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Encyclopedia > United States House of Representatives
United States House of Representatives
Type Bicameral
Speaker of the House of Representatives
House Majority Leader
Nancy Pelosi, (D)
since January 4, 2007
Steny Hoyer, (D)
since January 4, 2007
House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R)
since January 4, 2007
Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner
Political groups Democratic Party
Republican Party
Last elections November 7, 2006
Meeting place United States Capitol
Web site www.house.gov

The United States House of Representatives is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. Each state is represented in the House proportionally by its population, and is entitled to at least one representative; the most populous state has 53 representatives. The total number of representatives is currently fixed at 435 by Public Law 62-5 of 1911, though Congress has the authority to change that number. Each representative serves for a two-year term. The presiding officer of the House is known as the Speaker, and is elected by the members. The present House delegation by state are shown in the article List of U.S. states by population. Image File history File links House_large_seal. ... President George W. Bush delivers his State of the Union address to the nation and a joint session of Congress in the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol Tuesday, Jan. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (currently at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is currently the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Steny Hamilton Hoyer (born June 14, 1939) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the Marylands 5th congressional district since 1981. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives serves as floor leader of the opposition party, and is the minority counterpart to the Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives. ... John Andrew Boehner (pronounced Bay-Ner), born November 17, 1949, is an American politician of the Republican Party who served as House Majority Leader in the 109th Congress, and a U.S. Representative from Ohios 8th congressional district, which includes parts of the city of Dayton as well as... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... A Delegate to Congress is a non-voting member of the United States House of Representatives who is elected from a U.S. territory or from the District of Columbia. ... The Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico is a nonvoting representative of the United States House of Representatives elected by Puerto Ricans every 4 years. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Image:WashingtonDC Capitol USA2. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ... The size of the United States House of Representatives is 435, as it has been since 1910, a number fixed by the Reapportionment Act of 1929 and the Apportionment Act of 1941 (with the exception of 1959 to 1962 when there were 437 seats to accommodate the admission of Hawaii... On August 8, 1911, Public Law 62-5 set the number of representatives in the House of Representatives at 435 but the law didnt take effect until 1913. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... Map of states populations (2006) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2006, according to the 2005 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ...


The bicameral Congress arose from the desire of the Founders to create a House "of the people" that would represent public opinion, balanced by a more deliberative Senate that would represent the governments of the individual states, and would be less susceptible to variations of mass sentiment. The House is often considered to be the "lower house," with the Senate as the "upper house," although the United States Constitution does not use such language. The Constitution provides that the approval of both houses is necessary for the passage of legislation. Image:WashingtonDC Capitol USA2. ... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... Public Opinion is a book on media and democracy by Walter Lippmann. ... A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house. ... For the demesne in The Keys to the Kingdom series, see The House An upper house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the lower house. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ...


Because its members are generally elected from smaller (approximately 693,000 residents as of 2007) and more commonly homogenous districts than those from the Senate, the House is generally considered a more partisan chamber. Many of the Founding Fathers intended the Senate (whose members were originally chosen by the state legislatures) to be a check on the popularly elected House, just as the House was to be a check on the Senate. The "advice and consent" powers (such as the power to approve treaties) were therefore granted to the Senate alone. The House was granted its own exclusive powers: the power to initiate revenue bills, impeach officials, and elect the President in electoral college deadlocks. The Senate, however, can propose amendments to spending bills and has exclusive authority to try impeached officials and choose the Vice President in an electoral college deadlock. The Senate and its members generally have greater prestige than the House because Senators serve longer terms (six years) in a smaller body and (in all but seven states) represent larger constituencies than Representatives. Look up homogeneity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Partisan (political) in Wiktionary, the free dictionary In politics, a partisan is a person who supports a cause, party, or goal fervently, usually to the exclusion of all others. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      In the United States of America, a state legislature is a generic term referring to the... For the novel, see Advise and Consent. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ...


The House meets in the south wing of the United States Capitol. The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ...

Contents

History

United States

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
the United States
Image File history File links US-GreatSeal-Obverse. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential...


Federal government
Constitution
Taxation
President

Vice President
Cabinet This article describes the government of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ...


Congress
Senate
President pro tem
Party Leaders
House
Speaker
Party Leaders
Congressional districts

Federal courts

Supreme Court
Circuit Courts of Appeal
District Courts Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Party leaders of the United States House of Representatives are elected by their respective parties in... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... The United States federal courts are the system of courts organized under the Constitution and laws of the federal government of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ...

Elections
Presidential elections
Midterm elections
Political Parties
Democratic
Republican
Third parties
State & Local government
Governors
Legislatures (List)
State Courts
Local Government

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Under the Articles of Confederation, Congress was a unicameral body in which each state held one vote. The ineffectiveness of the federal government under the Articles led Congress to summon a Constitutional Convention in 1787; all states except Rhode Island agreed to send delegates. The issue of how Congress was to be structured was one of the most divisive during the Convention. James Madison's Virginia Plan called for a bicameral Congress; the lower house would be elected directly by the people, and the upper house would be elected by the lower house. The plan drew the support of delegates from large states such as Virginia, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania, as it called for representation based on population. The smaller states, however, favored the New Jersey Plan, which called for a unicameral Congress with equal representation for the states. Eventually, the Convention reached the Connecticut Compromise, or the Great Compromise, under which one house of Congress (the House of Representatives) would provide representation proportional to each state's population, whereas the other (the Senate) would provide equal representation amongst the states. The Constitution was ratified by the requisite number of states (nine out of the 13) in 1788, but its implementation was set for March 4, 1789. The House began work on April 1, 1789, when it achieved a quorum for the first time. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      United States presidential elections determine who serves as president and vice president of the United... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Midterm elections are elections in the United States in which members of Congress, state legislatures, and... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Third parties in the United States are political parties other than the two... A state government is the government of a subnational entity in nation-states with federal forms of government, which shares political power with the federal government or national government. ... Local governments are administrative offices that are smaller than a state or province. ... Current party control of Governors offices (2006). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      In the United States of America, a state legislature is a generic term referring to the... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      All United States states are required to possess a legislative branch. ... In the U.S., a state court has jurisdiction over disputes which occur in a state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Local government in the United States (sometimes referred to as municipal government) is generally structured... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... George W. Bush delivered his annual State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on January 28, 2003, in the House chamber. ... The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, commonly known as the Articles of Confederation, was the first governing document, or constitution, of the United States of America. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Madison redirects here. ... A proposal by Virginia delegates during the Philadelphia Convention of 1787, the Virginia Plan (also known as the Large State Plan) was notable for its role in setting the overall agenda for debate in the convention and, in particular, for setting forth the idea of population-weighted representation in the... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... The New Jersey Plan was a proposal for the structure of the United States Government proposed by William Paterson on June 15, 1787. ... The Connecticut Compromise of 1787 in the United States, also known as the Great Compromise, was one of the most important compromises reached in the United States Constitution. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Look up quorum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


During the second half of the nineteenth century, the House was frequently in conflict with the Senate over sectionally divisive issues, including slavery. The North was much more populous than the South, and therefore dominated the House of Representatives. However, the North held no such advantage in the Senate, where the equal representation of states prevailed. Sectional conflict was most pronounced over the issue of slavery. One example of a provision repeatedly supported by the House but blocked by the Senate was the Wilmot Proviso, which sought to ban slavery in the land gained during the Mexican-American War. Conflict over slavery and other issues persisted until the Civil War (1861–1865), which began soon after several southern states attempted to secede from the Union. The war culminated in the South's defeat and in the abolition of slavery. Because all southern senators except Andrew Johnson resigned their seats at the beginning of the war, the Senate did not have the balance of power between North and South during the war. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States. ... The history of the Southern United States reaches back thousands of years and included the Mississippian peoples, well known for their mound building. ... The Wilmot Proviso was introduced on August 8, 1846 in the House of Representatives as a rider on a $2 million appropriations bill intended for the final negotiations to resolve the Mexican-American War. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ...


