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Encyclopedia > United States National Guard
United States National Guard

Active 1903 to Present
Country United States
Allegiance States(Title 32 USC)
Federal(Title 10 USC)
Role Military Reserve
Size 456,800 end strength FY2004
Part of National Guard Bureau
Garrison/HQ in all fifty States, as well as organized territories of the United States
Nickname Air Guard
Army Guard
Motto Minutemen
Commanders
Current
commander
Lieutenant General H Steven Blum

The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). Both are maintained through the National Guard Bureau, a semi-independent subordinate entity of the United States Department of Defense, whose Chief is a Lieutenant General. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Lieutenant General H Steven Blum (1946-) currently serves as the 25th Chief of the National Guard Bureau. ... A military reserve force is a military organization composed of part-time military personnel, and sometimes civilians, who are available to fight when a nation mobilizes for total war or to defend against invasion. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ...

Contents

Overview

The Militia Act of 1903 organized the various state militias into the present National Guard system. The Army National Guard is part of the United States Army, comprising approximately one half of its available combat forces and approximately one third of its support organization. The Air National Guard is part of the United States Air Force. The Militia Act of 1903, also known as the Dick Act, was the result of a program of reform and reorganization in the military establishment initiated by Secretary of War Elihu Root following the Spanish-American War of 1898 after the war demonstrated weaknesses in the militia, as well as... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an organization of citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Army National Guard consists of the land force of the United States National Guard, or organized militia, of the several States and Territories, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, active and inactive, as defined in Title 32, USC Section 101. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The Air National Guard (ANG) is part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial warfare branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ...


Title X of the US Code states:

(a) The militia of the United States consists of all able-bodied males at least 17 years of age and, except as provided in section 313 of title 32, under 45 years of age who are, or who have made a declaration of intention to become, citizens of the United States and of female citizens of the United States who are members of the National Guard.
(b) The classes of the militia are—

(1) the organized militia, which consists of the National Guard and the Naval Militia; and
(2) the unorganized militia, which consists of the members of the militia who are not members of the National Guard or the Naval Militia.[1]

Many states also maintain their own State Defense Forces. These forces are federally recognized, but are separate from the National Guard and are not meant to be federalized, but rather serve the state exclusively, especially when the National Guard is deployed or otherwise unavailable. State Defense Forces (also known as State Guards, State Military Reserves, or State Militias) in the United States are military units that operate under the sole authority of a state government, although they are regulated by the National Guard Bureau of the United States Army. ...


Army National Guard units are trained and equipped as part of the U.S. Army; likewise, Air National Guard units are trained and equipped as part of the US Air Force. Both are expected to adhere to the same moral and physical standards as their "full-time" Federal counterparts. The same ranks and insignia are used and National Guardsmen are eligible to receive all United States military awards. The National Guard also bestows a number of state awards for local services rendered in a service member's home state. Awards and decorations of the United States military are military decorations which recognize a service members service and personal accomplishments while a member of the United States armed forces. ... Awards and decorations of the National Guard are presented to members of the United States National Guard in addition to regular United States military decorations. ...


Constitutional basis for the National Guard

National Guardsmen, Penn Station, New York City
National Guardsmen, Penn Station, New York City

The United States National Guard is authorized by the Constitution of the United States. As originally drafted, the Constitution limited the mustering of state militias: without the consent of Congress, states could not "keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace,…or engage in War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of delay." (Article I, Section 10; Clause 3) Congress, however, had a duty to protect states from invasion and domestic violence (Article IV, Section 4). Afraid that Congress would deny states the right to maintain their militias, which had a long history in the Colonial era, the nation passed the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1791, stating that "a well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of The People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed." This picture was taken on July 17, 2004, at Penn Station in New York City. ... This picture was taken on July 17, 2004, at Penn Station in New York City. ... Pennsylvania Station (commonly known as Penn Station) is the major intercity rail station and a major commuter rail hub in New York City. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... The role of militia, also known as civilian military service and duty, in the United States is complex and has transformed over time. ... The Bill of Rights in the National Archives Amendment II (the Second Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, declares a well regulated militia as being necessary to the security of a free State, and prohibits Congress or any other government agency from...


State militias are not entirely independent, however, because they may be federalized. According to Article I, Section 8; Clause 15, the United States Congress is given the power to pass laws for "calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections and repel Invasions." Congress may appropriate funds to support state militias (clause 12), and may: Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...

"provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the Militia, and for governing such Part of them as may be employed in the Service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively, the Appointment of the Officers, and the Authority of training the Militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress." (clause 16)

The President of the United States is the commander-in-chief of the state militias "when called into the actual Service of the United States". (Article II, Section 2). For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...


Laws covering the National Guard

The United states Congress has enacted various laws which control the National Guard

  1. The Militia Act of 1792
    Providing for the authority of the President to call out the Militia, and providing federal standards for the organization of the Militia.
    For the 111 years that the Militia Act of 1792 remained in effect, it defined the position of the militia in relation to the federal government. The War of 1812 tested this uniquely American defense establishment. To fight the War of 1812, the republic formed a small regular military and trained it to protect the frontiers and coastlines. Although it performed poorly in the offensive against Canada, the small force of regulars backed by a well-armed militia, accomplished its defensive mission well. Generals like Andrew Jackson proved, just as they had in the Revolution, that regulars and militia could be effective when employed as a team.
  2. The Militia Act of 1862
    Providing for the service of persons of African Descent in the Militia, and the Emancipation of Slaves owned by Confederates.
  3. Title 18, U.S. Code, Section 1385: The Posse Comitatus Act of June 18, 1878
    Congress' suspension of southern states' right to organize a militia resulted in Posse Comitatus, a limiting of any person's use of the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force in domestic law enforcement. The U.S. Navy and the U.S. Coast Guard, and the National Guard, when NOT in Federal Service, are specifically not limited by this act.
    The States revise the military codes - 1881 to 1892
  4. The Militia Act of 1903
    Affirmed the National Guard as the primary organized reserve force.
  5. The National Defense Act, 1916
    This act abandoned the idea of an expandable Regular Army and firmly established the traditional concept of the citizens' army as the keystone of the United States defense forces. It established the concept of merging the National Guard, the Army Reserve, and the Regular Army into the Army of the United States in time of war. The act further expanded the National Guard's role, and guaranteed the State militias' status as the Army's primary reserve force. The law mandated use of the term "National Guard" for that force, and the President was given authority, in case of war or national emergency, to mobilize the National Guard for the duration of the emergency. The number of yearly drills increased from 24 to 48 and annual training from five to 15 days. Drill pay was authorized for the first time.
  6. The National Defense Act Amendments of 1920
    This act established that the chief of the Militia Bureau (later the National Guard Bureau) would be a National Guard officer, that National Guard officers would be assigned to the general staff and that the divisions, as used by the Guard in World War I, would be reorganized.
  7. The National Guard Mobilization Act, 1933
    Made the National Guard a component of the Army.
  8. The National Defense Act of 1947
    Section 207 (f) established the Air National Guard, under the National Guard Bureau.
  9. The Total Force Policy, 1973
    Requires all active and reserve military organizations be treated as a single integrated force; reinforced the original intent of the founding fathers (a small standing army complemented by citizen-soldiers.)[Neutrality disputed — See talk page]
  10. The Montgomery Amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1987
    provides that a governor cannot withhold consent with regard to active duty outside the United States because of any objection to the location, purpose, type, or schedule of such duty. This law was challenged and upheld by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1990 (see case in FindLaw [2])
  11. John Warner Defense Authorization Act of 2007 H.R. 5122
    Federal law was changed so that the Governor of a state is no longer the sole commander in chief of the National Guard during emergencies within the state. The President of the United States will now be able to take control of a state's National Guard units without the governor's consent.[3] In a letter to Congress all 50 governors opposed the increase in power of the president over the National Guard.[4]

