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Encyclopedia > United States Navy
United States Navy
Leadership
Secretary of the Navy
Chief of Naval Operations
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy
Major Commands
U.S. Pacific Fleet
U.S. Fleet Forces Command
U.S. Naval Forces Europe
U.S. Naval Forces Central Command
Components
Military Sealift Command
Naval Special Warfare Command
U.S. Navy Reserve
Structure
Aircraft squadrons
Active units
Installations
Bases
Equipment
Full U.S. Navy ship list
Current Fleet
Reserve Fleet
Naval aircraft
Weapons systems
Personnel
Admirals
Officer insignia
Enlisted insignia
Designators
Ratings
Awards, Decorations and Badges
Badges
Awards
History and traditions
History of the United States Navy
Continental Navy
USS Constitution
Navy Hymn
Navy Band
Fleet Week

The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. The U.S. Navy currently has over 340,000 personnel on active duty and nearly 128,000 in the Navy Reserve. It operates 279 ships in active service and more than 4,000 aircraft.[1] The University of Southern Nevada (USN) is a university located in the city of Henderson, Nevada with satellite campus located in South Jordan, Utah. ... University School of Nashvile is a private K-12 school located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Navy_Seal. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) is the senior military officer in the United States Navy. ... Good conduct variation Master Chief Petty Officer insignia Master Chief Petty Officer is the ninth, and highest, enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy, just above Senior Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... The United States Pacific Fleet (USPACFLT) is a theater-level unit of the U.S. armed forces, under the operational control of the United States Pacific Command. ... The United States Fleet Forces Command (USFLTFORCOM) of the United States Navy is the part of the Navy responsible for operations in and around the Atlantic Ocean. ... Seal of the Commander in Chief, U.S. Naval Forces Europe; just Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe since 2002. ... The 5th Fleet of the United States Navy is responsible for naval forces in the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Arabian Sea and coast off East Africa as far south as Kenya. ... The Military Sealift Command (MSC) is a United States Navy (USN) organization that controls most of the replenishment and military transport ships of the Navy. ... NAVSPECWARCOM logo. ... The United States Navy Reserve is the reserve component of the United States Navy. ... This is a list of United States Navy aircraft squadrons. ... This article is a list of the operating units of the United States Navy. ... List of major active US Navy bases, stations, and schools. ... This is a set of lists of ships of the United States Navy, including both past and present vessels. ... USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72) This a list of current United States Navy ships complete and current as of 2005. ... The United States Navy maintains a number of its ships as part of a reserve fleet, often called the Mothball Fleet. While the details of the activity have changed several times, the basics are constant; keep the ships afloat and sufficiently working as to be reactivated quickly in an emergency. ... Naval aircraft used by the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... Shipboard systems Aegis combat system MK 45 5-inch gun Phalanx CIWS AGM-84 Harpoon BGM-109 Tomahawk RIM-7 Sea Sparrow RIM-67 Standard 2 RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile Mark 46 torpedo Mark 48 torpedo Mark 50 torpedo Mark 60 Captor Mine Trident II (D-5) nuclear... This chart represents the U.S. Navy officer rank insignia. ... Rate badge of Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy United States Navy enlisted rates are used to display where an enlisted sailor falls within the chain of command and are also defined as pay grade. ... In the United States Navy officers are assigned to one of four communities, based on their education, training and assignments: Line Officer, Staff Officer, Limited Duty Officer, or Warrant Officer. ... From left to right: a Special Warfare Operator 1st class and a Boatswains Mate 2nd class. ... Badges of the United States Navy are military badges issued by the United States Department of the Navy to Naval service members who achieve certain qualifications and accomplishments while serving on both active and reserve duty in the United States Navy. ... Military awards of the United States Department of the Navy are those military decorations which are presented to members of the United States Navy and U.S. Marine Corps under the authority of the Secretary of the Navy. ... The history of the United States Navy divides into two major periods: the Old Navy, a small but respected force of sailing ships that was also notable for innovation in the use of ironclads during the American Civil War, and the New Navy, the result of a modernization effort that... Continental Navy Jack The Continental Navy was authorized by the Continental Congress on October 13, 1775. ... “ Old Ironsides ” redirects here. ... Eternal Father, Strong to Save, is a hymn often associated with the Royal Navy or the United States Navy. ... The United States Navy Band, based at the historic Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., has served since 1925 as the official musical group of the United States Navy. ... The guided missile cruiser USS Anzio (CG-68) sails past the Statue of Liberty at the beginning of Fleet Week 2004 in New York City. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... The United States Navy Reserve is the reserve component of the United States Navy. ... For other uses, see Ship (disambiguation). ... Flying machine redirects here. ...


The United States Navy traces its origins to the Continental Navy, which was established during the American Revolutionary War and was disbanded shortly thereafter. The United States Constitution, though, provided the legal basis for a seaborne military force by giving Congress the power "to provide and maintain a navy."[2] Depredations against American shipping by Barbary Coast corsairs spurred Congress to employ this power[3] by passing the Naval Act of 1794 ordering the construction and manning of six frigates. The U.S. Navy came into international prominence in the 20th century, especially during World War II. It was a part of the conflict from the onset of American military involvement — the Attack on Pearl Harbor — to Japan's official surrender on the deck of the USS Missouri. In the subsequent Cold War, the U.S. Navy evolved into a nuclear deterrent and crisis response force while preparing for a possible global war with the Soviet Union. Continental Navy Jack The Continental Navy was authorized by the Continental Congress on October 13, 1775. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The Barbary Coast, or Barbary, was the term used by Europeans from the 16th until the 19th century to refer to the coastal regions of what is now Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Act to Provide a Naval Armament, also known as the Naval Act, was passed by the United States Congress on March 27, 1794 and established the first naval force, which eventually became the United States Navy. ... The six original United States frigates were authorized by Congress with the Naval Act of 1794 on March 27, 1794 at a then-cost of $688,888. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the actual attack. ... Radars: AN/SPS-49 Air Search Radar AN/SPS-67 Surface Search Radar Fire control: 4 × Mk 37 Gun Fire Control 2 × Mk 38 Gun Director 1 × Mk 40 Gun Director EW: AN/SLQ-32 Other: AN/SLQ-25 NIXIE Decoy System 8 × Super Rapid Bloom Rocket Launchers (SRBOC) Armor... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


The 21st century United States Navy maintains a sizable presence in the world, deploying in such areas as East Asia, Southern Europe, and the Middle East. Its ability to project force onto the littoral regions of the world, engage in forward areas during peacetime, and rapidly respond to regional crises makes it an active player in American foreign and defense policy. The United States Navy is the largest in the world with a tonnage greater than that of the next 17 largest combined[4] and has a budget of $127.3 billion for the 2007 fiscal year.[5] A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... USS , and HMS Illustrious, two aircraft carriers on a joint patrol. ... A littoral is the region near the shoreline of a body of fresh or salt water. ...


The Navy is administratively managed by the Department of the Navy, which is headed by the civilian Secretary of the Navy. The Department of the Navy is, itself, a division of the Department of Defense, which is headed by the Secretary of Defense. The highest ranking Navy officer is the Chief of Naval Operations. Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Department of Defense redirects here. ... The United States Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) is the head of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and military matters. ... The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) is the senior military officer in the United States Navy. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of the United States Navy

The history of the United States Navy divides into two major periods: the Old Navy, a small but respected force of sailing ships that was also notable for innovation in the use of ironclads during the American Civil War, and the New Navy, the result of a modernization effort that...

Origins

In the early stages of the American Revolutionary War, the establishment of an official navy was an issue of debate among the members of the Continental Congress. Supporters argued that a navy would protect shipping, defend the coast, and make it easier to seek out support from foreign countries. Detractors countered that challenging the British Royal Navy, then the world's preeminent naval power, was a foolish undertaking.[3] This article is about military actions only. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ...


While Congress deliberated, it received word that two unarmed British supply ships from England were heading towards Quebec without escort. A plan was drawn up to intercept the ships, however the armed vessels to be used were owned not by Congress, but by individual colonies. Of greater significance, then, was an additional plan to equip two ships that would operate under the direct authority of Congress to capture British supply transports. This was not carried out until October 13, 1775, when George Washington announced that he had taken command of three armed schooners under Continental authority to intercept any British supply ships near Massachusetts. With the revelation that vessels were already sailing under Continental control, the decision to add two more was made easier;[6] the resolution was adopted and October 13 would later become known as the United States Navy's official birthday.[7] This article is about the Canadian province. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


The Continental Navy achieved mixed results; it was successful in a few individual engagements and raided many British merchant vessels, but it lost 24 ships[8]and at one point was reduced to two in active service.[9] As Congress turned its attention after the conflict towards securing the western border of the new United States, a standing navy was considered to be dispensable because of its high operating costs and its limited number of national roles.[3]


From reestablishment to the Civil War

The United States would be without a navy for nearly a decade — a state of affairs that exposed its merchant ships to a series of attacks by Barbary pirates. The sole armed maritime presence between 1790 and the launching of the U.S. Navy's first warships in 1797 was the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service (USRCS), the primary "ancestor" of the U.S. Coast Guard. Although USRCS Cutters conducted operations against these pirates, the depredations far outstripped the abilities of the USRCS and Congress ordered the construction and manning of six frigates on March 27, 1794;[8] three years later the first three were welcomed into service: the USS United States, USS Constellation and USS Constitution. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The United States Revenue Cutter Service was established by Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton in 1790 as an armed maritime law enforcement service. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... USS United States was the first frigate in the United States Navy in 1797. ... The first USS Constellation, a 38-gun frigate, was the first ship to be commissioned in the United States Navy; the first US Navy vessel to put to sea; and the first US Navy vessel to engage, defeat, and capture an enemy vessel. ... “ Old Ironsides ” redirects here. ...

Following an undeclared Quasi-War with France, the U.S. Navy saw substantial action in the War of 1812, where it defeated rival British frigates on more than one occasion and emerged victorious in freshwater battles at Lake Champlain and Lake Erie. However, the U.S. Navy was not strong enough to prevent the British from blockading American ports and landing troops at will.[3] After the war, the U.S. Navy again focused its attention on protecting American shipping assets, sending squadrons to the Caribbean, the Mediterranean, South America, Africa, and the Pacific.[8] The United States went to war in 1846 against Mexico and the Navy contributed by instituting a blockade, assisting the American takeover of California, and participating in the U.S. military's first large-scale amphibious operation at Vera Cruz.[3] The United States Navy established itself as a player in American foreign policy through the actions of Commodore Matthew Perry in Japan, which resulted in the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854. Painting of combat between USS Constitution and HMS Guerriere by Michel Felice Corne, collected from [1] and cropped File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Painting of combat between USS Constitution and HMS Guerriere by Michel Felice Corne, collected from [1] and cropped File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... “ Old Ironsides ” redirects here. ... HMS Guerriere was a British 3-masted sail frigate of 38 (the captain was a homosexual)guns captured from the French, and commanded by Captain Tom Dacres when she met the Constitution in her last battle on 19 August 1812. ... This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ... The Quasi-War was an undeclared war fought entirely at sea between the United States and France from 1798 to 1801. ... This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ... The Battle of Plattsburgh also known as the Battle of Lake Champlain ended the final invasion of the Northern states during the War of 1812. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Robert Heriot Barclay Oliver Hazard Perry Jesse Elliot Strength 2 ships 2 brigs 1 schooner 1 sloop 3 brigs 5 schooners 1 sloop Casualties 41 dead 93 wounded prisoners 306 surrendered Entire squadron captured 27 dead 96 wounded One brig heavily damaged The Battle... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Veracruz from space, July 1997 The city of Veracruz is a major port city and municipality on the Gulf of Mexico in the Mexican state of Veracruz. ... Commodore is a rank of the United States Navy with a somewhat complicated history. ... Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858). ... On March 31, 1854, the Convention of Kanagawa (Japanese: 神奈川条約, Kanagawa Jōyaku, or 日米和親条約, Nichibei Washin Jōyaku) was used by Commodore Matthew Perry of the U.S. Navy to force the opening of the Japanese ports of...


