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Encyclopedia > United States Mint
Seal of the U.S. Mint
Seal of the U.S. Mint
Denver United States mint building

The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. The main Mint facility is located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and branch facilities are located in Denver, Colorado; San Francisco, California; and West Point, New York. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,008 × 2,000 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,008 × 2,000 pixels, file size: 1. ... For current exchange rates, see exchange links. ... It has been suggested that Commerce be merged into this article or section. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... A branch mint is a satellite operation of (usually) a national mint. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country State Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... West Point painting West Point is a federal military base (and a census-designated place) located in the Town of Highlands in Orange County, New York. ...


The Mint was created by Congress with the Coinage Act of 1792, and placed within the Department of State. Per the terms of the Coinage Act, the first Mint building was located in Philadelphia, then the U.S. capital. It was the first building of the federation raised under the Constitution. Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The Coinage Act, passed by the U.S. Congress on April 2, 1792, established the U.S. Mint and regulated coinage of the United States. ... Department of State redirects here. ...


The Mint's first director was renowned scientist David Rittenhouse. The position is currently held by Edmund C. Moy. Henry Voight was the first Superintendent and Chief Coiner, and is credited with some of the first U.S. coin designs. Another important position at the Mint is that of Chief Engraver, which has been held by such men as Frank Gasparro, William Barber, Charles E. Barber, James B. Longacre, Christian Gobrecht and Anthony C. Paquet, among others. David Rittenhouse (April 8, 1732 – June 26, 1796) was a renowned American astronomer, inventor, mathematician, surveyor, scientific instrument craftsman, and public official. ... Edmund C. Moy Edmund C. Moy is an American government official. ... Frank Gasparro (August 26, 1909 – September 29, 2001) was the 10th Chief Engraver of the U.S. Mint and held this position from February 23, 1965 to January 16, 1981. ... William Barber (2 May 1807–31 August 1879) was Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1869 until his death. ... Charles Edward Barber (1840–18 February 1917) was Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1879 until his death. ... James Barton Longacre, (August 11, 1794 - January 1, 1869) an American engraver, was Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1844 until his death. ... Christian Gobrecht (1785–1844) was Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1835 until his death in 1844. ...


The Mint was made an independent agency in 1799, and under the Coinage Act of 1873, became part of the Department of the Treasury. It was placed under the auspices of the Treasurer of the United States in 1981. In 1873, Congress enacted the Fourth Coinage Act (The Crime of 73) which embraced the gold standard and de-monetized silver. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ... The Treasurer of the United States is the only position within the United States Department of the Treasury older than the Department itself. ...

Contents

History

Branch facilities throughout the United States since the Philadelphia Mint opened in 1792 in a building named "Ye Olde Mint". With the opening of branch mints came the need for mint marks, an identifying feature on the coin to show its facility of origin. The first of these branch mints were the Charlotte, North Carolina (1838–1861), Dahlonega, Georgia (1838–1861), and New Orleans, Louisiana (1838–1909) branches. Both the Charlotte (C mint mark) and Dahlonega (D mint mark) Mints were opened to facilitate the conversion of local gold deposits into coinage, and minted only gold coins. The Civil War closed both these facilities permanently. The New Orleans Mint (O mint mark) closed at the beginning of the Civil War (1861) and did not re-open until the end of Reconstruction in 1879. During its two stints as a minting facility, it produced both gold and silver coinage in eleven different denominations, though only ten denominations were ever minted there at one time (in 1851 silver three-cent pieces, half dimes, dimes, quarters, half dollars, and gold dollars, Quarter Eagles, half eagles, eagles, and double eagles). A branch mint is a satellite operation of (usually) a national mint. ... The Philadelphia Mint was created from the need to establish a national identity and the needs of commerce. ... A mint mark is an inscription on a coin indicating the mint at which the coin was produced. ... Charlotte redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Historic Lumpkin County Courthouse, which now houses the Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site Dahlonega is a town in Lumpkin County, Georgia, USA, and is its county seatGR6. ... NOLA redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... With the Carolina gold rush in full swing, the Charlotte Mint was born on March 3, 1835. ... The Dahlonega Mint was chartered by the United States Congress in 1838, at the mining town of Dahlonega, Georgia, during the first gold rush. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Ionic portico of the façade of the New Orleans Mint today, as seen from across Esplanade Avenue. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The half dime was a silver coin, valued at five cents, formerly minted in the United States. ... A dime is a coin issued by the United States Mint with a denomination of one-tenth of a United States dollar, or ten cents. ... The quarter is 1/4th of a United States dollar or 25 cents. ... The Half Dollar of the United States has been produced nearly every year since the inception of the United States Mint in 1794. ... Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in gold, silver and base metal versions. ... The Quarter Eagle was authorized by the Act of April 2, 1792. ... The 1914 Half-Eagle The Half Eagle is a United States coin that was produced from 1795 to 1929. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The 1933 Double Eagle, Saint Gaudens design A Double Eagle is a gold coin of the United States with a denomination of $20. ...