// Authority Second Congress, Session I. Chapter XXVIII Passed May 2, 1792 providing for the authority of the President to call out the Militia Sec. ... Combatants United States British Empire: United Kingdom Upper Canada Lower Canada Newfoundland Nova Scotia Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •United States Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Militia Act of 1862 was legislation enacted by the United States Congress in 1862 during the American Civil War to enable African Americans to join the Union Army to free up front line troops for combat. ... The Posse Comitatus Act is a United States federal law (18 U.S.C. Â§ 1385) passed on June 16, 1878 after the end of Reconstruction. ... The Militia Act of 1903, also known as the Dick Act, was the result of a program of reform and reorganization in the military establishment initiated by Secretary of War Elihu Root following the Spanish-American War of 1898 after the war demonstrated weaknesses in the militia, as well as... The National Guard Bureau is located in Washington DC and is a joint command operated by the United States Department of the Army and The United States Department of the Air Force to conduct all the administrative matters pertaining to the Army National Guard and the Air National Guard. ... National Defense Act of 1947 Sections 207-209 Creation of the US Air Force The following text is taken from the National Security Act of 1947 and is the document authorizing the creation of a separate US Air Force. ... The Air National Guard (ANG) is part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... The National Guard Bureau is located in Washington DC and is a joint command operated by the United States Department of the Army and The United States Department of the Air Force to conduct all the administrative matters pertaining to the Army National Guard and the Air National Guard. ... Shortcut: WP:NPOV Wikipedia policy is that all articles should be written from a neutral point of view. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... H.R. 5122, also known as the John Warner National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007 was a bill passed in the United States Congress on September 30, 2006 and signed by President George W. Bush on October 17, 2006. ...

Duties and Administrative Organization

National Guard units can be mobilized at any time by presidential order to supplement regular armed forces, and upon declaration of a state of emergency by the governor of the state or territory in which they serve (In the case of Washington, D.C. guard units, the Mayor of D.C.). Unlike Army Reserve members, National Guard members cannot be mobilized individually, except through voluntary transfers and Temporary Duty Assignments (TDY). However, there has been a significant amount of individual activations to support ongoing military operations related to the Global War on Terrorism (beginning in 2001); the legality of this policy is a major issue within the National Guard. A military unit is an organisation within an armed force. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... A state of emergency is a governmental declaration that may suspend certain normal functions of government, may work to alert citizens to alter their normal behaviors, or may order government agencies to implement emergency preparedness plans. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... The United States Army Reserve is the federal reserve force of the United States Army. ... The War on terrorism or War on terror (abbreviated in policy circles as GWOT for global war on terror) is a global effort by the governments of several countries (primarily the United States and its principal allies) to destroy international groups it deems as terrorist (primarily radical Islamist terrorist groups...


The National Guard Bureau is in Arlington, Va., and is a joint bureau of the United States Department of the Army and The United States Department of the Air Force to conduct all the administrative matters pertaining to the Army National Guard and the Air National Guard. The current chief of the National Guard Bureau is Lieutenant General H. Steven Blum. The chief is the senior uniformed National Guard officer, in charge of developing all policies and advising the Secretaries and Chiefs of Staff of the Army and the Air Force on all National Guard issues. He is appointed by the president in his capacity as Commander in Chief. Seal The Department of the Army is one of the three military departments in the United States Department of Defense. ... Seal The United States Department of the Air Force was formed in 1949 and is a component agency of the United States Department of Defense. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Army National Guard consists of the land force of the United States National Guard, or organized militia, of the several States and Territories, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, active and inactive, as defined in Title 32, USC Section 101. ... The Air National Guard (ANG) is part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... Lieutenant General H. Steven Blum A native of Maryland, Lieutenant General H. Steven Blum (b. ... A Commander-in-Chief is the commander of a nations military forces or significant element of those forces. ...


History

A National Guardsman in 1917.
A National Guardsman in 1917.

Throughout the 19th century the regular Army was small, and the militia provided the majority of the troops during the Mexican-American War, the start of the American Civil War, and the Spanish-American War. In 1903, part of the militia was federalized and renamed the National Guard and organized as a Reserve force for the Army. In World War I, the National Guard made up 40 percent of the U.S. combat divisions in France. In World War II the National Guard made up 19 divisions. One hundred forty thousand guardsmen were mobilized during the Korean War and over 63,000 for Operation Desert Storm. They have also participated in U.S. peacekeeping operations in Somalia, Haiti, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bosnia, and Kosovo as well as for natural disasters, strikes, riots and security for the Olympic Games when they have been in the States. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1543x2192, 1313 KB) Description: A NATIONAL GUARDSMAN COMPLETELY EQUIPPED FOR SERVICE. On his back this American fighting man carries his blanket roll, small shovel, bat, etc. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1543x2192, 1313 KB) Description: A NATIONAL GUARDSMAN COMPLETELY EQUIPPED FOR SERVICE. On his back this American fighting man carries his blanket roll, small shovel, bat, etc. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares General Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... Combatants U.S.-led coalition Iraq Commanders George H. W. Bush, Norman Schwarzkopf, Colin Powell Saddam Hussein, Ali Hassan Al-Majid, Hussein Kamel Strength 660,000 ~545,000 Casualties 345 dead, 1,000 wounded 25,000 - 100,000 dead, 100,000 - 300,000 wounded The 1991 Gulf War (also Persian... Motto None Anthem Intermeco Bosnia and Herzegovina() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Sarajevo Official languages Bosnian Croatian Serbian Government Parliamentary democracy  -  Presidency members Željko KomÅ¡ić1 NebojÅ¡a Radmanović2 Haris Silajdžić3  -  Chairman of the Council of Ministers Nikola Å pirić  -  High Representative 4 Independence... Kosovo (Albanian: Kosova or Kosovë, Serbian: , transliterated ; also , transliterated ) is a region in southern Serbia which has been under United Nations administration since 1999. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ...