Naval power would play a significant role during the Civil War, where the Union had a distinct advantage over the Confederacy on the seas.[3] A Union blockade on shipping handicapped the Southern effort throughout the conflict. The two American navies would help usher in a new era in world naval history by putting ironclad warships into combat for the first time. The Battle of Hampton Roads in 1862, which pitted USS Monitor against CSS Virginia, became the first engagement between two steam-powered ironclads.[9] Soon after the war, however, the U.S. Navy slipped into obsolescence because of neglect. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... 1861 Cartoon map of the blockade // The Union Blockade refers to the naval actions between 1861 and 1865, during the American Civil War, in which the Union Navy maintained a massive effort on the Atlantic and Gulf Coast of the Confederate States of America designed to prevent the passage of... Ironclad (and broadside ironclad) redirects here. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders John L. Worden Franklin Buchanan Catesby R. Jones Strength 1 ironclad, 3 wooden warships 1 ironclad, 2 wooden warships, 1 gunboat, 2 tenders Casualties 2 wooden warships sunk, 1 wooden warship damaged 261 killed 108 wounded 1 ironclad damaged 7... USS Monitor was the first ironclad warship commissioned by the United States Navy. ... CSS Virginia was an ironclad warship of the Confederate States Navy during the American Civil War (built using the remains of the scuttled USS Merrimack). ...


20th century

A modernization program beginning in the 1880s brought the U.S. into the first rank of the world's navies by the end of the century. In 1907, several of the Navy's ships, dubbed the Great White Fleet, were showcased in a 14-month circumnavigation of the world. Ordered by President Theodore Roosevelt, it was a mission designed to demonstrate the Navy's capability to extend to the global theater.[8] Mort Kuntsler 1977 painting The Great White Fleet Sails. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ...


The Navy saw little action during World War I, but grew into a formidable force in the years before World War II. Though ultimately unsuccessful, Japan attempted to allay this strategic threat with the late-1941 surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. Following American entry into the war, the U.S. Navy grew tremendously as the United States was faced with a two-front war on the seas. It achieved notable acclaim in the Pacific Theater in particular, where it was instrumental to the Allies' successful "island hopping" campaign.[9] The U.S. Navy participated in many significant battles, including: the Battle of the Coral Sea, the Battle of Midway, the Battle of the Philippine Sea, the Battle of Leyte Gulf, and the Battle of Okinawa. By war's end in 1945, the United States Navy had added hundreds of new ships, including 18 aircraft carriers and 8 battleships and had over 70% of the world's total numbers and total tonnage of naval vessels of 1000 tons or greater.[10][11] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the actual attack. ... For other uses, see Pacific War (disambiguation). ... Island hopping refers to crossing an ocean by a series of shorter journeys between islands, as opposed to a single journey directly across the ocean to the destination. ... Combatants United States Navy Royal Australian Navy Imperial Japanese Navy Commanders Frank J. Fletcher John G. Crace Shigeyoshi Inoue Takeo Takagi Strength 2 large carriers, 3 cruisers 2 large carriers, 1 light carrier, 4 cruisers Casualties 1 fleet carrier, 1 destroyer, 1 oil tanker sunk 543 killed 1 light carrier... Combatants United States Empire of Japan Commanders Chester W. Nimitz Frank J. Fletcher Raymond A. Spruance Isoroku Yamamoto Chuichi Nagumo Tamon Yamaguchi â€  Strength 3 carriers, ~50 support ships, 233 carrier aircraft, 127 land-based aircraft 4 carriers, 7 battleships, ~150 support ships, 248 carrier aircraft, 16 floatplanes Casualties 1 carrier... Combatants United States Navy Imperial Japanese Navy Commanders Ray Spruance Jisaburo Ozawa Kakuji Kakuta Strength 7 fleet carriers, 8 light carriers, 7 battleships, 79 other ships, 28 submarines, 956 planes 5 fleet carriers, 4 light carriers, 5 battleships, 43 other ships, 450 carrier-based planes, 300 land-based planes Casualties... Combatants  United States  Australia Empire of Japan Commanders William Halsey, Jr (3rd Fleet) Thomas C. Kinkaid (7th Fleet) Takeo Kurita (Centre Force) Shoji Nishimura â€  (Southern Force) Kiyohide Shima (Southern Force) Jisaburo Ozawa (Northern Force) Strength 17 aircraft carriers 18 escort carriers 12 battleships 24 cruisers 141 destroyers and destroyer escorts... Combatants  United States  United Kingdom  Canada  Australia  New Zealand Empire of Japan Commanders Simon B. Buckner â€  Joseph W. Stilwell Ray Spruance Mitsuru Ushijima â€  Isamu Cho â€  Strength 548,000 soldiers, 1,300 ships,  ? aircraft 100,000 regulars and militia,  ? ships,  ? aircraft Casualties 12,513 dead or missing, 38,916 wounded, 33...

USS Yorktown (CV-5) under attack at the Battle of Midway in World War II.
USS Yorktown (CV-5) under attack at the Battle of Midway in World War II.

With the potential for armed conflict with the Soviet Union during the Cold War, the U.S. Navy continued to advance technologically by developing new weapons systems, ships, and aircraft. United States naval strategy changed to that of forward deployment in support of U.S. allies with an emphasis on carrier battle groups.[12] The Navy was a major participant in the Vietnam War, blockaded Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis, and through the use of ballistic missile submarines, became an important aspect of the United States' nuclear strategic deterrence policy. The United States Navy conducted various combat operations in the Persian Gulf against Iran in 1987 and 1988, most notably Operation Praying Mantis. PD USN photo of USS Yorktown at Midway, #80-G-414423, downloaded from http://www. ... PD USN photo of USS Yorktown at Midway, #80-G-414423, downloaded from http://www. ... The third USS Yorktown (CV-5) was lead ship of the Yorktown class aircraft carrier of World War II, sunk at the Battle of Midway. ... Combatants United States Empire of Japan Commanders Chester W. Nimitz Frank J. Fletcher Raymond A. Spruance Isoroku Yamamoto Chuichi Nagumo Tamon Yamaguchi â€  Strength 3 carriers, ~50 support ships, 233 carrier aircraft, 127 land-based aircraft 4 carriers, 7 battleships, ~150 support ships, 248 carrier aircraft, 16 floatplanes Casualties 1 carrier... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... President Kennedy in a crowded Cabinet Room during the Cuban Missile Crisis. ... The Redoutable, a French SNLE (now a museum) A ballistic missile submarine is a submarine equipped to launch ballistic missiles (SLBMs), such as the Russian SS-N-18 or the American Trident. ... Mutual assured destruction (MAD) is a doctrine of military strategy in which a full-scale use of nuclear weapons by one of two opposing sides would effectively result in the destruction of both the attacker and the defender. ... Iranian frigate IS Sahand (74) attacked by aircraft of U.S. Navy Carrier Air Wing 11 in retaliation for the mining of the guided missile frigate USS . ...


21st century

The United States Navy continues to be a major support to American interests in the 21st century. Since the end of the Cold War, it has shifted its focus from a large-scale war with the Soviet Union to special operations and strike missions in regional conflicts.[13] The Navy participated in Operation Enduring Freedom, the Iraq War, and the ongoing War on Terrorism largely in this capacity. Development continues on new ships and weapons, including the CVN-21 aircraft carrier and the Littoral combat ship. Because of its size, weapons technology, and ability to project force far from American shores, the current U.S. Navy remains a potent asset for the United States Commander-in-Chief (the President of the United States). Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11 2001. ... It has been proposed below that CVN-21 be renamed and moved to United States Navy CVN-21 program. ... The Littoral Combat Ship is the first of the U.S. Navys next-generation surface combatants. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...


Organization

Simplified flowchart of U.S. Navy command structure
Simplified flowchart of U.S. Navy command structure

The Navy falls under the administration of the Department of the Navy, under civilian leadership of the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV). The most senior naval officer is the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), a four-star admiral who is immediately under and reports to the Secretary of the Navy. At the same time, the Chief of Naval Operations is one of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, which is the second-highest deliberatory body of the armed forces after the United States National Security Council, although it only plays an advisory role to the President and does not nominally form part of the chain of command. The Secretary of the Navy and Chief of Naval Operations are responsible for organizing, recruiting, training, and equipping the Navy so that it is ready for operation under the command of the Unified Combatant Commanders. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (655x617, 12 KB) Summary Simplified flow chart of the United States Navys organizational hierarchy. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (655x617, 12 KB) Summary Simplified flow chart of the United States Navys organizational hierarchy. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) is the senior military officer in the United States Navy. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ... The National Security Council (NSC) of the United States is the principal forum used by the President of the United States for considering national security and foreign policy matters with his senior national security advisors and cabinet officials. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ...


Operating forces

There are nine components to the operating forces of the U.S. Navy: Atlantic Fleet, Pacific Fleet, Naval Forces Central Command, Naval Forces Europe, Naval Network Warfare Command, Navy Reserve, Naval Special Warfare Command, Operational Test and Evaluation Forces, and Military Sealift Command. Fleets in the United States Navy take on the role of force provider; they do not carry out military operations independently, rather they train and maintain naval units that will subsequently be provided to the naval forces component of each Unified Combatant Command. While not widely publicized, groups of ships departing U.S. waters for operational missions gain a Task force type designation, almost always with the Second or Third Fleets. On entry into another numbered fleet's area of responsibility, they are redesignated as a task group from that fleet. For example, a carrier task group departing the Eastern Seaboard for the Mediterranean might start out as Task Group 20.1; on entry into the Mediterranean, it might become Task Group 60.1. United States operating forces organization consists of nine components: Atlantic Fleet, Pacific Fleet, Naval Forces Central Command, Naval Forces Europe, Naval Network Warfare Command, Navy Reserve, Naval Special Warfare Command, Operational Test and Evaluation Forces, and Military Sealift Command. ... This article is a list of the operating units of the United States Navy. ... This article is a list of the operating units of the United States Navy. ... The Atlantic Fleet of the United States Navy is the part of the Navy responsible for operations in around the Atlantic Ocean. ... The United States Pacific Fleet (USPACFLT) is a theater-level unit of the U.S. armed forces, under the operational control of the United States Pacific Command. ... The United States Navy Reserve is the reserve component of the United States Navy. ... NAVSPECWARCOM logo. ... The Military Sealift Command (MSC) is a United States Navy (USN) organization that controls most of the replenishment and military transport ships of the Navy. ... A Unified Combatant Command is composed of forces from two or more services, has a broad and continuing mission, and is organized either on a geographical basis (known as Area Of Responsibility, AOR) or on a functional basis. ... A task force (TF) is a temporary unit or formation established to work on a single defined task or activity. ...

USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) docks at the U.S. navy base in Yokosuka, Japan.
USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) docks at the U.S. navy base in Yokosuka, Japan.

