FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > United States Marine Corps
United States Marine Corps

United States Marine Corps portal
Active 10 November 1775 - today
Country United States of America
Branch Marine Corps
Type Amphibious
Role Naval Infantry
Size 202,000 by 2011
Part of Department of Defense
Department of the Navy
Headquarters The Pentagon
Nickname The Few, The Proud
Motto Semper Fidelis
Colors Scarlet & Gold
March Semper Fidelis
Engagements Revolutionary War
Quasi-War
Barbary Wars
War of 1812
Seminole Wars
Mexican-American War
American Civil War
Spanish-American War
Philippine Insurrection
Boxer Rebellion
The Banana Wars
World War I
World War II
Korean War
Vietnam War
Persian Gulf War
Kosovo War
Operation Enduring Freedom
Operation Iraqi Freedom
Decorations Presidential Unit Citation
Joint Meritorious Unit Award
Navy Unit Commendation
Valorous Unit Award
Meritorious Unit Commendation
Croix de Guerre
Philippene Presidential Unit Citation
Korean Presidential Unit Citation
Vietnam Gallantry Cross
Vietnam Civil Actions Medal
Commanders
Commandant James T. Conway
A. Commandant Robert Magnus
Sergeant Major Carlton W. Kent
Insignia
Eagle, Globe, and Anchor
Aircraft flown
Attack F/A-18B, F/A-18D, AV-8B, F-35B
Electronic
warfare
EA-6B
Fighter F/A-18A, F/A-18C, F-35B
Helicopter AH-1W, AH-1Z, UH-1N, UH-1Y, CH-46E, CH-53E, MV-22
Reconnaissance RQ-7, ScanEagle
Transport KC-130J

The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. Administratively within the Department of the Navy,[2][3] operationally the U.S. Marine Corps acts as a separate branch of the military, often working closely with US Naval forces for training, transportation, and logistic purposes. Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The UKs Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft A marine corps (from French corps de marine) is a branch of a nations armed forces incorporating Marines, intended to be capable of mounting amphibious assaults using infantry, armour, aircraft, and watercraft. ... It has been suggested that Landing operation be merged into this article or section. ... British Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft Marines (from the English adjective marine, meaning of the sea , from Latin language mare, meaning sea, via French adjective marin(e), of the sea) are, in principle, seaborne land soldiers that are part of a navy. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... Semper Fidelis is Latin for Always faithful. ... Semper Fidelis is Latin for Always faithful. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... The Quasi-War was an undeclared war fought entirely at sea between the United States and France from 1798 to 1801. ... The Barbary Wars (or Tripolitan Wars) were two wars between the United States of America and Barbary States in North Africa in the early 19th century. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Combatants United States Seminole Commanders Andrew Jackson Osceola The Seminole Wars, also known as the Florida Wars, were three wars or conflicts in Florida between various groups of Indians collectively known as Seminoles and the United States. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... The Philippine-American War was a war between the armed forces of the United States and the Philippines from 1899 through 1913. ... Combatants Eight-Nation Alliance (ordered by contribution): Empire of Japan Russian Empire British Empire French Third Republic United States German Empire Kingdom of Italy Austro-Hungarian Empire Righteous Harmony Society Qing Dynasty (China) Commanders Edward Seymour Alfred Graf von Waldersee Ci Xi Strength 20,000 initially 49,000 total 50... US Marines with the captured flag of Augusto César Sandino in Nicaragua in 1932 The Banana Wars is an unofficial term that refers to the United States military interventions into Central and South America from 1898 (following the Spanish-American War) through 1934. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq arguably without the explicit backing of the... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Joint Meritorious Unit Award is a military award that was established on June 4, 1981 by Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger and was implemented by Department of Defense Directive 1348. ... Navy Unit Commendation The Navy Unit Commendation of the United States Navy is an award that was established by order of the Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal on 18 December 1944. ... The Valorous Unit Award is a decoration which is awarded to units of the United States Army which display extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy of the United States of America. ... The Meritorious Unit Commendation is a mid-level unit award of the United States military which is awarded to any military command which displays exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service, heroic deeds, or valorous actions. ... The Croix de guerre 1914-1918 (French for Cross of War) is a French military decoration. ... Philippine P.U.C. The Philippine Presidential Unit Citation is a decoration of the Republic of the Philippines which has been awarded to certain units of the United States military for actions both during and subsequent to the Second World War. ... The Presidential Unit Citation is a senior unit award granted to military units which have performed an extremely meritorious or heroic act, usually in the face of an armed enemy. ... Gallantry Cross Medal and Unit Citation The Vietnam Gallantry Cross is a military decoration of South Vietnam which was established in August 1950. ... Vietnam Civil Actions Medal (First Class) with Second Class Ribbon The Vietnam Civil Actions Medal is a decoration of South Vietnam which was first established in 1964. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... James Terry Conway (born December 26, 1947) is a General in the United States Marine Corps. ... General Robert Magnus (born April 28, 1947) is the Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps and assumed his duties on September 8, 2005. ... This article is about a military rank and position. ... Sergeant Major Carlton W. Kent is the current Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps, assuming the post on April 25, 2007. ... Eagle, Globe, and Anchor The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor (EGA) is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. ... A ground attack aircraft is an aircraft that is designed to operate very close to the ground, supporting infantry and tanks directly in battle. ... The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F/A-18 Hornet is a modern all-weather carrier-capable strike fighter jet, designed to attack both ground and aerial targets. ... The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F/A-18 Hornet is a modern all-weather carrier-capable strike fighter jet, designed to attack both ground and aerial targets. ... See also Hawker Siddeley Harrier The Harrier II is a second generation, vertical/short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) light_attack jet aircraft used by the United States Marine Corps, Royal Air Force, Spanish Armada and Italian navy. ... The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) is a fighter plane currently in early development by Lockheed Martin (with partners Northrop Grumman and BAE SYSTEMS.) The primary customers are the United States armed forces and the United Kingdom (RN and RAF), but the Netherlands... // Electronic warfare (EW) is the use of the electromagnetic spectrum to effectively deny the use of this phenomena by an adversary, while optimizing its use by friendly forces. ... The EA-6 Prowler is the United States Navys and the United States Marine Corpss primary electronic warfare aircraft. ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F/A-18 Hornet is a modern all-weather carrier-capable strike fighter jet, designed to attack both ground and aerial targets. ... The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F/A-18 Hornet is a modern all-weather carrier-capable strike fighter jet, designed to attack both ground and aerial targets. ... The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) is a fighter plane currently in early development by Lockheed Martin (with partners Northrop Grumman and BAE SYSTEMS.) The primary customers are the United States armed forces and the United Kingdom (RN and RAF), but the Netherlands... For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... The Bell AH-1 SuperCobra is a twin-engine attack helicopter based on the US Armys AH-1 Cobra. ... UH-1N on the ground at Camp Fallujah, Iraq in July of 2004 The Bell UH-1N Twin Huey is a medium military helicopter that first flew in 1968. ... The Bell UH-1Y Venom is currently in low-rate production to replace the United States Marine Corps aging fleet of UH-1N Twin Huey light utility helicopters first introduced in the early 1970s. ... April 1, 2004: Sailors from USS Saipan (LHA-2) rush out to unchain a CH-46 Sea Knight. ... The Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion (Sikorsky S-80E), is the largest and heaviest helicopter in the United States military. ... The V-22 Osprey is a joint service, multimission, military tiltrotor aircraft with both a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) and short takeoff and landing capability (STOL). ... English Electric Canberra PR.9 photo reconnaissance aircraft CP-140 Aurora long-range patrol aircraft of the Canadian Air Force. ... The RQ-7 Shadow unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is used by the United States Army. ... ScanEagle is a low cost recon UAV built by Boeing and The Insitu Group. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ... In military and diplomatic calculations, projection of force is the capacity, either implied, or demonstrated in practice, to exert control over distant theatres through military action. ... USN redirects here. ... The Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) is a term used by the United States Marine Corps to describe the principal organization for all missions across the range of military operations. ... The United States has seven uniformed services as defined by Title 10 of the United States Code. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy. ... United States operating forces organization consists of nine components: Atlantic Fleet, Pacific Fleet, Naval Forces Central Command, Naval Forces Europe, Naval Network Warfare Command, Navy Reserve, Naval Special Warfare Command, Operational Test and Evaluation Forces, and Military Sealift Command. ...


Originally organized as the Continental Marines on November 10, 1775 as naval infantry, the Marine Corps has evolved in its mission with changing military doctrine and American foreign policy. The Marine Corps has served in every American armed conflict including the Revolutionary War. It attained prominence in the 20th century when its theories and practice of amphibious warfare proved prescient and ultimately formed the cornerstone of the Pacific campaign of World War II.[4] By the mid 20th century, the Marine Corps had become the dominant theorist of amphibious warfare.[5][6][7] Its ability to respond rapidly to regional crises has made it, and continues to make it, an important body in the implementation and execution of American foreign policy.[8] The Continental Marines were the Marine force of the American Colonies during American Revolutionary War. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... France Marines is the name of a commune in the département of Val dOise, France. ... For a history, see Timeline of United States diplomatic history For the published diplomatic papers, see The Foreign Relations of the United States For Foreign relations under George W. Bush, see Foreign policy of the George W. Bush administration. ... The military history of the United States spans a period of over two centuries. ... This article is about military actions only. ... It has been suggested that Landing operation be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Pacific War (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The United States Marine Corps, with 186,342 active duty and 40,000 reserve Marines as of November 30, 2007,[9] is the smallest of the United States' armed forces in the Department of Defense (the United States Coast Guard is smaller, about one fifth the size of the Marine Corps, but serves under Homeland Security.) The Corps is nonetheless larger than the entire armed forces of many significant military powers; for example, it is larger than the active duty Israel Defense Forces.[10][11] The Marine Forces Reserve (MARFORRES) (also known as the United States Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR)), a part of the United States Marine Corps, is the largest command in the Marine Corps. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Emblem of the IDF The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ...

Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... // Origins The practice of carrying standards, to act both as a rallying point for troops, and to mark the location of the commander, is thought to have originated in Egypt some 5,000 years ago. ... USMC Flag // The Flag of the United States Marine Corps (also known as a standard or battle color) is scarlet with the Corps emblem in gray and gold. ...

Mission

The United States Marine Corps serves as an amphibious force-in-readiness. Today, it has three primary areas of responsibility as outlined in 10 U.S.C. § 5063, originally introduced under the National Security Act of 1947: Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. ... President Truman signs the National Security Act Amendment of 1949 with guests in the Oval Office. ...

  • The seizure or defense of advanced naval bases and other land operations to support naval campaigns;
  • The development of tactics, technique, and equipment used by amphibious landing forces; and
  • "Such other duties as the President may direct."

The quoted clause, while seemingly a consequence of the President's position as Commander-in-Chief, is a codification of the expeditionary duties of the Marine Corps. It derives from similar language in the Congressional Acts "For the Better Organization of the Marine Corps" of 1834, and "Establishing and Organizing a Marine Corps" of 1798. In 1951, the House of Representatives' Armed Services Committee called the clause "one of the most important statutory—and traditional—functions of the Marine Corps." It noted that the Corps has more often than not performed actions of a non-naval nature, including its famous actions in the War of 1812, at Tripoli, Chapultepec (during the Mexican-American War), numerous counter-insurgency, and occupational duties in Central America and East Asia, World War I and the Korean War. While these actions are not accurately described as support of naval campaigns nor as amphibious warfare, their common thread is that they are of an expeditionary nature, using the mobility of the Navy to provide timely intervention in foreign affairs on behalf of American interests.[12] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An amphibious vehicle is a vehicle or craft, that is a means of transport, viable on land as well as on water - just like an amphibian. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... Expeditionary Force is a generic name sometimes applied to a military force dispatched to fight in a foreign country. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services, commonly known as the House Armed Services Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Belligerents United States Sweden(until 1802) Barbary States (Ottoman Empire regencies) Commanders Richard Dale William Eaton Edward Preble Hassan Bey Murad Reis Strength 7 Ships 10 US Marines and Soldiers Christian Mercenaries Arab Mercenaries 4000 Casualties and losses 2 Ships destroyed 2 Marines killed, 3 wounded Christian/Arab Mercenaries killed... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Nicolás Bravo #, Mariano Monterde School Commandant, Juan N. Perez commander Remants Leon Brigade) Strength 13,000 876 cadets, 4000 regulars Casualties 130 killed 703 wounded 29 missing 862 total 1,800 killed and wounded 823 captured 2,623 Total Gen. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Counter-insurgency is the combating of insurgency, by the government (or allies) of the territory in which the insurgency takes place. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... This article is about the geographical region. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung...


In addition to its primary duties, the Marine Corps undertakes missions in support of the White House and the State Department. President Thomas Jefferson dubbed the Marine Band the "President's Own" for its role of providing music for state functions at the White House.[13] In addition, Marines guard presidential retreats, including Camp David,[14] and the Marines of the Executive Flight Detachment of HMX-1 provide VIP helicopter transport to the President and Vice President, using the call signs "Marine One" (when the President is aboard) and "Marine Two" (when the Vice President is aboard). By authority of the 1946 Foreign Service act, the Marine security guards of the Marine Embassy Security Command provide security for American embassies, legations, and consulates at over 110 State Department posts overseas.[15] For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Department of State redirects here. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... The United States Marine Band, colloquially known as The Presidents Own, was established by an Act of Congress on July 11, 1798, and is America’s oldest professional musical organization. ... The West Wing, see NSF Thurmont (The West Wing). ... Marine Helicopter Squadron One (HMX-1), The Nighthawks, based at Marine Corps Air Facility, Quantico, Virginia, is responsible for the helicopter transportation of the President of the United States, Vice President, Cabinet members and VIPs. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Marine One lifting off of the White House south lawn. ... Marine Two is the air traffic control callsign of any United States Marines aircraft carrying the Vice President of the United States. ... Marine Security Guard students perform rapid-fire exercises on the Department of State pistol qualification course Feb. ... - Seal on the building of German Embassies. ... A legation was the term used in diplomacy to denote a diplomatic representative office lower than an embassy. ...


Historical mission

At its founding, the Marine Corps was composed of infantry serving aboard naval vessels and was responsible for the security of the ship and her crew by conducting offensive and defensive combat during boarding actions, and defending the ship's officers from mutiny; to the latter end, their quarters on ship were often strategically positioned between the officers' quarters and the rest of the vessel. Continental Marines, as they were known at the time, were also responsible for manning raiding parties, both at sea and ashore. The role of the Marine Corps has since expanded significantly; as the importance of its original naval mission declined with changing naval warfare doctrine and the professionalization of the Naval service, the Corps adapted by focusing on what were formerly secondary missions ashore. The Advanced Base doctrine of the early 20th century codified their combat duties ashore, outlining the use of Marines in the seizure of bases and other duties on land to support naval campaigns. The Marines would also develop tactics and techniques of amphibious assault on defended coastlines in time for use in World War II.[16] Its original mission of providing shipboard security finally ended in the 1990s, when the last Marine security detachments were withdrawn from U.S. Navy ships. Mutiny AKA. Matt Daye Is A conspiracy among members of a group of similarly-situated individuals (typically members of the military; or the crew of any ship, even if they are civilians) to openly oppose, change or overthrow an existing authority. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Capabilities

While the Marine Corps does not employ any unique combat arms, as a force it has the unique ability to rapidly deploy a combined-arms task force to almost anywhere in the world within days. The basic structure for all deployed units is a Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) that integrates a ground combat component, an air combat component, and a logistics combat component under a common command element. While the creation of joint commands under the Goldwater-Nichols Act has improved inter-service coordination between the U.S. military services, the Corps' ability to permanently maintain integrated multi-element task forces under a single command provides a smoother implementation of combined-arms warfare principles.[4] The Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) is a term used by the United States Marine Corps to describe the principal organization for all missions across the range of military operations. ... Military logistics is the art and science of planning and carrying out the movement and maintenance of military forces. ... The Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 Pub. ...


The close integration of disparate Marine units stems from an organizational culture centered around the infantry. Every other Marine capability exists to support the infantry. Unlike some Western militaries, the Corps remained conservative against theories proclaiming the ability of new weapons to win wars independently. For example, Marine Aviation has always been focused on close air support and has remained largely uninfluenced by air power theories proclaiming that strategic bombing can singlehandedly win wars.[16] Marine AV-8B Harrier II on the deck of USS Nassau While other nations have Marines who are aviators, only the United States Marine Corps has its own dedicated aviation arm. ... An Apache attack helicopter provides close air support to United States Army soldiers patrolling the Tigris River southeast of Baghdad, Iraq during the Iraq War. ... The city heart of Rotterdam after being terror bombed by Germany in 1940, the ruin of the (now restored) Laurens Kerk is the only building that reminds people of Rotterdams medieval architecture. ...


This focus on the infantry is matched with the doctrine that "Every Marine is a rifleman," a focus of Commandant Alfred M. Gray, Jr., emphasizing the infantry combat abilities of every Marine. All enlisted Marines, regardless of military specialization, receive training as a rifleman; all officers receive training as infantry platoon commanders.[17] The value of this culture has been demonstrated many times throughout history. For example, at Wake Island, when all the Marine aircraft were shot down, pilots continued the fight as ground officers, leading supply clerks and cooks in a final defensive effort.[18] General Alfred M. Gray General Alfred M. Gray, Jr. ... For other uses, see Rifleman (disambiguation). ...


The amphibious assault techniques developed for World War II evolved, with the addition of air assault and maneuver warfare doctrine, into the current "Operational Maneuver from the Sea" doctrine of power projection from the seas.[1] The Marines are credited with the development of helicopter insertion doctrine and were the earliest in the American military to widely adopt maneuver-warfare principles, which emphasize low-level initiative and flexible execution. As a result, a large degree of initiative and autonomy is expected of junior Marines, particularly the NCOs, (corporals and sergeants), as compared with many other military organizations. The Marine Corps emphasizes authority and responsibility downward to a greater degree than the other military services. Flexibility of execution is implemented via an emphasis on "commander's intent" as a guiding principle for carrying out orders; specifying the end state but leaving open the method of execution.[19] A US Army UH-1 Huey seen offloading troops during the Vietnam War Air Assault (or air mobile, in the U.S.) is the movement of forces by helicopter or aircraft to engage and destroy enemy forces or to seize and hold key terrain. ... Maneuver warfare, is the term used by military theorist for a concept of warfare that advocates attempting to defeat an adversary by incapacitating their decision-making through shock and disruption brought about by movement. ... A US Army UH-1 Huey seen offloading troops during the Vietnam War Air Assault (or air mobile, in the U.S.) is the movement of forces by helicopter or aircraft to engage and destroy enemy forces or to seize and hold key terrain. ... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or Noncom, is an enlisted member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ... This article is about the military rank. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ...


The U.S. Marine Corps relies on the U.S. Navy for sealift to provide its rapid deployment capabilities. In addition to basing a third of the Marine Corps Operating Forces in Japan, Marine Expeditionary Units (MEU), smaller MAGTF, are typically stationed at sea. This allows the ability to function as first responders to international incidents. The U.S. Army now maintains light infantry units capable of rapid worldwide deployment, though they do not match the combined-arms integration of a MAGTF, nor do they have the logistical training that the Navy provides.[4] For this reason, the Marine Corps is often assigned to non-combat missions such as the evacuation of Americans from unstable countries and humanitarian relief of natural disasters. In larger conflicts, Marines act as a stopgap, to get into and hold an area until larger units can be mobilized. The Corps performed this role in World War I, and the Korean War, where Marines were the first significant combat units deployed from the United States and held the line until the country could mobilize for war.[20] The USNS Bob Hope, a non-combatant vessel crewed by civilian mariners under the United States Navys Military Sealift Command, is used to preposition tanks, trucks and other wheeled vehicles and supplies needed to support an Army heavy brigade. ... The Fleet Marine Force is a combined command of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps which comprises a combination of permanent afloat personnel, stationed on U.S. Navy ships, and ground units of the United States Marine Corps infantry branch. ... A Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) is the smallest Marine Air-Ground Task Force in the United States Marine Corps. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... Humanitarian aid arriving by plane at Rinas Airport in Albania in the summer of 1999. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung...


History

The United States Marine Corps was originally organized as the Continental Marines in 1775 to conduct ship-to-ship fighting, provide shipboard security and assist in landing forces. ...