The federally-controlled National Guard as we know it was officially created in 1916; however, the heritage of the National Guard traces back to English common law and the citizen militias of the British North American colonies. The claim that the National Guard is older than the nation itself, with over three and a half centuries of service, is based on the fact that the modern-day 101st Engineer Battalion and 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Massachusetts Army National Guard are both directly descended from Massachusetts Bay Colony regiments formed over 370 years ago. On December 13, 1636, the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony had ordered that the Colony's scattered militia companies be organized into North, South and East Regiments--with a goal of increasing the militias’ accountability to the colonial government, efficacy, and responsiveness in conflicts with indigenous Pequot Indians. Under this act, white males between the ages of 16 and 60 were obligated to possess arms and to play a part in the defense of their communities by serving in nightly guard details and participating in weekly drills. After the United States came into existence, state militias would develop out of this tradition. A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on...


The visit of the Marquis de Lafayette to the U.S., in 1824-25, was in every sense a triumphal procession. The 2nd Battalion, 11th New York Artillery, was one of many militia commands who turned out in welcome. This unit decided to adopt the title "National Guard," in honor of Lafayette's celebrated Garde Nationale de Paris. The Battalion, later the 7th Regiment, was prominent in the line of march on the occasion of Lafayette's final passage through New York en route home to France. Taking note of the troops named for his old command, Lafayette alighted from his carriage, walked down the line, clasping each officer by the hand as he passed. "National Guard" was destined to become the name of the U.S. militia.


Twentieth Century

Following World War II, the National Guard aviation units became the Air National Guard. There is no Naval National Guard due to the constitutional provision against states having ships of war in time of peace, though Alaska, California, New Jersey, New York, Texas and Ohio have incorporated Naval Militia units. The Air National Guard (ANG) is part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... Official language(s) English[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... “NY” redirects here. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... A naval militia in the United States is a reserve organization administered under the authority of a state government. ...


Elements of the Ohio Army National Guard were ordered to Kent State University by Ohio's governor James Rhodes to quell anti-Vietnam War protests, culminating in their shooting into a crowd of students on May 4, 1970, killing four and injuring nine. Seal of the Army National Guard The Ohio Army National Guard is a part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Army. ... Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State or KSU) is a major public research university located in Kent, Ohio, United States, which is about 40 miles southeast of Cleveland, 12 miles east of Akron, and 30 miles west of Youngstown. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... James Allen Rhodes (September 13, 1909 - March 4, 2001) was a Republican politician from Ohio, and as of 2004 one of only three U.S. state governors to be elected to four four-year terms in office. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... John Filos iconic Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph of Mary Ann Vecchio, a fourteen-year-old runaway, kneeling over the dead body of Jeffrey Miller after he was shot by the National Guard. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


National Guard members and reservists now comprise a larger percentage of frontline fighting forces than in any war in U.S. history (about 43 percent in Iraq and 55 percent in Afghanistan). There are now 183,366 National Guard members and reservists on active duty nationwide who leave behind about 300,000 dependents, according to U.S. Defense Department statistics.


The California Army National Guard were mobilized by the Governor of California during the Watts Riots, in August 1965, to provide security and help restore order. Seal of the Army National Guard The California National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The term Watts Riots refers to a large-scale riot which lasted six days in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, in August 1965. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...