The United States Navy has five active numbered fleets — Second, Third, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh — that are each led by a three-star Vice Admiral. These five fleets are further grouped under Fleet Forces Command (the former Atlantic Fleet), Pacific Fleet, Naval Forces Europe, and Naval Forces Central Command, whose commander also doubles as Commander Fifth Fleet; these four commands are led by four-star full Admirals. The First Fleet existed after the Second World War from 1947 at least, but it was redesignated Third Fleet in early 1973.[14] Likewise, Fourth Fleet has not been in operation for some time and no other active fleet has been renamed as such. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 1580 KB)source:http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 1580 KB)source:http://www. ... The supercarrier, USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), formerly CVA-63, is the second naval ship named after Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, the site of the Wright brothers first flight. ... Yokosuka (Japanese: 横須賀市; -shi) is a city located in Kanagawa, Japan. ... The 5th Fleet of the United States Navy is responsible for naval forces in the Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Arabian Sea and coast off East Africa as far south as Kenya. ... The United States First Fleet was a unit of the United States Navy, in operation from as early as 1946 to the early 1970s in the western Pacific Ocean as part of the Pacific Fleet. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Shore establishments

Shore establishment commands exist to support the mission of the afloat fleets through the use of facilities on land. Focusing on logistics and combat-readiness, they are essential for the full, smooth, and continuous operation of operating forces. The variety of commands reflect the complexity of the modern U.S. Navy and range from naval intelligence to personnel training to maintaining repair facilities. Two of the major logistics and repair commands are Naval Sea Systems Command and Naval Air Systems Command. Other commands such as the Office of Naval Intelligence, the United States Naval Observatory, and the Navy War College are focused on intelligence and strategy. Training commands include the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center and the United States Naval Academy. The Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) is the largest of the U.S. Navys five systems commands, consisting of four shipyards, 8 warfare centers (2 undersea and 6 surface), four major shipbuilding locations and the NAVSEA headquarters, located at the Washington Navy Yard, in Washington D.C.. NAVSEAs... The Naval Air Systems Command, or NAVAIR, is the part of the United States Navy focused on airborne weapon systems, including planes. ... The Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) was established in the United States Navy in 1882. ... Aerial view of USNO. The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) is one of the oldest scientific agencies in the United States. ... The Navy War College has two missions: Educating tomorrow’s leaders and helping the Chief of Naval Operations define the future Navy. ... The Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (NSAWC, pronounced EN-SOCK) at Naval Air Station Fallon is the center of excellence for naval aviation training and tactics development. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ...


The Navy maintains several "Naval Forces Commands" which operate naval shore facilities and serve as liaison units to local ground forces of the Air Force and Army. Such commands are answerable to a Fleet Commander as the shore protector component of the afloat command. During times of war, all Naval Forces Commands augment to become task forces of a primary fleet. Some of the larger Naval Forces Commands in the Pacific Ocean include Commander Naval Forces Korea (CNFK), Commander Naval Forces Marianas (CNFM), and Commander Naval Forces Japan (CNFJ). Port of Los Angeles, March 29, 2004. ... Commander Naval Forces Korea is a major shore command of the United States Navy that serves as the shore support agency for all U.S. naval activity in South Korea. ... Commander Naval Forces Japan (CNFJ) is the shore authority of the United States Navy for all U.S. naval faclities in Japan. ...

The hospital ship USNS Mercy anchored near Jolo, Philippines.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1500x1000, 361 KB)060608-N-6501M-003 Jolo, Philippines (June 8, 2006) - The U.S. Military Sealift Command (MSC) Hospital ship USNS Mercy (T-AH-19), anchored off of the coast of Jolo City. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1500x1000, 361 KB)060608-N-6501M-003 Jolo, Philippines (June 8, 2006) - The U.S. Military Sealift Command (MSC) Hospital ship USNS Mercy (T-AH-19), anchored off of the coast of Jolo City. ... USNS Mercy being refueled at sea, April 2005 during the ships mission to aid the tsunami vicitims. ...

Military Sealift Command

Military Sealift Command (MSC) serves not only the United States Navy, but the entire Department of Defense as the ocean carrier of materiel during peacetime and war. It transports equipment, fuel, ammunition, and other goods essential to the smooth function of United States armed forces worldwide. Up to 95% of all supplies needed to sustain the U.S. military can be moved by Military Sealift Command.[15] MSC operates approximately 120 ships with 100 more in reserve and is unique in that its ships are manned not by active duty Navy personnel, but by civil service or contract merchant mariners. The Military Sealift Command (MSC) is a United States Navy (USN) organization that controls most of the replenishment and military transport ships of the Navy. ... Materiel (from the French for material) is the equipment and supplies in Military and commercial supply chain management. ...


Relationships with other service branches

United States Marine Corps

Historically, the United States Navy has enjoyed a unique relationship with the United States Marine Corps (USMC), partly because they both specialize in seaborne operations. At the very top level of civilian organization, the USMC is part of the Department of the Navy and reports to the Secretary of the Navy. However, it is considered to be a distinct, separate service branch and not a subset of the Navy; the highest ranking Marine officer, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, does not report to a Navy officer. Marine Corps Medal of Honor recipients are awarded the Navy variant and Marines are eligible to receive the Navy Cross. The United States Naval Academy trains Marine Corps commissioned officers while Navy officers undergo instruction by Marine NCO Drill Instructors, in addition to their normal Recruit Division Commander. The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... The Navy Cross is the second highest medal that can be awarded by the Department of the Navy and the second highest award given for valor. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ...


The relationship extends to the operational theater as well. As amphibious assault specialists, Marines often deploy on and attack from Navy vessels; while being transported on a Navy ship, they must obey the orders of its captain. Marine strike-fighter air squadrons operate alongside Navy strike-fighter air squadrons from aircraft carriers, though they frequently have distinct missions and rarely fly sorties together; except to directly support Marine ground troops. Other types of marine air squadrons operate from amphibious assault ships in support of marine amphibious operations. The USMC does not train chaplains, Religious Programs Specialists and Hospital Corpsmen or medical doctors; thus officers and enlisted sailors from the Navy fulfill these roles. They generally wear Marine uniforms that are emblazoned with Navy insignia and markings to distinguish themselves from Marines. Corpsmen, Religious Program Specialists, and chaplains enjoy a great sense of camaraderie with the Marines due in part because they work closely with them and often are embedded with Marine units. They operate under the command of the Marine Corps under the auspices of the Fleet Marine Force, often called "green side" corpsman.[16] The Chaplain Corps of the United States Navy consists of ordained clergy who are commissioned Naval officers. ... Religious Programs Specialist rating insignia Religious Programs Specialist (abbreviated as RP) is a United States Navy occupational rating. ... The HM rating symbol (a caduceus). ... The Fleet Marine Force is a combined command of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps which comprises a combination of permanent afloat personnel, stationed on U.S. Navy ships, and ground units of the United States Marine Corps infantry branch. ...


United States Coast Guard

Although the Posse Comitatus Act applies only to the Army and Air Force, Department of Defense rules effectively require the Navy and Marine Corps to act as if Posse Comitatus did apply, preventing them from enforcing the law. The United States Coast Guard fulfills this role in naval operations. It provides Law Enforcement Detachments (LEDETs) to Navy vessels, where they perform arrests and other law enforcement duties during Navy boarding and interdiction missions. In times of war, or when directed by the President, the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy and is subject to the orders of the Secretary of the Navy until it is transferred back to the Department of Homeland Security. At other times, Coast Guard Port Security Units are sent overseas to guard the security of ports and other assets. The Coast Guard also jointly staffs the Navy's Naval Coastal Warfare Groups and Squadrons (the latter of which were known as Harbor Defense Commands until late-2004), which oversee defense efforts in foreign littoral combat and inshore areas. The Posse Comitatus Act is a United States federal law () passed on June 16, 1878 after the end of Reconstruction. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the United States armed forces a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... The United States Coast Guard (USCG) officially established the Law Enforcement Detachment or LEDET program in 1982. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... // Overview A US Coast Guard PSU TPSB guarding th USS John F. Kennedy in the Middle East . Coast Guard Port Security Units are elite deployable units organized for sustained force protection operations. ...


Personnel

A "shooter" gives the signal to launch an F/A-18 Super Hornet from the USS Enterprise (CVN-65).
A "shooter" gives the signal to launch an F/A-18 Super Hornet from the USS Enterprise (CVN-65).

The United States Navy has nearly 500,000 personnel, approximately a quarter of whom are in ready reserve. Of those on active duty, more than eighty percent are enlisted sailors while commissioned officers make up around fifteen percent; the rest are midshipmen of the United States Naval Academy (who are on active duty) and NROTC units at over 180 universities around the country.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2100x1500, 2291 KB)source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2100x1500, 2291 KB)source: http://www. ... Four F/A-18 E/F Super Hornets assigned to the Black Aces of Strike Fighter Squadron Forty One (VFA-41) fly over the Western Pacific Ocean in a stack formation. ... Enterprise Logo The supercarrier, USS Enterprise (CVN-65), formerly CVA(N)-65, is the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the eighth U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name. ... In military service, an enlisted rank is generally any rating below that of a commissioned officer. ... In military organizations, a commissioned officer is a member of the service who derives authority directly from a sovereign power, and as such holds a commission from that power. ... For the fishes called midshipman, see Midshipman fish In the navies of English-speaking countries, a midshipman is a low-ranking commissioned officer, usually the lowest rank. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ... The Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps commissions individiuals into either the United States Navy or United States Marine Corps. ...


Sailors prove they have mastered skills and deserve responsibilities by completing Personnel Qualification Standards (PQS) tasks and examinations. Among the most important is the "warfare qualification," which denotes a journeyman level of capability in Aviation Warfare, Special Warfare, Surface Warfare, or Submarine Warfare. Many qualifications are denoted on a sailor's uniform with U.S. Navy badges and insignia. Badges of the United States Navy are military badges issued by the United States Department of the Navy to Naval service members who achieve certain qualifications and accomplishments while serving on both active and reserve duty in the United States Navy. ...


Commissioned officer

See also: List of United States Navy staff corps

Commissioned officers in the Navy have pay grades ranging from O-1 to O-10, with O-10 being the highest; those with paygrades between O-1 through O-4 are considered junior officers and officers in the O-7 to O-10 range are called flag officers or the "admiralty." Promotion is based on performance in an officer's current paygrade, which is recorded in "FITREPS" (fitness reports), usually self-written by the officer and edited by superiors. Above the rank of Admiral is Fleet Admiral (O-11), which was awarded to a select few in World War II and is intended to be used only during a declared war. In 1899, a special rank called Admiral of the Navy was created for George Dewey, a war hero of the Spanish-American War, with the condition that it would cease to exist upon his death.[17] The honor was also significant because at that time, the United States Navy had no living admirals.[18] Commissioned officers originate from the United States Naval Academy, Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC), Officer Candidate School (OCS), and a host of other commissioning programs such as the Seaman to Admiral-21 program, the Limited Duty Officer Selection Program, and the United States Merchant Marine Academy. This chart represents the U.S. Navy officer rank insignia. ... Navy Dental Corps Navy Chaplain Corps Navy Civil Engineer Corps (which includes the Seabees) Judge Advocate Generals Corps (also known as JAG) Navy Medical Corps Navy Medical Service Corps Navy Nurse Corps Navy Supply Corps ... Fleet Admiral Collar Device Fleet Admiral Shoulder Board Fleet Admiral Sleeve Insignia A Fleet Admiral in the United States Navy is an admiral considered to be the equivalent of the United States Armys General of the Army. ... Admiral of the Navy is a senior-most rank of a naval service, with its origins in the Middle Ages. ... George Dewey (December 26, 1837 – January 16, 1917) was an admiral of the United States Navy, best known for his victory (without the loss of a single life of his own forces due to combat; one man died of a heart attack) at the Battle of Manila Bay during the... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ... The Navy Reserve Officers Training Corps commissions individiuals into either the United States Navy as an Ensign or United States Marine Corps as a Second Lieutenant. ... Officer Candidate School or Officer Cadet School (OCS) are institutions which train civilians and enlisted personnel in order for them to gain a commission as officers in the armed forces of a country. ... A Limited Duty Officer (LDO) is an officer in the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps who was selected for commissioning based on his skill and expertise, and is not required to have a Bachelors Degree. ... The United States Merchant Marine Academy is one of the five United States service academies. ...