The years of Reconstruction that followed witnessed large majorities for the Republican Party, which many Americans associated with the Union's victory in the Civil War. Reconstruction ended in about 1877; the ensuing era, known as the Gilded Age, was marked by sharp political divisions in the electorate. Both the Democratic and the Republican Party held majorities in the House at various times. For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Breakers, a gilded-age mansion in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


The late 19th and early 20th centuries also saw a dramatic increase in the power of the Speaker of the House. The rise of the Speaker's influence began in the 1890s, during tenure of Republican Thomas Brackett Reed. "Czar Reed," as he was nicknamed, attempted to put into effect his view that "The best system is to have one party govern and the other party watch." The leadership structure of the House also developed during approximately the same period, with the positions of Majority Leader and Minority Leader being created in 1899. While the Minority Leader was the head of the minority party, the Majority Leader remained subordinate to the Speaker. The Speakership reached its zenith during the term of Republican Joseph Gurney Cannon, 1903 to 1911. The powers of the Speaker included chairmanship of the influential Rules Committee and the ability to appoint members of other House committees. These powers, however, were curtailed in the "Revolution of 1910" because of the efforts of Democrats and dissatisfied Republicans who opposed Cannon's arguably heavy-handed tactics. Thomas Brackett Reed, (October 18, 1839 – December 7, 1902), occasionally ridiculed as Czar Reed, was a U.S. Representative from Maine, and Speaker of the House from 1889–1891 and from 1895–1899. ... Tsar, (Bulgarian цар�, Russian царь; often spelled Czar or Tzar in English), was the title used for the autocratic rulers of the First and Second Bulgarian Empires since 913, in Serbia in the middle of the 14th century, and in Russia from 1547 to 1917. ... The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (currently at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... The Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives serves as floor leader of the opposition party, and is the minority counterpart to the Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives. ... Joseph Cannon at the 1904 Republican Convention Joseph Gurney Cannon (May 7, 1836 – November 12, 1926) was a United States politician from Illinois and leader of the Republican party; historians consider him one of the most powerful Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1903 through 1911. ... The Committee on Rules, or (more commonly) Rules Committee, is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


The Democratic Party dominated the House of Representatives during the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1933–1945), often winning over two-thirds of the seats. Both Democrats and Republicans were in power at various times during the next decade. The Democratic Party maintained control of the House from 1954 until 1995. In the mid-1970s, there were major reforms of the House, strengthening the power of sub-committees at the expense of committee chairmen and allowing party leaders to nominate committee chairs. These actions were taken to undermine the seniority system, and to reduce the ability of a small number of senior members to obstruct legislation they did not favor. There was also a shift from the 1970s to greater control of the legislative program by the majority party; in particular, the power of party leaders (especially the Speaker) grew considerably. The Republicans took control of the House in 1995, under the leadership of Speaker Newt Gingrich. Gingrich attempted to pass a major legislative program, the Contract with America on which the House Republicans had been elected, and made major reforms of the House, notably reducing the tenure of committee chairs to three two-year terms. Many elements of the Contract did not pass Congress, were vetoed by President Bill Clinton, or were substantially altered in negotiations with Clinton. The Republicans would hold on to the House until the United States Congressional elections, 2006, during which the Democrats won back control of both the House of Representatives and, narrowly, the Senate. FDR redirects here. ... The Republican Revolution refers to the success of Republican Party in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate. ... Newton Leroy Gingrich, (born June 17, 1943), served as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999. ... The Contract with America was a document released by the Republican Party of the United States during the 1994 Congressional election campaign. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with United States general elections, 2006. ...


Membership and qualifications

Further information: United States congressional apportionment

Under Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution, seats in the House of Representatives are apportioned among the states on the basis of population, as determined by the census conducted every ten years. Each state, however, is entitled to at least one Representative. US Congressional apportionment for states in 2000 The membership of the United States House of Representatives changes each decade following the decennial United States Census. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Article One of the United States Constitution Article One of the United States Constitution describes the powers of the legislative branch of the United States government, known as Congress, which includes the House of Representatives and the Senate. ... US Congressional apportionment for states in 2000 The membership of the United States House of Representatives changes each decade following the decennial United States Census. ... The United States Census is a decennial census mandated by the United States Constitution. ...


The only constitutional rule relating to the size of the House says "The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand." (see Article I, Section 2) As the population of the United States increased, Congress regularly increased the size of the House after the census to account for growth; but the limit became obsolete when Congress fixed the size of the House at 435 seats in 1911 (see Public Law 62-5). The figure was temporarily increased to 437 in 1959 to reflect the admission of Alaska and Hawaii as states (seating 1 representative from each of those states without changing existing apportionment), but returned to 435 four years later (after seats reapportioned per the 1960 census were voted on in the 1962 election). The size of the United States House of Representatives refers to the number of members of the lower house of the United States Congress. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Article One of the United States Constitution Article One of the United States Constitution describes the powers of the legislative branch of the United States government, known as Congress, which includes the House of Representatives and the Senate. ... On August 8, 1911, Public Law 62-5 set the number of representatives in the House of Representatives at 435 but the law didnt take effect until 1913. ... Official language(s) None[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ...


The Constitution does not provide for the representation of the District of Columbia or of territories. However, Congress has passed legislation permitting them to elect non-voting delegates or Resident Commissioners. The District of Columbia and the territories of American Samoa, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands are represented by one delegate each. Puerto Rico elects a Resident Commissioner, who is the only member of Congress elected to a four-year term; other than his longer term, however, his role is identical to the delegates from the other territories. The Northern Mariana Islands do not currently elect any sort of representative to Congress, although legislation was introduced by former Rep. Richard Pombo of California that would have allowed them to do so. Delegates and Resident Commissioners are permitted to participate in debates and vote in committees. On 24 January 2007, the House changed its internal rules (by passing H. Res. 78 to permit the non-voting delegates and Resident Commissioner to vote in the Committee of the Whole when their votes would not be decisive. ... United States territory is any extent of region under the jurisdiction of the federal government of the United States,[1] including all waters[2] (around islands or continental tracts). ... A Delegate to Congress is a non-voting member of the United States House of Representatives who is elected from a U.S. territory or from the District of Columbia. ... The Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico is a nonvoting representative of the United States House of Representatives elected by Puerto Ricans every 4 years. ... Voting rights in the District of Columbia differ from those of United States citizens in other parts of the country. ... The Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico is a nonvoting representative of the United States House of Representatives elected by Puerto Ricans every 4 years. ... Richard William Pombo (born January 8, 1961) is a former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Californias 11th congressional district from 1993 to 2007. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... In the United States House of Representatives, the Committee of the Whole, short for Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union, is a parliamentary device in which the House of Representatives is considered one large Congressional committee. ...