During the LA Riots in 1992, when portions of south central Los Angeles erupted in chaos, overwhelming the LAPD's ability to contain the violence, the California National Guard were mobilized to help restore order. The National Guard were attributed with five shootings of people suspected of violating the curfew order placed on the city. The term L.A. riot may refer to: The 1965 Watts Riots The 1992 L.A. Riots This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Los Angeles Police Department (usually known as the LAPD) is the police department of the City of Los Angeles, California. ... A curfew can be one of the following: An order by the government or by the childs parents for certain persons to return home daily before a certain time. ...


Twenty-first Century

National Guard units played a major role in providing security and assisting recovery efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, in September 2005. This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In January and February 2007, National Guard troops from 8 states were activated to go help shovel snow, drop hay for starving cattle, deliver food and necessities to stranded people in their houses, and help control traffic and rescue stranded motorists in blizzards dropping feet of snow across the country.[5]


The Air National Guard has more than 106,000 personnel, and the Army National Guard (ARNG) around 325,000 personnel (as of February 2006).[citation needed] The Air National Guard (ANG) is part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Army National Guard consists of the land force of the United States National Guard, or organized militia, of the several States and Territories, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, active and inactive, as defined in Title 32, USC Section 101. ...


The Army National Guard is reorganizing into 28 brigade combat teams and 78 support brigades as a part of the Army's transformation plan. When the reorganization is complete, brigades will have 3,000-to-4,000 soldiers whereas the former Army organization was principally structured around large, mostly mechanized, divisions of around 15,000 soldiers each. [6] The Brigade Combat Team (BCT) is the basic deployable unit of maneuver in the US Army. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Graphic legend of Army Transformation Army Transformation describes the future-concept of the US Armys plan of modernization. ... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ...


In the first quarter of 2007, Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates announced changes to the Guard deployment policy aimed at shorter and more predictable deployments for National Guard troops. "Gates said his goal is for Guard members to serve a one-year deployment no more than every five years. … Gates is imposing a one-year limit to the length of deployment for National Guard Soldiers, effective immediately.” Prior to this time, Guard troops deployed for a standard one-year deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan would serve for 18 or more months including training and transit time. During the transition to the new policy for all troops in the pipeline, deployed or soon to be deployed, some will face deployments faster than every five years. "The one-to-five year cycle does not include activations for state emergencies." [7] The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Dr. Robert Michael Gates (born September 25, 1943) served as Director of Central Intelligence from November 6, 1991 until January 20, 1993 and was Deputy National Security Adviser under Brent Scowcroft during the first Gulf War. ...


The "Global War On Terrorism "

Prior to the attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001, the National Guard's general policy regarding mobilization was that Guardsmen would be required to serve no more than one year cumulative on active duty (with no more than six months overseas) for each five years of regular drill. Due to strains placed on active duty units following the attacks, the possible mobilization time was increased to 18 months (with no more than one year overseas). Additional strains placed on military units as a result of the invasion of Iraq further increased the amount of time a Guardsman could be mobilized to 24 months. Current Department of Defense policy is that no Guardsman will be involuntarily activated for more than 24 months (cumulative) in one six year enlistment period (this policy is due to change 1 August 2007, the new policy states that soldiers will be given 24 months between deployments of no more than 24 months (individual states have differing policies).[citation needed] A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq arguably without the explicit backing of the... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ...


Traditionally, most National Guard personnel serve "One weekend a month, two weeks a year", although a significant number serve in a full-time capacity, in a role called Active Guard and Reserve, or AGR. This slogan has lost most of its relevance since the Iraq War, when up to 40% of total US forces in Iraq and Afghanistan consisted of mobilized personnel of the reserve components. Furthermore, most National Guardsmen have now served at least one combat tour in support of the Global War on Terrorism [citation needed]. . One weekend a month, two weeks a year is a (now defunct) slogan used by the Army National Guard. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


Presidents who have served in the National Guard

Historically, National Guard service has been a common trait among presidents of the United States. 20 of America's 43 presidents have served in the National Guard. Among these, 19 have served in the Army Guard and one (George W. Bush) has served in the Air Guard.