Commissioned officers can generally be divided into line officers and staff corps; line officers can be further split into unrestricted and restricted communities. Unrestricted Line Officers are the warfighting command element and are authorized to lead ships, aviation squadrons, and special operations units. Restricted Line Officers, on the other hand, concentrate on non-combat related fields, such as engineering and maintenance; they are not qualified to command combat units. Staff Corps officers are specialists in fields that are themselves professional careers and not exclusive to the military, for example: medicine, law, and civil engineering. Unrestricted Line Officers (URL Officers) are Officers of the Line in the U.S. Navy who are qualified to command ships and aviation squadrons. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Navy Dental Corps Navy Chaplain Corps Navy Civil Engineer Corps (which includes the Seabees) Judge Advocate Generals Corps (also known as JAG) Navy Medical Corps Navy Medical Service Corps Navy Nurse Corps Navy Supply Corps ...

Commissioned Officer Rank Structure of the United States Navy
Fleet Admiral Admiral Vice Admiral Rear Admiral
(Upper Half)
Rear Admiral
(Lower Half)
O-11 O-10 O-9 O-8 O-7
Captain Commander Lieutenant Commander Lieutenant Lieutenant Junior Grade Ensign
O-6 O-5 O-4 O-3 O-2 O-1

Fleet Admiral Collar Device Fleet Admiral Shoulder Board Fleet Admiral Sleeve Insignia A Fleet Admiral in the United States Navy is an admiral considered to be the equivalent of the United States Armys General of the Army. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Fleet Admiral Shoulder Board This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... . Captain, is the name most often given in naval circles to the NATO rank code of OF-5. ... Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ... In the Royal Navy, United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a lieutenant commander (lieutenant-commander or Lt Cdr in the RN) is a commissioned officer superior to a lieutenant and inferior to a commander. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... LTJG insignia. ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Chief Warrant Officer

Chief Warrant Officer (CWO) pay grades range from CWO2 to the highest rank of CWO5. United States Navy CWOs are commissioned officers whose role is to provide leadership and skills for the most difficult and demanding operations in a particular technical specialty. They occupy a niche that is not as well served by the line officer community, which tends to have a broader focus. CWOs come from the senior non-commissioned officer ranks of the enlisted and receive their commission after completing the appropriately named Chief Warrant Officer Program. They typically become CWOs in specialties that are most related to their previous enlisted rating. Like Staff Corps officers, CWOs wear special insignia above the rank devices on their shoulder boards and sleeves to indicate their field of expertise.

Chief Warrant Officer Rank Structure of the United States Navy
CWO5 CWO4 CWO3 CWO2

Image File history File links Cwo5. ... Image File history File links Cwo4. ... Image File history File links Cwo3. ... Image File history File links Cwo2. ...

Enlisted sailors

See also: List of United States Navy ratings

Enlisted members of the Navy have pay grades from E-1 to E-9, with E-9 being the highest. All enlisted sailors with paygrades of E-4 and higher are considered Petty Officers while those at E-7 and higher are further named Chief Petty Officers. Unlike commissioned officers, who are given authority by the government, NCOs are promoted through the ranks of the enlisted. Those who demonstrate superior performance are given an increase in paygrade; the official Navy term is to be advanced. Two notable advancements are from Seaman to Petty Officer Third Class (E-3 to E-4) and from Petty Officer First Class to Chief Petty Officer (E-6 to E-7). Advancement to Chief Petty Officer is especially significant and is marked by a special initiation ceremony. Rate badge of Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy United States Navy enlisted rates are used to display where an enlisted sailor falls within the chain of command and are also defined as pay grade. ... From left to right: a Special Warfare Operator 1st class and a Boatswains Mate 2nd class. ... A Petty Officer is a noncommissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... Chief Petty Officer is a non-commissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... This article is about a military rank. ... U.S. Navy Good conduct variation U.S. Navy Petty Officer Third Class insignia Petty Officer Third Class is the fourth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Seaman and below Petty Officer Second Class, and is the lowest form of non-commissioned... Good conduct variation Petty Officer First Class insignia Petty Officer First Class is the sixth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Petty Officer Second Class and below Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... Chief Petty Officer is a non-commissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ...


Enlisted members of pay grades E-4 and above are said to be "rated," meaning that they possess a rating, or occupational specialty. Members of grades E-1 to E-3 can be "strikers," meaning they have the same rating designation as a Petty Officer in their field (example: a BM3 is a Petty Officer Third Class rated as a Boatswain's Mate; BMSN is a Seaman designated as a Boatswain's Mate striker), but do not necessarily have to be. Whether a designated striker or not, personnel in the pay grades of E-3 and below are all considered "Non-Rates." There are more than 50 ratings covering a broad range of skills and subspecialties. From left to right: a Special Warfare Operator 1st class and a Boatswains Mate 2nd class. ...

Non-Commissioned Officer and Enlisted Rate Structure of the United States Navy
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Fleet Master Chief Petty Officer and
Force Master Chief Petty Officer
Command Master Chief Petty Officer Master Chief Petty Officer Senior Chief Petty Officer Chief Petty Officer Petty Officer First Class
E-9 E-9 E-9 E-9 E-8 E-7 E-6
Petty Officer Second Class Petty Officer Third Class Seaman Seaman Apprentice Seaman Recruit
E-5 E-4 E-3 E-2 E-1
No insignia

Good conduct variation Master Chief Petty Officer insignia Master Chief Petty Officer is the ninth, and highest, enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy, just above Senior Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... Good conduct variation Master Chief Petty Officer insignia Master Chief Petty Officer Sleeve Insignia Master Chief Petty Officer is the ninth, and highest, enlisted rank (E-9) in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Senior Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... Good conduct variation Master Chief Petty Officer insignia Master Chief Petty Officer Sleeve Insignia Master Chief Petty Officer is the ninth, and highest, enlisted rank (E-9) in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Senior Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... A Command Master Chief Petty Officer is the senior enlisted person in a United States Navy command structure. ... Good conduct variation Master Chief Petty Officer insignia Master Chief Petty Officer Sleeve Insignia Master Chief Petty Officer is the ninth, and highest, enlisted rank (E-9) in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Senior Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... Good conduct variation Senior Chief Petty Officer insignia Senior Chief Petty Officer is the eighth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Chief Petty Officer and below Master Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... Chief Petty Officer is a non-commissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... Good conduct variation Petty Officer First Class insignia Petty Officer First Class is the sixth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Petty Officer Second Class and below Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Good conduct variation Petty Officer Second Class insignia Petty Officer Second Class is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Petty Officer Third Class and below Petty Officer First Class, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... U.S. Navy Good conduct variation U.S. Navy Petty Officer Third Class insignia Petty Officer Third Class is the fourth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Seaman and below Petty Officer Second Class, and is the lowest form of non-commissioned... This article is about a military rank. ... Fireman variation Airman variation Seaman Apprentice insignia Seaman Apprentice is the second lowest enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Seaman Recruit and below Seaman; this rank was formerly known as Seaman Second Class. ... Seaman Recruit is the lowest enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just below Seaman Apprentice; this rank was formerly known as Seaman Third Class. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Uniforms and appearance

A Vice Admiral returns salute from enlisted sailors in a ceremony.
A Vice Admiral returns salute from enlisted sailors in a ceremony.

The uniforms of the United States Navy are designed to combine professionalism and naval heritage with versatility, safety, and comfort.[19] The Navy currently incorporates many different styles that are specific for a variety of uses and occasions. In most cases, distinctions are made to distinguish officers and enlisted men in their uniformed appearance. U.S. Navy uniforms can generally be divided into three categories: dress uniforms, service uniforms, and working uniforms. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1542x1011, 520 KB)source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1542x1011, 520 KB)source: http://www. ... Recruiting poster for the United States Navy, featuring a woman wearing the most famous naval uniform, the crackerjack. ...

  • Dress uniforms are worn during military-related formal occasions, such as ceremonies and other official functions. Many types of dress uniforms are used in the Navy with the full range of formal requirements represented. Service dress is the least formal dress uniform, full dress is one step higher in formality, and mess dress is the most formal dress available.
A Bermuda Regiment NCO with a (female) US Navy hospital corpsman, attached to the Bermuda Regiment from USNAS Bermuda, on training at USMC Camp Lejeune, 1994. The hospital corpsman wears a military combat uniform.
A Bermuda Regiment NCO with a (female) US Navy hospital corpsman, attached to the Bermuda Regiment from USNAS Bermuda, on training at USMC Camp Lejeune, 1994. The hospital corpsman wears a military combat uniform.
  • Service uniforms are designed for daily wear and are most often worn in office or classroom-type settings, as well as other occasions in which physical activity is at a minimum.[20] The most visible distinction between officers and enlisted personnel are the color of the service uniform. Only officers and chief petty officers are authorized to wear service khaki; all other personnel must wear winter blue or summer white.
  • Working uniforms prioritize comfort and safety first and thus are the most utilitarian of the Navy uniforms. They are intended for use in underway ships and in occasions that involve dirty, physical labor. Many working uniforms are variations of the service uniforms except with less formal requirements. This category includes Navy coveralls, which are authorized to be worn by members of all ranks.

Recently, the Navy completed a project named "Task Force Uniform" to streamline Navy uniforms. Among the changes are that enlisted personnel from Seaman Recruit to Petty Officer First Class (E1-E6) will have one year-round service uniform instead of Winter Blues and Summer Whites. All personnel from Seaman Recruit to Admiral will also have new working uniforms dubbed Navy Working Uniform (NWU) to replace the wash khakis, coveralls, dungarees, and aviation working greens currently in use. The uniform is a digital patterned camouflage in predominantly haze gray and blue hues.[21] Image File history File linksMetadata Bermuda_Regiment_&_US_Navy_personnel_at_Camp_Lejeune. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Bermuda_Regiment_&_US_Navy_personnel_at_Camp_Lejeune. ... The Bermuda Regiment Band A Command Centre during IS training. ... S-3 Viking at USNAS Bermuda. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune is near Jacksonville, North Carolina, on the Atlantic seaboard of the United States. ... Seaman Recruit is the lowest enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just below Seaman Apprentice; this rank was formerly known as Seaman Third Class. ... Good conduct variation Petty Officer First Class insignia Petty Officer First Class is the sixth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Petty Officer Second Class and below Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ...


Grooming for both male and female sailors is regulated to a high degree, with exact standards in regards to hair, facial hair, use of cosmetics, and jewelry. New male recruits are given the military crew cut and are prohibited from having hair longer than four inches while in the service. Men are required to be clean shaven at all times, although mustaches are allowed. Women do not have a hair length regulation, however hair cannot fall past the bottom edge of the uniform collar and the style of hair is strictly controlled. Multicolored hair, body piercing, and tattoos on the head are banned for both sexes.[22] A U.S. Marine sporting a high and tight, crew cut hairstyle A crew cut is a type of haircut in which the hair is cut fairly short. ...


Bases

The size, complexity, and international presence of the United States Navy require a large number of navy installations to support its operations. While the majority of bases are located on the West and East coasts of the United States, the Navy maintains a significant number of facilities farther inland and abroad, either in U.S.-controlled territories or in foreign countries under a Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA). List of major active US Navy bases, stations, and schools. ... A Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA) is an agreement between a country and a foreign nation stationing military forces in that country. ...


Eastern United States

Map of Navy bases in the United States.
Map of Navy bases in the United States.