A new branch facility was opened in Carson City, Nevada in 1870; it operated until 1893, with a four-year hiatus from 1885 to 1889. Like the Charlotte and Dahlonega branches, the Carson City Mint (CC mint mark) was opened to take advantage of local precious metal deposits, in this case, a large vein of silver. Though gold coins were also produced there, no base metal coins were. Motto: Proud of its Past. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Carson City Mint, 1866 Carson City Mint was a branch of the United States Mint in Carson City, Nevada. ... This article is about the chemical element. ...


A branch of the U.S. mint (Manila Mint) was established in 1920 in Manila in the Philippines, which was then a U.S. colony. To date, the Manila Mint is the only US mint established outside of the Continental U.S. and was responsible for producing coins for the colony (one, five, ten, twenty and fifty centavo denominations). This branch was in production from 1920 to 1922, and then again from 1925 through 1941 (until the outbreak of World War II). Coins struck by this mint bear either the M mintmark (for Manila) or none at all, similar to the Philadelphia mint at the time. The Manila Mint was a branch of the United States Mint, located in Manila, now the capital city of the Philippines. ... For other meanings of the word, see Manila (disambiguation). ... The Manila Mint was a branch of the United States Mint, located in Manila, now the capital city of the Philippines. ... Centavo is a Spanish word derived from the Latin Centum meaning hundred. It is a fractional monetary unit, used to represent one hundredth of a basic monetary unit in many countries around the world including: Argentina Bolivia Brazil Cape Verde Chile Colombia Dominican Republic Ecuador El Salvador Guatemala Guinea-Bissau... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The new regulation, coming from the Treasury Department, allows the U.S. Mint to charge fines of up to $25,000 for any misuse of its names and symbols, as well as names, symbols and emblems of the Treasury in advertisements and other activities. [1] The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ...


Current facilities

The Mint's largest facility is the Philadelphia Mint, one of four active coin-producing mints. The current facility at Philadelphia, which opened in 1969, is the fourth Philadelphia Mint. The first was built in 1792, when Philadelphia was still the U.S. capital, and began operation in 1793. Until 1980, coins minted at Philadelphia bore no mint mark, with the exceptions of the Susan B. Anthony dollar and the wartime Jefferson nickel. In 1980, the P mint mark was added to all U.S. coinage except the cent. Until 1968, the Philadelphia Mint was responsible for nearly all official proof coinage. Philadelphia is also the site of master die production for U.S. coinage, and the engraving and design departments of the Mint are also located there. The Susan B. Anthony dollar is a United States coin minted between 1979 and 1981, and again in 1999. ... The United States five-cent coin, commonly called a nickel, is a unit of currency equaling one-twentieth, or five-hundredths, of a United States dollar. ... The United States one-cent coin is a unit of currency equaling one-hundredth of a United States dollar. ... A beautiful example of a proof coin. ...

The Denver Mint
The Denver Mint

The Denver branch began life in 1863 as the local assay office, just five years after gold was discovered in the area. By the turn of the century, the office was bringing in over $5 million in annual gold and silver deposits, and in 1906, the Mint opened its new Denver branch. Denver uses a D mint mark, and strikes coinage only for circulation. It also produces its own working dies ,as well as working dies for the other Mints. Download high resolution version (880x574, 355 KB)Photo by User: Nv8200p taken July, 1987. ... Download high resolution version (880x574, 355 KB)Photo by User: Nv8200p taken July, 1987. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country State Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... Assay offices are institutions setup to test the purity of precious metal items, to protect consumers. ... The Denver Mint The Denver Mint is a branch of the United States Mint established in 1862 that is today operational and produces coins for circulation, as well as mint sets and commemorative coins. ...


The San Francisco branch, opened in 1854 to serve the goldfields of the California Gold Rush, uses an S mint mark. It quickly outgrew its first building and moved into a new facility in 1874. This building, one of the few that survived the great earthquake of 1906, served until 1937, when the present facility was opened. It was closed in 1955, then reopened a decade later during the coin shortage of the mid-60s. In 1968, it took over most proof-coinage production from Philadelphia, and since 1975, it has been used solely for proof coinage, with the exception of the Anthony dollar and a portion of the mintage of cents in the early 1980s. (These cents are indistinguishable from those minted at Philadelphia.) The San Francisco Mint is a branch of the United States Mint, and was opened in 1854 to serve the gold mines of the California Gold Rush. ... The California Gold Rush (1848–1855) began shortly after January 24, 1848 (when gold was discovered at Sutters Mill in Coloma). ... San Francisco Earthquake redirects here. ... The Susan B. Anthony dollar is a United States coin minted between 1979 and 1981, and again in 1999. ...