George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Andrew Jackson, William Harrison, John Tyler, James Polk, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James Garfield, Chester Arthur, Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and George W. Bush.[8] George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), an American politician and fourth President of the United States of America (1809–1817), was one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... William Harrison (1534-1593) was an English clergyman, one of the co-authors of Holinsheds Chronicle. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was an American politician and the eleventh U.S. President, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ... Birthplace of Franklin Pierce Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 — October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Ulysses Simpson Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American Civil War General and the 18th (1869–1877) President of the United States. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831–September 19, 1881) was a major general in the United States Army, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and the twentieth President of the United States. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829—November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as 21st President of the United States. ... Benjamin Harrison, VI (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was a sex offender from Arkansas, serving one term from 1889 to 1893. ... For the mountain, see Mount McKinley. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... For the victim of Mt. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


List of chiefs of the National Guard Bureau

Name From To
Colonel Erasmus M. Weaver, Jr. February 14, 1908 March 14, 1911
Brigadier General Robert K. Evans March 15, 1911 August 31, 1912
Major General Albert L. Mills September 1, 1912 September 18, 1916
Major General William A. Mann October 26, 1916 November 26, 1917
Major General Jessie Mcl. Carter November 26, 1917 August 15, 1918
Major General George C. Rickards June 29, 1921 June 28, 1925
Major General Creed C. Hammond June 29, 1925 June 28, 1929
Colonel Ernest R. Redmond (Actg) June 29, 1929 September 30, 1929
Major General William G. Everson October 1, 1929 November 30, 1931
Major General George E. Leach December 1, 1931 November 30, 1935
Colonel Harold J. Weiler (Actg) December 1, 1935 January 16, 1936
Colonel John F. Williams (Actg) January 17, 1936 January 30, 1936
Major General Albert H. Blanding January 31, 1936 January 30, 1940
Major General John F. Williams January 31, 1940 January 30, 1944
Major General John F. Williams (Actg) January 31, 1944 January 31, 1946
Major General Butler B. Miltonberger February 1, 1946 September 29, 1947
Major General Kenneth F. Cramer September 30, 1947 September 4, 1950
Major General Raymond H. Fleming (Actg) September 5, 1950 August 13, 1951
Major General Raymond H. Fleming August 14, 1951 February 15, 1953
Major General Earl T. Ricks (Actg) February 16, 1953 June 21, 1953
Major General Edgar C. Erickson June 22, 1953 May 31, 1959
Major General Winston P. Wilson (Actg) June 1, 1959 July 19, 1959
Major General Donald W. McGowan July 20, 1959 August 30, 1963
Major General Winston P. Wilson August 31, 1963 August 31, 1971
Major General Francis S. Greenlief September 1, 1971 June 23, 1974
Lieutenant General La Vern E. Weber August 16, 1974 August 15, 1982
Lieutenant General Emmett H. Walker, Jr. August 16, 1982 August 15, 1986
Lieutenant General Herbert R. Temple, Jr. August 16, 1986 January 31, 1990
Lieutenant General John B. Conaway February 1, 1990 December 1, 1993
Major General Raymond F. Rees (Actg) January 1, 1994 July 31, 1994
Lieutenant General Edward D. Baca October 1, 1994 July 31, 1998
Lieutenant General Russell C. Davis August 4, 1998 August 3, 2002
Major General Raymond F. Rees (Actg) August 4, 2002 April 10, 2003
Lieutenant General H. Steven Blum April 11, 2003 present

is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Lieutenant General John B. Conaway Lieutenant General John B. Conaway was chief of the National Guard Bureau in Washington, D.C. from 1990 to 1993. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Major General Raymond F. Rees Major General Raymond F. Rees assumed duties as the Adjutant General for Oregon on July 1, 2005. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Lieutenant General Russell C. Davis was Chief, National Guard Bureau in Arlington, Virginia. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Major General Raymond F. Rees Major General Raymond F. Rees assumed duties as the Adjutant General for Oregon on July 1, 2005. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lieutenant General H. Steven Blum A native of Maryland, Lieutenant General H. Steven Blum (b. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