The largest concentration of installations is in Hampton Roads, Virginia, where the Navy occupies over 36,000 acres (146 km²) of land, making it the largest naval base in the world. It is the homeport of the Atlantic Fleet and the location of Northrop Grumman Newport News, a privately owned company that builds the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier. The state of Florida is the location of two major bases, Naval Station Mayport, the Navy's third largest, near Jacksonville and Naval Air Station Pensacola, the primary training base for Navy and Marine pilots. The main U.S. Navy submarine base is located in Groton, Connecticut. Image File history File links Base_map_2004. ... Image File history File links Base_map_2004. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The newly constructed USS Birmingham is launched from the Newport News yards in 1942 Northrop Grumman Newport News (NGNN), formerly called Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company (NNS&DD or simply NNS), is the largest privately owned shipyard in the United States and the only one that can build Nimitz... The Nimitz-class supercarriers are a line of nuclear-powered aircraft carriers in service with the US Navy, and are the largest capital ships in the world. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... The USS departing NS Mayport, Florida Naval Station Mayport is a major U. S. Navy base near Jacksonville, Florida. ... “Jacksonville” redirects here. ... Naval Air Station Pensacola, The Cradle of Naval Aviation, is a United States Navy base located in Warrington, Florida, a community southwest of the Pensacola city limits. ... Waterfront of Groton, Connecticut looking upriver Groton is a town located on the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...


Western United States and Hawaii

The Navy's second-largest complex is located in San Diego in Southern California. An important port for the Pacific Fleet, it contains the Naval Special Warfare Center, the main training center for SEALs. The other major collection of naval bases on the west coast is in Puget Sound, Washington. Among them, Naval Station Everett is one of the newer bases in operation and the Navy states that it is its most modern facility.[23] The naval presence in Hawaii is centered on Pearl Harbor, which hosts the headquarters of the Pacific Fleet and many of its subordinate commands. San Diego redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The United States Naval Special Warfare Center (NSWC, also know as The Center) is part, a component command, of the Naval Special Warfare Command and is sited within the Naval base Coronado in San Diego, California. ... Puget Sound For the university in this region, see University of Puget Sound. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Naval Station Everett is the United States Navys most modern facility. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ...


United States territories

Guam, an island strategically located in the Western Pacific Ocean, maintains a sizable Navy presence. The westernmost U.S. territory, it contains a Naval Air Station and a natural deep water harbor capable of harboring even aircraft carriers in emergencies.[24] Puerto Rico in the Caribbean formerly housed a navy facility, but it was shut down in 2004 shortly after the controversial closure of the live ordnance training area on nearby Vieques Island. Flag Seal Nickname: Isla Nena (Baby Girl Island) Gentilic: Viequenses Location Location of Vieques, Puerto Rico within Puerto Rico Government Founded — Mayor Damaso Serrano López Political party PPD Senatorial district 8 (Carolina) Representative district 36 Geographical characteristics Area Total 348. ...


Foreign countries

The largest overseas base is in Yokosuka, Japan,[25] which serves as the homeport for the Navy's largest forward-deployed fleet and is a significant base of operations in the Western Pacific. European operations revolve around facilities in Italy and Greece with Gaeta, Italy as the homeport for the Sixth Fleet. In the Middle East, naval facilities are located almost exclusively in countries bordering the Persian Gulf, with Manama, Bahrain serving as the headquarters of Fifth Fleet. Guantánamo Bay in Cuba is the oldest overseas facility and has become known in recent years as the location of a detention camp for suspected al-Qaeda operatives. U.S. Fleet Activities Yokosuka, or Commander, Fleet Activities Yokosuka is a United States Navy base, in Yokosuka, Japan. ... Gaeta (ancient Latin name Caieta) is a city in Province of Latina, in Lazio, Italy. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... Manama (Arabic: المنامة Al-Manāmah) is the capital city of Bahrain and is situated on the Persian Gulf, in the northeast of Bahrain Island. ... , For other titular locales, see Guantánamo (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism Wikisource has original text related to this article: Statement of Alberto J Mora on interrogation abuse, July 7, 2004 Guantanamo Bay detention camp is a joint military prison and... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ...


Ships

USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), the newest aircraft carrier
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), the newest aircraft carrier
See also: List of ships of the United States Navy

The names of commissioned ships of the U.S. Navy start with "USS",[26] designating 'United States Ship'. Non-commissioned, civilian-manned vessels of the U.S. Navy have names that begin with "USNS", standing for 'United States Naval Ship'. Additionally, each ship is given a letter-based hull classification symbol (for example CVN and DDG) to indicate the vessel's type and a hull number. The names of ships are officially selected by the Secretary of the Navy and are usually those of U.S. states, cities, towns, important people, famous battles, fish, or ideals. All ships in the U.S. Navy inventory are placed in the Naval Vessel Register, which tracks data such as the current status of a ship, the date of its commissioning, and the date of its decommissioning. Vessels that are removed from the register prior to disposal are said to be stricken from the register. The Navy also maintains a reserve fleet of inactive vessels that are maintained for reactivation in times of need. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76), the ninth and penultimate Nimitz-class supercarrier, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for former President of the United States Ronald Reagan. ... The names of commissioned ships of the U.S. Navy all start with USS, meaning United States Ship. Non-commissioned, civilian-manned vessels of the U.S. Navy have names that begin with USNS, standing for United States Naval Ship. A letter based hull classification symbol is used to designate... This is a set of lists of ships of the United States Navy, including both past and present vessels. ... The United States Navy uses hull classification symbols (sometimes called hull codes) to identify the types of its ships. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... The Naval Vessel Register (NVR), official inventory of ships and service craft in custody or titled by the United States Navy, traces its origin back to the 1880s. ... The United States Navy maintains a number of its ships as part of a reserve fleet, often called the Mothball Fleet. While the details of the activity have changed several times, the basics are constant; keep the ships afloat and sufficiently working as to be reactivated quickly in an emergency. ...


The U.S. Navy pioneered the use of nuclear reactors aboard naval vessels;[27] today, nuclear energy powers most U.S. aircraft carriers and submarines. In the case of a Nimitz-class carrier, two naval reactors give the ship almost unlimited range and provide enough electrical energy to power a city of 100,000 people.[28] The U.S. Navy previously operated nuclear-powered cruisers and destroyers as well, but all have been decommissioned. Core of a small nuclear reactor used for research. ... Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and in most cases recover aircraft, acting as a sea... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... United States Naval reactors are given three-character designations consisting of a letter representing the ship type the reactor is designed for, a consecutive generation number, and a letter indicating the reactors designer. ...


Aircraft carriers

USS Nimitz (CVN-68) returns from deployment in the Persian Gulf.
USS Nimitz (CVN-68) returns from deployment in the Persian Gulf.

Due to their ability to put most nations within striking distance of U.S. air power, aircraft carriers are the cornerstones of the United States’ forward deployment and deterrence strategy.[29] Multiple carriers are deployed around the world at any given time to provide military presence, respond quickly to crises, and participate in joint exercises with allied forces;[30] this has led the Navy to refer to their Nimitz-class carriers as "4.5 acres of sovereign and mobile American territory."[31] Former President Bill Clinton summed up the importance of the aircraft carrier by stating that "when word of crisis breaks out in Washington, it's no accident the first question that comes to everyone's lips is: where is the nearest carrier?"[32] The power and operational flexibility of a carrier lie in the aircraft of its carrier air wing. Made up of both fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft, a carrier air wing is able to perform over 150 strike missions, hitting over 700 targets a day,[33] protect friendly forces, conduct electronic warfare, assist in special operations, and carry out search and rescue missions. In addition to their airborne capabilities, carriers are important as command platforms for large battle groups or multinational task forces. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 428 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 700 pixel, file size: 108 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 428 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (500 × 700 pixel, file size: 108 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... USS Nimitz (CVN-68) is a supercarrier in the United States Navy, the lead ship of its class. ... Two aircraft carriers, USS (left), and HMS Illustrious (right), showing the difference in size between a supercarrier and a light V/STOL aircraft carrier. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Carrier Air Wing is an arcade game that was released in 1990 by Capcom. ... Search and Rescue (acronym SAR) is an operation mounted by emergency services, often well-trained volunteers, to find someone believed to be in distress, lost, sick or injured either in a remote or difficult to access area, such as mountains, desert or forest (Wilderness search and rescue), or at sea...


A carrier is typically deployed along with a host of additional vessels, forming a carrier strike group. The supporting ships, which usually include three or four Aegis-equipped cruisers and destroyers, a frigate, and two attack submarines, are tasked with protecting the carrier from air, missile, sea, and undersea threats as well as providing additional strike capabilities themselves. Ready logistics support for the group is provided by a combined ammunition, oiler, and supply ship. Aircraft carriers beginning with USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) are named for living or deceased politicians important to the Navy or United States history. Previous aircraft carriers were generally named for battles and past famous fighting ships of the Navy. The Abraham Lincoln battle group during the 2000 RIMPAC exercises A carrier battle group (CVBG) consists of an aircraft carrier (CV) and its escorts. ... USS Lake Champlain, a Ticonderoga-class Aegis guided missile cruiser, launched in 1987 The Aegis combat system is an integrated missile guidance system used by the United States Navy. ... USS (CVA/CV-67) (or Big John) is a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier. ...

The Kitty Hawk-class supercarriers of the United States Navy were an incremental improvement on the Forrestal-class vessels. ... Enterprise Logo The supercarrier, USS Enterprise (CVN-65), formerly CVA(N)-65, is the worlds first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the eighth U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name. ... The Nimitz-class supercarriers are a line of nuclear-powered aircraft carriers in service with the US Navy, and are the largest capital ships in the world. ... The -class aircraft carriers (or Ford-class) will be the next generation supercarrier for the United States Navy. ...

Amphibious warfare vessels

Amphibious assault ships are the centerpieces of U.S. amphibious warfare and fulfill the same power projection role as aircraft carriers except that their striking force comprises land forces instead of aircraft. They deliver, command, coordinate, and fully support all elements of a 2200-strong Marine Expeditionary Unit in an amphibious assault using air and amphibious vehicles. Resembling small aircraft carriers, amphibious assault ships are capable of V/STOL, STOVL, VTOL, tiltrotor, and rotary wing aircraft operations. They also contain a welldeck to support the use of Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) and other amphibious assault watercraft. Recently, amphibious assault ships have begun to be deployed as the core of an expeditionary strike group, which usually consists of an additional amphibious transport dock and dock landing ship for amphibious warfare and an Aegis-equipped cruiser and destroyer, frigate, and attack submarine for group defense. Amphibious assault ships are typically named after World War II aircraft carriers, a name source carried over from the earliest assault ships which actually were converted WWII carriers. Six of the U.S. Navys assault ships in formation; lead ship and first ship to port are Tarawa-class, all others are Wasp-class Amphibious assault ships, usually shortened to amphibs, phibs or popularly known as gator freighters, denotes a range of classes of warship employed to land... A Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) is the smallest Marine Air-Ground Task Force in the United States Marine Corps. ... V/STOL is an acronym for Vertical/Short Take-Off and Landing. ... STOVL is an acronym for Short Take Off and Vertical Landing. ... The Hawker Harrier, one of the famous examples of a plane with VTOL capability. ... Landing craft Rapière LCU 1656 departs USS Bataan (LHD-5) well deck during Hurricane Katrina relief operations. ...