On 19 April 2007, the House of Representatives passed HR 1905, the DC House Voting Rights Act of 2007, a bill "to provide for the treatment of the District of Columbia as a Congressional district for purposes of representation in the House of Representatives, and for other purposes" by a vote of 241 - 177. That bill would permanently increase the House to 437 members, adding one additional Member from D.C. and one from Utah, which is the state next in line to receive an additional district based on its population after the 2000 Census. The bill is being considered by the U.S. Senate. is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The District of Columbia has never had voting representation in the United States Congress, but efforts are currently under way to enact a statute that would give the District one vote in the House of Representatives, though not in the Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


States that are entitled to more than one Representative are divided into single-member districts (see General ticket). Typically, states redraw these district lines (see redistricting) after each census, though they may do so at other times (see 2003 Texas redistricting). Each state determines its own district boundaries, either through legislation or through non-partisan panels. "Malapportionment" is unconstitutional and districts must be approximately equal in population (see Wesberry v. Sanders). The Voting Rights Act prohibits states from "gerrymandering" districts to reduce racial minorities' voting power. Single-winner voting systems are voting systems in which a predetermined constituency elects a single person to some office; they contrast generally with proportional representation, in which constituencies are combined to elect several representatives at once. ... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... General ticket representation is a term used to describe a particular method of electing members of a multi-member state delegation to the United States House of Representatives. ... The process known as redistricting in the United States and redistribution in many Commonwealth countries is the changing of political borders (in many countries, specifically the electoral district/constituency boundaries) usually in response to periodic census results. ... The 2003 Texas redistricting refers to a highly controversial congressional redistricting plan appealed to the United States Supreme Court in League of United Latin American Citizens v. ... Malapportionment is broad and systematic variance in the size of electoral constituencies (at least within electoral systems which have them). ... Wesberry v. ... The National Voting Rights Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. Â§ 1973-1973aa-6)[1] outlawed the requirement that would-be voters in the United States take literacy tests to qualify to register to vote, and it provided for federal registration of voters in areas that had less than 50... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The Gerry-Mander first appeared in this cartoon-map in the Boston Gazette, 26 March 1812 Gerrymandering is a form of redistricting in which electoral district or constituency boundaries are manipulated for an electoral advantage. ...


Using gerrymandering for political gain is not prohibited, even when political gerrymandering incidentally involves the creation of racially concentrated districts. Because of gerrymandering, fewer than 10% of all House seats are seriously contested in each election cycle. Since over 90% of House members are nearly guaranteed reelection every two years because of lack of electoral competition, elections have been criticized as being contrary to fair competition, one of the principles of democracy. The legal gerrymandering of the House, combined with the institutionalized gerrymandering of the Senate and the Electoral College, have been criticized as being antithetical to democracy and representative government.


Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution sets forth three qualifications for representatives: each representative must be at least twenty-five years old, must have been a citizen of the United States for the past seven years, and must be (at the time of the election) an inhabitant of the state they represent. It is not, however, required for the representative to live in the district they will represent. The age and citizenship qualifications for representatives are less stringent than those for senators. The United States flag The Seal of the United States The Immigration and Naturalization Act sets forth the legal requirements for acquiring and losing citizenship of the United States. ...


Furthermore, under the Fourteenth Amendment, any federal or state officer who takes the requisite oath to support the Constitution, but later engages in rebellion or aids the enemies of the United States, is disqualified from becoming a representative. This provision, which came into force soon after the end of the American Civil War, was intended to prevent those who sided with the Confederacy from serving. The Amendment, however, allows a disqualified individual to serve if they gain consent of two-thirds of both Houses of Congress. Amendment XIV in the National Archives The Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution (Amendment XIV) is one of the post-Civil War amendments (known as the Reconstruction Amendments), first intended to secure rights for former slaves. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion...


Elections for representatives are held in every even-numbered year, on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November (see Election Day (United States)). Generally, the Republican and Democratic parties choose their candidates for each district in primary elections, which are typically held several months before. Rules for independent and third-party candidates seeking a spot on the November ballot vary from state to state. For the general election, almost all states use the first-past-the-post system, under which the candidate with a plurality of votes (not necessarily an absolute majority) wins. The sole exception is Louisiana, which holds an all-party "primary election" on the general Election Day, with a subsequent runoff election between the top two finishers (regardless of party) if no candidate receives a majority in the primary. Seats vacated during a term are filled through special elections, though that election will sometimes not take place until the next general election date. A member chosen in a special election usually takes office as soon thereafter as possible. Election Day in the United States is the day when polls most often open for the election of certain public officials. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... In any two-party system of politics, a third party is a party other than the two dominant ones. ... The first-past-the-post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called first-past-the-post (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority. ... For the use of the term in political theory, see Pluralism (political theory). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... An example of runoff voting. ...


Representatives and delegates serve for two-year terms, while the Resident Commissioner serves for four years. Once elected, a representative continues to serve until the expiry of his term, death, or resignation. Furthermore, the Constitution permits the House to expel any member with a two-thirds vote. In the history of the United States, only five members have been expelled from the House; three of them were removed in 1861 for supporting the Confederate States' secession, which led to the Civil War. Michael Myers (D-PA) was expelled for accepting bribes in 1980, and James Traficant (D-OH) was expelled in 2002 following his conviction for corruption. The House also has the power to formally censure or reprimand its members; censure or reprimand requires only a simple majority, but does not remove a member from office. Michael Joseph Ozzie Myers (born May 4, 1943) is a politician from the U.S. State of Pennsylvania. ... James Anthony Traficant, Jr. ... Distinguish from sensor, censer and censor. ...


Representatives use the prefix "The Honorable" before their names. A member of the House is referred to as a "Representative," "Member of Congress," "Congressman" or "Congresswoman." While Senators are technically "Members of Congress," that term is generally used to refer to Members of the House of Representatives exclusively. The Delegates and the Resident Commissioner use the same styles and titles as Members of the House. The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable ( or formerly The Honble) is a title of quality attached to the names of certain classes of persons. ...