National Guard Forces

State Abbr. Rsvrd. State
AK Alaska
AL Alabama
AR Arkansas
AZ Arizona
CA California
CO Colorado
CT Connecticut
DE Delaware
DC District of Columbia
FL Florida
GA Georgia
GU Guam
HI Hawaii
IA Iowa
ID Idaho
IL Illinois
IN Indiana
KS Kansas
State Abbr. Rsvrd. State
KY Kentucky
LA Louisiana
MA Massachusetts
MD Maryland
ME Maine
MI Michigan
MN Minnesota
MO Missouri
MS Mississippi
MT Montana
NC North Carolina
ND North Dakota
NE Nebraska
NH New Hampshire
NJ New Jersey
NM New Mexico
NV Nevada
NY New York
State Abbr. Rsvrd. State
OH Ohio
OK Oklahoma
OR Oregon
PA Pennsylvania
PR Puerto Rico
RI Rhode Island
SC South Carolina
SD South Dakota
TN Tennessee
TX Texas
UT Utah
VA Virginia
VI U.S. Virgin Islands
VT Vermont
WA Washington
WI Wisconsin
WV West Virginia
WY Wyoming

Seal of the Army National Guard The Alaska National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Alabama National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Arkansas National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Arizona National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The California National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Colorado National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Connecticut National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Delaware National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... The District of Columbia National Guard comprises both Army National Guard and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Florida National Guard comprises both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Hawaii National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Iowa National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Idaho National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Illinois National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Indiana National Guard comprises both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Kansas National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Seal of the Army National Guard The Louisiana National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard The United States National Guard is a significant component of the United States armed forces military reserve. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Seal of the Army National Guard The Minnesota National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Missouri National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... It has been suggested that National Guard Bureau be merged into this article or section. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Montana National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The North Carolina National Guard comprises both Army and Air National Guard components. ... The North Dakota Army National Guard is headquartered in Bismarck, North Dakota, and consists of the 68th Troop Command and the Engineer Brigade. ... The Nebraska Army National Guard is a group of Army National Guard units in the U.S. state of Nebraska. ... It has been suggested that National Guard Bureau be merged into this article or section. ... A New Jersey Air National Guard F-16 from the 177th Fighter Wing The New Jersey Army and Air National Guard consists of over 9,000 Guardsmen from New Jersey. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... The Nevada National Guard is one of the 54 members (50 states, three territories and the District of Columbia) of the United States’ National Guard, an integral part of this nation’s reserve forces. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Seal of the Army National Guard The Ohio Army National Guard is a part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Army. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... The Oregon National Guard is a Federally mandated and equipped military organization under the civilian direction of the Oregon Military Department, with the Governor of Oregon as its Commander in Chief. ... The Pennsylvania National Guard is comprised of the Pennsylvania Army National Guard and the Pennsylvania Air National Guard. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Seal of the Army National Guard The South Carolina National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Seal of the Army National Guard The Texas National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Utah National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Virginia National Guard is comprised of both Army and Air National Guard components. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... The Washington Army National Guard is composed of both Army National Guard and Air National Guard units. ... The Wisconsin National Guard (“Guard”) has dual state and federal roles, and is jointly funded and maintained by both governments. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air...

See also

Military of the United States Portal

Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ... State Defense Forces (also known as State Guards, State Military Reserves, or State Militias) in the United States are military units that operate under the sole authority of a state government, although they are regulated by the National Guard Bureau of the United States Army. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an organization of citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... A Home Guard is a part-time civilian reserve military force similar to a militia. ... The Air National Guard (ANG) is part of the United States National Guard and a reserve component of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... A naval militia in the United States is a reserve organization administered under the authority of a state government. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Army National Guard consists of the land force of the United States National Guard, or organized militia, of the several States and Territories, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, active and inactive, as defined in Title 32, USC Section 101. ...

Notes

  1. ^ FindLaw (January 19, 2004).10 U.S.C. § 311. FindLaw. Retrieved on February 14, 2007.
  2. ^ FindLaw (June 27, 2004). "PERPICH v. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, 496 U.S. 334 (1990)". FindLaw. Retrieved on 2006-05-13.
  3. ^ http://www.stateline.org/live/details/story?contentId=170453
  4. ^ National Governors Association
  5. ^ FindLaw (February 14, 2007)."National Guard to Rescue in 8 States". FindLaw. Retrieved on February 14, 2007.
  6. ^ Transformation of the United States Army, accessed 21 Nov 2006
  7. ^ "Gates Promises Predictable Deployments", GX -- The Guard Experience 4 (3): 22, April 2007
  8. ^ http://www.ngb.army.mil/resources/photo_gallery/presidential/index.htm

January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Graphic legend of Army Transformation Army Transformation describes the future-concept of the US Armys plan of modernization. ...

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