Amphibious transport docks are warships that embark, transport, and land Marines, supplies, and equipment in a supporting role during amphibious warfare missions. With a landing platform, amphibious transport docks also have the capability to serve as secondary aviation support for an expeditionary group. All amphibious transport docks can operate helicopters, LCACs, and other conventional amphibious vehicles while the newer San Antonio class of ships has been explicitly designed to operate all three elements of the Marines' "mobility triad": Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles (EFVs), the V-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft, and the previously mentioned LCACs. Amphibious transport docks are named for cities, except for USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19), named for Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado, and two of the three ships named in memory of the September 11, 2001 attacks: USS New York (LPD-21), for the state of New York, and USS Somerset (LPD-25) for Somerset County, Pennsylvania. General characteristics of the Tarawa-class amphibious assault ship: Builders: Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi Power Plant: Two boilers, two geared steam turbines, two shafts, 70,000 total shaft horsepower (52 MW) Length: 820 ft (249. ... The Wasp class amphibious assault ships of the United States Navy are designed to land forces on hostile shores, and they are the largest vessels of this type in service anywhere in the world. ... An amphibious transport dock (also called a landing platform dock or LPD) is an amphibious assault ship, a warship that embarks, transports, and lands elements of a landing force for expeditionary warfare missions. ... USMC Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle. ... The V-22 Osprey is a joint service, multimission, military tiltrotor aircraft with both a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) and short takeoff and landing capability (STOL). ... USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19), a San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, is the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. ... Mesa Verde National Park is a U.S. National Park and UNESCO World Heritage Site located in Montezuma County, Colorado, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... USS New York (LPD-21), a San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, is the sixth ship of the United States Navy to be named for the state of New York. ... This article is about the state. ... USS Somerset (LPD-25), a San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, is the fifth ship of the United States Navy of that name, in honor of Somerset County, Pennsylvania. ... Somerset County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania. ...

  • Austin class (9 in commission, 2 decommissioned, 1 converted to an auxiliary command ship)
  • San Antonio class (2 in commission, 3 under construction, 4 more planned)

The dock landing ship is a medium amphibious transport that is designed specifically to support and operate Landing Craft Air Cushions (LCACs), though it is able to operate other amphibious assault vehicles in the United States inventory as well. Dock landing ships are normally deployed as a component of an expeditionary strike group's amphibious assault contingent, operating as a secondary launch platform for LCACs. All dock landing ships are named after locations in the United States. The Austin class of amphibious transport dock followed the Raleigh class and was followed by the San Antonio and Cleveland classes. ... PCU San Antonio The San Antonio class is the United States Navys primary class of amphibious transport dock (LPD). ... The United States Navy Dock Landing Ship (Navy hull classification LSD) was designed to support amphibious operations. ... Landing craft Rapière A landing craft is a type of boat used to convey infantry and vehicles on to a shore during an assault from sea to land. ...

The Whidbey Island class dock landing ship is a ship of the United States Navy. ... The Harpers Ferry class of the United States Navy is a class of dock landing ships completed in the eary 1990s. ...

Surface vessels

Cruisers are large surface combat vessels that conduct anti-air/anti-missile warfare, surface warfare, undersea warfare, and strike operations independently or as members of a larger task force. Modern guided missile cruisers were developed out of a need to counter the anti-ship missile threat facing the United States Navy. This led to the development of the AN/SPY-1 phased array radar and the Standard Missile 2 with the Aegis combat system coordinating the two. Ticonderoga-class cruisers became the first to equip Aegis and were put to use primarily as anti-air and anti-missile defense in a battle force protection role. Later developments of vertical launch systems and the Tomahawk missile gave cruisers additional long-range land and sea strike capability, making them capable of both offensive and defensive battle operations. All cruisers since CG-47 have been named for famous battles with USS Thomas S. Gates (CG-51) as the only exception. Previously, cruisers were either named for cities (until CG-12), former important navy figures (CG-15 to CG-35), or states (CG-36 to CG-42). USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser (really an uprated guided missile destroyer), launched in 1992. ... The AN/SPY-1 is a US naval radar system manufactured by Lockheed Martin. ... The Standard Missile is a type of surface-to-air missile (SAM) originally developed for the United States Navy. ... USS Lake Champlain, a Ticonderoga-class Aegis guided missile cruiser, launched in 1987 The Aegis combat system is an integrated missile guidance system used by the United States Navy. ... Categories: Stub ... The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) is a long-range, all-weather, subsonic cruise missile. ... Crest of the USS USS (CG-51) is a Ticonderoga-class cruiser in the United States Navy. ...

USS Milius (DDG-69) fires a Tomahawk missile during Operation Iraqi Freedom.
USS Milius (DDG-69) fires a Tomahawk missile during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Destroyers are multi-mission medium surface ships capable of sustained performance in anti-air, anti-submarine, anti-ship, and offensive strike operations. Like cruisers, the guided missile destroyers of the Navy are primarily focused on surface strikes using Tomahawk missiles and fleet defense through Aegis and the Standard missile. Destroyers additionally specialize in anti-submarine warfare and are equipped with VLA rockets and LAMPS Mk III Sea Hawk helicopters to deal with underwater threats. When deployed with a carrier strike group or expeditionary strike group, destroyers and their fellow Aegis-equipped cruisers are primarily tasked with defending the fleet while providing secondary strike capabilities. Destroyers have been named for important navy personnel and heroes since the USS Bainbridge (DD-1). Ticonderoga class cruiser is a class of warships in the US Navy, first ordered and authorized in FY 1978. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1960x3008, 1787 KB)source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1960x3008, 1787 KB)source: http://www. ... Categories: Stub ... The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) is a long-range, all-weather, subsonic cruise missile. ... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq arguably without the explicit backing of the... USS Lassen, an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast and maneuverable yet long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet or battle group and defend them against smaller, short-range attackers (originally torpedo boats, later submarines and aircraft). ... The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) is a long-range, all-weather, subsonic cruise missile. ... USS Lake Champlain, a Ticonderoga-class Aegis guided missile cruiser, launched in 1987 The Aegis combat system is an integrated missile guidance system used by the United States Navy. ... The Standard Missile is a type of surface-to-air missile (SAM) originally developed for the United States Navy. ... An older Matchbox ASROC launcher, phased out in the 1990s ASROC (for Anti-Submarine ROCket) is an urgent-attack, all-weather, all sea-conditions anti-submarine missile system, developed by the United States Navy, and installed on over 200 surface ships, generally cruisers and destroyers. ... SH-60F of the United States Navy, with external fuel tank. ... The second USS Bainbridge (Destroyer No. ...

Modern U.S. frigates mainly perform undersea warfare for carrier strike groups and amphibious expeditionary groups and provide armed escort for supply convoys and merchant shipping. They are designed to protect friendly ships against hostile submarines in low to medium threat environments using torpedoes and LAMPS helicopters. Some Frigates are also able to launch Standard missiles to supply limited protection against anti-ship missiles. Independently, frigates are able to conduct counterdrug missions and other maritime interception operations. The U.S. Navy expects to retire its current class of frigates by 2020.[34] As in the case of destroyers, frigates are named after naval heroes. The Arleigh Burke class of guided missile destroyers, one of the destroyer classes of the United States Navy, is built around the Aegis combat system and the SPY-1D multi-function phased array radar. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ...

All U.S. battleships have been decommissioned and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register. Designed to engage other capital ships in open sea warfare, battleships were the Navy's largest and most important vessels until the mid-20th century. The rise of aircraft carriers in World War II led to the declining importance of battleships and the Navy relegated them to the roles of fire support and escort. Following a long period of inactivity, the Iowa class battleships were recommissioned in the 1980s to augment the Navy's size and were upgraded with Tomahawk cruise missile capability. They were decommissioned for the final time in the early 1990s due in part to their high maintenance costs and the Cold War's end. All battleships except USS Kearsarge (BB-5) were named for states. The USS McInerney (FFG 8), an Oliver Hazard Perry class frigate. ... For other uses, see Battleship (disambiguation). ... The Iowa-class battleships were six battleships ordered by the United States Navy in 1939 and 1940 for use as escorts for the Fast Carrier Task Forces operating in the Pacific Theatre of World War II. Four were completed in the early to mid-1940s; two more were laid down... USS Kearsarge (BB-5), the lead ship of her class of battleships, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named, by act of Congress, in honor of the famous American Civil War sloop of war Kearsarge. ...

USS Louisville (SSN-724) entering Pearl Harbor.
USS Louisville (SSN-724) entering Pearl Harbor.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2100x1500, 698 KB)source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2100x1500, 698 KB)source: http://www. ... USS Louisville (SSN-724), a Los Angeles-class submarine, was the fourth ship of the United States Navy to be named for Louisville, Kentucky. ... This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ...

Submarines

The primary missions of submarines in the U.S. Navy are peacetime engagement, surveillance and intelligence, special operations, precision strikes, battlegroup operations, and denial of the seas.[35] The U.S. Navy operates two types: ballistic submarines and attack submarines. Ballistic submarines have only one mission: to carry and launch the nuclear Trident missile. Attack submarines have several tactical missions, including sinking ships and subs, launching cruise missiles, gathering intelligence, and assisting in special operations. Sea attack submarines are typically named for cities while land attack submarines (Virginia- and converted Ohio-class boats) are typically named for states. Earlier attack submarines were named for "denizens of the deep", while earlier ballistic missile submarines were named for "famous Americans" (although many of them were actually foreigners). There are two major types of submarines in the United States Navy: ballistic missile submarines and attack submarines. ... This article contains technical information about the Trident ballistic missile. ... A Tomahawk cruise missile A cruise missile is a guided missile which uses a lifting wing and most often a jet propulsion system to allow sustained flight. ...

  • Ohio class (18 in commission) — ballistic missile submarines with four converted into guided missile submarines.
  • Los Angeles class (49 in commission, 13 decommissioned) — attack submarines
  • Seawolf class (3 in commission) — attack submarines
  • Virginia class (3 in commission, 3 under construction, 5 more planned) — attack submarines

The United States has 18 Ohio class submarines: 14 nuclear-powered SSBNs, each armed with 24 Trident II SLBMs; they are also known as Trident submarines, and provide the sea-based leg of the nuclear triad of the United States strategic deterrent forces 4 nuclear-powered SSGNs, each armed with... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Los Angeles class submarines The Los Angeles class is a class of nuclear-powered fast attack submarines (SSN) that forms the backbone of the United States submarine fleet, and is the most numerous class of nuclear powered submarine in the world. ... USS Seawolf (SSN-575) The Seawolf class attack submarine (SSN) was the intended successor to the Los Angeles class, ordered at the end of the Cold War in 1989. ... The Virginia class (or SSN-774 class) of attack submarines are the first U.S. subs to be designed for a broad spectrum of open-ocean and littoral missions around the world. ...

Historically significant vessels

The U.S. Navy has operated a number of vessels important to both United States and world naval history. USS Constitution, nicknamed "Old Ironsides", is the only surviving vessel of the original six frigates authorized by Congress when they re-established the United States Navy in 1794. It served with distinction in the War of 1812 and is currently docked in Charlestown, Massachusetts, as the oldest commissioned warship afloat. USS Monitor and CSS Virginia are together known for participating in the first engagement between two steam-powered ironclads, known as the Battle of Hampton Roads. USS Monitor was the first ironclad built by the U.S. Navy and its design introduced the rotating gun turret to naval warfare. The first submarine built by the U.S. Navy was USS Alligator, which sank in 1863 while being towed during a storm and never saw combat. The submarine USS Nautilus (SSN-571), commissioned in 1954, was the first nuclear-powered warship in the world. It demonstrated its capabilities by traveling 62,562 miles (100,684 km), more than half of which was submerged, in two years before having to refuel while breaking the record for longest submerged voyage.[36] USS Long Beach (CGN-9) was the first nuclear-powered surface warship in the world and signaled a new era of United States naval weaponry by being the first large ship in the Navy to have guided missiles as its main battery. Image File history File linksMetadata USS_Constitution_1997. ... Image File history File linksMetadata USS_Constitution_1997. ... “ Old Ironsides ” redirects here. ... “ Old Ironsides ” redirects here. ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ... USS Monitor was the first ironclad warship commissioned by the United States Navy. ... CSS Virginia was an ironclad warship of the Confederate States Navy during the American Civil War (built using the remains of the scuttled USS Merrimack). ... Ironclad warships, frequently shortened to just ironclads, were ships sheathed with thick iron plates for protection. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders John L. Worden Franklin Buchanan Catesby R. Jones Strength 1 ironclad, 3 wooden warships 1 ironclad, 2 wooden warships, 1 gunboat, 2 tenders Casualties 2 wooden warships sunk, 1 wooden warship damaged 261 killed 108 wounded 1 ironclad damaged 7... The fourth USS Alligator is the first known US Navy submarine, though not of the United States. ... USS Nautilus (SSN-571) was the worlds first operational nuclear-powered submarine and the first vessel to complete a submerged transit across the North Pole. ... USS Long Beach (CGN-160/CLGN-160/CGN-9) was the first all-new cruiser designed and constructed after World War II (all others were completions or conversions of cruisers begun or completed during the war). ...