The West Point branch is the newest branch mint. Its predecessor, the West Point Bullion Depository, was opened in 1937, and cents were produced there from 1973 to 1986. The West Point Mint gained official status as a branch mint on March 31, 1988. Along with the cents already mentioned, which were identical to those produced at Philadelphia, West Point has struck a great deal of commemorative and proof coinage bearing the W mint mark. In 1996, West Point produced clad dimes, but for collectors, not for circulation. The West Point facility is still used for storage of part of the United States' gold bullion reserves, and West Point is now the United States' only production facility for gold, silver and platinum American Eagle coins. West Point painting West Point is a federal military base (and a census-designated place) located in the Town of Highlands in Orange County, New York. ... The United States one-cent coin, commonly called a penny, is a unit of currency equaling 1/100 of a United States dollar. ... The West Point Mint Facility was erected in 1937, near the U.S. Military Academy in New York State. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... General Name, Symbol, Number Gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11 (IB), 6 , d Density, Hardness 19300 kg/m3, 2. ...


While not a coin production facility, the U.S. Bullion Depository at Fort Knox, Kentucky is another facility of the Mint. Its primary purpose is for storage of the United States' (and other countries') gold bullion reserves. The United States Bullion Depository is a fortified vault building located near Fort Knox, Kentucky which is used to store the majority of United States gold metal holdings, as well as from time to time, other precious items belonging to the United States government. ... This article is about United States Army post. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...


The Mint manages extensive commercial marketing programs. The product line includes special coin sets for collectors, national medals, American Eagle gold, silver and platinum bullion coins, and commemorative coins marking national events such as the Bicentennial of the Constitution. The Mint's functions include: American Eagle bullion coins are produced by the United States Mint. ... Commemorative coins are coins that were issued to commemorate some particular event or issue. ...

  • Producing domestic, bullion and foreign coins;
  • Manufacturing and selling national commemorative medals;
  • Designing, producing, and marketing special coinage;
  • Manufacturing and selling proof and uncirculated coin sets and other numismatic items;
  • Safeguarding and controlling the movement of bullion;
  • Disbursing gold and silver for authorized purposes;
  • Distributing coins from the various mints to Federal Reserve Banks.

Note that the Mint is not responsible for the production of paper money; that is the responsibility of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ... the bomb. ...


In 2000, the Mint was responsible for the production of 28 billion coins. See United States Mint coin production for annual production values of each coin. Top row: Sacagawea Dollar, Lincoln Cent, and Roosevelt Dime. ... Production values for each year are the sum of all facility outputs of business strike coins. ...


Responsible for protection of Mint facilities, employees and reserves is the United States Mint Police, a federal law enforcement agency. The United States Mint Police is the law enforcement agency responsible for the protection of the United States Treasury and the United States Mint. ... Federal police agencies are responsible for the enforcement of federal laws in countries with a federal constitution. ...


Mintmarks

Proof Lincoln memorial cent, with the S mintmark of the San Francisco mint.
Proof Lincoln memorial cent, with the S mintmark of the San Francisco mint.

With the exception of a brief period in 1838 and 1839, all coins minted at U.S. branch mints prior to 1909 displayed that branch's mintmark on their reverse. Larger denominations of gold and silver coins were labeled with the Dahlonega, Charlotte, and New Orleans mintmarks (D, C, and O, respectively) on the obverse (just above the dates) in those two years. Carson City, which served as a U.S. branch mint from 1870 to 1893, produced coins with a CC mintmark. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (910x910, 596 KB)Media:Example. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (910x910, 596 KB)Media:Example. ... A mint mark is an inscription on a coin indicating the mint at which the coin was produced. ... The term obverse, and its opposite, reverse, describe the two sides of units of currency and many other kinds of two-sided objects, most often in reference to coins, but also to medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art. ... Carson City Mint, 1866 Carson City Mint was a branch of the United States Mint in Carson City, Nevada. ...