Salary

The annual salary of each Representative is currently $165,200, though the Speaker of the House and the Majority and Minority Leaders earn more. The Speaker of the House earned $212,100 during the 109th Congress (January 4, 2005-January 3, 2007) while the Majority and Minority Leaders earned $183,500 (the same as the Leaders in the United States Senate). A cost-of-living-adjustment (COLA) increase takes effect annually unless Congress votes to not accept it. Congress has the power to set members' salaries; however, the Twenty-Seventh Amendment prohibits a change in wages from taking effect in the same two-year term in which it is passed into law. USD redirects here. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ... The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (currently at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... The Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives serves as floor leader of the opposition party, and is the minority counterpart to the Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives. ... The 109th United States Congress meets from January 4, 2005, to January 1, 2007. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Page 1 of the certification of Amendment XXVII in the National Archives Page 2 of the amendments certification Page 3 of the amendments certification Amendment XXVII (the Twenty-seventh Amendment) is the most recent amendment to be incorporated into the United States Constitution, having been ratified in 1992... A wage is a compensation which workers receive in exchange for their labor. ...


Officers

The party with a majority of seats in the House is known as the majority party; the next-largest party is the minority party. The Speaker, committee chairmen, and some other officials are generally from the majority party; they have counterparts (for instance, the "ranking members" of committees) in the minority party. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ...


The Constitution provides that the House may choose its own Speaker. Although not explicitly required by the Constitution, every Speaker has been a member of the House. The Constitution does not specify the duties and powers of the Speaker, which are instead regulated by the rules and customs of the House. The Speaker has a role both as a leader of the House and the leader of his or her party (which need not be the majority party; theoretically, a member of the minority party could be elected as Speaker with the support of a fraction of members of the majority party). Under the Presidential Succession Act (1947), the Speaker is second in the line of presidential succession behind the Vice President. The Presidential Succession Act of 1947 (codified as Title 3, Chapter 1, Section 19 of the United States Code) establishes the order of succession to the office of President of the United States in the event neither a President nor Vice President is able to discharge the powers and duties... The presidential line of succession defines who may become or act as President of the United States upon the incapacity, death, resignation, or removal from office (by impeachment and subsequent conviction) of a sitting president or a president-elect. ...


The Speaker is the presiding officer of the House but does not preside over every debate. Instead, he or she delegates the responsibility of presiding to other members in most cases. The presiding officer sits in a chair in the front of the House chamber. The powers of the presiding officer are extensive; one important power is that of controlling the order in which members of the House speak. No member may make a speech or a motion unless he or she has first been recognized by the presiding officer. Moreover, the presiding officer may rule on any "point of order" (a member's objection that a rule has been breached), but the decision is subject to appeal to the whole House. A Point of Order is a matter raised during a debate concerning the rules of debating themselves. ...


The Speaker is the chair of his or her party's steering committee, which chooses the chairmen of standing committees. The Speaker determines which committees consider bills, appoints most of the members of the Rules Committee, and appoints all members of conference committees. When the Presidency and Senate are controlled by a different party from the one controlling the House, the Speaker can become the de facto "leader of the opposition." Since the Speaker is a partisan officer with substantial power to control the business of the House, the position is often used for partisan advantage. The Committee on Rules, or (more commonly) Rules Committee, is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


Each party elects a floor leader, who is known as the Majority Leader or Minority Leader. While the Minority Leader is the full leader of his party, the same is not true of the Majority Leader. Instead, the Speaker is the head of the majority party; the Majority Leader is only the second-highest official. Party leaders decide what legislation members of their party should either support or oppose. Each party also elects a whip, who works to ensure that the party's members vote as the party leadership desires. Representatives are generally less independent of party leaders than senators, and usually vote as the leadership directs. Incentives to cooperate include the leadership's power to select committee chairmen. As a result, the leadership plays a much greater role in the House than in the Senate, and the atmosphere of the House is regarded by many as more partisan. A hardwood floor (parquetry) is a popular feature in many houses. ... The majority leader is a term used in congressional systems for the chamber leader of the party in control of a legislature. ... In U.S. politics, the minority leader is the Floor Leader of the second-largest caucus in a legislative body. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ...


Non-member officials

The House is also served by several officials who are not members. The House's chief officer is the Clerk, who maintains public records, prepares documents, and oversees junior officials, including pages. The Clerk also presides over the House at the beginning of each new Congress pending the election of a Speaker. Another officer is the Chief Administrative Officer, responsible for the day-to-day administrative support to the House of Representatives. This includes everything from payroll to food service. The Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives is an employee of the United States House of Representatives. ... A US House Page (Congressional Page or simply Page) is a non-partisan federal employee serving the US House of Representatives in Washington, DC. Under the direction of the Office of the Clerk, Pages, who are specially-appointed high school juniors, provide supplemental administrative support to House operations in varying... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The position of Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) was created following the 1994 Republican Revolution and replaced the positions of Doorkeeper and Director of Non-Legislative and Financial Services (which had been created only two years prior to provide a nonpartisan management body to administer those functions of the House that should not be under partisan control). The CAO also assumed some of the responsibilities of the House Information Services, which previously had been controlled directly by the Committee on House Administration, at the time headed by Representative Charlie Rose of North Carolina, along with the House "Folding Room." The Republican Revolution refers to the success of Republican Party in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate. ... Doorkeeper of the United States House of Representatives office was abolished during the 104th Congress. ...


The Chaplain leads the House in prayer at the opening of the day. There is also a Sergeant at Arms, who as the House's chief law enforcement officer, maintains order and security on House premises. Finally, routine police work is handled by the United States Capitol Police, which is supervised by the Capitol Police Board, a body to which the Sergeant at Arms belongs. The election of William Linn as Chaplain of the House on May 1, 1789, continued the tradition established by the Continental Congresses of each days proceedings opening with a prayer by a chaplain. ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... The United States House of Representatives Sergeant at Arms is an officer of the House with law enforcement, protocol, and administrative responsibilities. ... The United States Capitol Police (USCP) is a police force charged with protecting the United States Congress within the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its territories. ... The Capitol Police Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Police. ...


Procedure

The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each member's name and vote while votes are in progress. The screens are notably used by Congressional leaders to identify which members are voting against party lines.
The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each member's name and vote while votes are in progress. The screens are notably used by Congressional leaders to identify which members are voting against party lines.

Like the Senate, the House of Representatives meets in the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. At one end of the chamber of the House is a rostrum from which the Speaker presides. The lower tier of the rostrum is used by clerks and other officials. Members' seats are arranged in the chamber in a semicircular pattern; the seats are divided by a wide central aisle. By tradition, Democrats sit on the right of the center aisle, while Republicans sit on the left, as viewed from the presiding officer's chair. Sittings are normally held on weekdays; meetings on Saturdays and Sundays are rare. Sittings of the House are generally open to the public and are broadcast live on television by C-SPAN. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x626, 126 KB) empty chamber of the US House of Representatives. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x626, 126 KB) empty chamber of the US House of Representatives. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... At a hearing during the 109th Congress, then-Chairman Vernon J. Ehlers greets then-Ranking Member Juanita Millender-McDonald. ... Rostrum can mean one of several different things: A rostrum (Latin beak) is an anatomical structure resembling a birds beak, such as the snout of crocodiles or dolphins or the part of the carapace of a crustacean. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The procedure of the House depends not only on the rules, but also on a variety of customs, precedents, and traditions. In many cases, the House waives some of its stricter rules (including time limits on debates) by unanimous consent. Any member may block a unanimous consent agreement, but in practice, objections are rare. The presiding officer enforces the rules of the House, and may warn members who deviate from them. The presiding officer uses a gavel to maintain order. The box in which legislation is placed to be considered by the House is called the hopper. Unanimous consent, in parliamentary procedure, refers to situations in which a motion can pass if no one present objects. ... A gavel is a hammer-like instrument used by judges and presiding officers. ...