Aircraft

Four F/A-18F Super Hornets fly over the Western Pacific Ocean.
Four F/A-18F Super Hornets fly over the Western Pacific Ocean.
See also: List of United States Navy aircraft squadrons

Carrier-based aircraft are able to strike air, sea, and land targets far from a carrier strike group while protecting friendly forces from enemy aircraft, ships, and submarines. In peacetime, aircraft's ability to project the threat of sustained attack from a mobile platform on the seas gives United States leaders significant diplomatic and crisis-management options. Aircraft additionally provide logistics support to maintain the Navy’s readiness and, through helicopters, supply platforms with which to conduct search and rescue, special operations, anti-submarine warfare (ASW), and anti-surface warfare (ASuW). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1960x3008, 395 KB) F/A-18 Super Hornets assigned to the Black Aces of Strike Fighter Squadron Forty One (VFA-41) fly over the Western Pacific Ocean 031025-N-9411J-008 Western Pacific Ocean (Oct. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1960x3008, 395 KB) F/A-18 Super Hornets assigned to the Black Aces of Strike Fighter Squadron Forty One (VFA-41) fly over the Western Pacific Ocean 031025-N-9411J-008 Western Pacific Ocean (Oct. ... The Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet is a carrier-based fighter/attack aircraft that entered service in 1999 with the United States Navy. ... Naval aircraft used by the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... This list of military aircraft of the United States includes prototype, pre-production and operational types. ... This is a list of United States Navy aircraft squadrons. ... Look up Logistics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Search and Rescue (acronym SAR) is an operation mounted by emergency services, often well-trained volunteers, to find someone believed to be in distress, lost, sick or injured either in a remote or difficult to access area, such as mountains, desert or forest (Wilderness search and rescue), or at sea... Special forces or special operations forces is a term used to describe relatively small military units raised and trained for reconnaissance, unconventional warfare and special operations. ... “A/S” redirects here. ... Anti-surface warfare, or ASUW (sometimes ASuW or less commonly, anti-surface unit warfare) is a type of naval warfare directed against surface ships. ...


The U.S. Navy began to research the use of aircraft at sea in the 1910s and commissioned its first aircraft carrier, USS Langley, in 1922.[37] United States naval aviation fully came of age in World War II, when it became clear following the Attack on Pearl Harbor, the Battle of the Coral Sea, and the Battle of Midway that aircraft carriers and the planes that they carried had replaced the battleship as the greatest weapon on the seas. Navy aircraft also played a significant role in conflicts during the following Cold War years, with the F-4 Phantom II and the F-14 Tomcat becoming military icons of the era. The Navy's current primary fighter and attack airplanes are the multi-mission F/A-18C/D Hornet and its newer cousin, the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. The F-35 Lightning II is presently under development and is scheduled to replace the C and D versions of the Hornet in 2012.[38] The USS Langley (CV-1/AV-3) was the United States Navys first aircraft carrier. ... This article is about the actual attack. ... Combatants United States Navy Royal Australian Navy Imperial Japanese Navy Commanders Frank J. Fletcher John G. Crace Shigeyoshi Inoue Takeo Takagi Strength 2 large carriers, 3 cruisers 2 large carriers, 1 light carrier, 4 cruisers Casualties 1 fleet carrier, 1 destroyer, 1 oil tanker sunk 543 killed 1 light carrier... Combatants United States Empire of Japan Commanders Chester W. Nimitz Frank J. Fletcher Raymond A. Spruance Isoroku Yamamoto Chuichi Nagumo Tamon Yamaguchi â€  Strength 3 carriers, ~50 support ships, 233 carrier aircraft, 127 land-based aircraft 4 carriers, 7 battleships, ~150 support ships, 248 carrier aircraft, 16 floatplanes Casualties 1 carrier... “F-4” redirects here. ... The Grumman F-14 Tomcat is a supersonic, twin-engine, two-seat, variable geometry wing aircraft. ... The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F/A-18 Hornet is a modern all-weather carrier-capable strike fighter jet, designed to attack both ground and aerial targets. ... The Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet is a carrier-based fighter/attack aircraft that entered service in 1999 with the United States Navy. ... The F-35 Lightning II is a single-seat, single-engine, stealth-capable military strike fighter, a multi-role aircraft that can perform close air support, tactical bombing, and air-to-air combat. ...


Weapons systems

Current U.S. Navy shipboard weapons systems are almost entirely focused on missiles, both as a weapon and as a threat. In an offensive role, missiles are intended to strike targets at long distances with accuracy and precision. Because they are unmanned weapons, missiles allow for attacks on heavily defended targets without risk to human pilots. Land strikes are the domain of the BGM-109 Tomahawk, which was first deployed in the 1980s and is continually being updated to increase its capabilities. For anti-ship strikes, the Navy's dedicated missile is the Harpoon missile. To defend against enemy missile attack, the Navy operates a number of systems that are all coordinated by the Aegis combat system. Medium-long range defense is provided by the Standard Missile 2, which has been deployed since the 1980s. The Standard missile doubles as the primary shipboard anti-aircraft weapon and is undergoing development for use in theater ballistic missile defense. Short range defense against missiles is provided by the Phalanx CIWS and the more recently developed RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile. In addition to missiles, the Navy employs Mark 46 and Mark 50 torpedoes and various types of mines. Shipboard systems Aegis combat system MK 45 5-inch gun Phalanx CIWS AGM-84 Harpoon BGM-109 Tomahawk RIM-7 Sea Sparrow RIM-67 Standard 2 RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile Mark 46 torpedo Mark 48 torpedo Mark 50 torpedo Mark 60 Captor Mine Trident II (D-5) nuclear... The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) is a long-range, all-weather, subsonic cruise missile. ... The AGM-84 Harpoon is a US all-weather, over-the-horizon, anti-ship missile system. ... USS Lake Champlain, a Ticonderoga-class Aegis guided missile cruiser, launched in 1987 The Aegis combat system is an integrated missile guidance system used by the United States Navy. ... The Standard Missile is a type of surface-to-air missile (SAM) originally developed for the United States Navy. ... Block 1 CIWS The Phalanx CIWS (Close-in weapon system, pronounced see-wiz) is an anti-missile system that was designed and manufactured by the General Dynamics Corporation, Pomona Division. ... Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile is a development of the Sea Sparrow missile used to protect ships from attacking missiles and aircraft. ... A French Lynx helicopter carrying a mk46 torpedo Designed to attack high-performance submarines, the Mark 46 torpedo is the backbone of the U.S. Navys lightweight ASW torpedo inventory, and is the current NATO standard. ... Mark 50 torpedo being fired The Mark 50 torpedo is a U.S. Navy advanced lightweight torpedo for use against the faster, deeper-diving and more sophisticated submarines. ...

Aviation Ordnancemen loading GBU-12 bombs.
Aviation Ordnancemen loading GBU-12 bombs.

Naval fixed-wing aircraft employ much of the same weapons as the United States Air Force for both air-to-air and air-to-surface combat. Air engagements are handled by the heat-seeking Sidewinder and the radar guided AMRAAM missiles along with the M61 Vulcan for close range dogfighting. For surface strikes, Navy aircraft utilize a combination of missiles, smart bombs, and dumb bombs. On the list of available missiles are the Maverick, SLAM-ER, and JSOW. Smart bombs include the GPS-guided JDAM and the laser-guided Paveway series. Unguided munitions such as dumb bombs and cluster bombs round out the rest of the weapons deployed by fixed-wing aircraft. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2100x1500, 722 KB)source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2100x1500, 722 KB)source: http://www. ... American Paveway-series laser-guided bomb, based on the Mk 82 general-purpose bomb, but with laser seeker and wings for guidance. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... The AIM-9 Sidewinder is a heat-seeking, short-range, air-to-air missile carried by fighter aircraft and recently, certain gunship helicopters. ... The AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile, or AMRAAM (pronounced am-ram), is a modern Beyond Visual Range (BVR) air-to-air missile (AAM) capable of all weather day and night performance. ... Unmounted M61 Vulcan The 20 mm M61 Vulcan is a hydraulically or pneumatically driven, six-barreled, air-cooled, electrically fired Gatling-style cannon with an extremely high rate of fire. ... The AGM-65 Maverick is an air-to-ground tactical missile (AGM) designed for close air support. ... The Standoff Land Attack Missile or SLAM is an over-the-horizon, all-weather cruise missile which grew out of the Navys Harpoon anti-ship missile in the 1970s. ... AGM-154 JSOW The Joint Standoff Weapon (JSOW) was a joint venture of the United States Navy and Air Force to deploy a standardized medium range precision guided weapon, especially for engagement of defended targets at ranges outside that of standard anti-aircraft defenses, thereby increasing aircraft survivability and minimizing... The Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) is a guidance tail kit that converts existing unguided free-fall bombs into accurate, adverse weather smart munitions. ... A Paveway III seeker head, at the RAF Museum in Hendon, London. ... A US B-1 Lancer releasing its payload of cluster bombs Cluster Munitions or Cluster Bombs are air-dropped or ground-launched munitions that eject a number of smaller submunitions (bomblets). The most common types are intended to kill enemy personnel and destroy vehicles. ...


Rotary aircraft weapons revolve around anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and light to medium surface engagements. To combat submarines, helicopters use Mark 46 and Mark 50 torpedoes. Against small watercraft, they utilize Hellfire and Penguin air to surface missiles. Helicopters also employ various types of mounted anti-personnel machine guns, including the M60D, M240, GAU-16, and GAU-17. Type Air-to-ground and surface-to-surface Missile Nationality United States Era Cold War and through Global War on Terrorism Launch platform Rotary- and fixed-wing platforms, Unmanned aerial vehicle, tri-pods, ships, and ground vehicles Target Three warhead variants defeat an array of targets including tanks, light armored... The Penguin anti-ship missile (U.S. designation AGM-119), made by Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace (KDA)[1] [2] of Norway from the early 1970s and continually upgraded since, is a passive-IR seeker based short-to-medium range naval cruise missile. ... For other uses, see M60. ... The M240, formally United States Machine Gun, 7. ... The GAU-16/A is the improved version of the GAU-15 both of which are aircaft carried derivatives of the venerable M2 fifty calibre machine gun. ... GAU-17 is the name of a 7. ...


Nuclear weapons in the U.S. Navy arsenal are deployed through ballistic missile submarines and aircraft. The Ohio-class submarine carries the latest iteration of the Trident missile, a three stage, underwater launched, nuclear ICBM with MIRV capability; the current Trident II (D5) version is expected to be in service past 2020.[39] The Navy’s other nuclear weapon is the aircraft-deployed B61 nuclear bomb. The B61 is a thermonuclear device that can be dropped by strike aircraft such as the F/A-18 Hornet and Super Hornet at high speed from a large range of altitudes. They can be released through free-fall or parachute and can be set to detonate in the air or on the ground. The United States has 18 Ohio class submarines: 14 nuclear-powered SSBNs, each armed with 24 Trident II SLBMs; they are also known as Trident submarines, and provide the sea-based leg of the nuclear triad of the United States strategic deterrent forces 4 nuclear-powered SSGNs, each armed with... This article contains technical information about the Trident ballistic missile. ... A Minuteman III missile soars after a test launch. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... B61 bomb in various stages of assembly. ...