Origins

The United States Marine Corps traces its institutional roots to the Continental Marines of the American Revolutionary War, formed at Tun Tavern in Philadelphia, by a resolution of the Continental Congress on November 10, 1775, a date regarded and celebrated as the date of the Marine Corps' "birthday". At the end of the American Revolution in 1783, both the Continental Navy and Continental Marines were disbanded, and although individual Marines were enlisted for the few American naval vessels left, the institution itself would not be resurrected until 1798. In preparation for the Naval War with France, Congress created the United States Navy and Marine Corps.[21] The U.S. Marines' most famous action of this period occurred during the First Barbary War (1801–1805) against the Barbary pirates,[22] when William Eaton and First Lieutenant Presley O'Bannon led seven Marines and 300 Arab and European mercenaries in an effort to capture Tripoli. Though they only reached Derna, the action at Tripoli has been immortalized in the Marines' hymn and the Mameluke Sword carried by Marine officers.[23] The Continental Marines were the Marine force of the American Colonies during American Revolutionary War. ... This article is about military actions only. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Continental Navy Jack The Continental Navy was authorized by the Continental Congress on October 13, 1775. ... The Quasi-War was an undeclared war fought entirely at sea between the United States and France from 1798 to 1801. ... The French people proclaimed Frances First Republic on 21 September 1792 as a result of the French Revolution and of the abolition of the French monarchy. ... Belligerents United States Sweden(until 1802) Barbary States (Ottoman Empire regencies) Commanders Richard Dale William Eaton Edward Preble Hassan Bey Murad Reis Strength 7 Ships 10 US Marines and Soldiers Christian Mercenaries Arab Mercenaries 4000 Casualties and losses 2 Ships destroyed 2 Marines killed, 3 wounded Christian/Arab Mercenaries killed... The Moorish ambassador of the Barbary States to the Court of Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... William Eaton (23 February 1764 – 1 June 1811) was a United States Army officer, involved with the First Barbary War. ... Presley Neville O’Bannon (1784 – 12 September 1850) was an officer in the United States Marine Corps, famous for his exploits in the First Barbary War. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mercenary (disambiguation). ... Tripoli (Arabic: طرابلس Tarābulus) is the capital city of Libya. ... Combatants United States Ottoman vilayet of Tripoli Commanders William Eaton Hassan Bey Strength 10 US Marines & Soldiers 70 Christian mercenaries 400 Arab mercenaries 4,000 Casualties Americans 2 killed, 3 wounded Christian Mercenaries: 9 killed and wounded Arab Mercenaries: unknown Unknown {{{notes}}} The Battle of Derna was a decisive victory... The Marines Hymn is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps. ... A Mameluke Sword is a cross hilted, curved scimitar-like sword. ...


During the War of 1812, Marine naval detachments took part in the great frigate duels that characterized the war, which were the first American victories in the conflict. Their most significant contributions came at the Battle of Bladensburg and the defense of New Orleans. At Bladensburg, they held the line after the Army and militias retreated, and although eventually defeated, they inflicted casualties on the British and delayed their march to Washington, D.C. At New Orleans, the Marines held the center of Gen. Andrew Jackson's defensive line. By the end of the war, the Marines had acquired a well-deserved reputation as expert marksmen, especially in ship-to-ship actions.[23] This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... The Battle of Bladensburg was a battle fought during the War of 1812. ... For other uses of the name, see Battle of New Orleans (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... A US Marine marksman. ...


After the war, the Marine Corps fell into a depression. The third and fourth commandants were court-martialed. However, the appointment of Archibald Henderson as its fifth commandant in 1820 breathed new life into the Corps; he would go on to become the Corps' longest-serving commandant. Under his tenure, the Corps took on expeditionary duties in the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico, Key West, West Africa, the Falkland Islands, and Sumatra. Commandant Henderson is credited with thwarting President Andrew Jackson's attempts to combine and integrate the Marine Corps with the Army.[23] Instead, Congress passed the Act for the Better Organization of the Marine Corps in 1834, stipulating that the Corps was part of the Department of the Navy as a sister service to the U.S. Navy.[24] This would be the first of many times that Congress came to the aid of the Marines. The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... Archibald Henderson (January 21, 1783 – January 6, 1859) was the longest-serving Commandant of the Marine Corps, serving from 1820 to 1859. ... West Indies redirects here. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Monroe Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Morgan McPherson Area  - City  7. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... For other uses, see Sumatra (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ...

When the Seminole Wars of 1835 broke out, Commandant Henderson volunteered the Marines for service, himself personally leading two battalions, nearly half of the entire Corps, to war. A decade later, in the Mexican–American War (1846–1848), the Marines made their famed assault on Chapultepec Palace, an imposing complex overlooking Mexico City. The Marines were placed on guard duty at the Mexican Presidential Palace, hence the phrase "The Halls of Montezuma" in the Marines' hymn. In the 1850s, the Marines would further see service in Panama and Asia, escorting Matthew Perry's East India Squadron on its historic trip to the Far East. Colonel Archibald Henderson is known affectionately as "The Grand Old Man" of the Marine Corps, based on his many contributions during his 39 years as Commandant.[25] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Nicolás Bravo #, Mariano Monterde School Commandant, Juan N. Perez commander Remants Leon Brigade) Strength 13,000 876 cadets, 4000 regulars Casualties 130 killed 703 wounded 29 missing 862 total 1,800 killed and wounded 823 captured 2,623 Total Gen. ... Combatants United States Seminole Commanders Andrew Jackson Osceola The Seminole Wars, also known as the Florida Wars, were three wars or conflicts in Florida between various groups of Indians collectively known as Seminoles and the United States. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 18,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Nicolás Bravo #, Mariano Monterde School Commandant, Juan N. Perez commander Remants Leon Brigade) Strength 13,000 876 cadets, 4000 regulars Casualties 130 killed 703 wounded 29 missing 862 total 1,800 killed and wounded 823 captured 2,623 Total Gen. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858) Matthew Calbraith Perry (April 10, 1794 – March 4, 1858) was the Commodore of the U.S. Navy who compelled the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854. ... East India Squadron is a squadron of American ships which existed in the nineteenth century. ...


With their vast service in foreign engagements, the Marine Corps played a moderate role in the Civil War (1861–1865); their most important task was blockade duty. But Marines fought most battles on the coast. At Fort Wagner, Fort Pulaski, New Orleans, Galveston, Brownsville, Fort Fisher, Newport As more and more states seceded from the Union, about half of the officers in the Marine Corps also left the Union to join the Confederacy and form The Confederate States Marine Corps (CSMC)(a branch of the Confederate Navy, was established by the Confederate Congress on March 16, 1861). Without most of its officers, the remaining Marines were few and inexperienced. The battalion of recruits formed for the First Battle of Bull Run (First Manassas) performed poorly, retreating with the rest of the Union forces. The Confederate Congress authorized the formation of a Marine Corps of its own, to be made up of ten companies, but this organization had little impact on the war.[20] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A blockade is any effort to prevent supplies, troops, information or aid from reaching an opposing force. ... The Ordinance of Secession was the document drafted and ratified in 1860 and 1861 by the seceding states that officially declared their secession from the United States of America. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... The Confederate States Marine Corps (CSMC) was a branch of the Confederate Navy, tasked with shore operations. ... Categories: Stub | American Civil War | Confederate States Navy ... The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Irvin McDowell Joseph E. Johnston P.G.T. Beauregard Strength 35,000 32,500 Casualties 2,896 (460 killed, 1,124 wounded, 1,312 captured/missing)[1] 1,982 (387 killed, 1,582 wounded, 13 missing)[1] For other uses... The Congress of the Confederate States was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ...

Five U.S. Marines with fixed bayonets, and their NCO with his sword. Washington Navy Yard, April 1864.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x833, 149 KB) Pictured by an unknown photographer, five U.S. Marine Corps privates with fixed bayonets under the command of their noncommissioned officer (NCO), who displays his M1859 Marine NCO sword. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x833, 149 KB) Pictured by an unknown photographer, five U.S. Marine Corps privates with fixed bayonets under the command of their noncommissioned officer (NCO), who displays his M1859 Marine NCO sword. ... For other uses, see bayonet (disambiguation). ... The Washington Navy Yard is the former shipyard and ordnance plant of the United States Navy in Washington, D.C.. The yard currently is a ceremonial and administrative center for the navy, home to the Chief of Naval Operations and is headquarters for the Naval Historical Center, the Marine Corps...

Formative years

The remainder of the 19th century was marked by declining strength and introspection about the mission of the Marine Corps. The U.S. Navy's transition from sail to steam put into question the need for Marines on naval ships. Meanwhile, Marines served as a convenient resource for interventions and landings to protect American lives and interests overseas. The Corps was involved in over 28 separate interventions in the 30 years from the end of the American Civil War to the end of 19th century, including China, Formosa, Japan, Nicaragua, Uruguay, Mexico, Korea, Panama, Hawaii, Egypt, Haiti, Samoa, Argentina, Chile, and Colombia. They would also be called upon to stem political and labor unrest within the United States.[26] During this period, war correspondent Richard Harding Davis coined the phrase "The Marines have landed and have the situation well in hand." Under Commandant Jacob Zeilin's tenure, Marine customs and traditions took shape: the Corps adopted the Marine Corps emblem on November 19, 1868. It was also during this time that "The Marines' Hymn" was first heard. Around 1883, the Marines adopted their current motto "Semper Fidelis" (Latin: Always Faithful).[23] Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Traditional wooden cutter under sail. ... For other uses, see Steamboat (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other persons named Richard Davis, see Richard Davis (disambiguation). ... Categories: Stub | 1806 births | 1880 deaths ... Eagle, Globe, and Anchor The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor (EGA) is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Marines Hymn is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps. ... Semper Fidelis is Latin for Always faithful. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ...


John Philip Sousa, the musician and composer, enlisted as a Marine apprentice at the age of 13, serving from 1867 until 1872. He would later return to Corps service from 1880 to 1892 as the leader of the U.S. Marine Band (The President's Own). (His father, John Antonio Sousa, had been a trombonist in the same band.) John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor of the late Romantic era known particularly for American military marches. ...

U.S. Marines in Nicaragua during "The Banana Wars" holding up the captured flag of Augusto César Sandino, 1932
U.S. Marines in Nicaragua during "The Banana Wars" holding up the captured flag of Augusto César Sandino, 1932

During the Spanish–American War (1898), Marines led U.S. forces ashore in the Philippines, Cuba, and Puerto Rico, demonstrating their readiness for deployment. At Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, the Marines seized an advanced naval base that remains in use today by the U.S. Navy. Between 1899 and 1916, the Corps continued its record of participation in foreign expeditions, including the Philippine-American War, the Boxer Rebellion in China (1899–1901), Panama, the Cuban Pacifications, the Perdicaris Incident in Morocco, Veracruz (Mexico), Haiti, Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic), and in Nicaragua. In the 1900s and 1910s, the seizure of advance naval bases entered Marine Corps doctrine with the formation of the Marine Corps Advanced Base School and the Advanced Base Force, the prototype of the Fleet Marine Force.[25] Image File history File links Sandinoflagusmc. ... Image File history File links Sandinoflagusmc. ... US Marines with the captured flag of Augusto César Sandino in Nicaragua in 1932 The Banana Wars is an unofficial term that refers to the United States military interventions into Central and South America. ... Augusto César Sandino Augusto Nicolás Calderón Sandino (May 18, 1895 – February 21, 1934) was a Nicaraguan revolutionary and leader of a rebellion against the U.S. military presence in Nicaragua between 1927 and 1933. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties Unknown[1] The Spanish–American... This article is about the body of water. ... Gitmo redirects here. ... Belligerents United States Philippine Constabulary Philippine Scouts First Philippine Republic several groups post-1902 Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Malvar several unofficial leaders post-1902 Strength 126,000 soldiers[1] First Philippine Republic: 80,000 soldiers Casualties and losses ~5,000-7,000[1][2] ~12,000... Combatants Eight-Nation Alliance (ordered by contribution): Empire of Japan Russian Empire British Empire French Third Republic United States German Empire Kingdom of Italy Austro-Hungarian Empire Righteous Harmony Society Qing Dynasty (China) Commanders Edward Seymour Alfred Graf von Waldersee Ci Xi Strength 20,000 initially 49,000 total 50... Ion Perdicaris (1840 - 1925) was a U.S.-Greek playboy who was the centre of the infamous Perdicaris incident, a kidnapping that aroused international conflict in 1904. ...


Throughout the first half of the 20th century, before and after World War I, Marines saw action throughout Central America, including Haiti and Nicaragua. These actions became known as the "Banana Wars" after the principal export of those countries. The experiences gained in counter-insurgency and guerrilla operations during this period were consolidated into the Small Wars Manual.[27] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... US Marines with the captured flag of Augusto César Sandino in Nicaragua in 1932 The Banana Wars is an unofficial term that refers to the United States military interventions into Central and South America. ... Small Wars Manual The Marine Corps role in Small Wars has a long and complex history. ...


World War I

During World War I, battle-tested, veteran Marines served a central role in the U.S. late entry into the conflict. Unlike the U.S. Army, the Marine Corps had a deep pool of officers and NCOs with battle experience, and experienced a relatively smaller expansion. Here, the Marines fought their celebrated battle at Belleau Wood, then the largest in the history of the Corps; it created the Marines' reputation in modern history. Rallying under the battle cries of "Retreat? Hell, we just got here!" (Captain Lloyd W. Williams) and "Come on, you sons of bitches, do you want to live forever?" (GySgt. Dan Daly), the Marines drove German forces from the area. While its previous expeditionary experiences had not earned it much acclaim in the Western world, the Marines' fierceness and toughness earned them the respect of the Germans, who rated them of stormtrooper quality. Though Marines and American media reported that Germans had nicknamed them Teufel Hunden as meaning "Devil Dogs," there is no evidence of this in German records and since Teufelshunde would be the proper German phrase, it was possibly American propaganda. Nevertheless, the name stuck.[28] The Corps had entered the war with 511 officers and 13,214 enlisted personnel, and by November 11, 1918 had reached a strength of 2,400 officers and 70,000 men.[29] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (896x674, 252 KB)Georges Scott (1873-1943) illustration American Marines in Belleau Wood (1918) - originally published in the French Magazine Illustrations - retrieved from http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (896x674, 252 KB)Georges Scott (1873-1943) illustration American Marines in Belleau Wood (1918) - originally published in the French Magazine Illustrations - retrieved from http://www. ... Combatants United States France British Empire German Empire Commanders John J. Pershing James Harbord Crown Prince Wilhelm Strength 2 U.S. divisions French 6th Army (elements) British IX Corps (elements) 5 German divisions (elements) Casualties 9,777 unknown The Battle of Belleau Wood was a battle of the first World... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants United States France British Empire German Empire Commanders John J. Pershing James Harbord Crown Prince Wilhelm Strength 2 U.S. divisions French 6th Army (elements) British IX Corps (elements) 5 German divisions (elements) Casualties 9,777 unknown The Battle of Belleau Wood was a battle of the first World... Sergeant Major Daniel Joseph Dan Daly (11 November 1873 – 28 April 1937) was a United States Marine. ... The Stormtroopers were special military troops which were formed in the last year of World War I as the German army developed new methods of attacking enemy trenches, called infiltration tactics. Men trained in these methods were known as in German as Sturmmann (literally storm man or assault man but... This article is about U.S. Marine Corps nickname. ... 1967 Chinese propaganda poster from the Cultural Revolution. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


Between the World Wars, the Marine Corps was headed by Commandant John A. Lejeune. Under his leadership, the Corps presciently studied and developed amphibious techniques that would be of great use in World War II. Many officers, including Lt. Col. Earl Hancock "Pete" Ellis, foresaw a war in the Pacific with Japan and took preparations for such a conflict. While stationed in China, then-Lt. Col. Victor H. Krulak observed Japanese amphibious techniques in 1937. Through 1941, as the prospect of war grew, the Corps pushed urgently for joint amphibious exercises and acquired amphibious equipment such as the Higgins boat which would prove of great use in the upcoming conflict.[30] Lieutenant General John Archer Lejeune, 13th Commandant of the Marine Corps, was born at Pointe Coupee, Louisiana, on 10 January 1867. ... Lieutenant Colonel Earl Hancock “Pete” Ellis (December 19, 1880 - May 12, 1923) was a significant United States Marine Corps officer. ... Victor H. Krulak (born January 7, 1913 in Denver, Colorado) was a decorated United States Marine Corps officer who saw action in WWII, Korea and Vietnam. ... The Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP) or Higgins boat was a landing craft used extensively in World War II. The craft was designed by Andrew Higgins of Louisiana, based on boats made for operating in swamps and marshes. ...


World War II

US Marines on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima, raise the American flag.
US Marines on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima, raise the American flag.

In World War II, the Marines played a central role in the Pacific War; the Corps expanded from two brigades to two corps with six divisions and five air wings with 132 squadrons. In addition, 20 defense battalions and a parachute battalion were set up.[31] The battles of Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Cape Gloucester, Saipan, Peleliu, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa saw fierce fighting between U.S. Marines and the Imperial Japanese Army. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1380x1111, 200 KB) This work is copyrighted and unlicensed. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1380x1111, 200 KB) This work is copyrighted and unlicensed. ... Iwo Jima (Japanese 硫黄島 Iōjima, meaning sulfur island) is a volcanic island in Japan, part of the Volcano Islands (also known as the Ogasawara Islands), approximately 650 miles (1046 km) south of Tokyo (24. ... For other uses, see Iwo Jima (disambiguation). ... Flag ratio: 7:12; nicknames: Stars and Stripes, Old Glory The flag of the United States of America consists of thirteen equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white; there is a blue rectangle in the upper hoist-side corner bearing 50 small, white, five-pointed stars... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For other uses, see Pacific War (disambiguation). ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... This article is about a military unit. ... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... Wing is a term used by different air forces for a unit of command. ... A Squadron is a small unit or formation of cavalry, aircraft (including balloons), or naval vessels. ... Paramarine in training at NAS Lakehurst in 1942 The Paramarines (also known as Marine paratroopers) was a short-lived specialized unit of the United States Marine Corps, trained to be dropped by parachute. ... Operation Watchtower On August 7, 1942, the 1st Marine Division performed an amphibious landing east of the Tenaru River. ... Combatants  United States Empire of Japan Commanders Holland Smith Keiji Shibazaki  â€  Strength 35,000 troops 3,000 troops, 1,000 Japanese and 1,200 Korean laborers Casualties 990 killed 2,296 injured 4,713 killed 17 Japanese and 129 Koreans captured Map of Tarawa Atoll Map of Betio, Tarawa Atoll... Combatants United States; Australia Japan Commanders William H. Rupertus Iwao Matsuda Casualties 310 soldiers killed in action; 1,083 wounded more than 1,000 soldiers killed in action The Battle of Cape Gloucester was a battle in the Pacific theater of World War II, which took place between late December... Combatants United States Empire of Japan Commanders Richmond K. Turner Holland Smith Yoshitsugu Saito â€  Chuichi Nagumo â€  Strength 71,000 31,000 Casualties 3,426 killed; 13,160 wounded 24,000 KIA and 5,000 suicides; 921 prisoners The Battle of Saipan was a battle of the Pacific campaign of World... Combatants United States Empire of Japan Commanders William H. Rupertus, USMC Kunio Nakagawa Strength 2 divisions (1st Marine Division and the USA 81st Infantry Division) Approximately 11,000 men Casualties 2,336 killed and 8,450 wounded 10,695 killed, 202 captured The Battle of Peleliu, like the bloody World... Belligerents United States Empire of Japan Commanders Holland Smith Tadamichi Kuribayashi â€  Strength 110,000 21,000 Casualties and losses 6,821 dead 19,189 wounded,[1] 494 missing[1] Total: 26,504 20,703 dead,[1] 216 captured[1] Total: 20,919 The Battle of Iwo Jima took place between... Combatants  United States  United Kingdom  Canada  Australia  New Zealand Empire of Japan Commanders Simon B. Buckner â€  Joseph W. Stilwell Ray Spruance Mitsuru Ushijima â€  Isamu Cho â€  Strength 548,000 soldiers, 1,300 ships,  ? aircraft 100,000 regulars and militia,  ? ships,  ? aircraft Casualties 12,513 dead or missing, 38,916 wounded, 33... The Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) (KyÅ«jitai: 大日本帝國陸軍, Shinjitai: , Romaji: Dai-Nippon Teikoku Rikugun), or more officially Army of the Greater Japanese Empire was the official ground based armed force of Imperial Japan from 1867 to 1945. ...