The Constitution provides that a majority of the House constitutes a quorum to do business. Under the rules and customs of the House, a quorum is always assumed to be present unless a quorum call explicitly demonstrates otherwise. House rules prevent any member from making a point of order that a quorum is not present unless a question is being voted upon; the presiding officer will not accept a point of order of no quorum during general debate or when a question is not before the House. Look up quorum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A quorum call or call to quorum is a parliamentary procedure used to delay a vote or otherwise slow down the deliberations of a parliamentary body. ...


During debates, a member may only speak if called upon by the presiding officer. The presiding officer may determine which members to recognize, and may therefore control the course of debate. All speeches must be addressed to the presiding officer, using the words "Mr. Speaker" or "Madam Speaker." Only the presiding officer may be directly addressed in speeches; other members must be referred to in the third person. In most cases, members do not refer to each other by name, but by state, using forms such as "the gentleman from Virginia" or "the gentlewoman from California."


Before legislation reaches the floor of the House, the Rules Committee normally passes a rule to govern debate on that measure. For instance, the committee determines if amendments to the bill are permitted. An "open rule" permits all germane amendments, but a "closed rule" restricts or even prohibits amendment. Debate on a bill is generally restricted to one hour, equally divided between the majority and minority parties. Each side is led during the debate by a "floor manager," who allocates debate time to members who wish to speak. On contentious matters, many members may wish to speak; thus, a member may receive as little as one minute, or even thirty seconds, to make his/her point. The Committee on Rules, or (more commonly) Rules Committee, is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


When debate concludes, the motion in question is put to a vote. In many cases, the House votes by voice vote; the presiding officer puts the question, and Members respond either "Yea" (in favor of the motion) or "Nay" (against the motion). The presiding officer then announces the result of the voice vote. Any member, however, may challenge the presiding officer's assessment and "request the yeas and nays" or "request a recorded vote." The request may be granted only if it is seconded by one-fifth of the members present. In practice, however, members of congress second requests for recorded votes as a matter of courtesy. Recorded votes are automatically held in some cases, such as votes on the annual budget.


The House may vote in three manners. Firstly, the House may vote by electronic device; each member uses a personal identification card to record his vote at one of 46 voting stations in the chamber. Votes are almost always held by electronic device. Secondly, the House may conduct a teller vote. Members hand in colored cards to indicate their votes: green for "Yea," red for "Nay," and orange for "Present" (i.e., to abstain). Teller votes are normally held only when the computer system breaks down. Finally, the House may conduct a roll call vote. The Clerk reads the list of members of the House, each of whom announces his vote when his name is called. This procedure is reserved for very formal votes (such as the election of a Speaker) because of the time consumed by calling over four hundred names. In the United States Congress, a recorded vote is a vote in which the names of those voting for and against a motion may be recorded. ...


Voting traditionally lasts for fifteen minutes, but it may be extended if the leadership needs to "whip" more Congressmen into alignment. The 2003 vote on the Prescription Drug Benefit was open for three hours, from 3:00 to 6:00 a.m., to receive four additional votes, three of which were necessary to pass the legislation. The 2005 vote on the Central American Free Trade Agreement was open for one hour, from 11:00 p.m. to midnight. An October 2005 vote on facilitating refinery construction was kept open for forty minutes. The Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) is a free trade agreement between the United States and the Central American countries of Guatemala, Honduras, and Canada, and Mexico. ...


The presiding officer may vote, like any other member. If a vote is tied, the presiding officer does not have a casting vote (unless he has not yet cast his vote). Instead, motions are decided in the negative when ties arise. A casting vote is a vote given to the presiding officer of a council or legislative body in order to resolve a deadlock. ...


Committees

The House uses committees (as well as their subcommittees) for a variety of purposes, including the review of bills and the oversight of the executive branch. The appointment of committee members is formally made by the whole House, but the choice of members is actually made by the political parties. Generally, each party honors the preferences of individual congressmen and congresswomen, giving priority on the basis of seniority. Historically, membership on committees has been in rough proportion to the party's strength in the House as a whole, except that on the Rules Committee, the majority party usually has a greater than two-to-one advantage. However, when party control in the House is closely divided, extra seats on committees are sometimes allocated to the majority party. (For example in the 109th Congress, the Republicans controlled about 53% of the House as a whole, but had 54% of the Appropriations Committee members, 55% of the members on the Energy and Commerce Committee, 58% of the members on the Judiciary Committee, and 69% of the members on the Rules Committee.) A Congressional committee in the parlance of the United States Congress and politics of the United States is a legislative sub-organization that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress, making necessary and proper laws). ... U.S. House Committee members sit in the tiers of raised chairs, while those testifying and audience members sit below. ...


The largest committee of the House is the Committee of the Whole, which, as its name suggests, consists of all members of the House. The Committee meets in the House chamber; it may consider and amend bills, but may not grant them final passage. Generally, the debate procedures of the Committee of the Whole are more flexible than those of the House itself. One advantage of the Committee of the Whole is its ability to include otherwise non-voting members of Congress. In the United States House of Representatives, the Committee of the Whole, short for Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union, is a parliamentary device in which the House of Representatives is considered one large Congressional committee. ... In the United States House of Representatives, the Committee of the Whole, short for Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union, is a parliamentary device in which the House of Representatives is considered one large Congressional committee. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political...


Most committee work is performed by twenty standing committees, each of which has jurisdiction over a specific field such as Agriculture or International Relations. Each standing committee considers, amends, and reports bills that fall under its jurisdiction. Committees have extensive powers with regard to bills; they may block legislation from reaching the floor of the House. Standing committees also oversee the departments and agencies of the executive branch. In discharging their duties, standing committees have the power to hold hearings and to subpoena witnesses and evidence. A subpoena is a command to appear at a certain time and place to give testimony upon a certain matter. ...


The House also has one permanent committee that is not a standing committee, the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. Furthermore, the Congress includes joint committees, which include members of both the Senate and the House of Representatives. Some joint committees oversee independent government bodies; for instance, the Joint Committee on the Library oversees the Library of Congress. Other joint committees serve to make advisory reports; for example, there exists a Joint Committee on Taxation. Bills and nominees are not referred to joint committees. Hence, the power of joint committees is considerably lower than those of standing committees. The U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence is a committee of the United States House of Representatives, currently chaired by Peter Hoekstra. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...


Each House committee and subcommittee is led by a chairman (always a member of the majority party). From 1910 to the 1970s, committee chairmen were very powerful. Woodrow Wilson in the 1880s suggested: Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ...