Special warfare

SEALs coming ashore.
SEALs coming ashore.

The major players in U.S. Navy special operations are the United States Navy SEALs and the Special Warfare Combatant-craft Crewmen (SWCCs, pronounced "swicks"). SEALs in from the water. ... SEALs in from the water. ... Navy SEALs redirects here. ... The Special Warfare Combatant-craft Crewman Badge (SWCC badge) is a military qualification badge of the United States Navy which was first conceived in 1996, though the design wasnt approved for wear until 2001. ...


The SEALs derive their name from the environments in and from which they can operate: SEa, Air, and Land. Their distinguishing specialty, however, is maritime operations — striking from and returning to the sea.[40]The SEALs are a flexible group of naval Special Forces who are trained to conduct clandestine warfare, most often in small-unit actions. For other uses, see Special forces (disambiguation). ...


SWCC's are trained in small ship and watercraft special operations and often work closely with their SEAL counterparts. Organized into Special Boat Teams, SWCCs have their expertise in inserting and extracting SEALs in hostile territory, coastal patrol and surveillance, and boarding and searching vessels.[41]


Naval special operations groups

Navy special operations fall under the jurisdiction of Naval Special Warfare Command, the Navy branch of United States Special Operations Command. Within Naval Special Warfare Command are seven operational entities: four Special Warfare Groups, the Special Warfare Development Group, the Operational Support Group, and the Special Warfare Center. NAVSPECWARCOM logo. ... Emblem of the United States Special Operations Command. ...

  • Naval Special Warfare Group ONE and Group TWO each consist of four teams of Navy SEALs and a few Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Units. NSW units are charged with overall command and control and planning of special operations within their geographic jurisdiction.
  • Group FOUR comprises all of the Navy's Special Boat Teams.
  • The Navy Special Warfare Development Group, also known as Dev Group or DEVGRU, is the United States military's premier Maritime Counter-Terrorism unit. While the Navy confirms the existence of the unit, it merely states that the role of Dev Group is to test, evaluate, and develop technology and maritime, ground and airborne tactics for Navy Special Warfare; no official mention of counter-terrorism concerning DEVGRU is made. Though much of the information regarding this unit is classified, it is estimated that the group consists of approximately 200 active operators.[42]
  • The Operational Support Group is the reserve element of NSWC, providing support to active units when necessary.[43]

Although not under the jurisdiction of NSW Command, Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Units often work closely with special operations teams. Trained to be combat-ready and highly mobile, EOD units are entrusted with nullifying hazardous ordnance in a number of different maritime environments.[44] They are also able to conduct underwater anti-mine operations using marine mammals.[45] Navy SEALs redirects here. ... Mark 8 mod 1 SDV The Swimmer Delivery Vehicle (SDV) is a manned submersible used to deliver United States Navy SEALs and their equipment for special operations missions. ... Mark 8 mod 1 SDV Swimmer Delivery Vehicles (SDVs) are midget wet submersibles designed to transport combat swimmers or naval Special Forces underwater, over long distances. ... Advanced SEAL Delivery System (ASDS) is a midget submarine operated by the United States Navy and SOCOM, designed to provide stealthy submerged transportation for special forces, primarily U.S. Navy SEALs, from the decks of nuclear submarines. ... SEAL Team SIX patch The United States Navy Special Warfare Development Group (NAVSPECWARDEVGRU, also known as NSWDG or DEVGRU) is the United States Navys premier counter-terrorism unit. ... The United States Naval Special Warfare Center (NSWC, also know as The Center) is part, a component command, of the Naval Special Warfare Command and is sited within the Naval base Coronado in San Diego, California. ... Navy SEALs redirects here. ... Bomb disposal is the process by which hazardous devices are rendered safe. ...


Coastal warfare

Members of Inshore Boat Unit 24 patrol near Kuwait Naval Base.
Members of Inshore Boat Unit 24 patrol near Kuwait Naval Base.

Coastal and harbor defense and protection of naval assets are placed under the jurisdiction of two Naval Coastal Warfare Groups: one for the Pacific Fleet and one for the Atlantic Fleet. Within these groups are Mobile Security Squadrons and Naval Coastal Warfare Squadrons. MSSs deploy Mobile Security Detachments that provide force protection for high value naval targets in ports and harbors where U.S. shore infrastructure is limited or does not exist. Naval Coastal Warfare Squadrons provide surveillance and security in harbors, coasts, and inshore areas. They comprise Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Units (MIUWUs) and Inshore Boat Units (IBUs). MIUWUs are charged with security, observation, and communications support for commanders operating in an inshore/coast environment, including anchorages and harbors. In the same operating environment, IBUs manage water craft for security, interdiction and surveillance. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1504x1000, 331 KB)source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1504x1000, 331 KB)source: http://www. ...


Naval culture

 First and Current U.S. Naval Jack
First and Current U.S. Naval Jack
 Former U.S. Naval Jack
Former U.S. Naval Jack
The Lone Sailor Statue at the United States Navy Memorial in Washington DC
The Lone Sailor Statue at the United States Navy Memorial in Washington DC

The current naval jack of the United States is the First Navy Jack, traditionally regarded as having been used during the American Revolutionary War. On May 31, 2002, Secretary of the Navy Gordon England directed all U.S. naval ships to fly the First Navy Jack for the duration of the War on Terrorism. Many ships chose to shift colors later that year on the first anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks. The previous naval jack was a blue field with 50 white stars, identical to the canton of the ensign (the Flag of the United States) both in appearance and size. A jack of similar design was used in 1794, though with 13 stars arranged in a 3–2–3–2–3 pattern. When a ship is moored or anchored, the jack is flown from the bow of the ship while the ensign is flown from the stern. When underway, the ensign is raised on the mainmast. The First Naval Jack, however, has always been flown on the oldest ship in the American fleet. Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ... Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ... Image File history File links FIAV_000001. ... Image File history File links US_Naval_Jack. ... Image File history File links US_Naval_Jack. ... Image File history File links FIAV_historical. ... Image File history File links FIAV_000001. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The United States Navy Memorial at 7th Street between Pennsylvania Avenue and Indiana Avenue in Washington, D.C. honors those who have served, and are currently serving, in the Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and the Merchant Marine. ... A Maritime flag or Naval Jack is a national flag used exclusively on boats and other watercraft. ... US First Navy Jack In the fall of 1775, as the first ships of the Continental Navy readied in the Delaware River, Commodore Esek Hopkins issued, in a set of fleet signals, an instruction directing his vessels to fly a striped Jack and Ensign. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Secretary Gordon R. England Gordon Richard England is an American businessman who (as of 2004) serves as the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11 2001. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Union Jack. ... Bow of the Cruise ship Spirit of Endeavour The bows of lifeboat 17-31 (Severn class) in Poole Harbour, Dorset, England The bow (pronounced to rhyme with how) is a nautical term that refers to the forward part of the hull of a ship or boat, the point that is... Aft of the Soleil Royal, by Jean Bérain the Elder. ...


Over the course of the United States Navy's 207-year existence, a distinct jargon has evolved among American sailors and has become a normal part of their everyday speech. Modern U.S. Navy slang draws from a number of varied sources. It includes traditional sailing terms, archaic English words, and a plethora of acronyms, joke phrases, crude expressions, and abbreviations that have been created within the past hundred years.


The USN also has new sailors take the "Sailor's creed" upon entering into service. The United States Sailors Creed is a pledge taken upon by all persons entering the United States Navy. ...


Notable sailors

John Paul Jones, America's first well-known navy hero.
John Paul Jones, America's first well-known navy hero.

Many past and present United States historical figures have served in the Navy. Notable officers include John Paul Jones, James Lawrence, whose last words "Don't give up the ship" are memorialized in Bancroft Hall at the US Naval Academy, Oliver Hazard Perry, Commodore Matthew Perry, who fully opened Tokugawa-era Japan to the West, and Chester Nimitz, Admiral of the Pacific Fleet in World War II, Rodger W. Simpson, World War II Hero. A number of former Presidents were in the Navy as well, including John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, and George H.W. Bush. Both Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin D. Roosevelt were the Assistant Secretary of the Navy prior to their Presidencies. Some members of the United States Senate and House of Representatives, for example John McCain and John Kerry, have also seen Navy service. Other notable former members of the U.S. Navy include astronauts, entertainers, authors, and professional athletes such as David Robinson and Roger Staubach. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 432 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (610 × 846 pixels, file size: 492 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) John Paul Jones Primary source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 432 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (610 × 846 pixels, file size: 492 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) John Paul Jones Primary source: http://www. ... John Paul Jones (July 11, 1747–July 18, 1792) was Americas first well-known naval hero in the American Revolutionary War. ... // Main article: :Category:United States Navy officers W. W. Behrens, Jr. ... John Paul Jones (July 11, 1747–July 18, 1792) was Americas first well-known naval hero in the American Revolutionary War. ... Captain James Lawrence, USN James Lawrence (October 1, 1781 – June 4, 1813) was an American naval hero. ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... Oliver Hazard Perry Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (August 23, 1785 – August 23, 1819) was an officer in the United States Navy. ... Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858). ... The Edo period ), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1868. ... Chester William Nimitz (February 24, 1885 – February 20, 1966) was the Commander in Chief of Pacific Forces for the United States and Allied forces during World War II. He was the United States leading authority on submarines, as well as Chief of the Navys Bureau of Navigation in 1939. ... Roger Whitton Simpson (1898–1964) was a rear admiral of the United States Navy who distinguished himself during World War II. The USS Simpson (FFG-56) was named in his honor. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... FDR redirects here. ... Assistant Secretary of the Navy (abbrev. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... David Maurice Robinson (born August 6, 1965)) is a retired American NBA basketball player, who is often considered one of the greatest centers to ever play the game. ... Roger Thomas Staubach (born February 5, 1942 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a businessman, Heisman Trophy winner and former American professional football player where he was the quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys for most of the 1970s during their reign as Americas Team. ...


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United States Navy Portal
Military of the United States Portal
  • Globalsecurity.org United States Navy section
  • Naval Open Source Intelligence (NOSI)
  • United States Navy Official Website
  • U.S. Navy in WW II
  • Howarth, Steven. To Shining Sea: A history of the United States Navy 1776-1991. New York: Random House, 1991. ISBN 0-394-57662-4
  • Love, Robert W. Jr. History of the U.S. Navy Volume One: 1775-1941. Harrisburg: Stackpole Books, 1992. ISBN 0-8117-1862-X

is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (99th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the United States armed forces a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Navy_Seal. ... Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ...

External links

  • United States Navy official website.
  • Navy.com, USN official recruitment site.
  • U.S. Navy Times website.; official news
  • United States Navy Memorial.
  • Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports regarding the U.S. Navy. University of North Texas Libraries.
  • Photographic History of The U.S. Navy. Naval History. NavSource.
  • Haze Gray & Underway — Naval History and Photography. HazeGray.org.
  • U.S. Navy Ships. Military Analysis Network. Federation of America Scientists.
  • United States Navy in World War I. World War I at Sea.net. Retrieved on 2007-02-03. (Includes warship losses.)
  • U.S. Navy in World War II. World War II on the World Wide Web. Hyper War. (Includes The Official Chronology of the U.S. Navy in World War II.)
  • Our Fighting Ships". U.S. WW II Newsmap. Army Orientation Course (1942-06-29). Hosted by the UNT Libraries Digital Collections
  • Strict Neutrality — Britain & France at War with Germany, September 1939 - May 1940. United States Navy and World War II. Naval-History.net. Retrieved on 2007-02-03. (Chronology of the lead up of U.S. entry into WWII.)
  • The National Security Strategy of the United States of America.

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