Philip Johnston proposed the use of Navajo the United States Marine Corps at the beginning of World War II. The idea was accepted, and the Navajo code was formally developed and modeled on the Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet that uses agreed-upon English words to represent letters. For each letter in the English alphabet, the code talkers were asked to generate several nouns and sometimes verbs in Navajo using the principle of letter and word substitution. As it was determined that phonetically spelling out all military terms letter by letter into words—while in combat—would be too time consuming, some terms, concepts, tactics and instruments of modern warfare were given uniquely formal descriptive nomenclatures in Navajo (the word for "potato" being used to refer to a hand grenade, or "tortoise" to a tank, for example). The Navajo people (or Diné) of the Southwestern United States are currently the largest Native American tribe in North America, with an estimated tribal population of 300,000. ... The Joint Army/Navy Phonetic Alphabet was a radio alphabet developed in 1941 and was used by all branches of the United States military until the promulgation of the NATO phonetic alphabet (Alpha, Bravo) in 1956, which replaced it. ... A spelling alphabet, radio alphabet, or telephone alphabet is a set of words which are used to stand for the letters of an alphabet. ... The modern English alphabet consists of 26 letters[1] derived from the Latin alphabet: The exact shape of printed letters varies depending on the typeface. ... A noun, or noun substantive, is a word or phrase that refers to a person, place, thing, event, substance or quality. ... A verb is a part of speech that usually denotes action (bring, read), occurrence (to decompose (itself), to glitter), or a state of being (exist, live, soak, stand). Depending on the language, a verb may vary in form according to many factors, possibly including its tense, aspect, mood and voice. ... In cryptography, a substitution cipher is a method of encryption by which units of plaintext are substituted with ciphertext according to a regular system; the units may be single letters (the most common), pairs of letters, triplets of letters, mixtures of the above, and so forth. ... List of terms, acronyms, information, related to modern infantry, infantry weapons, military, or firerarms in general. ... This is a list of established military terms which have been in use for at least 50 years. ... This page contains a list of military tactics: // Identification of objectives Concentration of effort Exploiting prevailing weather Exploiting night Maintenance of reserve forces Economy of force Force protection Force dispersal Military Camouflage Deception Perfidy False flag Electronic countermeasures Electronic counter-counter-measures Radio silence Fortification Fieldworks (entrenchments) Over Head Protection...


During the battle of Iwo Jima, photographer Joe Rosenthal took the famous photograph Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima of five Marines and one Navy Corpsman raising the American flag on Mt. Suribachi. Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal, who had come ashore earlier that day to observe the progress of the troops, said of the flag raising on Iwo Jima, "...the raising of that flag on Suribachi means a Marine Corps for the next five hundred years." The acts of the Marines during the war added to their already significant popular reputation. The USMC War Memorial in Arlington, Virginia was dedicated in 1954. By war's end, the Corps had grown to include six divisions, five air wings, and supporting troops totaling about 485,000. Nearly 87,000 Marines were casualties during World War II (including nearly 20,000 killed). and 82 received the Medal of Honor[32] 2,274 Marines were POWs {2,270 by the Japanese and 4 by the Germans}; 1,756 returned to the USA. 268 known to have died and 250 known to have been captured but otherwise unaccounted for and presumed to have died. See [1]. With the U.S. fleet off Iwo Jima in the background, Joe Rosenthal strikes a pose on the summit of Mount Suribachi Joe Rosenthal (October 9, 1911 – August 20, 2006) was an American photographer who received the Pulitzer Prize for his iconic World War II photograph Raising the Flag on... Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, by Joe Rosenthal / The Associated Press. ... The HM rating symbol (a caduceus). ... Union Jack. ... For other uses, see Iwo Jima (disambiguation). ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... James Vincent Forrestal (February 15, 1892 – May 22, 1949) was a Secretary of the Navy and the first United States Secretary of Defense. ... The Marine Corps War Memorial is a military memorial statue located near the Arlington National Cemetery in Rosslyn, Virginia, United States. ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ...


Despite Secretary Forrestal's prediction, the Corps faced an immediate institutional crisis following the war. Army generals pushing for a strengthened and reorganized defense establishment also attempted to fold the Marine mission and assets into the Navy and Army. Drawing on hastily assembled Congressional support, the Marine Corps rebuffed such efforts to dismantle the Corps, resulting in statutory protection of the Marine Corps in the National Security Act of 1947.[33] Shortly afterward, in 1952 the Douglas-Mansfield Bill afforded the Commandant an equal voice with the Joint Chiefs of Staff on matters relating to the Marines and established the structure of three divisions and air wings that remains today. This allowed the Corps to permanently maintain a division and air wing in the Far East and participate in various small wars in Southeast Asia—in the Tachen Islands, Taiwan, Laos, Thailand, and South Vietnam.[4] President Truman signs the National Security Act Amendment of 1949 with guests in the Oval Office. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ... This article is about the Asian regions. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... The Dachen Archipelago or Dachen Islands (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), formerly known as Tachen Islands is an archipelago of Jiaojiang District of Taizhou, Zhejiang strategically located in the Gulf of Taizhou, Zhejiang, off the coast of Zhejiang, the Peoples Republic of China. ... Anthem Thanh niên Hành Khúc (Call to the Citizens) Capital Saigon Language(s) Vietnamese Government Republic Last President¹ Duong Van Minh Last Prime minister Vu Van Mau Historical era Cold War  - Regime change June 14, 1955  - Dissolution April 30, 1975 Area  - 1973 173,809 km² 67,108...


Korean War

Marine lieutenant Baldomero Lopez scaling the seawall at Inchon.
Marine lieutenant Baldomero Lopez scaling the seawall at Inchon.

The Korean War (1950–1953) saw the hastily formed Provisional Marine Brigade holding the defensive line at the Pusan Perimeter. To execute a flanking maneuver, General Douglas MacArthur called on Marine air and ground forces to make an amphibious landing at Inchon. The successful landing resulted in the collapse of North Korean lines and the pursuit of North Korean forces north near the Yalu River until the entrance of the People's Republic of China into the war. Chinese troops surrounded, surprised and overwhelmed the overextended and outnumbered American forces. However, unlike the Eighth Army, which retreated in disarray, the X Corps, which included the 1st Marine Division and the Army 7th Infantry Division, regrouped and inflicted heavy casualties during their fighting withdrawal to the coast. Now known as the Battle of Chosin Reservoir, it entered Marine lore as an example of toughness and resolve. Marines would continue a battle of attrition around the 38th Parallel until the 1953 armistice.[34] The Korean War saw the Corps expand from 75,000 regulars to a force, by the end of the conflict in 1953, of 261,000 Marines, most of whom were reservists. 30,544 Marines were killed or wounded during the war and 42 were awarded the Medal of Honor.[35] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x737, 88 KB) Photo #NH96876 Marines Landing at Inchon, 15 September 1950 Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x737, 88 KB) Photo #NH96876 Marines Landing at Inchon, 15 September 1950 Source: http://www. ... 1stLt Baldomero Lopez Baldomero Lopez was a First Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps during the Korean War. ... Combatants  United Nations  North Korea Commanders Douglas MacArthur Arthur Dewey Struble Chesty Puller Kim Il-sung Choi Yong-Kun The Battle of Inchon (Korean spelling: Incheon) (Korean: Incheon Sangryuk Jakjeon; code name: Operation Chromite) was a decisive invasion and battle during the Korean War. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, a formation of United States Marines hastily put together at the outset of the Korean War, fought with great distinction at the Pusan Perimeter, the most important early battle in that conflict. ... The Pusan Perimeter was the area in extreme southeast Korea that was held by US and South Korean troops during the furthest advance of the North Korean troops, in the summer and fall of 1950, during the Korean War. ... “Flanking” redirects here. ... This article is about the American general; for the municipality in the Philippines, see General MacArthur, Eastern Samar. ... Combatants  United Nations  North Korea Commanders Douglas MacArthur Arthur Dewey Struble Chesty Puller Kim Il-sung Choi Yong-Kun The Battle of Inchon (Korean spelling: Incheon) (Korean: Incheon Sangryuk Jakjeon; code name: Operation Chromite) was a decisive invasion and battle during the Korean War. ... North Korea, officially the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK; Korean: Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk; Hangul: 조선민주주의인민공화국; Hanja: 朝鮮民主主義人民共和國), is a country in eastern Asia, covering the northern half of the peninsula of Korea. ... The Amnok River, or the Yalu River, is a river on the border between China and North Korea. ... The Eighth United States Army—often abbreviated EUSA—(the acronym EUSA was deemed unauthorized by LTG Charles Campbell in 2002) is the commanding formation of all US Army troops in South Korea. ... The 1st Marine Division is the oldest, largest (active duty), and most decorated division in the United States Marine Corps representing a combat-ready force of more than 19,000 men and women. ... Combatants United Nations Great Britain United States Peoples Republic of China Commanders Oliver Smith Song Shi-Lun Strength 30,000 60,000 Casualties 2,500 dead, 192 missing, 5,000 wounded, 7,500 frostbite casualties 25,000 killed, 12,500 wounded, 30,000 frostbite casualties The Battle of Chosin... The 38th parallel north is a line of latitude that cuts across Asia, the Mediterranean and the United States. ...


Vietnam War

Operation Hastings: Marines on patrol
Operation Hastings: Marines on patrol

The Marine Corps served an important role in the Vietnam War taking part in such battles as Da Nang, Hue City, and Khe Sanh. Individuals from the USMC operated in the Northern I Corps Regions of South Vietnam. While there, they were constantly engaged in a guerilla war against the National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam (NLF) and an intermittent conventional war against the North Vietnamese Army (NVA). Portions of the Corps were responsible for the less-known combined action program (CAC) that implemented unconventional techniques for counter-insurgency (COIN) and worked as military advisors to the Republic of Vietnam Marine Corps. Image File history File links Dong_Ha,_Vietnam_Operation_Hastings. ... Image File history File links Dong_Ha,_Vietnam_Operation_Hastings. ... Operation Hastings was an American military operation in the Vietnam War. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... This article is about the city of Da Nang. ... Combatants South Viet Nam United States North Viet Nam Viet Cong Commanders Ngo Quang Truong Foster C. LaHue Tran Van Quang Strength Over 30,000 8,000, later 12,000 Casualties ARVN: 452 KIA; 2,123 WIA US: 216 KIA; 1,584 WIA[1] Total: 668 KIA; 3,707 WIA... Combatants  United States Republic of Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam Commanders David E. Lownds (local), William C. Westmoreland (theater) Tran Quy Hai (local), Vo Nguyen Giap (theater) Strength 6,000 ~30,000 Casualties 730 killed in action, 2,642 wounded, 7 missing[2] Unknown; estimated between 10,000 and 15... Anthem Thanh niên Hành Khúc (Call to the Citizens) Capital Saigon Language(s) Vietnamese Government Republic Last President¹ Duong Van Minh Last Prime minister Vu Van Mau Historical era Cold War  - Regime change June 14, 1955  - Dissolution April 30, 1975 Area  - 1973 173,809 km² 67,108... Guerrilla redirects here. ... Viet Cong redirects here. ... 40th anniversary of Vietnam Peoples Army, commemorated on 1984 Vietnam postage stamp block The Vietnam Peoples Army (VPA) (Vietnamese: ) is official name for the armed forces of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Counter-insurgency is the combating of insurgency, by the government (or allies) of the territory in which the insurgency takes place. ... The Republic of Vietnam Marine Corps (VNMC) was established by President Ngo Dinh Diem of South Vietnam on October 13, 1954. ...


Vietnam was the longest war for Marines; by its end, 13,091[36] were killed in action, 51,392 were wounded, and 57 Medals of Honor were awarded.[37][38] Due to policies concerning rotation, more Marines were deployed for service during Vietnam than World War II.[39] The USMC presence was withdrawn in 1971, and returned briefly in 1975 to evacuate Saigon and in an attempt to rescue the crew of the Mayagüez.[40] While recovering from Vietnam, the Corps hit a detrimental low point in its service history caused by courts-martial and Non-Judicial Punishments related partially to increased Unauthorized Absences and Desertions during the war. Overhauling of the Corps began in the late 1970s when discharge policies for inadequate Marines relaxed, resulting in the removal of only the most delinquent. Once quality of new recruits improved, the Corps could focus on reforming the NCO Corps, a vital functioning part of its forces.[4] Saigon redirects here. ... Combatants United States of America Democratic Kampuchea Commanders Lt. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... For other uses of Desertion, see Abandonment. ...


Post-Vietnam and pre-9/11

After Vietnam, the Marines resumed their expeditionary role, participating in the 1980 Iran hostage rescue attempt Operation Eagle Claw, the invasion of Grenada (Operation Urgent Fury) and the invasion of Panama (Operation Just Cause). On October 23, 1983, the Marine headquarters building in Beirut, Lebanon was bombed, causing the highest peacetime losses to the Corps in its history (220 Marines and 21 other service members of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit were killed) and leading to the American withdrawal from the country. The year of 1990 saw Marines of the Joint Task Force Sharp Edge save thousands of lives by evacuating the British, French and American Nationals from the violence of the Liberian Civil War. During the Persian Gulf War (1990–1991), Marine task forces formed the initial core for Operation Desert Shield, while U.S. and Coalition troops mobilized, and later liberated Kuwait in Operation Desert Storm.[23] U.S. Marines participated in combat operations in Somalia (1992–1995) during Operations Restore Hope, Restore Hope II, and United Shield to provide humanitarian relief.[41] Combatants United States Iran Commanders Col. ... Combatants  United States  Antigua and Barbuda  Barbados  Dominica  Jamaica  Saint Lucia  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines  Grenada  Cuba Commanders Ronald Reagan Joseph Metcalf H. Norman Schwarzkopf Hudson Austin Pedro Tortolo Strength 7,300 Grenada: 1,500 regulars Cuba: about 722 (mostly military engineers)[1] Casualties 19 killed; 116 wounded[2... Combatants Panama United States Commanders Manuel Noriega Maxwell R. Thurman Strength 16,000+ 27,684+ Casualties 100-1,000 killed 24 Killed 325 Wounded 300-3,000 civilians killed Rangers from Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment prepare to take La Comandancia in the El Chorrillo neighborhood of Panama... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... The 1983 Beirut barracks bombing was a major incident on October 23, 1983, during the Lebanese Civil War. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Combatants Armed Forces of Liberia United Liberation Movement of Liberia for Democracy National Patriotic Front of Liberia Independent National Patriotic Front of Liberia Commanders Samuel Doe† Charles Taylor Prince Yormie Johnson The First Liberian Civil War was a conflict in Liberia from 1989 until 1996. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States United Nations Pakistan Malaysia Somalia Commanders Many Mohamed Farrah Aidid The United Nations intervention in Somalia (code-named Operation Restore Hope) was a United Nations–sanctioned United States military operation from 9 December 1992 to 4 May 1993. ... Operation United Shield was the name given to the US military operation of evacuating all remaining 6,200 UN peacekeeping troops from Somalia from January to March of 1995, the troops were made up of Americans, Pakistanis and Egyptians. ...


Global War on Terrorism

Main article: War on Terrorism


Following the September 11, 2001 attacks President George W. Bush announced a War on Terrorism. The stated objective of the Global War on Terror is "the defeat of al Qaeda, other terrorist groups and any nation that supports or harbors terrorists".[42] Since that time the United States Marine Corps, along with other military and federal agencies, has engaged in global operations including Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and other areas of the world, as part of that mission. The War on Terrorism (also known as the War on Terror) is campaign begun by the Bush administration which includes various military, political, and legal actions taken to ostensibly curb the spread of terrorism following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The War on Terrorism (also known as the War on Terror) is campaign begun by the Bush administration which includes various military, political, and legal actions taken to ostensibly curb the spread of terrorism following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. ... Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


Operation Enduring Freedom

Marines and other U.S. forces began staging in Uzbekistan on the border of Afghanistan as early as October, 2001 in preparation for the invasion of Afghanistan.[43] The 15th and 26th Marine Expeditionary Units were the first conventional forces into Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in November of 2001 when they seized an airfield outside of Khandahar.[44] Since then Marine battalions and squadrons have been rotating through, engaging Taliban and Al-Qaeda forces. In 2002, Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) was stood up at Camp Lemonier to provide regional security.[45] Despite transferring overall command to the U.S. Navy in 2006, the Marines have continued to operate in the Horn of Africa into 2007.[46] Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (15th MEU) is one of seven Marine Expeditionary Units currently in existence in the United States Marine Corps. ... The 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (26th MEU) is one of seven Marine Expeditionary Units currently in existence in the United States Marine Corps. ... Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... Kandahār (or Qandahār) is a city in southern Afghanistan, the capital of Kandahar province. ... The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim and ethnic Pashtun movement [2] that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the Northern Alliance, United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Combatants United States Ethiopia al-Qaeda Islamic Courts Union Casualties U.S.: 15 non-combat fatalities Ethiopian army, Somali TFG, Somali ARPCT: 600 killed 2,000+ killed Operation Enduring Freedom - Horn of Africa is the official name used by the US government for a component of its response to the... Camp Le Monier is a United States Marine Corps Base situated in Djibouti and is home to Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA). ... The Horn of Africa. ...


Operation Iraqi Freedom

Main article: Iraq War

Most recently, the Marines have served prominently in Operation Iraqi Freedom. The I Marine Expeditionary Force, along with the Army's 3rd Infantry Division, spearheaded the 2003 invasion of Iraq.[47] During the occupation of Iraq, Marines spearheaded both assaults on the city of Fallujah in April and November 2004, also known as Operation Phantom Fury.[48] Their time in Iraq has also courted controversy with the Haditha killings and the Hamdania incident.[43][49] They currently continue to operate throughout Iraq. For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Presumably a USA force ? // Lineage Activated November 8th, 1969 at Okinawa, Japan as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Redesignated August 18th, 1970 as the I Marine Amphibious Force Relocated in April 1971 to Camp Pendleton, California Redesignated February 5th, 1988 as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Recent Service Persian Gulf... The 3rd Infantry Division (Mechanized) —nicknamed the Rock of the Marne— is a United States Army infantry division based at Fort Stewart, Georgia. ... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Fallujah skyline before November 2004 battle Fallujah (Arabic: ; sometimes transliterated as Falluja or Fallouja) is a city in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69 km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... Combatants United States Iraqi insurgents Commanders James T. Conway Abu Musab al-Zarqawi Strength 2,200[1] 8,000[2] Casualties 27 killed, 90+ wounded[3] 184 insurgents, 616 civilians killed (estimated)[4] The First Battle of Fallujah, codenamed Operation Vigilant Resolve by the United States Military, was an unsuccessful... Combatants United States Iraqi Security Forces Mujahideen Shura of al-Falluja Al-Qaeda in Iraq Commanders Richard F. Natonski Abdullah al-Janabi Omar Hussein Hadid Strength 8,000 (including 5,000 non-combat troops) 4,000 - 5,000 (combatants) Casualties (December 23, 2004) U.S.: 95 killed, 630 wounded[1... Combatants United States Iraqi Security Forces Iraqi insurgents Tawhid wal Jihad Commanders Maj. ... The Haditha killings (also called the Haditha incident or the Haditha massacre) refers to the incident where 24 Iraqis were killed on November 19, 2005 in Haditha, a city in the western Iraq province of Al Anbar. ... The Hamdania incident refers to alleged war crimes committed by members of the United States Marines in relation to the shooting death of an Iraqi civilian on April 26, 2006 in Al Hamdania, a small village west of Baghdad near Abu Ghraib prison. ...


Organization

The Department of the Navy, led by the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV), administers both the Marine Corps and the Navy. The most senior Marine officer is the Commandant of the Marine Corps, responsible for organizing, recruiting, training, and equipping the Marine Corps so that it is ready for operation under the command of the Unified Combatant Commanders. The Marine Corps is organized into four principal subdivisions: Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC), the Operating Forces, the Supporting Establishment, and the Marine Forces Reserve (MARFORRES or USMCR). The United States Marine Corps is administered by the Department of the Navy, which is lead by the Secretary of the Navy(SECNAV). ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ... Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC), located in Washington, D.C., includes the offices of the Commandant of the Marine Corps and various agencies and staff functions. ... The Marine Forces Reserve (MARFORRES) (also known as the United States Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR)), a part of the United States Marine Corps, is the largest command in the Marine Corps. ...


The Operating Forces are further subdivided into three categories: Marine Corps Forces (MARFOR) assigned to unified commands, Marine Corps Security Forces guarding high-risk naval installations, and Marine Corps Security Guard detachments at American embassies. Under the "Forces for Unified Commands" memo, Marine Corps Forces are assigned to each of the regional unified commands at the discretion of the Secretary of Defense and with the approval of the President. Since 1991, the Marine Corps has maintained component headquarters at each of the regional unified combatant commands.[50] Marine Corps Forces are further divided into Marine Forces Command (MARFORCOM) and Marine Forces Pacific (MARFORPAC), each headed by a Lieutenant General. MARFORCOM has operational control of the II Marine Expeditionary Force; MARFORPAC has operational control of the I Marine Expeditionary Force and III Marine Expeditionary Force.[20] Marine Security Guard students perform rapid-fire exercises on the Department of State pistol qualification course Feb. ... The United States Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) is the head of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and military matters. ... Marine Forces Pacific (MarForPac) are the forces from the United States Marine Corps that fall under the United States Pacific Command. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... The 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force (II MEF), one of three MEFs in the Marine Corps, is a combined arms force consisting of ground, air, and logistics forces possessing the capability of projecting offensive combat power ashore while sustaining itself in combat without external assistance for a period of 60... Presumably a USA force ? // Lineage Activated November 8th, 1969 at Okinawa, Japan as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Redesignated August 18th, 1970 as the I Marine Amphibious Force Relocated in April 1971 to Camp Pendleton, California Redesignated February 5th, 1988 as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Recent Service Persian Gulf... The III Marine Expeditionary Force, is a Marine Air-Ground Task Force of the United States Marine Corps that is forward-deployed and able to deploy rapidly and conduct operations across the spectrum from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to amphibious assault and high intensity combat. ...


