as its corporate board of directors, they set policy and proceedure and postal rates for services rendered.
The United States Postmaster General, formerly appointed by the president and confirmed by the senate, but now appointed by the board of governors, serves as Chief Operating Officer and deals with the day to day activities of the service.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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