"Power is nowhere concentrated; it is rather deliberately and of set policy scattered amongst many small chiefs. It is divided up, as it were, into forty-seven seigniories, in each of which a Standing Committee is the court-baron and its chairman lord-proprietor. These petty barons, some of them not a little powerful, but none of them within the reach of the full powers of rule, may at will exercise almost despotic sway within their own shires, and may sometimes threaten to convulse even the realm itself."

From 1910 to 1975 committee and subcommittee chairmanship was determined purely by seniority; men sometimes had to wait 30 years to get one, but their chairmanship was independent of party leadership. The rules were changed in 1975 to permit party caucuses to elect chairmen, shifting power upward to the party leaders. In 1995, Republicans under Newt Gingrich set a limit of three two-year terms for committee chairmen. The Democrats who took over in 2007 have not decided whether to continue the Gingrich rules. The chairmen's powers are extensive; they control the committee/subcommittee agenda, and may prevent the committee from dealing with a bill. The senior member of the minority party, is known as the Ranking Member. In some committees like Appropriations, partisan disputes are few. A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... Newton Leroy Gingrich, (born June 17, 1943), served as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999. ...


Legislative functions

Most bills may be introduced in either House of Congress. However, the Constitution provides that "All bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives." As a result, the Senate does not have the power to initiate bills imposing taxes. Furthermore, the House of Representatives holds that the Senate does not have the power to originate appropriation bills, or bills authorizing the expenditure of federal funds. Historically, the Senate has disputed the interpretation advocated by the House. However, whenever the Senate originates an appropriations bill, the House simply refuses to consider it, thereby settling the dispute in practice. The constitutional provision barring the Senate from introducing revenue bills is based on the practice of the British Parliament, in which only the House of Commons may originate such measures. An appropriation bill or supply bill is a legislative motion which authorizes the government to spend money. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups...


Although it cannot originate revenue bills, the Senate retains the power to amend or reject them. As Woodrow Wilson wrote: Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ...

[T]he Senate's right to amend [revenue bills] has been allowed the widest possible scope. The upper house may add to them what it pleases; may go altogether outside of their original provisions and tack to them entirely new features of legislation, altering not only the amounts but even the objects of expenditure, and making out of the materials sent them by the popular chamber measures of an almost totally new character.

The approval of both the Senate and the House of Representatives is required for any bill, including a revenue bill, to become law. Both Houses must pass the exact same version of the bill; if there are differences, they may be resolved by a conference committee, which includes members of both bodies. For the stages through which bills pass in the Senate, see Act of Congress. A conference committee in the United States Congress and bicamerial state legislature is a committee appointed by the members of the upper and lower house to resolve disagreements on a bill passed in different versions of each House. ... An Act of Vaginapenis is a bill or resolution adopted by both houses of the United States Congress to which one of the following events has happened: Acceptance by the President of the United States, Inaction by the President after ten days from reception (excluding Sundays) while the Congress is...


Checks and balances

The Constitution provides that the Senate's "advice and consent" is necessary for the President to make certain appointments and to ratify treaties; however, the House must also confirm the nomination of a new Vice President under the 25th Amendment. Thus, in terms of potential to frustrate Presidential appointments, the powers of the Senate are more extensive than those of the House. Page 1 of Amendment XXV in the National Archives Page 2 of the amendment Amendment XXV (the Twenty-fifth Amendment) of the United States Constitution clarifies an ambiguous provision of the Constitution regarding succession to the Presidency, and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the...


The Constitution empowers the House of Representatives to impeach federal officials for "Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors" and empowers the Senate to try such impeachments. The House may approve "articles of impeachment" by a simple majority vote; however, a two-thirds vote is required for conviction in the Senate. A convicted official is automatically removed from office; in addition, the Senate may stipulate that the defendant be banned from holding office in the future. No further punishment is permitted during the impeachment proceedings; however, the party may face criminal penalties in a normal court of law. Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ...


In the history of the United States, the House of Representatives has impeached sixteen officials, of whom seven were convicted. (Another, Richard Nixon, resigned after the House Judiciary Committee passed Articles of impeachment but before a formal impeachment vote by the full House.) Only two Presidents of the United States have ever been impeached: Andrew Johnson in 1868 and Bill Clinton in 1998. Both trials ended in acquittal; in Johnson's case, the Senate fell one vote short of the two-thirds majority required for conviction. Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... The articles of impeachment are the set of charges drafted against a public official to initiate the impeachment process. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


Under the Twelfth Amendment, the House has the power to elect the President if no presidential candidate receives a majority of votes in the electoral college. The Twelfth Amendment requires the House to choose from the three candidates with the highest numbers of electoral votes. The Constitution provides that "the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote." Electoral college deadlocks are very rare; in the history of the United States, the House has only had to break a deadlock twice. In 1800, it elected Thomas Jefferson over Aaron Burr; in 1824, it elected John Q. Adams over Andrew Jackson and William H. Crawford. The power to elect the Vice President in the case of an electoral college deadlock belongs to the Senate. Amendment XII in the National Archives The Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution alterd Article II pertaining to presidential elections. ... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the American politician. ... Order: 6th President Term of Office: March 4, 1825–March 3, 1829 Preceded by: James Monroe Succeeded by: Andrew Jackson Date of birth: July 11, 1767 Place of birth: Braintree, Massachusetts Date of death: February 23, 1848 Place of death: Washington, D.C. First Lady: Louisa Catherine (Johnson) Adams... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... William Harris Crawfordlalalalalalala (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an important American politician, as well as a judge, during the early 19th century. ...


Latest election

2006 (Convened January 2007)

[discuss] – [edit]
Summary of the November 7, 2006 United States House of Representatives election results
Party Seats Popular Vote
2004 2006 +/−  % Vote  % +/−
Democratic Party 202 233 +31 53.6% 42,082,311 52.0% +5.4%
Republican Party 232 202 −30 46.4% 35,674,808 44.1% –5.1%
Independents 1 0 −1 0 220,842 0.3% -0.3%
Others 0 0 0 0 2,997,576 3.6% +0.0%
Total 435 435 0 100.0% 80,975,537 100.0% 0
Voter turnout:   36.8 %
Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk

Special case: FL-13 (FL certified the Republican the winner, but this election is being disputed in court and Congress.) President Bush meets with Nancy Pelosi and Steny Hoyer (then House Minority Leader and Minority Whip, respectively) at the Oval Office in the White House. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... President Bush meets with Nancy Pelosi and Steny Hoyer (then House Minority Leader and Minority Whip, respectively) at the Oval Office in the White House. ... Summary of party change of U.S. house seats in the 2004 House election. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Floridas 13th congressional district encompasses all of Sarasota, DeSoto, and Hardee County, and most of Manatee County, except for a small northern coastal portion in District 11. ...