The Supporting Establishment includes Marine Corps Combat Development Command (MCCDC), Marine Corps Recruit Depots, Marine Corps Logistics Command, Marine bases and air stations, Recruiting Command, and the Marine Band. Marine Corps Combat Development Command, located in at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, has the mission of developing Marine Corps warfighting abilities to enable the Corps to field combat-ready forces. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... This is a list of U.S. Marine Corps bases and installations, organized by U.S. state within the territory of the U.S. and by country if overseas. ... This is a list of U.S. Marine Corps bases and installations, organized by U.S. state within the territory of the U.S. and by country if overseas. ... The United States Marine Band, colloquially known as The Presidents Own, was established by an Act of Congress on July 11, 1798, and is America’s oldest professional musical organization. ...


Relationship with other services

The Marine Corps combat capabilities in some ways overlap those of the U.S. Army, the latter having historically viewed the Corps as encroaching on the Army's capabilities and competing for funding, missions, and renown. The attitude dates back to the founding of the Continental Marines, when General George Washington refused to allow the initial Marine battalions to be drawn from among his Continental Army. Most significantly, in the aftermath of World War II, Army efforts to restructure the American defense establishment included the dissolution of the Corps and the folding of its capabilities into the other services. Leading this movement were such prominent Army officers as General Dwight D. Eisenhower and Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall.[33] The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The Continental Marines were the Marine force of the American Colonies during American Revolutionary War. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Categories: United States-related stubs | United States Army | Joint Chiefs of Staff ... George C. Marshall George Catlett Marshall (December 31, 1880–October 16, 1959), an American military leader and statesman, was born into a middle-class family in Uniontown, Pennsylvania. ...


The Marine Corps is a sister service with the U.S. Navy under the Department of the Navy. As a result, the Navy and Marine Corps have a close relationship, more so than with other branches of the United States military. Whitepapers and promotional literature have commonly used the phrase "Navy-Marine Corps Team".[51][52] Both the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) and Commandant of the Marine Corps, heads of their respective services, report directly to the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV), a civilian who heads the Department of the Navy. USN redirects here. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ... The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) is the senior military officer in the United States Navy. ...


Cooperation between the two services begins with the training and instruction of Marines. The Corps receives a significant portion of its officers from the United States Naval Academy and Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC). NROTC are staffed by Marines alongside naval officers. Marine Corps drill instructors contribute to training of naval officers in the Navy's Officer Candidate School. Marine aviators are trained in the Naval Aviation training pipeline. The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ... NROTC officers being comissioned The Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) program is a college-based, commissioned officers recruitment tool of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The United States Navys Officer Candidate School (NAVOCS), currently located at NAS Pensacola, Florida provides training to become a commissioned officer. ...


Training alongside each other is viewed as critical, as the Navy provides transport, logistical, and combat support to put Marine units into the fight. Navy aircraft carriers typically deploy with a Marine F/A-18 Hornet squadron alongside Navy squadrons. Since every Marine is a combatant, the Marines do not recruit or train chaplains or medical personnel; officers and enlisted sailors from the Navy fill these roles. Some of these sailors, particularly Hospital Corpsmen, generally wear Marine uniforms emblazoned with Navy insignia and markings in order to be noticeably distinct to compatriots but generally indistinguishable to enemies. Conversely, the Marine Corps is responsible for conducting land operations to support naval campaigns, including the seizure of naval and air bases. Both services operate a network security team in conjunction. Soon the Marine Corps is also expecting to provide small detachments to permanently serve on Navy ships for security, vessel boarding, search and seizure operations and numerous other duties. Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault ship USS Wasp, USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and recover aircraft, acting as a sea-going airbase. ... The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F/A-18 Hornet is a modern all-weather carrier-capable strike fighter jet, designed to attack both ground and aerial targets. ... A chaplain in the 45th Infantry Division leads a Christmas Day service in Italy, 1943. ... The HM rating symbol (a caduceus). ...


During training, every Marine officer and enlisted man learns the traditional naval nomenclature for common features of buildings, ships and bases. For example, even on land bases, Marines refer to stairs as "ladders", walls are "bulkheads", ceilings are "overheads", the floor is the "deck", doors are "hatches", and being on a Marine base is referred to as "being aboard" MCB/MCAS/MCRD and so forth. Headgear is always referred to as one's "cover", as in the Navy. Marines drill on the "parade deck", never the parade ground. Marines stand "watches", while soldiers pull guard duty. Like sailors and Naval officers, Marines never salute when not wearing their covers--rather, Marines come to strict attention when addressing or responding to a superior, and salutes are not exchanged.


Finally, there are several traditional connections between the two services. Marine Corps Medal of Honor recipients wear the Navy variant of the award; Marines also may be awarded the Navy Cross.[16] The Navy's Blue Angels flight demonstration team is staffed by both Navy and Marine officers and enlisted men, and includes a Marine C-130 Hercules aircraft.[16] In cities with Navy and Marine Corps presence, social activities are often conducted together, for example with the Navy/Marine ball in San Diego. The Navy Cross is the second highest medal that can be awarded by the Department of the Navy and the second highest award given for valor. ... The United States Navys Blue Angels (or Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron), formed in 1946, is the worlds first officially sanctioned military aerial demonstration team. ... The Lockheed C-130 Hercules is a four-engine turboprop cargo aircraft and the main tactical airlifter for many military forces worldwide. ... San Diego redirects here. ...


Air-ground task forces

Today, the basic framework for deployable Marine units is the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF), a flexible structure of varying size. A MAGTF integrates a ground combat element (GCE), an air combat element (ACE), and a logistics combat element (LCE)[53] under a common command element (CE). A MAGTF can operate independently or as part of a larger coalition. It is a temporary organization formed for a specific mission and dissolved after completion of that mission. The MAGTF structure reflects a strong tradition in the Corps towards self-sufficiency and a commitment to combined arms, both essential assets to an expeditionary force often called upon to act independently in discrete, time-sensitive situations. The history of the Marine Corps as well has led to a wariness of overreliance on its sister services, and towards joint operations in general.[4] The Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) is a term used by the United States Marine Corps to describe the principal organization for all missions across the range of military operations. ... The Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) is a term used by the United States Marine Corps to describe the principal organization for all missions across the range of military operations. ... Combined arms is an approach to warfare which seeks to integrate different arms of a military to achieve mutually complementary effects. ...


A MAGTF varies in size from the smallest, a Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), based around a reinforced infantry battalion and a composite squadron, up to the largest, a Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF), which ties together a Division, an Air Wing, and a Logistics Group under a MEF Headquarters Group. There are usually three MEUs assigned to each of the Navy's Atlantic and Pacific Fleets, with a seventh MEU based on Okinawa. While one MEU is on deployment, one MEU is training to deploy and one is standing down, resting its Marines and refitting (with the exception of the 31st MEU(SOC) based in Okinawa, which is always forward deployed and spends the majority of time at sea, only rotating out the air and ground units which make up the Aviation Command Element and the Ground Combat Element). Each MEU is rated as capable of performing special operations.[54] A Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) is the smallest Marine Air-Ground Task Force in the United States Marine Corps. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... A Squadron is a small unit or formation of cavalry, aircraft (including balloons), or naval vessels. ... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... Wing is a term used by different air forces for a unit of command. ... The United States Fleet Forces Command (USFLTFORCOM) of the United States Navy is the part of the Navy responsible for operations in and around the Atlantic Ocean. ... The United States Pacific Fleet (USPACFLT) is a theater-level unit of the U.S. armed forces, under the operational control of the United States Pacific Command. ... This article is about the prefecture. ... For other uses, see Special forces (disambiguation). ...


The three Marine Expeditionary Forces are:

Presumably a USA force ? // Lineage Activated November 8th, 1969 at Okinawa, Japan as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Redesignated August 18th, 1970 as the I Marine Amphibious Force Relocated in April 1971 to Camp Pendleton, California Redesignated February 5th, 1988 as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Recent Service Persian Gulf... The edge of Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton is located in southern California between the towns of Oceanside and San Clemente. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force (II MEF), one of three MEFs in the Marine Corps, is a combined arms force consisting of ground, air, and logistics forces possessing the capability of projecting offensive combat power ashore while sustaining itself in combat without external assistance for a period of 60... Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune is near Jacksonville, North Carolina, on the Atlantic seaboard of the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... The III Marine Expeditionary Force, is a Marine Air-Ground Task Force of the United States Marine Corps that is forward-deployed and able to deploy rapidly and conduct operations across the spectrum from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to amphibious assault and high intensity combat. ... Camp Courtney is a Marine Base located in Gushikawa, Okinawa. ... This article is about the prefecture. ...

Special warfare

Although the notion of a Marine special forces contribution to the U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) was considered as early as the founding of USSOCOM in the 1980s, it was resisted by the Marine Corps. Then-Commandant Paul X. Kelley expressed the popular belief that Marines should support Marines, and that the Corps should not fund a special warfare capability that would not support Marine operations.[55] However, much of the resistance from within the Corps dissipated when Marine leaders watched the Corps' 15th and 26th MEU(SOC)s "sit on the sidelines" during the very early stages of Operation Enduring Freedom while other special operations units actively engaged in operations in Afghanistan.[56] After a three-year development period, the Corps agreed in 2006 to supply a 2,600-strong unit, Marine Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC), which would answer directly to USSOCOM.[57] For other uses, see Special forces (disambiguation). ... Emblem of the United States Special Operations Command. ... Gen. ... Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... United States Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC) is a component command of the U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) that comprises the Marine Corps contribution to SOCOM. Its core capabilities are direct action, special reconnaissance, foreign internal defense, counterterrorism, information operations, and unconventional warfare. ...


Personnel

Commandants

Gen. James T. Conway, 34th Commandant of the Marine Corps
Gen. James T. Conway, 34th Commandant of the Marine Corps

The Commandant of the Marine Corps is the highest-ranking officer of the Marine Corps, though he may not be the senior officer in time and grade. He is both the symbolic and functional head of the Corps, and holds a position of very high esteem among Marines. The commandant has the U.S. Code Title 10 responsibility to man, train, and equip the Marine Corps. He does not serve as a direct battlefield commander. The Commandant is a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and reports to the Secretary of the Navy.[58] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2400x3000, 1246 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Marine Corps James T. Conway Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2400x3000, 1246 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Marine Corps James T. Conway Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... James Terry Conway is a Lieutenant General in the United States Marine Corps. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... // PAY GRADE In the United States Military, a Pay Grade is the rate at which all military members receive their basic pay. ... Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ...


The current and 34th Commandant of the Marine Corps is General James T. Conway; his nomination was confirmed by the Senate on August 2, 2006. Conway was then promoted to General, and assumed command as the 34th Commandant of the Marine Corps on November 13, 2006.[59] As of October 2007, Marine General James E. Cartwright (Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff) is senior in terms of time in grade to the commandant.[60] James Terry Conway is a Lieutenant General in the United States Marine Corps. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... James E. Cartwright General James E. Cartwright is Commander, United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM), Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. ... The position of Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was created by the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986. ...


Rank structure

As in the rest of the U.S. military (excluding the U.S. Air Force, which does not currently appoint warrant officers), ranks fall into one of three categories: commissioned officer, warrant officer, and enlisted, in decreasing order of authority. To standardize compensation, each rank is assigned a pay grade. The following tables list the rank, abbreviation, pay grade, and insignia of each rank.[61] This article is about the use of the term rank. ... An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. ... For other uses of Warrant Officer, see Warrant Officer. ... // PAY GRADE In the United States Military, a Pay Grade is the rate at which all military members receive their basic pay. ...


Commissioned officers

See also: United States Marine Corps officer rank insignia

Commissioned Officers are distinguished from other officers by their commission, which is the formal written authority, issued in the name of the President of the United States, that confers the rank and authority of a Marine Officer. Commissioned officers carry the "special trust and confidence" of the President of the United States. Commissioned officer ranks are further subdivided into Generals, field-grade officers, and company-grade officers.[12] Commissioned Officers are distinguished from other officers by their commission, which is the formal written authority, issued in the name of the President of the United States, that confers the rank and authority of a Marine Officer. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...

An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. ... A General is a high rank in the United States military. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... For the 17th Century Cromwellian regime see Rule of the Major-Generals Major General or Major-General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Brigadier General is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually just above colonel and just below major general. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ... Lieutenant Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces which is currently used by the United States Army, United States Air Force, United States Marine Corps, and United States National Guard. ... Insignia of a Major in the United States Military Major is a rank used in the United States Army, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps, and is the equivalent of a Lieutenant Commander in the United States Navy and United States Coast Guard. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... Image File history File links US-OF1A.svg‎ US military insignia Pay Grade: O-2 NATO Equivalent: OF-1 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): First Lieutenant Philadelphia Fire Department Category: ... Image File history File links US-OF1B.svg Summary US 2nd Lt (and equivalents) insignia Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Second Lieutenant Table of ranks in Battlefield 2 User:CShuts14 ...

Warrant officers

See also: Warrant Officer (United States)

Warrant Officers provide leadership and skills in specialized fields. Unlike most other militaries, the American military confers commissions on its Warrant Officers, though they are generally not responsible for leadership outside of their specialty. Warrant officers come primarily from the senior Non-Commissioned Officer ranks. For other uses of Warrant Officer, see Warrant Officer. ...


A Chief Warrant Officer, CWO5, serving in the MOS 0306 "Infantry Weapons Officer" carries a special title, "Marine Gunner" (not a rank). A Marine Gunner replaces the Chief Warrant Officer insignia on the left collar with a bursting bomb insignia. Other warrant officers are sometimes informally also referred to as "Gunner," but this usage is not correct.

Warrant officer insignia File links The following pages link to this file: Warrant Officer Categories: U.S. military awards ... Warrant officer insignia File links The following pages link to this file: Warrant Officer Categories: U.S. military awards ... Warrant officer insignia File links The following pages link to this file: Warrant Officer Rose Franco Categories: U.S. military awards ... Warrant officer insignia File links The following pages link to this file: Warrant Officer Categories: U.S. military awards ... Warrant officer insignia File links The following pages link to this file: Warrant Officer Categories: U.S. military awards ...

Enlisted

See also: United States Marine Corps enlisted rank insignia

Enlisted Marines in the pay grades E-1 to E-3 are not "non-commissioned officers" (NCOs); they make up the bulk of the Corps' ranks. They may be referred to as "troops," "non-rates," or simply "Marines." Although they do not technically hold leadership ranks, the Corps' ethos stresses leadership among all Marines, and junior Marines are often assigned responsibility normally reserved for superiors. Enlisted Marines with paygrades of E-4 and E-5 are considered Noncommissioned Officers (NCOs) while those at E-6 and higher are considered Staff Noncommissioned Officers (SNCOs). ... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or Noncom, is an enlisted member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ...


Those in the pay grades of E-4 and E-5 are non-commissioned officers (NCOs). They primarily supervise junior Marines and act as a vital link with the higher command structure, ensuring that orders are carried out correctly. Marines E-6 and higher are Staff Non-Commissioned Officers (SNCOs), charged with supervising NCOs and acting as enlisted advisors to the command. A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or Noncom, is an enlisted member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ...


The E-8 and E-9 levels each have two ranks per pay grade, each with different responsibilities. Gunnery Sergeants (E-7) indicate on their annual evaluations, called "fitness reports", or "fitreps" for short, their preferred promotional track: Master Sergeant or First Sergeant. The First Sergeant and Sergeant Major ranks are command-oriented, with Marines of these ranks serving as the senior enlisted Marines in a unit, charged to assist the commanding officer in matters of discipline, administration and the morale and welfare of the unit. Master Sergeants and Master Gunnery Sergeants provide technical leadership as occupational specialists in their specific MOS. First Sergeants typically serve as the senior enlisted Marine in a company, battery or other unit at similar echelon, while Sergeants Major serve the same role in battalions, squadrons or larger units.


The Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps is a unique rank conferred on the senior enlisted Marine of the entire Marine Corps, personally selected by the Commandant of the Marine Corps. The Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps wears unique chevrons with the Eagle, Globe, and Anchor at the center, flanked by two five-point stars. This article is about a military rank and position. ... Eagle, Globe, and Anchor The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor (EGA) is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. ...

This article is about a military rank and position. ... This article is about a military rank and position. ... Master Gunnery Sergeant Insignia Master Gunnery Sergeant is the ninth and highest enlisted rank (along with the grade-equivalent rank of Sergeant Major) in the U.S. Marine Corps. ... First Sergeant is the name of a military rank used in some countries. ... United States Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Marine Corps Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Army Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Air Force A Master Sergeant is: the eighth enlisted rank in the United States Marine Corps, just above Gunnery Sergeant, below Master Gunnery Sergeant, Sergeant Major, and Sergeant Major of... Gunnery Sergeant insignia (U.S. Marine Corps) Gunnery Sergeant is the seventh enlisted rank in the U.S. Marine Corps, just above Staff Sergeant and below Master Sergeant and First Sergeant, and is a staff non-commissioned officer. ... United States Military Staff Sergeant insignia (U.S. Air Force) Staff Sergeant is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Airman and below Technical Sergeant. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... This article is about the military rank. ... Lance Corporal (LCpl or L/Cpl) is a military rank used by some elements of the British, Commonwealth, and U.S. armed forces. ... US Military In the U.S. Army, Private First Class is the third lowest enlisted rank, just above Private and below Corporal or Specialist. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ...

Forms of address

See also: List of U.S. Marine Corps acronyms and expressions

Junior Marines, those not yet non-commissioned officers (Privates, Privates First Class, and Lance Corporals), are typically addressed by their last names. Non-commissioned officers are addressed by rank and last name. All officers, both commissioned and warrant, are addressed as "sir" or "ma'am" by their juniors. Warrant Officers are sometimes informally addressed as "Gunner", although the usage of this term is improper unless the Warrant Officer holds the Military Occupational Specialty of Infantry Weapons Officer (MOS 0306). A Marine may correctly address a superior officer using the syntax (rank), (name), (sir/ma'am) if there are multiple officers present and simply saying "sir" or "ma'am" would cause confusion. The nautical term "Skipper" is also used when referring to the commanding officer of a specific unit by those who report to him or her, however this is an informal title, the use of which would likely be frowned on in many cases and never used when directly addressing a senior officer. This is a list of acronyms, expressions, euphemisms, jargon, military slang, and sayings in common or formerly common use in the United States Marine Corps. ... A Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) is a job classification in use in the United States Army and Marine Corps. ...


During recruit training, recruits are not considered full-fledged Marines; as a result, all Marines who have completed recruit training are addressed as "sir" or "ma'am" by incoming recruits who are beginning recruit training. Also, incoming recruits must also refer to themselves in the third person (i.e. "this recruit"), and their rank is replaced with the word "Recruit". This usually lasts until the last week of recruit training when in most instances, recruits are then considered-full fledged Marines. Likewise, during officer training, officer candidates are not yet commissioned Marine officers, and must refer to themselves as "this candidate" or "the candidate", even though some officer candidates have evolved to officer training from the enlisted ranks where they hold enlisted ranks. During the period of Officer Candidate School, each candidate is referred to as "candidate", and not "Marine".


Informally, some enlisted ranks have commonly used nicknames, though they are not official and are improper for use in formal situations. Whether or not it is acceptable to use these nicknames in informal situations is at the discretion of the individual rank holder. A Gunnery Sergeant is typically called "Gunny" and (much less often) "Guns", a Master Sergeant is commonly called "Top", a First Sergeant is sometimes referred to as "The First Shirt", and a Master Gunnery Sergeant is "Master Guns" or "Master Gunny". Differing from the US Army and Air Force, all ranks containing "Sergeant" are always addressed by their full rank and never shortened to simply "Sergeant" or "Sarge". A Private First Class is usually referred to as a PFC, instead of simply "private" as the Army does.


Finally, Marines generally consider it an insult to be called a "soldier" (as soldiers are in the Army); the proper term is always Marine. When writing journalism or scholarly references to the Marine Corps, its elements, and/or individual Marines, the correct attributions might include, "soldiers [or sailors] and Marines" or "members of the U.S. armed forces", which is an acceptable collective reference.[12]


Initial training

Officers

Every year, over 2000 new Marine officers are commissioned, and 38,000 recruits accepted and trained.[20] Commissioned officers are commissioned mainly through one of three sources: Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC), Officer Candidates School (U.S. Marine Corps) (OCS), or the United States Naval Academy (USNA). All officer candidates are screened and evaluated for fitness to lead Marines; OCS candidates are screened during either two 6-week courses or one 10-week course at OCS. NROTC midshipmen are screened during one 6-week course at OCS and Academy Midshipmen may choose to be screened at a month-long training program called Leatherneck. NROTC officers being comissioned The Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) program is a college-based, commissioned officers recruitment tool of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps. ... The United States Marine Corps Officer Candidates School (OCS) is a school located on Marine Corps Base (MCB) Quantico that trains, screens, and evaluates potential Marine Corps officers. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ...