Between 1965 and 1967, as the Mint labored to replace the silver coinage with base metal coins, mintmarks were temporarily dispensed with (including on the penny and nickel) in order to discourage the hoarding of coins by numismatists. Mintmarks were moved to the obverse of the nickel, dime, quarter, and half dollar in 1968, and have appeared on the obverse of the dollar coin since its re-introduction in 1971. Numismatics is the scientific study of currency and its history in all its varied forms. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Penny: Unlike all other coins, which had their mintmarks on the reverse until 1964, the Lincoln penny has always had its mintmark on the obverse below the date to the right of Lincoln's bust since its 1909 introduction.
  • Nickel: The mintmark was located near the rim of the obverse side, clockwise from the date from 1968 to 2005, to the right of Thomas Jefferson's bust. The redesigned obverse of the nickel which appeared starting in 2006 has its mintmark below the date on the lower right. Many earlier nickels from 1938 to 1964 are still in circulation, and their mintmarks can be found on the reverse to the right of Monticello, with the exception of the 1942-1945 war nickels cited elsewhere in this article.
  • Sacagawea dollar (2001-present): The mintmark is just below the date.
Reverse of a wartime nickel, with the mintmark located above Monticello
Reverse of a wartime nickel, with the mintmark located above Monticello

Due to a shortage of nickel during World War II, the composition of the five-cent coin was changed to include silver. To mark this change, nickels minted in Philadelphia (which had featured no mintmarks until then) displayed a P in the field above the dome of Monticello. Nickels from San Francisco were minted in the same fashion, and Denver nickels reflected the change in 1943. This new mintmark location continued until 1946, when the nickel returned to its pre-war composition. The United States one-cent coin is a unit of currency equaling one-hundredth of a United States dollar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The United States five-cent coin, commonly called a nickel, is a unit of currency equaling one-twentieth, or five hundredths, of a United States dollar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... This is about the Jefferson residence. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other uses, see Dime. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... A quarter is a coin worth one-quarter of a United States dollar, or 25 cents. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The Half Dollar of the United States has been produced nearly every year since the inception of the United States Mint in 1794. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Bicentennial Eisenhower Dollar Reverse Apollo 11 Insignia The Eisenhower Dollar is a dollar coin issued by the United States government from 1971–1978 (not to be confused with the Eisenhower commemorative dollar of 1990. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... The Susan B. Anthony dollar is a United States coin minted between 1979 and 1981, and again in 1999. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Susan B. Anthony (disambiguation). ... Sacagawea (Sakakawea, Sacajawea, Sacajewea; see below) (c. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Reverse of Presidential dollar coin The Presidential $1 Coin Program is part of an Act of Congress, Pub. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Image File history File linksMetadata War_Nickle. ... Image File history File linksMetadata War_Nickle. ... This is about the Jefferson residence. ... For other uses, see Nickel (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the chemical element. ... This is about the Jefferson residence. ...


The P mintmark, discontinued after the war, reappeared in 1979 on the Anthony dollar. By 1982, it had appeared on every other regular-issue coin except the cent, which still bears no P mintmark. The circulating cents struck in the 1980s at San Francisco (except proofs) and West Point also bear no mintmark, as their facilities were used to supplement Philadelphia's production. Given the limited numbers produced at each facility, they might have been hoarded as collectibles.[citation needed]


References

  1. ^ U.S. Mint to Fine any Misuse of Its Names and Symbols

See also

Commemorative coinage of the United States consists of coins that have been minted to commemorate a particular event, person or organization. ... The Early period of Commemorative Coins of the United States of America traditionally begins with the 1892 Colombian Half dollar and extends through the 1954 Booker T. Washington issue. ... // Half dollars George Washington - 1982 Statue of Liberty - 1986 Congress - 1989 Mount Rushmore Golden Anniversary - 1991 XXV Olympiad - 1992 Christopher Columbus Quincentenary - 1992 Bill of Rights - 1993 World War II 50th anniversary - (1993)1991–1995 1994 World Cup tournament - 1994 Civil War battlefields - 1995 Centennial Olympic Games - 1995–1996 Capitol... the bomb. ...

External link

  • U.S. Mint website

  Results from FactBites:
 
United States Mint - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1555 words)
The United States Mint is responsible for producing and circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce.
The Mint was made an independent agency in 1799, and under the Coinage Act of 1873, became part of the Department of the Treasury.
During its two stints as a minting facility, it produced both gold and silver coinage in eleven different denominations, though only ten denominations were ever minted there at one time (in 1851 silver three-cent pieces, half dimes, dimes, quarters, half dollars, and gold dollars, Quarter Eagles, half eagles, eagles, and double eagles).
United States Mint - MSN Encarta (317 words)
United States Mint, federal agency of the U.S. Department of the Treasury, created in 1873, and responsible for the production of domestic and foreign coins, the manufacture of national medals authorized by Congress, and the custody and traffic of bullion.
The first national mint was created by an act of Congress in 1792 in Philadelphia, then the nation's capital.
The director of the mint administers all agency functions, including operations of the coinage mints at Philadelphia and at Denver, Colorado; bullion depositories at Fort Knox, Kentucky, and West Point, New York; and an assay office in San Francisco.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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