Current composition

Current percentage of House members for each party by state for the 110th Congress.
Current percentage of House members for each party by state for the 110th Congress.
Affiliation Members Delegates / Resident Commissioner (non-voting)
  Democratic Party 233 4
  Republican Party 200 1
  Vacant 2 -
Total 435 5
Majority 33
1. Republican Representative Paul Gillmor of Ohio was found dead on September 5.
2. Republican Representative Jo Ann Davis of Virginia died October 6 of breast cancer.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (987x585, 31 KB) Partisan affiliations, by percent, of the states congressional delegations in the 110th U.S. Congress. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (987x585, 31 KB) Partisan affiliations, by percent, of the states congressional delegations in the 110th U.S. Congress. ... The 110th United States Congress consists of 540 elected officials from fifty states, four territories, and the District of Columbia. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Paul Eugene Gillmor (born February 1, 1939) is an American politician of the Republican party who serves as a U.S. representative from the fifth congressional district of Ohio. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jo Ann Davis (June 29, 1950 – October 6, 2007) was a Republican from the United States Commonwealth of Virginia, who represented the states 1st congressional district[1] in the U.S. House of Representatives from 2001 until her death. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

Surveys

  • MacNeil, Neil. Forge of Democracy: The House of Representatives (1963) a popular history
  • Peters, Ronald M., Jr. The American Speakership: The Office in Historical Perspective. Johns Hopkins U. Press, 1990. 354 pp.
  • Polsby, Nelson W. How Congress Evolves: Social Bases of Institutional Change Oxford U. Press, 2003. 257 pp.
  • Poole, Keith T. and Howard Rosenthal, Congress: A Political-Economic History of Roll Call Voting Oxford University Press, 1997; uses their NOMINATE score to handle roll calls
  • Remini, Robert V. The House: The History of the House of Representatives (2006), the major scholarly history
  • Sinclair, Barbara. Majority Leadership in the U.S. House. Johns Hopkins U. Press, 1984. 263 pp.
  • Zelizer, Julian E. ed. The American Congress: The Building of Democracy (2004), overview by numerous scholars

Nelson Woolf Polsby (born October 25, 1934, Norwich, Connecticut; died February 6, 2007, Berkeley, California) was an American political scientist who specialized in the study of the United States presidency and United States Congress. ...

Before 1945

  • David W. Brady and Mathew D. McCubbins. Party, Process, and Political Change in Congress: New Perspectives on the History of Congress (2002)
  • Brady, David W. Congressional Voting in a Partisan Era: A Study of the McKinley Houses and a Comparison to the Modern House of Representatives. U. Pr. of Kansas, 1973. 273 pp.
  • Cooper, Joseph. The Origins of the Standing Committees and the Development of the Modern House. Rice U. Press, 1970. 167 pp.
  • Linda Grant de Pauw, Charlene Bangs Bickford, and Kenneth R. Bowling, eds. Documentary History of the First Federal Congress of the United States of America, March 4, 1789-March 3, 1791 (1992- 2006) 14 volumes of primary documents
  • Ronald L. Hatzenbuehler, "Party Unity and the Decision for War in the House of Representatives in 1812," William and Mary Quarterly 29 (1972): 367-90;
  • Henig, Gerald S. Henry Winter Davis: Antebellum and Civil War Congressman from Maryland. 1973. 332 pp. Radical leader in Civil War era
  • Klingman, Peter D. Josiah Walls: Florida's Black Congressman of Reconstruction. U. Press of Florida, 1976. 157 pp.
  • Lowitt, Richard. George W. Norris: The Making of a Progressive, 1861-1912 Vol. 1. Syracuse U. Press, 1963. leader of Republican insurgents in 1910
  • Margulies, Herbert F. Reconciliation and Revival: James R. Mann and the House Republicans in the Wilson Era. Greenwood, 1996. 242 pp.
  • Patterson, James. Congressional Conservatism and the New Deal: The Growth of the Conservative Coalition in Congress, 1933-39 (1967)
  • Robert V. Remini. Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union (1992) . Speaker for most of 1811-1825
  • Strahan, Randall; Moscardelli, Vincent G.; Haspel, Moshe; and Wike, Richard S. "The Clay Speakership Revisited" Polity 2000 32(4): 561-593. ISSN 0032-3497 uses roll call analysis
  • Stewart, Charles H., III. Budget Reform Politics: The Design of the Appropriations Process in the House of Representatives, 1865-1921. Cambridge U. Press, 1989. 254 pp.
  • Trefousse, Hans L. Thaddeus Stevens: Nineteenth-Century Egalitarian (1997) majority leader in 1860s
  • Waller, Robert A. Rainey of Illinois: A Political Biography, 1903-34. U. of Illinois Press, 1977. 260 pp. Democratic Speaker 1932-34