Following commissioning, all Marine commissioned officers, regardless of accession route or further training requirements, attend The Basic School (TBS) at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia. There, they spend six months learning to command a rifle platoon. The Basic School, for second lieutenants, warrant officers, and selected guest officers from the armed forces of allied nations, learning the art of infantry and combined arms warfare, is an example of the Corps' approach to furthering the concept that "Every Marine is a rifleman". It has always been, and remains, the unbending policy of the Corps that every officer, regardless of his MOS/billet, is qualified to be an infantry platoon or company commander.[12] The Basic School (TBS) is where all newly commissioned United States Marine Corps officers are sent to learn the art and science of being a Marine officer. ... The Marine Corps Base Quantico, near Fredericksburg, Virginia, is one of the largest United States Marine Corps bases in the world. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Enlisted

A Marine Senior Drill Instructor inspects his platoon shortly before Lights Out.

Enlisted Marines attend recruit training, known as boot camp, at either Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD) San Diego or Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, just outside Beaufort, South Carolina. Women only attend the Parris Island depot, in the Fourth Recruit Training Battalion, while males who train at Parris Island comprise the First through Third Battalions. Historically, the Mississippi River served as the dividing line which delineated who would be trained where. More recently the recruiting district system has been implemented, resulting in a more even distribution of male recruits between the two MCRD facilities. All recruits must pass an Initial Strength Test to start training. Recruits who fail to do so are placed in a Physical Conditioning Platoon, where they receive individualized attention and training until the minimum standards are reached. United States Marine Corps Boot Camp, otherwise known as Recruit Training is a program of initial training that each recruit must successfully complete to join the United States Marine Corps. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 571 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1500 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 571 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1500 pixel, file size: 2. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Platoon of the German Bundeswehr. ... Taps (Butterfields Lullaby), sometimes known by the lyrics of its second verse, Day is Done, is a famous musical piece, played in the U.S. military during flag ceremonies and funerals, generally on bugle or trumpet. ... U.S. Army recruits learn about bayonet fighting skills in an infantry Basic Combat Training at Fort Benning, Georgia. ... United States Marine Corps Boot Camp, otherwise known as Recruit Training is a program of initial training that each recruit must successfully complete to join the United States Marine Corps. ... Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD) San Diego is a United States military installation in San Diego, California. ... Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island is an 8,095 acre (32. ... Beaufort is a city in Beaufort County, South Carolina, United States, situated on the Beaufort River. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...


Marine recruit training is the longest among the American military services; it is 13 weeks long, compared to the U.S. Army's 10 weeks.


Following recruit training, enlisted US Marines then attend School of Infantry training at Camp Geiger or Camp Pendleton, generally based upon where the Marine received their recruit training. Infantry Marines begin their Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) training, which varies in length, immediately with the Infantry Training Battalion (ITB). Marines in all other MOSs train for 29 days in Marine Combat Training (MCT), learning common infantry skills, before continuing on to their MOS schools which vary in length.[62] The School of Infantry (SOI) — SOI East, located at United States Marine Corps Base Camp Geiger, a satellite facility of Camp Lejeune, and the SOI West at Camp Pendleton — host the second stage of initial military training for enlisted Marines after recruit training. ... Camp Geiger is a United States Marine Corps Base. ... The edge of Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton is located in southern California between the towns of Oceanside and San Clemente. ... A Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) is a job classification in use in the United States Army and Marine Corps. ...


Uniforms

Enlisted Blue Dress Uniform
Officer Service Uniform
Gen. Hagee and an enlisted Marine in woodland MARPAT
Gen. Hagee and an enlisted Marine in woodland MARPAT

Uniforms serve to distinguish Marines from members of other services and militaries. The Marine Corps has the most stable and hence most recognizable uniforms in the American military; the Blue Dress dates back to the early 19th century[20] and the service uniform to the early 20th century. Marines' uniforms are also distinct in their simplicity; Marines do not wear unit patches or U.S. flags on any of their uniforms, nor name tags on their service and formal uniforms (with some exceptions). Only a handful of skills (parachutist, air crew, explosive ordnance disposal, etc.) warrant distinguishing badges, and rank insignia is not worn on uniform headgear (with the exception of an officer's garrison service cover). While other servicemen commonly identify with a sub-group as much as or more than their service (ranger, submariner, aircrew, etc.), Marines consider it enough to be distinguished simply as a Marine, and their uniforms reflect this. The Uniforms of the United States Marine Corps serve to distinguish Marines from members of other services. ... Image File history File links PlateIV_Enlisted_Dress_Uniform. ... Image File history File links PlateIV_Enlisted_Dress_Uniform. ... Image File history File links PlateI_Officer_Service_Uniform. ... Image File history File links PlateI_Officer_Service_Uniform. ... Image File history File links Hagee_in_MARPAT_with_Soldier. ... Image File history File links Hagee_in_MARPAT_with_Soldier. ... A Shoulder Patch, officially known as a Shoulder Sleeve Insignia (SSI) by the US Institute for Heraldry, is a multi-colored or subdued heraldic device that uniquely identifies the major unit the soldier belongs to. ... Badges of the United States Marine Corps are military decorations which are issued by the United States Department of the Navy to service members of the U.S. Marines to denote a variety of qualifications and accomplishments. ...


The Marines have three main uniforms: Dress, Service, and Utility.


The Marine Corps Dress uniform is the most elaborate, worn for formal or ceremonial occasions. There are three different forms of the Dress uniform, the most common being the Blue Dress Uniform. There is also a "Blue-White" Dress for summer, and Evening Dress for formal (white tie) occasions. It is also worn by Marine Corps enlisted recruiters on a daily basis. It is the only U.S. military uniform which bears all three colors of the U.S. flag. See military uniform and full dress for wider coverage of dress uniforms. ... Formal evening dress is more strictly regulated than other forms of dress, and properly consists of: Black tailcoat with silk (ribbed or satin) facings, sharply cut-away at the front Black trousers with a single stripe of satin or braid in the US or two stripes in Europe White stiff...


The Blue Dress uniform, often seen in recruiting advertisements, is also often called "Dress Blues" or simply "Blues". It is equivalent in composition and use to black tie, worn at ceremonial events. It consists of a long-sleeved midnight blue coat with a standing collar, white barracks cover, plain white shirt, sky blue trousers with tan web belt or suspenders, white gloves, and black shoes and socks. The uniform may also be worn with a khaki long- or short-sleeved shirt in place of the coat. Officers have the option of wearing a Sam Browne belt and the Mameluke sword, and Noncommissioned Officers may wear the NCO sword, as prescribed. NCOs, SNCOs, and Officers wear a blood stripe on their trousers.[63] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Khaki is a common material in military uniforms Khaki is a type of fabric or the colour of such fabric. ... John J. Pershing wearing a Sam Browne belt. ... A Mameluke Sword is a cross hilted, curved scimitar-like sword. ... // The sword adopted in 1859 and subsequently carried by noncommissioned officers (NCOs) of the United States Marine Corps is patterned after the U.S. Army’s foot officers’ sword of 1850, with minor differences. ...


The Service Uniform was once the prescribed daily work attire in garrison; however, it has been largely superseded in this role by the utility uniform. Consisting of olive green and khaki colors, it is commonly referred to as "Greens". It is roughly equivalent in function and composition to a business suit. It consists of green trousers with khaki web belt, khaki longsleeve or shortsleeve button-up shirt, khaki necktie (with long sleeves), tie clasp, and black shoes. When worn with a green coat, it becomes the "Service Alpha" uniform, worn to formal but non-ceremonial occasions such as checking into a unit and court-martial hearings. Females wear a green necktab in place of the tie, pumps instead of shoes, and have the option of wearing a skirt instead of slacks. Marines may wear a soft garrison cap (sometimes nicknamed "piss cutter"), or a hard framed hat, which differs in design between females and males.[63] At the Treaty of Versailles signing, in 1919, the heads of state wore morning dress and lounge suits for informal meetings, but frock coats for formal daytime meetings. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Utility Uniform is intended for wear in the field or for dirty work in garrison, though as noted above it has now been standardized for regular duty. It consists of camouflage blouse and trousers, tan rough-out leather boots, and green undershirt. It is rendered in MARPAT pixelated camouflage (sometimes referred to as digitals or digies) that breaks up the wearer's shape, and also serves to distinguish Marine uniforms from those of other services. MARPAT camouflage utilities come in two patterns: woodland digital (for temperate, subtropical, and humid tropical environments) and desert digital (for arid/dry mountain/desert environments). To further distinguish the uniform, upon close examination you can see the Eagle, Globe, and Anchor within the pattern. There are two approved varieties of MARPAT; woodland (green/brown/black) and desert (tan/brown). The same boots and undershirt are worn with either pattern. In garrison, during the summer months, the sleeves of the blouse are tightly folded up to the biceps, exposing the lighter inside layer, and forming a neat cuff to present a crisper appearance to the otherwise formless uniform. In years past when Marines wore identical utilities to their Army and Air Force counterparts, this served to distinguish them as the other services have a different standard for rolling sleeves. In Haiti, the practice earned them the nickname "whitesleeves".[64] Woodland MARPAT in a tropical environment. ... This article is about protective camouflage used to disguise people, animals, or military targets. ... Eagle, Globe, and Anchor The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor (EGA) is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ...


The approved headwear for this uniform is the utility cover ("cover" is the Marine and Navy term for headgear), an eight-pointed brimmed hat that is worn "blocked", that is, creased and peaked. In the field, a boonie cover is also authorized. Since the introduction of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP), Marines have the option of substituting a color-coded rigger's belt for their web belt, indicating their level of proficiency in MCMAP. Unlike the Dress and Service uniforms, utilities are not permitted for off-base wear. Until recently, these uniforms were allowable to wear off base making a stop on the way home (i.e. picking up children, or a quick trip to the grocery store). During Summer 2007 it was ruled that utility uniforms only be worn off base under unavoidable situation, such as running out of gas.[63] United States Navy SEALs wearing boonie hats. ... MCMAP logo The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP) is a combat system developed by the United States Marine Corps to combine existing and new hand-to-hand and close combat techniques with morale and team-building functions and instruction in what the Marine Corps calls the Warrior Ethos.[1...


Culture

As in any military organization, the official and unofficial traditions of the Marine Corps serve to reinforce camaraderie and set the service apart from others. The Corps' embracement of its rich culture and history is cited as a reason for its high esprit de corps.[12]


Official traditions and customs

The Marines' Hymn dates back to the 19th century and is the oldest official song in the U.S. Armed Forces. It embraces some of the most important battles the Corps had been in to that time (Chapultepec, Derna), and (informal) additional verses were created to honor later events. The Marines Hymn is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Winfield Scott Nicolás Bravo #, Mariano Monterde School Commandant, Juan N. Perez commander Remants Leon Brigade) Strength 13,000 876 cadets, 4000 regulars Casualties 130 killed 703 wounded 29 missing 862 total 1,800 killed and wounded 823 captured 2,623 Total Gen. ... Combatants United States Ottoman vilayet of Tripoli Commanders William Eaton Hassan Bey Strength 10 US Marines & Soldiers 70 Christian mercenaries 400 Arab mercenaries 4,000 Casualties Americans 2 killed, 3 wounded Christian Mercenaries: 9 killed and wounded Arab Mercenaries: unknown Unknown {{{notes}}} The Battle of Derna was a decisive victory...


The Marine motto "Semper Fidelis" means "always faithful" in Latin. This motto often appears in the shortened form "Semper Fi". It is also the name of the official march of the Corps, composed by John Phillip Sousa. It was adopted in 1868, before which the traditional mottos were "Fortitudine" (With Fortitude); By Sea and by Land, a translation of the Royal Marines' Per Mare, Per Terram; and To the Shores of Tripoli.[65] Semper Fidelis is Latin for Always faithful. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... John Philip Sousa John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 - March 6, 1932), is probably the most famous marching band conductor (although his band rarely marched) and composer in history. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ...

A rendition of the emblem on the flag of the U.S. Marine Corps

The Marine Corps emblem is the Eagle, Globe, and Anchor. (The abbreviation "EGA" for Eagle, Globe, and Anchor is generally not accepted and frowned upon when used in the Fleet Marine Force; the majority of Marines consider the abbreviation offensive and lazy.) Adopted in its present form in 1868 by Commandant Brigadier General Jacob Zielin, it derives partially from ornaments worn by the Continental Marines and the British Royal Marines, and is usually topped with a ribbon reading "Semper Fidelis". The eagle stands for a proud country, the globe signifies world-wide service, and the fouled anchor signifies naval tradition. The eagle is a crested eagle found worldwide[citation needed], not the bald eagle that appears in other American symbols and is native to North America only. The eagle is standing on the Western Hemisphere and is holding a scroll bearing the Marine Corps motto, Semper Fidelis. It is inscribed with gold letters, "Department of the Navy, United States Marine Corps.[66] Image File history File links Flags of the U.S. Marine Corps Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Flags of the U.S. Marine Corps Source: http://www. ... Eagle, Globe, and Anchor The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor (EGA) is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) Bald Eagle range  Resident, breeding Summer visitor, breeding Winter visitor On migration only Star: accidental records Subspecies (Linnaeus, 1766) Southern Bald Eagle (Audubon, 1827) Northern Bald Eagle Synonyms Falco leucocephalus Linnaeus, 1766 The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a bird of prey found in North America... The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ...


The Marine Corps seal was designated by General Lemuel C. Shepherd, and consists of the Marine emblem in bronze, the beak holding a ribbon reading "Semper Fidelis", on a scarlet and blue background with gold trim. On the seal, however, a bald eagle appears in place of the crested eagle.[65] The blue signifies naval ties, while the scarlet and gold are the official Marine Corps colors. They appear ubiquitously in the Marine Corps, particularly on signage. They also form the base colors of the flag of the United States Marine Corps.[67] Lemuel C. Shepherd, Jr. ... USMC Flag // The Flag of the United States Marine Corps (also known as a standard or battle color) is scarlet with the Corps emblem in gray and gold. ...


Two styles of swords are worn by Marines. The Marine Corps officers' sword is a Mameluke Sword, similar to the Persian shamshir presented to Lt. Presley O'Bannon after the Battle of Derna during the First Barbary War. After its adoption in 1825 and initial distribution in 1826, Mameluke Swords have been worn by Marine officers ever since, except during the period 1859–1875, when they were required to wear the Army's Model 1850-foot officers' sword. Since 1859, noncommissioned officers have worn the NCO sword, similar to the U.S. Army's foot officers' sword of the Civil War, making Marine NCOs, the only enlisted service members in the U.S. Armed Forces authorized to carry a sword.[20] A Mameluke Sword is a cross hilted, curved scimitar-like sword. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Presley Neville O’Bannon (1784 – 12 September 1850) was an officer in the United States Marine Corps, famous for his exploits in the First Barbary War. ... Combatants United States Ottoman vilayet of Tripoli Commanders William Eaton Hassan Bey Strength 10 US Marines & Soldiers 70 Christian mercenaries 400 Arab mercenaries 4,000 Casualties Americans 2 killed, 3 wounded Christian Mercenaries: 9 killed and wounded Arab Mercenaries: unknown Unknown {{{notes}}} The Battle of Derna was a decisive victory... Belligerents United States Sweden(until 1802) Barbary States (Ottoman Empire regencies) Commanders Richard Dale William Eaton Edward Preble Hassan Bey Murad Reis Strength 7 Ships 10 US Marines and Soldiers Christian Mercenaries Arab Mercenaries 4000 Casualties and losses 2 Ships destroyed 2 Marines killed, 3 wounded Christian/Arab Mercenaries killed... // The sword adopted in 1859 and subsequently carried by noncommissioned officers (NCOs) of the United States Marine Corps is patterned after the U.S. Army’s foot officers’ sword of 1850, with minor differences. ...


The Marine Corps Birthday is celebrated every year on the 10th of November. The celebrations were formalized by Commandant Lemuel C. Shepherd in 1952, outlining the cake ceremony, which would enter the Marine Drill Manual in 1956. By tradition, the first slice of cake is given to the oldest Marine present, who in turn hands it off to the youngest Marine present. This symbolizes the old and experienced Marines passing their knowledge to the new generation of Marines. The celebration also includes a reading of Marine Corps Order 47, Commandant Lejeune's Birthday Message.[68] is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lieutenant General John Archer Lejeune, 13th Commandant of the Marine Corps, was born at Pointe Coupee, Louisiana, on 10 January 1867. ...


Close Order Drill is heavily emphasized early on in a Marine's training. Formal events, such as the Marine Corps Birthday Ball or a retirement ceremony, will almost always incorporate some form of close order drill. The Marine Corps uses close order drill to teach discipline by instilling habits of precision and automatic response to orders, increase the confidence of junior officers and noncommissioned officers through the exercise of command and give Marines an opportunity to handle individual weapons.[69]


Unofficial traditions and customs

A recruiting poster makes use of the "Teufel Hunden" nickname.

Marines have several generic nicknames, mildly derogatory when used by outsiders but complimentary when used by Marines themselves. They include "jarheads" (it was said their hats on their uniform made them look like Mason jars, or that the popular "high and tight" haircut gave the appearance of a jar-lid). While these explanations are often repeated, the first is questionable, while the second is demonstrably false. The high and tight haircut, while a de facto standard today, is not mandated by USMC regulations, which specify a maximum hair length of 3 inches (76 mm) on the top. In the 1950s, the term jarhead was well established, while the term "high and tight" did not yet exist. Marines who chose to trim their hair closely on the sides were said to have "white sidewalls." Photos of Marines in the World War II era show haircuts that are even longer. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary using the Transwiki process. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The high and tight can be any of several very short hair styles most commonly worn by men in military service, predominantly in the United States. ...


Other nicknames include "gyrenes" (perhaps a combination of "G.I." and "Marine"), and "leathernecks", referring to the leather collar that was a part of the Marine uniform during the Revolutionary War period. "Devil Dog" ("Teufel Hunden", a corrupted version of the German Teufelshunde, on posters and in print) arises from the nickname reporters[70] conferred on Marines after the Battle of Belleau Wood. The German high command classified Marines as stormtrooper quality (elite troops). The bulldog has also been closely associated with the Marine Corps, and some units keep one as a mascot.[20] GI or G.I. is a term describing a US soldier or an item of their equipment. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary using the Transwiki process. ... This article is about U.S. Marine Corps nickname. ... Combatants United States France British Empire German Empire Commanders John J. Pershing James Harbord Crown Prince Wilhelm Strength 2 U.S. divisions French 6th Army (elements) British IX Corps (elements) 5 German divisions (elements) Casualties 9,777 unknown The Battle of Belleau Wood was a battle of the first World... The Stormtroopers were special military troops which were formed in the last year of World War I as the German army developed new methods of attacking enemy trenches, called infiltration tactics. Men trained in these methods were known as in German as Sturmmann (literally storm man or assault man but... For other uses, see Bulldog (disambiguation). ...


A spirited cry, "Ooh-rah!", is common among Marines, being similar in function and purpose to the Army's "Hooah" cry. "Ooh-rah" is usually either a reply in the affirmative to a question, an acknowledgment of an order, an expression of enthusiasm (real or false), or a greeting. Usage of the term appears to have begun during World War II and became more firmly established after the Vietnam War. There is little agreement or authoritative documentation on where, or why, the practice originated. Apocryphal stories have arisen regarding the origin of the term, including imitations of submarine alarm klaxons, air raid sirens and modifications by English speakers of the word "kill" in languages such as Turkish and Russian. Another theory (commonly held although there is no firm data pointing toward it) is that "Oorah!" is based on the British cheer "Hurrah!".[71] Urah or Ooh-rah is a spirited cry common to United States Marines since the mid-20th century. ... Hooah (hü-ä or who-ah) is a U.S. Army slang term. ... Urah or Ooh-rah is a spirited cry common to United States Marines since the mid-20th century. ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... For the English band, see Klaxons. ... Thunderbolt 1000/1000T Civil Defense siren. ...


And still some believe the roots of the Marine warcry to the Spartans of ancient Greece. This term is more than a "spirited cry" or a guttural sound. It was a proclamation of the Marine Corps Motto and a welcome greeting to the ears of those being greeted. It fostered a tie among the brethren who fought in the bloody fields of the Pacific Island-hopping campaign and all around the world.


"Semper Fi, Mac", was the common and preferred form of greeting in times past. Another saying derived from the USMC Motto is the rhyme "Semper-Fi. This term is shortened from the Latin phrase Semper Fidelis, meaning always faithful."


Veteran Marines

Marines and those familiar with Marine Corps tradition will often object to the use of the term "former Marine" or "ex-Marine" because Marines are inculcated with the ethos "Once a Marine, always a Marine". The terms "former" or "ex" refer to something that once was, but is no longer, as Col Wesley L. Fox, USMC (Ret.) states in the welcoming theater video at the National Museum of the Marine Corps. Ethos (ἦθος) (plurals: ethe, ethea) is a Greek word originally meaning the place of living that can be translated into English in different ways. ... Wesley Lee Fox (born September 30, 1931) is a decorated United States Military veteran and retired Colonel in the Marine Corps. ... Aerial view of the Museum under construction, taken April 2006. ...


Veteran Marine refers to an individual that completed their service and has received an honorable or general discharge from the service.[72] Veteran Marines may be addressed as "Veteran Marines", yet Marines who have retired are more commonly called "retired Marines". However, addressing any veteran Marine as "Marine" is appropriate. Veteran Marines may be addressed as "Sir" or "Ma'am" out of respect or, according to the "Commandant's White letters" from Commandant General Gray, by their earned rank.[64] A military discharge is given when a member of the armed forces is released from their obligation to serve. ... A military discharge is given when a member of the armed forces is released from his or her obligation to serve. ... General Alfred M. Gray General Alfred M. Gray, Jr. ...


Martial arts program

In 2001, the Marine Corps initiated an internally-designed martial arts program, called Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP). The idea was borrowed from the South Korean Marines, who train in martial arts and who, during the Vietnam War, were widely rumored to all hold black belts. Due to an expectation that urban and police-type peacekeeping missions would become more common in the 21st century, placing Marines in even closer contact with unarmed civilians, MCMAP was implemented to provide Marines with a larger and more versatile set of less-than-lethal options for controlling hostile, but unarmed individuals. It is also a stated aim of the program to instill and maintain the "Warrior Ethos" within Marines.[73] MCMAP logo The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP) is a combat system developed by the United States Marine Corps to combine existing and new hand-to-hand and close combat techniques with morale and team-building functions and instruction in what the Marine Corps calls the Warrior Ethos.[1... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... For Korea as a whole, see Korea. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


The Marine Corps Martial Arts program is an eclectic mix of different styles of martial arts melded together, similar in concept to Jeet Kune Do. MCMAP consists of boxing movements, joint locking techniques, opponent weight transfer (Jujitsu), ground grappling (mostly wrestling), bayonet, knife and baton fighting, non-compliance joint manipulations, and blood restriction chokes. Jeet Kune Do (Chinese: 截拳道 Cantonese: Jitkyùndou Pinyin: Jiéquándào, lit. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Joint (disambiguation). ... Jujutsu (also jujitsu, ju jitsu, ju jutsu, or jiu jitsu; from the Japanese 柔術 jūjutsu gentle/yielding/compliant Art) is a Japanese martial art. ... Ancient Greek wrestlers (Pankratiasts) Wrestling is the act of physical engagement between two unarmed persons, in which each wrestler strives to get an advantage over or control of their opponent. ... For other uses, see bayonet (disambiguation). ... “Truncheon” redirects here. ... The lateral vascular neck restraint is a very potent chokehold. ...


Marines begin MCMAP training in boot camp. There are five levels of MCMAP, signified by the color of a rigger's belt (from the lowest to the highest levels: Tan, Grey, Green, Brown, and Black). A minimum level of achievement is set for each rank level, including officers. Recruits and junior officers must earn a tan belt in initial training before being allowed to graduate. After entering the Fleet Marine Forces (FMF), Marines are allowed to progress further in MCMAP. Tan and Grey belts are considered the foundation of the movements in MCMAP, with succeeding belts building on those basic techniques. When a Marine has been screened by his or her command they can attend the MAI (Martial Arts Instructor) course. Again upon successful completion and screening they may be eligible to attend the MAIT (Martial Arts Instructor Trainer) course. The only belt requirement is that, to attend the MAIT course, a Marine must already be at least a Green belt instructor. The highest level in belts is the black belt, which has six degrees indicated by red stripes to the right of the buckle.[73] Enlisted Marines who graduate from the MAI or MAIT course, receive an additional Military Occupational Specialty (MOS). In order to retain instructor status, the Marine must recertify before the end of three years. If recertification is not obtained, the Marine loses his/her additional MOS. Marine Corps Order 1500.54A


Equipment

Main article: :Category:United States Marine Corps equipment

Infantry weapons

Marine sniper using the USMC Designated Marksman Rifle (DMR)

The basic infantry weapon of the U.S. Marine Corps is the M16 assault rifle family, with a majority of Marines being equipped with the M16A2 or M16A4 service rifles, or more recently the M4 carbine—a compact variant. Suppressive fire is provided by the M249 SAW and M240G machine guns, at the squad and company levels respectively. In addition, indirect fire is provided by the M203 grenade launcher in fireteams, M224 60 mm mortar in companies, and M252 81 mm mortar in battalions. The M2 .50 caliber heavy machine gun and MK19 automatic grenade launcher (40 mm) are available for use by dismounted infantry, though they are more commonly vehicle-mounted. Precision fire is provided by the USMC Designated Marksman Rifle (DMR) and M40A3 sniper rifle.[74] This is a list of weapons used by the United States Marine Corps: // M9 bayonet OKC-3S bayonet Ka-Bar Strider SMF Gerber Mark II Marine Noncommissioned Officers Sword, 1859-Present Marine Officers Mameluke Sword, 1875-Present M1911A1 . ... USMC photo of DMR. not copyrightable. ... USMC photo of DMR. not copyrightable. ... The United States Marine Corps Designated Marksman Rifle (DMR, NSN 1005-01-458-6235; more formally the United States Rifle, 7. ... M16 (more formally United States Rifle, Caliber 5. ... M4A1 redirects here. ... The M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (M249 SAW) is the United States military designation for a sub-family of the FN MINIMI squad automatic weapon (from Mini-mitrailleuse French: mini-machine gun. Both are 5. ... The M240, formally United States Machine Gun, 7. ... M203 generally refers to the United States Army designation for a single shot 40 mm grenade launcher that attaches to the M16 assault rifle or the M4 Carbine. ... The M224 60 mm Lightweight Mortar is a smooth bore, muzzle-loading, high-angle-of-fire weapon used for close-in support of ground troops. ... Bore diameter: 81 mm Length: 50 in (1. ... This article is about the . ... Mk19 40mm grenade launcher MK-19 40mm grenade launcher during MIL-EX 2003 Mk19 40mm grenade launcher with cover open and training ammunition loaded The Mk 19 Grenade Launcher is a belt-fed automatic 40mm grenade launcher or grenade machine gun entered U.S. military service during the Cold War... The United States Marine Corps Designated Marksman Rifle (DMR, NSN 1005-01-458-6235; more formally the United States Rifle, 7. ... This article is about the M40 rifle. ...


The Marine Corps utilizes a variety of direct-fire rockets and missiles to provide infantry with an offensive and defensive anti-armor capability. The SMAW and AT4 are unguided rockets that can destroy armor and fixed defenses (e.g. bunkers) at ranges up to 500 meters. The Predator SRAW, FGM-148 Javelin and BGM-71 TOW are anti-tank guided missiles. All three can utilize top-attack profiles to avoid heavy frontal armor. The Predator is a short-range fire-and-forget weapon; the Javelin and TOW are heavier missiles effective past 2,000 meters that give infantry an offensive capability against armor.[75] SMAW The Shoulder-Launched Multipurpose Assault Weapon (SMAW) is a shoulder-launched rocket weapon, based on the Israeli B-300, with the primary function of being a portable anti-armor rocket launcher. ... This article is about the unguided anti-tank weapon. ... Shoulder-launched weapons avoid the problem of recoil by directing all exhaust out the rear of the launch tube A shoulder-launched missile weapon is a weapon that fires a projectile at a target, yet is small enough to be carried by one person, and fired while held on one... The FGM-172 SRAW (Short-Range Assault Weapon), also known as the Predator SRAW, is a lightweight, close range anti-tank missile system produced by Lockheed Martin that is designed to complement the Javelin anti-tank missile. ... For the British Javelin missile, see Javelin surface-to-air missile. ... A TOW missile being fired from a Jeep. ... For other uses, see Air-to-ground missile. ... Fire-and-forget is a third-generation method of missile guidance. ...


Ground vehicles

Main article: List of vehicles of the United States Marine Corps

The Corps operates the same High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) and M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tank as does the U.S. Army. However, for its specific needs, the Corps uses a number of unique vehicles. The LAV 25 is a dedicated wheeled armored personnel carrier used to provide strategic mobility.[76] Amphibious capability is provided by the AAV-7A1 Amphibious Assault Vehicle, an armored tractor that doubles as an armored personnel carrier. Somewhat dated, it will eventually be replaced by the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle, a markedly faster tractor that incorporates superior armor and weaponry. The threat of land mines and improvised explosive devices in Iraq and Afghanistan has also seen the Corps begin purchasing Cougar and Buffalo heavy armored vehicles that can better withstand the effects of these weapons as part of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle program.[77] The Marine Corps has ordered 1960 International MaxxPro MRAP vehicles for delivery by February 2008, though some of these vehicles will probably be used by other branches of the Armed Forces. The Marine Corps hopes to use MRAP vehicles to replace all HMMWVs on patrol "outside the wire" in Iraq.[78] This article refers to the Military HMMWV, not the civilian Hummer sold by General Motors The M998 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV or Humvee) is a military 4WD motor vehicle created by AM General. ... The M1 Abrams is a military tank produced in the United States. ... LAV-25, also known as Bison, is said to be an 8 wheeled vehicle that has been used to destroy non-biological land-mines while safely carring 6 people. ... The Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAV)—official designation AAV-7A1 (formerly known as LVT-7) is the current amphibious troop transport of the United States Marine Corps and is also operated by other forces. ... USMC Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle. ... “Minefield” redirects here. ... Munitions rigged for an IED discovered by Iraqi police in Baghdad, November 2005. ... The Cougar is an armored fighting vehicle designed to be resistant to anti-vehicle mines and improvised munitions. ... Buffalo mine-protected vehicle and GI Buffalo showing remote manipulator arm. ... FPI Cougar HE in testing Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles are a family of armored fighting vehicles designed to survive IED attacks and ambushes. ... The International MaxxPro MPV is an armored fighting vehicle designed by Navistar Internationals subsidiary International Military and Government LLC (IMG) along with Plasan Sasa. ... FPI Cougar HE in testing Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles are a family of armored fighting vehicles designed to survive IED attacks and ambushes. ... International FTTS UV Concept The HMMWV replacement process, now being undertaken by the US Military is an effort to replace the current AM General HMMWV. The HMMWV has evolved several times since its introduction, and is now used in tactical roles for which it was never originally intended. ...


Prior to 2005, the Marines operated exclusively tube artillery—the M198 155 mm howitzer, now being replaced by the M777 155 mm howitzer. In 2005, the Corps expanded its artillery composition to include the High Mobility Artillery rocket system (HIMARS), a truck-mounted rocket artillery system. Both are capable of firing guided munitions.[79] The M198 Howitzer during the Persian Gulf War The M198 howitzer is a medium-sized, towed artillery piece. ... USMC gunners test a new M777 howitzer. ... HIMARS carry a six-pack of rockets or one ATACMS missile on the US Armys new FMTV five-ton truck, and can launch the entire MLRS family of munitions. ...


Aircraft

Main article: List of vehicles of the United States Marine Corps
MV-22 Osprey
MV-22 Osprey

The organic aviation capability of the Marine Corps is essential to its mission. The Corps operates both rotary-wing and fixed-wing aircraft mainly to provide assault support and close air support to its ground forces. However, other aircraft types are also used in a variety of support and special-purpose roles. U.S. Navy photograph of a V-22 Osprey aircraft[1]. Taken January 17, 2003 by Vernon Pugh. ... U.S. Navy photograph of a V-22 Osprey aircraft[1]. Taken January 17, 2003 by Vernon Pugh. ... The V-22 Osprey is a joint service, multi-mission aircraft with vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) capability. ... Marine AV-8B Harrier II on the deck of USS Nassau While other nations have Marines who are aviators, only the United States Marine Corps has its own dedicated aviation arm. ... Assault Support is one of the six functions of Marine aviation and is comprised of those actions required to airlift personnel, supplies or equipment into or within a battle area by helicopters or fixed wing aircraft. ... An Apache attack helicopter provides close air support to United States Army soldiers patrolling the Tigris River southeast of Baghdad, Iraq during the Iraq War. ...


The Marine light attack helicopter squadrons (HMLA) are composite squadrons of AH-1W SuperCobras and UH-1N Hueys, as the airframes have over 80% commonality. Both are slated to be replaced by the AH-1Z Zulu Cobra and the UH-1Y Yankee Huey. These provide light-attack and light transport capabilities.[80] Marine medium helicopter (HMM) squadrons fly the CH-46E Sea Knight and CH-53D Sea Stallion medium-lift transport helicopters. They are converting to the V-22 Osprey, a tilt-rotor aircraft with superior range and speed, and are being re-named as "Marine medium tilt-rotor" (VMM) squadrons. Marine heavy helicopter (HMH) squadrons fly the CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter for heavy-lift missions. These will eventually be replaced with the upgraded CH-53K, currently under development.[81] The Bell AH-1 SuperCobra is a twin-engine attack helicopter based on the US Armys AH-1 Cobra. ... UH-1N on the ground at Camp Fallujah, Iraq in July of 2004 The Bell UH-1N Twin Huey is a medium military helicopter that first flew in 1968. ... April 1, 2004: Sailors from USS Saipan (LHA-2) rush out to unchain a CH-46 Sea Knight. ... The CH-53 Sea Stallion is the most common name for the Sikorsky S-65 family of heavy-lift transport helicopters. ... The V-22 Osprey is a joint service, multimission, military tiltrotor aircraft with both a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) and short takeoff and landing capability (STOL). ... The Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion (Sikorsky S-80E), is the largest and heaviest helicopter in the United States military. ... The Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion (Sikorsky S-80E), is the largest and heaviest helicopter in the United States military. ...


Marine attack squadrons (VMA) fly the AV-8B Harrier II; while Marine Fighter-Attack (VMFA) and Marine (All Weather) Fighter-Attack (VMFA(AW)) squadrons, respectively fly both the single-seat and dual-seat versions of the F/A-18 Hornet strike-fighter aircraft. The AV-8B Harrier II is a VTOL aircraft that can operate from amphibious assault ships, land air bases and short, expeditionary airfields. The F/A-18 can only be flown from land or aircraft carriers. Both are slated to be replaced by the STOVL version of the F-35 Lightning II (the F-35B), beginning training operations in 2008.[82] The McDonnell Douglas AV-8B Harrier II is a family of second-generation vertical/short takeoff and landing or V/STOL jet multirole aircraft of the late 20th century. ... The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F/A-18 Hornet is a modern all-weather carrier-capable strike fighter jet, designed to attack both ground and aerial targets. ... The McDonnell Douglas AV-8B Harrier II is a family of second-generation vertical/short takeoff and landing or V/STOL jet multirole aircraft of the late 20th century. ... The Hawker Harrier, one of the famous examples of a plane with VTOL capability. ... For the general article on amphibious ships, see Amphibious warfare ship. ... The F-35 Lightning II is a single-seat, single-engine, stealth-capable military strike fighter, a multi-role aircraft that can perform close air support, tactical bombing, and air-to-air combat. ...


In addition, the Corps operates its own organic electronic warfare (EW) and aerial refueling assets in the form of the EA-6B Prowler and KC-130 Hercules. In Marine transport refuelling (VMGR) squadrons, the Hercules doubles as a ground refueller and tactical-airlift transport aircraft. Serving in Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare (VMAQ) Squadrons, the Prowler is the only active tactical electronic warfare aircraft left in the U.S. inventory. It has been labeled a "national asset" and is frequently borrowed to assist in any American combat action, not just Marine operations. Since the retirement of the US Air Force's own EW aircraft, the EF-111 Raven; Marine Corps Prowlers, along with those of the US Navy, also provide electronic warfare support to US Air Force aircraft.[83] // Electronic warfare (EW) is the use of the electromagnetic spectrum to effectively deny the use of this phenomena by an adversary, while optimizing its use by friendly forces. ... Boom and receptacle: USAF KC-135R Stratotanker, two F-15s (twin fins) and two F-16s, on an aerial refueling training mission IAF Il-76 MD refueling two Mirage 2000 fighter jets German Luftwaffe Airbus A310 MRTT ready for refueling, shown at the Paris Air Show 2007 Aerial refueling, also... The EA-6B Prowler is a twin-engine, mid-wing aircraft manufactured by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Corporation as a modification of the basic A-6 Intruder airframe. ... The Lockheed C-130 Hercules is a four-engine turboprop cargo aircraft and the main tactical airlifter for many military forces worldwide. ... The EF-111A Raven was an electronic warfare aircraft designed to replace the elderly and obsolescent Douglas EB-66 in the United States Air Force. ...


The Marines also operate two Marine unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) squadrons (VMU), with the RQ-7 Shadow UAV for tactical reconnaissance.[84] These squadrons also fly the Boeing Scan Eagle and have recently retired the RQ-2 Pioneer.[85] The £124 million Taranis UAV built by BAE Systems An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is an aircraft with no onboard pilot. ... The RQ-7 Shadow unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is used by the United States Army. ... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661) is a major aerospace and defense corporation, originally founded by William Edward Boeing. ... A US Marine holds a ScanEagle in Iraq. ... An RQ-2B on the tarmac Crewmen recover an RQ-2 Pioneer aboard USS Iowa Developed jointly by AAI Corporation and Israel Aircraft Industries, the RQ-2 Pioneer unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) has served with United States Navy, Marine, and Army units, deploying aboard ship and ashore since 1986. ...


Marine Fighter Training Squadron 401 (VMFT-401), operates F-5E, F-5F and F-5N Tiger II aircraft in support of air combat adversary (aggressor) training. Marine Helicopter Squadron One (HMX-1) operates the VH-3D Sea King medium-lift and VH-60N Nighthawk light-lift helicopters in the VIP transport role, most notably Marine One. A single Marine Corps C-130 Hercules aircraft "Fat Albert" is used to support the US Navy's flight demonstration team, the "Blue Angels". Marine Fighter Training Squadron 401 (VMFT-401) is a United States Marine Corps fighter squadron flying the F-5E Tiger II . ... The F-5A/B Freedom Fighter and F-5E/F Tiger II are part of a family of widely used light supersonic fighter aircraft, designed and built by Northrop in the United States, beginning in 1960s. ... Dissimilar air combat training was introduced into air combat training after Vietnam combat experience. ... Marine Helicopter Squadron One (HMX-1), The Nighthawks, based at Marine Corps Air Facility, Quantico, Virginia, is responsible for the helicopter transportation of the President of the United States, Vice President, Cabinet members and VIPs. ... The Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King (company designation S-61) is a twin-engined anti-submarine warfare (ASW)helicopter. ... The Sikorsky S-70 is a medium-lift military helicopter family manufactured by Sikorsky. ... Marine One lifting off of the White House south lawn. ... The United States Navys Blue Angels (or Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron), formed in 1946, is the worlds first officially sanctioned military aerial demonstration team. ...


Marine bases and stations

The "Commandant's Own" Drum and Bugle Corps
The "Commandant's Own" Drum and Bugle Corps

The Marine Corps operates 15 major bases, 10 of which host operating forces.[86] Marine Corps bases are concentrated around the locations of the Marine Expeditionary Forces (MEF), though reserve units are scattered throughout the United States. The principal bases are Camp Pendleton on the West Coast, home to I MEF; Camp Lejeune on the East Coast, home to II MEF, and Camp Butler in Okinawa, Japan, home to III MEF. Image File history File links Usmc_dci_finale_2002. ... Image File history File links Usmc_dci_finale_2002. ... The United States Marine Drum and Bugle Corps -- the Marine D&BC -- performs martial and popular music for hundreds of thousands of spectators each year. ... This is a list of U.S. Marine Corps bases and installations, organized by U.S. state within the territory of the U.S. and by country if overseas. ... The Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) is a term used by the United States Marine Corps to describe the principal organization for all missions across the range of military operations. ... The edge of Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton is located in southern California between the towns of Oceanside and San Clemente. ... Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune is near Jacksonville, North Carolina, on the Atlantic seaboard of the United States. ... Marine Corps Base Camp Smedley D. Butler (usually Butler Marine Base in Okinawa) is a United States military Marine base located in the Japanese prefecture of Okinawa. ... “Okinawa” redirects here. ...


Other important bases are the homes to Marine training commands. Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms in California is the Marine Corps' largest base and home to the Corps' most complex, combined-arms, live-fire training. Marine Corps Base Quantico in Virginia is home to Marine Corps Combat Development Command. It is considered the "Crossroads of the Marine Corps"[87] as most Marines will attend school at Quantico at some point—it is home to initial officer training and the Marine Corps University, which contains the career schools Staff Non-Commissioned Officers Academy, Marine Corps War College (MCWAR), School of Advanced Warfighting (SAW), Command and Staff College (CSC), The School of MAGTF Logistics (SOML)Expeditionary Warfare School (EWS)and Officer Candidate School (OCS), as well as a variety of other leadership and education programs. There is also Guantanamo Bay, which is located in Cuba and serves as a military prison and a hub for ground forces.[88] Twentynine Palms Base, officially the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), is a census-designated place and United States Marine Corps base located in Twentynine Palms in San Bernardino County, California. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Marine Corps Base Quantico, near Fredericksburg, Virginia, is one of the largest United States Marine Corps bases in the world. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Marine Corps Combat Development Command, located in at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, has the mission of developing Marine Corps warfighting abilities to enable the Corps to field combat-ready forces. ... The Marine Corps University was established on 1 August 1989 by Commandant of the Marine Corps, General Alfred M. Gray, reporting to the USMC Training And Education Command. ... Gitmo redirects here. ...


Famous Marines

Many famous Americans, such as the composer John Philip Sousa who directed the U.S. Marines band for 13 years, have served in the Marine Corps. Tom Monaghan, the founder of Domino's Pizza, is a Marine. In politics, Senator Zell Miller, pundit James Carville, Secretary of the Navy and U.S. Senator Jim Webb and military analysts Anthony Zinni, Joseph Hoar and Bernard E. Trainor are Marines. Donald P. Bellisario the creator of Quantum Leap, Magnum P.I., JAG and N.C.I.S. is a former Marine. Baseball Hall of Famers Tom Seaver, Ted Williams, Rod Carew, Roberto Clemente, Eddie Collins, and Bill Veeck all served in the Marines. Professional boxers Leon Spinks and Barney Ross both served in the Marines, and so did former heavyweight champions Gene Tunney & Ken Norton. Six astronauts, including Senator John Glenn, Charles F. Bolden, Jr. and Fred Haise, are Marine aviators. Several have succeeded in the entertainment industry, including actors Steve McQueen, Tyrone Power, Don Adams, Gene Hackman, Harvey Keitel, Lee Marvin and Drew Carey,talk show host Steve Wilkos,rock and roll singers The Everly Brothers and reggae musician Orville Burrell (Shaggy). R. Lee Ermey and comedian Jonathan Winters were both drill instructors prior to their renown. Oliver North was a veteran Marine, implicated in covert military actions not specifically authorized by Congress. Smedley Butler received two Medal of Honor awards and spoke out against war profiteers once he retired in War is a Racket. In addition, many films feature the U.S. Marine Corps.[16] Lee Harvey Oswald, the man accussed of assassinating President John F. Kennedy was a former Marine, as was Charles Whitman, who killed 16 people and wounded 31 others at the University of Texas at Austin in 1966. The following is a list of people who served in the United States Marine Corps and have gained fame through subsequent endeavors, infamy, or successes: Joseph M. Acaba Joseph M. Acaba — NASA astronaut Don Adams — actor Mike Anderson — NFL football player Walter Anderson (editor) — author; PARADE Magazine  editor; Parade Publications... John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor of the late Romantic era known particularly for American military marches. ... Thomas Stephen Tom Monaghan (born March 25, 1937 in Ann Arbor, Michigan) is an entrepreneur and Catholic philanthropist who founded Dominos Pizza in 1960. ... For Dominos Pizza in Australia, New Zealand, France, Belgium, the Netherlands and the Principality of Monaco, see Dominos Pizza Enterprises. ... Zell Bryan Miller (born February 24, 1932) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... James Carville James Carville (born October 25, 1944) is an American political consultant, commentator, media personality and pundit. ... For other persons named James Webb, see James Webb (disambiguation). ... Anthony Charles Zinni (born September 17, 1943) is a retired general in the United States Marine Corps and a former Commander in Chief of U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM). ... General Joseph P. Hoar (born December 30, 1934) is a retired U.S. Marine Corps officer, former Commander in Chief of United States Central Command. ... Bernard E. Trainor is a retired Marine Corps lieutenant general who is military analyst for NBC. He worked for The New York Times as chief military correspondent from 1986 to 1990 and at Harvards John F. Kennedy School of Government as Director of the National Security Program from 1990... Donald Paul Bellisario (born August 8, 1935 in North Charleroi, Pennsylvania) is an American television producer and scriptwriter. ... Quantum Leap is a science fiction television series that ran for 97 episodes from March 1989 to May 1993 on NBC. It follows the adventures of Dr. Samuel Beckett (played by Scott Bakula), a brilliant scientist who after researching time-travel, and doing experiments in something he calls The Imaging... Magnum, P.I. was an American television show that followed the adventures of Thomas Magnum (played by Tom Selleck), a private investigator living in Hawaii. ... For other uses, see JAG (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Thomas Seaver, see Thomas Seaver (disambiguation). ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Rodney Cline Rod Carew (born October 1, 1945), is a former Major League Baseball player for the Minnesota Twins and California Angels from 1967 to 1985. ... Roberto Clemente Walker (August 18, 1934 – December 31, 1972) was a professional baseball player and a former Major League Baseball right fielder. ... Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. ... William Louis Veeck Jr. ... Leon Spinks (born July 11, 1953 in St. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... James Joseph Gene Tunney (May 25, 1897 – November 7, 1978) was the heavyweight boxing champion from 1926-28 who defeated Jack Dempsey in 1926 and 1927 in what became known as The Long Count Fight and retired undefeated after winning against Tom Heeney in 1928. ... This article is about the hall of fame boxer. ... For other persons named John Glenn, see John Glenn (disambiguation). ... Charles F. Bolden, Jr. ... Fred Wallace Haise, Jr. ... For other uses, see Steve McQueen (disambiguation). ... Tyrone Edmund Power, Jr. ... For American former professional basketball player, see Don Adams (basketball). ... Eugene Allen Gene Hackman[1] (born January 30, 1930) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Harvey Keitel (born May 13, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor from New York City. ... Lee Marvin (February 19, 1924, New York City – August 29, 1987, Tucson, Arizona) was an American film actor. ... Drew Allison Carey (born May 23, 1958) is an American comedian, actor, and game show host. ... This article is about the person. ... The Everly Brothers, (Don Everly, born Isaac Donald Everly February 1, 1937, Brownie, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, Phil Everly, born Phillip Everly, January 19, 1939, Chicago, Illinois) are male siblings who were top-selling country-influenced rock and roll performers, best known for their steel-string guitar playing and close harmony... Shaggy (born October 22, 1968, in Kingston, Jamaica as Orville Richard Burrell) is a Jamaican reggae deejay who takes his nickname from Scooby-Doos companion, a nickname given to him by his friends, during his teenage years in which his hair bore a similarity to the Scooby Doo character. ... Ronald Lee Ermey (born March 24, 1944) is a former U.S. Marine Corps drill instructor and later Golden Globe-nominated actor, often playing the roles of authority figures, such as Gunnery Sergeant Hartman in Full Metal Jacket, Mayor Tilman in the Alan Parker film Mississippi Burning and Sheriff Hoyt... Jonathan Harshman Winters III (born November 11, 1925 in Bellbrook, Ohio) is an American film and television actor. ... Oliver Laurence North (born October 7, 1943 in San Antonio, Texas) is most well known for his involvement in the Iran-Contra Affair. ... Smedley Darlington Butler (July 30, 1881–June 21, 1940), nicknamed The Fighting Quaker and Old Gimlet Eye, was a Major General in the U.S. Marine Corps and, at the time of his death, the most decorated Marine in U.S. history. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... War is a Racket (1935) is a short work by former U.S. Marine Brigadier General Smedley Darlington Butler, where Butler discusses how business interests have commercially benefited from warfare. ... This is a list of films featuring the United States Marine Corps. ... Lee Harvey Oswald (October 18, 1939 – November 24, 1963) was, according to four United States government investigations, the assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... This article is about the tower sniper. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
United States Marine Corps
United States Marine Corps Portal
Military of the United States Portal

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ... British Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft Marines (from the English adjective marine, meaning of the sea , from Latin language mare, meaning sea, via French adjective marin(e), of the sea) are, in principle, seaborne land soldiers that are part of a navy. ... The RRT of the 22d MEU-SOC, Tunisia, 1997 The Radio Reconnaissance Platoon is the special operations element of the United States Marine Corps Radio Battalion. ... The United States Marine Corps Womens Reserve (USMCWR) was established on July 30, 1942 as part of the United States Marine Corps Reserve. ... The United States Marine Drum and Bugle Corps -- the Marine D&BC -- performs martial and popular music for hundreds of thousands of spectators each year. ... General Orders for Sentries is the official title of a set of rules governing military guard duty. ... The five paragraph order is an element of United States Marine Corps and United States Army small unit tactics that specifies instruction to a unit based upon a METT-T Analysis (Mission, Enenmy, Terrainm & Weather, Troops & Fire Support, and Time) using the BAMCIS process (Begin the Planning, Arrange Recon, Make... The Riflemans Creed, also known as My Rifle and The Creed of The United States Marine, is a part of basic United States Marine Corps doctrine. ... This article is about the military memorials. ... The United States Marine Corps on film began with The Star Spangled Banner (1918), the United States Marine Corps discovered the use of motion pictures. ... Marine ranks in descending order, with tables indicating abbreviations in the style used by the Marine Corps, pay grades, and rank insignia: // Commissioned Officers are distinguished from other officers by their commission, which is the formal written authority, issued in the name of the President of the United States, that... . ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b Gen. Charles C. Krulak (1996). "Operational Maneuver from the Sea" (PDF). Headquarters Marine Corps.
  2. ^ U.S Navy Organization — An Overview. United States Navy. Retrieved on 2007-12-30.
  3. ^ National Security Act of 1947, SEC. 206. (a) [50 U.S.C. 409(b)].
  4. ^ a b c d e f Warren, James A. (2005). American Spartans: The U.S. Marines: A Combat History From Iwo Jima to Iraq. New York: Free Press, Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-684-87284-6. 
  5. ^ Hough, Col Frank O. (USMCR); Ludwig, Maj Verle E. (USMC), and Henry I. Shaw, Jr.. "Part I, Chapter 2: Evolution of Modern Amphibious Warfare, 1920–1941", Pearl Harbor to Guadalcanal, History of U.S. Marine Corps Operations in World War II, Volume I. Historical Branch, HQMC, United States Marine Corps. 
  6. ^ Garand, George W. and Truman R. Strobridge (1971). "Part II, Chapter 1: The Development of FMFPac", Western Pacific Operations, History of U.S. Marine Corps Operation in World War II, Volume IV. Historical Branch, HQMC, United States Marine Corps. Retrieved on 2007-06-02. 
  7. ^ Frank, Benis M and Henry I. Saw, Jr. (1968). "Part VI, Chapter 1: Amphibious Doctrine in World War II", Victory and Occupation, History of U.S. Marine Corps Operations in World War II, Volume V. Historical Branch, HQMC, United States Marine Corps. Retrieved on 2007-06-02. 
  8. ^ John H. Dalton, Secretary of the Navy; Adm. J. M. Boorda, Chief of Naval Operations; General Carl E Mundy, Commandant, U.S. Marine Corps (November 11, 1994). "Forward...From the Sea". Department of the Navy.
  9. ^ Armed Forces Strength Figures For November 30, 2007--http://siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil/personnel/MILITARY/ms0.pdf
  10. ^ "Israeli Defense Forces, CSIS" (PDF), 2006-07-25, p. p. 12. 
  11. ^ "United State Armed Forces, DOD" (PDF), DOD, 2006-07-25. 
  12. ^ a b c d e Estes, Kenneth W. (2000). The Marine Officer's Guide, 6th Edition. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-567-5. 
  13. ^ U.S. Marine Band. U.S. Marine Band — Our History. USMC.
  14. ^ Marine Barracks, Washington, DC. GlobalSecurity.org.
  15. ^ Marine Security Guard Battalion. GlobalSecurity.org.
  16. ^ a b c d e Lawliss, Chuck (1988). The Marine Book: A Portrait of America's Military Elite. New York: Thames and Hudson. 
  17. ^ Milks, Keith A. (May 8, 2003). Ensuring 'Every Marine a Rifleman' is more than just a catch phrase. Marine Corps News. 22 MEU, USMC.
  18. ^ Lieutenant Colonel R.D. Heinl, Jr., USMC (1947). "Marines in WWII Historical Monograph: The Defense of Wake". Historical Section, Division of Public Information, Headquarters, USMC.
  19. ^ Lind, William S.; Col. Michael Wyly (1985). Maneuver Warfare Handbook. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press. ISBN 0-86531-862-X. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f g Chenoweth, USMCR (Ret.), Colonel H. Avery; Colonel Brooke Nihart, USMC (ret) (2005). Semper fi: The Definitive Illustrated History of the U.S. Marines. New York: Main Street. ISBN 1-4027-3099-3. 
  21. ^ U.S. Congress (11 July 1798). An Act for Establishing and Organizing a Marine Corps.
  22. ^ Richard Leiby, Terrorists by Another Name: The Barbary Pirates, The Washington Post, October 15 2001
  23. ^ a b c d e Simmons, Edwin H. (2003). The United States Marines: A History, Fourth Edition. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-790-5. 
  24. ^ U.S. Congress (30 June 1834). An Act for the Better Organization of the United States Marine Corps. Retrieved on 2007-12-30.
  25. ^ a b Moskin, J. Robert (1987). The U.S. Marine Corps Story. New York: McGraw-Hill. 
  26. ^ Ellsworth, Harry Allanson (1934). One Hundred Eighty Landings of United States Marines 1800–1934. Washington, D.C.: History and Museums Division, HQ, USMC. 
  27. ^ (December 17, 1932). "Report on Marine Corps Duplication of Effort between Army and Navy". U.S. Marine Corps.. Contains a very detailed account of almost all the actions of the Continental Marines and USMC until 1932. It is available in scanned TIFF format from the archives of the Marine Corps University.
  28. ^ Flippo, Hyde. The devil dog legend. About.com.
  29. ^ History of Marine Corps Aviation — World War One. AcePilots.com.
  30. ^ Ballendorf, Dirk Anthony (1997). Pete Ellis: an amphibious warfare prophet, 1880–1923. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press. 
  31. ^ Marines in World War II Commemorative Series. Marine Corps Historical Center. Retrieved on January 17 2008.
  32. ^ Marine Corps History. GlobalSecurity.org. Retrieved on January 17 2008.
  33. ^ a b Krulak, Victor H. (1984). First To Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-785-2.  Chapter 7, The Marines' Push Button 113–119
  34. ^ Fehrenbach, T.R. (1994). This Kind of War: The Classic Korean War History. Brassey's. ISBN 1-57488-259-7. 
  35. ^ Fast Facts on the Korean War. History Division, U.S. Marine Corps.
  36. ^ Official U.S. Navy figures number the USMC deaths at 13,091. This source provides a number of 14,837. U.S. Military Casualties in Southeast Asia. The Wall-USA (March 31, 1997).
  37. ^ Casualties: U. S. Navy and Marine Corps Personnel Killed and Wounded in Wars, Conflicts, Terrorist Acts, and Other Hostile Incidents. Naval Historical Center, Department of the Navy (August 7, 2006).
  38. ^ Marines Awarded the Medal of Honor. United States Marine Corps.
  39. ^ Simmons, 247. Roughly 800,000 Marines served in Vietnam, as opposed to 600,000 in World War II.
  40. ^ Millet, Alan R. (1991). Semper Fidelis: The History of the United States Marine Corps. New York: Macmillan. 
  41. ^ The preannounced landing of U.S. Marines was witnessed by millions of U.S. primetime television viewers (PDF). 'United States Naval Aviation, 1910–1995'. U.S. Navy. (PDF file, see 1992, December 9, p. 16.
  42. ^ Address to Congress. whitehouse. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  43. ^ a b CNN Transcript. CNN. Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  44. ^ Marines land in Afghanistan. International Herald Tribune. Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  45. ^ Fact Sheet - CJTF-HOA. Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa. Retrieved on 2007-04-24.
  46. ^ USMC.mil - 26th MEU in HOA. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved on 2007-04-24.
  47. ^ West, Bing; General Ray L. Smith (September 2003). The March Up: Taking Baghdad with the 1st Marine Division. New York: Bantam Books. ISBN 0-553-80376-X. 
  48. ^ West, Bing (October 2005). No True Glory: A Frontline Account of the Battle for Fallujah. New York: Bantam Dell. ISBN 978-0-533-90402-7. 
  49. ^ 8 Troops Charged In Death Of Iraqi. CNN. Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  50. ^ GlobalSecurity.org. Marine Corps Organization. GlobalSecurity.org.
  51. ^ Clark, Adm. Vern (October 2002). "Sea Power 21". Proceedings (October 2002). Naval Institute Press. Retrieved on 2006-07-28. 
  52. ^ Lt. Col. James Kuhn. Enduring Freedom [Film]. Department of the Navy.
  53. ^ MARADMIN 562/06. Renaming of the Combat Service Support Element (CSSE) to the Logistics Combat Element (LCE). US Marine Corps.
  54. ^ Prepared for the Larger Conflicts: Capable of specializing for the unique conflict. Other Marine Expeditionary Forces. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved on 2006-08-05.
  55. ^ Smith, Jr., W Thomas (2005). Marines, Navy SEALs Forge New Special Operations Team; An exclusive interview with U.S. Navy SEAL Commander Mark Divine. Military.com. Retrieved on 2006-07-31.
  56. ^ Priddy, Maj. Wade (June 2006). "Marine Detachment 1: Opening the door for a Marine force contribution to USSOCom". Marine Corps Gazette (June 2006): 58–59. Marine Corps Association. 
  57. ^ Graham, Bradley. "Elite Marine Unit to Help Fight Terrorism, Force to Be Part of Special Operations", Washington Post, 2005-11-2. 
  58. ^ Estes (1986), p. 60
  59. ^ "Conway confirmed as new commandant", Marine Corps Times, August 3, 2006. Retrieved on 2006-08-03. 
  60. ^ Kreisher, Otto. "Pendleton's Hagee seen as crossroads commandant", San Diego Union-Tribune, 9-6-2002. 
  61. ^ DoD Defense Insignia
  62. ^ Training Information. Infantry Training Battalion, School of Infantry (West), United States Marines Corps. Retrieved on 2007-04-19.
  63. ^ a b c MCO P1020.34G. United States Marine Corps. Retrieved on 27 November, 2005.
  64. ^ a b Freedman, David H. (2000). Corps Business: The 30 Management Principles of the U.S. Marines. New York: Collins. 
  65. ^ a b USMC Customs and Traditions. History Division, U.S. Marine Corps.
  66. ^ U.S. Marine Corps Emblem. U.S. Marine Corps.
  67. ^ U.S. Marine Corps Seal. U.S. Marine Corps.
  68. ^ Marine Corps Birthday Celebration. USMC History Division.
  69. ^ Drill a Platoon Sized Unit. Student Handout. Marine Corps University.
  70. ^ Flippo, Hyde Flippo. German Myth 13: Teufelshunde - Devil Dogs: Did German soldiers give the U.S. Marines the nickname "Teufelshunde"?. German Language. about.com.
  71. ^ Hiresman III, LCpl. Paul W. The meaning of 'Oorah' traced back to its roots. Marine Corps News. United States Marine Corps.
  72. ^ see Veteran Marine on this page
  73. ^ a b Yi, Capt. Jamison, USMC. "MCMAP and the Warrior Ethos", Military Review, November-December 2002.
  74. ^ M40A1 Sniper Rifle. USMC Fact File. U.S. Marine corps.
  75. ^ Tube Launched, Optically Tracked, Wire Guided (TOW) Missile Weapon System. USMC Fact File. U.S. Marine Corps.
  76. ^ Light Armored Vehicle-25 (LAV-25). USMC Fact File. U.S. Marine Corps.
  77. ^ U.S. Marine Corps Orders More Force Protection Vehicles. Force Protection, Inc. — In the News. Force Protection, Inc. (August 2006). Retrieved on 3 January, 2007.
  78. ^ Andrew Feickert (August 21, 2007). "Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected (MRAP) Vehicles: Background and Issues for Congress". United States Congress. Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  79. ^ Lewis, Maj. J Christopher (July 2006). "The Future Artillery Force...Today". Marine Corps Gazette (July 2006): 24–25. Marine Corps Association. 
  80. ^ AH-1W Super Cobra Helicopter. USMC Fact File. U.S. Marine Corps.
  81. ^ Marine Corps Rotary Wing. Federation of American Scientists.
  82. ^ F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Program. Department of Defense. Retrieved on 2007-11-20.
  83. ^ EA-6B Prowler. USMC Fact File. U.S. Marine corps.
  84. ^ Talton, Trista. U.S. Marines’ Shadow UAV Sees First Combat. Defensenews.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-18.
  85. ^ Scully, Megan. Army assumes Navy, Marine UAV training. Seapower. Retrieved on 2007-12-06.
  86. ^ Williams, BGen Willie J. (October 2004). "Bases and Stations: Are They Relevant?". Marine Corps Gazette 88 (10): 12–16. Marine Corps Association. 
  87. ^ About MCB Quantico
  88. ^ About Marine Corps University. U.S. Marine Corps. 

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... General Charles Chandler Krulak (born March 4, 1942) served as the 31st Commandant of the Marine Corps from July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1999. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jeremy Michael Boorda (November 26, 1939 – May 16, 1996) was an admiral of the United States Navy and the 25th Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). ... Carl Epting Mundy Jr. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Marine Band, colloquially known as The Presidents Own, was established by an Act of Congress on July 11, 1798, and is America’s oldest professional musical organization. ... GlobalSecurity. ... GlobalSecurity. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William S. Lind is an American expert on military affairs and a pundit on cultural conservatism. ... Michael Duncan Wyly is a retired U.S. Marine Colonel. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Screenshot of About. ... GlobalSecurity. ... Victor H. Krulak (born January 7, 1913 in Denver, Colorado) was a decorated United States Marine Corps officer who saw action in WWII, Korea and Vietnam. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... F. J. ‘Bing’ West served in Marine infantry in Vietnam and as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs in the Reagan administration. ... F. J. ‘Bing’ West served in Marine infantry in Vietnam and as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs in the Reagan administration. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GlobalSecurity. ... Admiral Vern Clark Admiral Vern Clark is Chief of Naval Operations in the United States Navy. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Federation of American Scientists (FAS)[1] is a non-profit organization formed in 1945 by scientists from the Manhattan Project who felt that scientists, engineers and other innovators had an ethical obligation to bring their knowledge and experience to bear on critical national decisions. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Ballendorf, Dirk Anthony (1997). Pete Ellis: an amphibious warfare prophet, 1880–1923. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press. 
  • Chenoweth, USMCR (Ret.), Colonel H. Avery; Colonel Brooke Nihart, USMC (ret) (2005). Semper fi: The Definitive Illustrated History of the U.S. Marines. New York: Main Street. ISBN 1-4027-3099-3. 
  • Ellsworth, Harry Allanson (1934). One Hundred Eighty Landings of United States Marines 1800–1934. Washington, D.C.: History and Museums Division, HQ, USMC. 
  • Estes, Kenneth W. (2000). The Marine Officer's Guide, 6th Edition. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-567-5. 
  • Fehrenbach, T.R. (1994). This Kind of War: The Classic Korean War History. Brassey's. ISBN 1-57488-259-7. 
  • Freedman, David H. (2000). Corps Business: The 30 Management Principles of the U.S. Marines. New York: Collins. 
  • Krulak, Victor H. (1984). First To Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-785-2. 
  • Lawliss, Chuck (1988). The Marine Book: A Portrait of America's Military Elite. New York: Thames and Hudson. 
  • Lind, William S.; Col. Michael Wyly (1985). Maneuver Warfare Handbook. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press. ISBN 0-86531-862-X. 
  • Millet, Alan R. (1991). Semper Fidelis: The History of the United States Marine Corps. New York: Macmillan. 
  • Moskin, J. Robert (1987). The U.S. Marine Corps Story. New York: McGraw-Hill. 
  • Simmons, Edwin H. (2003). The United States Marines: A History, Fourth Edition. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-790-5. 
  • Warren, James A. (2005). American Spartans: The U.S. Marines: A Combat History From Iwo Jima to Iraq. New York: Free Press, Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-684-87284-6. 
  • West, Bing; General Ray L. Smith (September 2003). The March Up: Taking Baghdad with the 1st Marine Division. New York: Bantam Books. ISBN 0-553-80376-X. 
  • West, Bing (October 2005). No True Glory: A Frontline Account of the Battle for Fallujah. New York: Bantam Dell. ISBN 978-0-533-90402-7. 

Victor H. Krulak (born January 7, 1913 in Denver, Colorado) was a decorated United States Marine Corps officer who saw action in WWII, Korea and Vietnam. ... William S. Lind is an American expert on military affairs and a pundit on cultural conservatism. ... Michael Duncan Wyly is a retired U.S. Marine Colonel. ... F. J. ‘Bing’ West served in Marine infantry in Vietnam and as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs in the Reagan administration. ... F. J. ‘Bing’ West served in Marine infantry in Vietnam and as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs in the Reagan administration. ...

External links

  • USMC official web site
  • Marines.com - Official recruitment site
  • Marine Corps Association
  • Marine Corps Heritage Foundation
  • Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation
  • Marine Corps League
  • Marine Corps Engineer Association
  • MarineCorps.com
  • An Unofficial Dictionary for Marines
  • Marine Corps Veteran Resources
  • The Marine Corps Official MySpace site
Image File history File links En-wikivoice-okso-20070417. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... This article is about a military rank and position. ... Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... The United States Marine Corps is administered by the Department of the Navy, which is lead by the Secretary of the Navy(SECNAV). ... Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC), located in Washington, D.C., includes the offices of the Commandant of the Marine Corps and various agencies and staff functions. ... Presumably a USA force ? // Lineage Activated November 8th, 1969 at Okinawa, Japan as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Redesignated August 18th, 1970 as the I Marine Amphibious Force Relocated in April 1971 to Camp Pendleton, California Redesignated February 5th, 1988 as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Recent Service Persian Gulf... The 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force (II MEF), one of three MEFs in the Marine Corps, is a combined arms force consisting of ground, air, and logistics forces possessing the capability of projecting offensive combat power ashore while sustaining itself in combat without external assistance for a period of 60... The III Marine Expeditionary Force, is a Marine Air-Ground Task Force of the United States Marine Corps that is forward-deployed and able to deploy rapidly and conduct operations across the spectrum from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to amphibious assault and high intensity combat. ... The Marine Forces Reserve (MARFORRES) (also known as the United States Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR)), a part of the United States Marine Corps, is the largest command in the Marine Corps. ... United States Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC) is a component command of the U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) that comprises the Marine Corps contribution to SOCOM. Its core capabilities are direct action, special reconnaissance, foreign internal defense, counterterrorism, information operations, and unconventional warfare. ... Not to be confused with Marine Recon Battalions. ... The Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) is a term used by the United States Marine Corps to describe the principal organization for all missions across the range of military operations. ... This is a list of U.S. Marine Corps bases and installations, organized by U.S. state within the territory of the U.S. and by country if overseas. ... . ... Marine AV-8B Harrier II on the deck of USS Nassau While other nations have Marines who are aviators, only the United States Marine Corps has its own dedicated aviation arm. ... The following is a list of Marine Expeditionary Units of the United States Marine Corps. ... Marine ranks in descending order, with tables indicating abbreviations in the style used by the Marine Corps, pay grades, and rank insignia: // Commissioned Officers are distinguished from other officers by their commission, which is the formal written authority, issued in the name of the President of the United States, that... Commissioned Officers are distinguished from other officers by their commission, which is the formal written authority, issued in the name of the President of the United States, that confers the rank and authority of a Marine Officer. ... Enlisted Marines with paygrades of E-4 and E-5 are considered Noncommissioned Officers (NCOs) while those at E-6 and higher are considered Staff Noncommissioned Officers (SNCOs). ... The following is a list of people who served in the United States Marine Corps and have gained fame through previous or subsequent endeavors, infamy, or successes: Joseph M. Acaba Joseph M. Acaba — NASA astronaut Don Adams — actor Mike Anderson — NFL football player Walter Anderson (editor) — author; PARADE Magazine  editor... The following is a list of the essential names in Marine Corps lore; the people who make up what the Marines call Knowledge. John Basilone — only Medal of Honor recipient to return to combat and be killed. ... The Marine Corps League is the only federally-chartered United States Marine Corps-related veterans organization in the U.S. Its Federal Charter was approved by the 75th U.S. Congress and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on August 4, 1937. ... MCMAP logo The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP) is a combat system developed by the United States Marine Corps to combine existing and new hand-to-hand and close combat techniques with morale and team-building functions and instruction in what the Marine Corps calls the Warrior Ethos.[1... United States Marine Corps Boot Camp, otherwise known as Recruit Training is a program of initial training that each recruit must successfully complete to join the United States Marine Corps. ... The School of Infantry (SOI) — SOI East, located at United States Marine Corps Base Camp Geiger, a satellite facility of Camp Lejeune, and the SOI West at Camp Pendleton — host the second stage of initial military training for enlisted Marines after recruit training. ... The United States Marine Corps Officer Candidates School (OCS) is a school located on Marine Corps Base (MCB) Quantico that trains, screens, and evaluates potential Marine Corps officers. ... The Basic School (TBS) is where all newly commissioned United States Marine Corps officers are sent to learn the art and science of being a Marine officer. ... // The Special Missions Training Center (SMTC) is a US Coast Guard run training facility that is located in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. ... The Uniforms of the United States Marine Corps serve to distinguish Marines from members of other services. ... Military awards of the United States Department of the Navy are those military decorations which are presented to members of the United States Navy and U.S. Marine Corps under the authority of the Secretary of the Navy. ... Badges of the United States Marine Corps are military decorations which are issued by the United States Department of the Navy to service members of the U.S. Marines to denote a variety of qualifications and accomplishments. ... This is a list of weapons used by the United States Marine Corps: // M9 bayonet OKC-3S bayonet Ka-Bar Strider SMF Gerber Mark II Marine Noncommissioned Officers Sword, 1859-Present Marine Officers Mameluke Sword, 1875-Present M1911A1 . ... Marines test the MTV while running an obstacle course at MCB Hawaii. ... U.S. Marines wearing the Lightweight Helmet. ... An ILBE pack is visible on the second Marine from the left The Improved Load Bearing Equipment or ILBE is the United States Marine Corps new backpack, designed to replace the existing ALICE and MOLLE packs currently in service. ... The United States Marine Corps was originally organized as the Continental Marines in 1775 to conduct ship-to-ship fighting, provide shipboard security and assist in landing forces. ... Semper Fidelis is Latin for Always faithful. ... The Marines Hymn is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps. ... The United States Marine Band, colloquially known as The Presidents Own, was established by an Act of Congress on July 11, 1798, and is America’s oldest professional musical organization. ... The Silent Drill Platoon performs in front of the home of the Commandant of the Marine Corps The United States Marine Corps Silent Drill Platoon, a 24-man rifle platoon, often referred to as The Marching Twenty-Four, performs a unique precision exhibition drill. ... Marine One lifting off of the White House south lawn. ... USMC Flag // The Flag of the United States Marine Corps (also known as a standard or battle color) is scarlet with the Corps emblem in gray and gold. ... Eagle, Globe, and Anchor The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor (EGA) is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. ... Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, by Joe Rosenthal / The Associated Press. ... The Riflemans Creed, also known as My Rifle and The Creed of The United States Marine, is a part of basic United States Marine Corps doctrine. ... An early official promotional photo from the Toys for Tots program Motorcyclists fill eastbound I-76 for the 2002 Toys for Tots parade to benefit patients at Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia InPhonics CEO and CFO present the results of the companys Toys for Tots drive at InPhonic... Aerial view of the Museum under construction, taken April 2006. ... This is a list of acronyms, expressions, euphemisms, jargon, military slang, and sayings in common or formerly common use in the United States Marine Corps. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ... Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Army_Seal. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Navy_Seal. ... USN redirects here. ... Image File history File links Seal_of_the_US_Air_Force. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Image File history File links USCG_S_W.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Navy United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Air Force Military of the United States United States Coast Guard... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The United States has seven uniformed services as defined by Title 10 of the United States Code. ... Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Army_Seal. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Navy_Seal. ... USN redirects here. ... Image File history File links Seal_of_the_US_Air_Force. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Image File history File links USCG_S_W.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Navy United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Air Force Military of the United States United States Coast Guard... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... PHS Cap Device The United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC), also known as the Meditary, is the uniformed division of the United States Public Health Service (PHS) and one of the seven Uniformed Services of the United States. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Seal of the NOAA Commissioned Corps The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps (NOAA Corps) is the smallest of the seven Uniformed Services of the United States, having only approximately 300 commissioned officers. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... American history redirects here. ... This is a timeline of United States history. ... The pre-Columbian era incorporates all period subdivisions in the history and prehistory of the Americas before the appearance of significant European influences on the American continents. ... For colonies not part of the 13 colonies see European colonization of the Americas or British colonization of the Americas. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... A government map, probably created in the mid-20th century, that depicts a simplified history of territorial acquisitions within the continental United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... The War on Terrorism (also known as the War on Terror) is campaign begun by the Bush administration which includes various military, political, and legal actions taken to ostensibly curb the spread of terrorism following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. ... For a history, see Timeline of United States diplomatic history For the published diplomatic papers, see The Foreign Relations of the United States For Foreign relations under George W. Bush, see Foreign policy of the George W. Bush administration. ... // 2000 282,338,631 2010 309,162,581 2020 336,031,546 2030 363,811,435 2040 392,172,658 2050 420,080,587 2060 450,505,985 2070 480,568,004 2080 511,442,859 2090 540,405,985 2100 571,440,474 The US population in 1900 was... 48-star flag, 1957 This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of the United States. ... The United States Constitution, the supreme law of the United States The United States Reports, the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States The law of the United States was originally largely derived from the common law of the system of English law, which was in force... The United States Bill of Rights consists of the first 10 amendments to the United States Constitution. ... theSeparation of powers is a political doctrine under which the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government are kept distinct, to prevent abuse of power. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... This is an incomplete list of federal agencies, which are either departmental agencies within the executive branch of the United States government or are Independent Agencies of the United States Government (including regulatory agencies and government corporations). ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building, Washington, D.C. For animal rights group, see Justice Department (JD) The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... Logo used on the Intelligence Community web site. ... CIA redirects here. ... The Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, is a major producer and manager of military intelligence for the United States Department of Defense. ... For other uses of NSA, see NSA (disambiguation). ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... USN redirects here. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Union Jack. ... Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential republic, whereby the President of the United States is head of state, head of government, and of a two-party legislative and electoral system. ... Political parties in the United States lists political parties in the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Third parties in the United States are political parties other than the two... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent... Political Compass. ... This article provides a list of major political scandals of the United States. ... Map of results by state of the 2004 U.S. presidential election, representing states won by the Democrats as blue and those won by the Republican Party as red. ... This article is about the national personification of the USA. For other uses, see Uncle Sam (disambiguation). ... Flag of Puerto Rico The political movement for Puerto Rican Independence (Lucha por la Independencia Puertorriqueña) has existed since the mid-19th century and has advocated independence of the island of Puerto Rico, in varying degrees, from Spain (in the 19th century) or the United States (from 1898 to... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... United States territory is any extent of region under the jurisdiction of the federal government of the United States,[1] including all waters[2] (around islands or continental tracts). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This is a list of the cities, towns, and villages of the United States. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... This list of regions of the United States includes official (governmental) and non-official areas within the borders of the United States, not including U.S. states, the federal district of Washington, D.C. or standard subentities such as cities or counties. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... Historic Southern United States. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The list of mountains of the United States shows the location of mountains in a given state. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Rivers in the United States is a list of rivers in the United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River from Laughlin Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page, Arizona The Colorado River is... This is a list of the extreme points of the United States, the points that are farther north, south, east, or west than any other location in the country. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ... Water supply and sanitation in the United States is provided by towns and cities, public utilities that span several jurisdictions and rural cooperatives. ... USD redirects here. ... This is a list of companies from the United States: #Current companies #Former companies, including acquired and merged ones #By industry #By location #See also Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... The Fed redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The standard of living in the United States is one of the highest in the world by almost any measure. ... For information on household income, see Household income in the United States. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This graph shows the household income of the given percentiles from 1967 to 2003, in 2003 dollars. ... Single family homes such as this are indicative of the American middle class. ... The primary regulator of communications in the United States is the Federal Communications Commission. ... This article adopts the US Department of Transportation definition of passenger vehicle The United States is home to the largest passenger vehicle market of any country,[1] which is a consequence of the fact that it has the largest Gross Domestic Product of any country in the world. ... Current U.S. Route shield Current U.S. Route shield in California The system of United States Numbered Highways (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated system of roads and highways in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ... There arergwertwertert[1] Kyle Railroad (KYLE) [2] Missouri and Northern Arkansas Railroad (MNA) [3] Montana Rail Link (MRL) [4] Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway (MMA) [5] Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado RailNet (NKCR) New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway (NYSW) [6] Northern Plains Railroad Paducah and Louisville Railway (PAL) [7] Palouse... The United States of America has a large and lucrative tourism industry serving millions of international and domestic tourists. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... The first U.S. census, in 1790, recorded four million Americans. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens of thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... For other uses, see American Dream (disambiguation). ... The percentage of households and individuals over the age of 25 with incomes exceeding $100,000 in the US.[1][2] Affluence in the United States refers to an individuals or households state of being in an economically favorable position in contrast to a given reference group. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... Percent below each countrys official poverty line, according to the CIA factbook. ... This graph shows the educational attainment since 1947. ... Violent conforntation between working class union members and law enforecement such as the one between teamsters and Minneapolis police above were commonly frowned upon by professional middle class. ... Holidays of the United States vary with local observance. ... Health care in the United States is provided by many separate legal entities. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... The United States is home to a wide array of regional styles and scenes. ... American classical music refers to music written in the United States but in the European classical music tradition. ... American folk music, also known as Americana, is a broad category of music including Native American music, Bluegrass, country music, gospel, old time music, jug bands, Appalachian folk, blues, Tejano and Cajun. ... The first major American popular songwriter, Stephen Foster Even before the birth of recorded music, American popular music had a profound effect on music across the world. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... This article is about television in the United States, specifically its history, art, business and government regulation. ... Hollywood redirects here. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... The folklore of the United States, or American folklore, is one of the folk traditions which has evolved on the North American continent since Europeans arrived in the 16th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Transcendentalism was a group of new ideas in literature, religion, culture, and philosophy that emerged in New England in the early-to mid-19th century. ... The Harlem Renaissance was named after the anthology The New Negro, edited by Alain Locke in 1925. ... Beats redirects here. ... The Rocky Mountains, Landers Peak, 1863 by Albert Bierstadt, one of the Hudson River School painters Visual arts of the United States refers to the history of painting and visual art in the United States. ... Jackson Pollock, No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Closely related to the development of American music in the early 20th century was the emergence of a new, and distinctively American, art form -- modern dance. ... The United States has a history of architecture that includes a wide variety of styles. ... Social issues are matters which directly or indirectly affect many or all members of a society and are considered to be problems, controversies related to moral values, or both. ... Main articles: Adolescent sexuality and Adolescent sexual behavior Adolescent sexuality in the United States relates to the sexuality of American adolescents and its place in American society, both in terms of their feelings, behaviors and development and in terms of the response of the government, educators and interested groups. ... Affirmative action is a policy or a program of giving preferential treatment to certain designated groups allegedly seeking to redress discrimination or bias through active measures, as in education and employment. ... Progress of America, 1875, by Domenico Tojetti American exceptionalism (cf. ... Anti-Americanism, often Anti-American sentiment, is defined as being opposed or hostile to the United States of America, its people, its principles, or its policies. ... Capital punishment is a controversial issue in the United States and, indeed, in most of the world, with many prominent organizations and individuals participating in the debate. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine underground brewery during the prohibition era. ... The Energy policy of the United States is determined by federal, state and local public entities, which address issues of energy production, distribution and consumption. ... 1970s US postage stamp block In the United States today, the organized environmental movement is represented by a wide range of organizations sometimes called non-governmental organizations or NGOs. ... Gun Politics in the United States, incorporating the political aspects of gun politics, and firearms rights, has long been among the most controversial and intractable issues in American politics. ... The Statue of Liberty. ... - Fence barrier on the international bridge near McAllen, TX . ... Pornography may use any of a variety of media — written and spoken text, photos, movies, etc. ... Racial profiling, also known as ethnic profiling, is the inclusion of racial or ethnic characteristics in determining whether a person is considered likely to commit a particular type of crime (see Offender Profiling). ... Racism in the United States has been a major issue in America since the colonial era. ... International recognition Civil unions and domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated Civil unions legal, same-sex marriage debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage, also called gay...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia4U - United States Marine Corps - Encyclopedia Article (768 words)
The Marine Corps is part of the United States Navy, however the Commandant of the Marine Corps, the highest ranking officer and representative of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, does report to the Secretary of the Navy, but does not report to the Chief of Naval Operations.
Thus the Marine Corps, at heart, is an infantry corps.
The Marines are proud of their Gung-ho attitude and are inculcated with a strong belief in their chain of command and the importance of esprit de corps, a spirit of enthusiasm and pride in themselves and the Corps.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: United States Marine Corps (839 words)
The Marine Corps has a widely held reputation as a fierce and effective fighting force and the Marines take pride in their gung-ho attitude, they are indoctrinated with a strong belief in their chain of command and the importance of esprit de corps, a spirit of enthusiasm and pride in themselves and the Corps.
Marines are regularly admonished from the time that they are recruits in boot camp that their conduct, even while on liberty, leave, or after they are discharged, can and will reflect upon the Corps.
As of October 2005, Marine Generals Peter Pace (Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff) and James L. Jones (Commander of the United States European Command; NATO Supreme Allied Commander, Europe; and a former commandant of the Marine Corps) are senior in time and grade to the commandant.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m