Since 1945

  • Barone, Michael, and Grant Ujifusa, The Almanac of American Politics 2006: The Senators, the Representatives and the Governors: Their Records and Election Results, Their States and Districts (2005). Published every two years since 1975; enormous detail on every state and district and member.
  • Abramowitz, Alan I. and Kyle L. Saunders. 1998. �Ideological Realignment in the US Electorate.� Journal of Politics 60(3):634-652.
  • Adler, E. Scott. Why Congressional Reforms Fail: Reelection and the House Committee System. Univ. of Chicago Press, 2002.
  • Albert, Carl and Goble, Danney. Little Giant: The Life and Times of Speaker Carl Albert. U. of Oklahoma Press, 1990. 388 pp. Speaker in 1970s
  • Barry, John M. The Ambition and the Power: The Fall of Jim Wright. A True Story of Washington. Viking, 1989. 768 pp. Speaker in 1980s
  • Berard, Stanley P. Southern Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives. U. of Oklahoma Press, 2001. 250 pp.
  • Congressional Quarterly Congress and the Nation: 2001-2004: A Review of Government and Politics: 107th and 108th Congresses (2005); massive, highly detailed summary of Congressional activity, as well as major executive and judicial decisions; based on Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report and the annual CQ almanac.
    • Congressional Quarterly, Congress and the Nation: 1997-2001 (2002)
    • Congressional Quarterly, Congress and the Nation: 1993-1996 (1998)
    • Congressional Quarterly, Congress and the Nation: 1989-1992 (1993)
    • Congressional Quarterly, Congress and the Nation: 1985-1988 (1989)
    • Congressional Quarterly, Congress and the Nation: 1981-1984 (1985)
    • Congressional Quarterly, Congress and the Nation: 1977-1980 (1981)
    • Congressional Quarterly, Congress and the Nation: 1973-1976 (1977)
    • Congressional Quarterly, Congress and the Nation: 1969-1972 (1973)
    • Congressional Quarterly, Congress and the Nation: 1965-1968 (1969)
    • Congressional Quarterly, Congress and the Nation: 1945-1964 (1965), the first of the series
  • Cox, Gary W. and McCubbins, Mathew D. Legislative Leviathan: Party Government in the House. U. of California Press, 1993. 324 pp.
  • Currie, James T. The United States House of Representatives. Krieger, 1988. 239 pp short survey
  • DeGregorio, Christine A. Networks of Champions: Leadership, Access, and Advocacy in the U.S. House of Representatives. U. of Michigan Press, 1997. 185 pp.
  • Dierenfield, Bruce J. Keeper of the Rules: Congressman Howard W. Smith of Virginia U. Press of Virginia, 1987. 306 pp. leader of Conservative coalition 1940-66
  • Farrell, John A. Tip O'Neill and the Democratic Century Little, Brown, 2001. 776 pp. Democratic Speaker in 1980s
  • Gertzog, Irwin J. Congressional Women: Their Recruitment, Treatment, and Behavior Praeger, 1984. 291 pp.
  • Hardeman, D. B. and Bacon, Donald C. Rayburn: A Biography. Texas Monthly Press, 1987. 554 pp.
  • Hechler, Ken. Toward the Endless Frontier: History of the Committee on Science and Technology, 1959-79. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1980. 1073 pp.
  • Hibbing, John R. Congressional Careers: Contours of Life in the U.S. House of Representatives. U. of North Carolina Press, 1991. 213 pp.
  • Jacobs, John. A Rage for Justice: The Passion and Politics of Phillip Burton. U. of California Press., 1995. 578 pp. leader of liberal Democrats in 1970s
  • Jacobson, Gary C. The Electoral Origins of Divided Government: Competition in U.S. House Elections, 1946-1988. Westview, 1990. 152 pp.
  • Kiewiet, D. Roderick and McCubbins, Mathew D. The Logic of Delegation: Congressional Parties and the Appropriations Process. U. of Chicago Press, 1991. 286 pp.
  • Merriner, James L. Mr. Chairman: Power in Dan Rostenkowski's America. Southern Illinois U. Pr., 1999. 333 pp. Democratic chair of Ways and Means in 1980s
  • Price, David E. The Congressional Experience: A View from the Hill. Westview, 1992. 194 pp. by political scientist who served in House
  • Rohde, David W. Parties and Leaders in the Postreform House. U. of Chicago Press, 1991. 232 pp.
  • Rohde, David W. and Kenneth A. Shepsle, "Leaders and Followers in the House of Representatives: Reflections on Woodrow Wilson's Congressional Government," Congress & the Presidency 14 (1987): 111-33
  • Schooley, C. Herschel. Missouri's Cannon in the House. Marceline, Mo.: Walsworth, 1977. 282 pp. Chaired Appropriations in 1960s
  • Schickler, Eric. Disjointed Pluralism: Institutional Innovation and the Development of the U.S. Congress (2001)
  • Shelley II, Mack C. The Permanent Majority: The Conservative Coalition in the United States Congress (1983)
  • Sinclair, Barbara. Legislators, Leaders, and Lawmaking: The U.S. House of Representatives in the Postreform Era. Johns Hopkins U. Press, 1995. 329 pp.
  • Sinclair, Barbara. Congressional Realignment, 1925-1978. U. of Texas Press, 1982. 201 pp.
  • Steinberg, Alfred. Sam Rayburn: A Biography. Hawthorn, 1975. 391 pp. popular biography
  • Strahan, Randall. New Ways and Means: Reform and Change in a Congressional Committee. U. of North Carolina Press, 1990. 218 pp.
  • VanBeek, Stephen D. Post-Passage Politics: Bicameral Resolution in Congress. U. of Pittsburgh Press, 1995. 227 pp.
  • Julian E. Zelizer. On Capitol Hill : The Struggle to Reform Congress and its Consequences, 1948-2000 (2006)

The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ...

See also

United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the Senate and the House of Representatives. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States...

References

  • Berman, Daniel M. (1964). In Congress Assembled: The Legislative Process in the National Government. London: The Macmillan Company.
  • "Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-2005." Washington: Government Printing Office, 2005. Prepared by the Office of the Clerk, Office of History and Preservation, United States House of Representatives. Contains biographical entries for every Member of Congress. Also online at Biographical Directory.
  • Congressional Quarterly's Guide to Congress, 5th ed. (2000). Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Press.
  • C-SPAN. (2003). "Capitol Questions."
  • Robert V. Remini. The House: The History of the House of Representatives (2006)
  • Story, Joseph. (1891). Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States. (2 vols). Boston: Brown & Little.
  • Wilson, Woodrow. (1885). Congressional Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin.

Congressional Quarterly (CQ) produces a number of publications that report primarily on the United States Congress. ... American jurist Joseph Story Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 - September 10, 1845), American jurist, was born at Marblehead, Massachusetts. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ...

External links

Image File history File links United_States_House_of_Representatives. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the Senate and the House of Representatives. ... The 110th United States Congress consists of 540 elected officials from fifty states, four territories, and the District of Columbia. ... The 110th United States Congress began on January 4, 2007. ... This is an incomplete list of notable former members of the United States House of Representatives. ... This is a list of current U.S. Senators sorted by age. ... This is a classification of current U.S. Senators by seniority. ... This is an incomplete list of all people who previously served in the United States Senate. ... List of former United States Senators, who as of 2007 are still alive: See also: List of current United States Senators by age, List of former United States Senators, Classes of United States Senators and List of current United States Senators by seniority // Class 3: Jeremiah Denton (Republican), 1981-1987... The United States Constitution gives the Senate the power to expel any member by a two-thirds vote. ... Category: ... The three classes of US Senators, each currently including 33 or 34 Senators (since Hawaii became the 50th state in 1959, and until another state is admitted), are a means used by the United States Senate for describing the schedules of Senate seats elections, and of the expiration of the... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Party leaders of the United States House of Representatives are elected by their respective parties in... A whip in the United States House of Representatives is a member of the party leadership who comes second in line after the partys floor leader, which in the house is the House Majority Leader or the House Minority Leader. ... The House Democratic Caucus, nominates and elects the Democratic Party leadership in the United States House of Representatives. ... The House Republican Conference, sometimes known as the House Republican Leadership Conference, is an organization for Republicans in the United States House of Representatives. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... This is a complete List of Presidents pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two... The Assistant Majority and Minority Leaders of the United States Senate (commonly called Senate Majority and Minority Whips) are the second-ranking members of their parties in the United States Senate. ... The Senate Democratic Caucus is the formal organization of the (currently) 44 Democratic Senators in the United States Senate. ... The Democratic caucus of the United States Senate chooses a conference chairman. ... The United States Senate Democratic Conference Secretary, also called the Caucus Secretary, is a ranking leadership position within the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. ... Since 1947, the Democratic members of the United States Senate have elected a policy committee chairman. ... The Senate Republican Conference is the formal organization of the (currently) 55 Republican Senators in the United States Senate. ... The Republican conference of the United States Senate chooses a conference chairperson. ... The United States Senate Republican Conference Vice-Chair, also known previously as the Conference Secretary, is the third-ranking leadership position within the U.S. Republican Party in the United States Senate. ... Since 1947, the Republican members of the United States Senate have elected a policy committee chairman. ... The Dean of the United States Senate is the longest-serving (in consecutive terms) United States Senator. ... Joseph Rainey, first black member of the U.S. House of Representatives Since 1868, 122 African Americans have served in the United States Congress. ... This is a list of Asian Pacific Americans in the U.S. Congress. ... A Congressional caucus is a group of members of the United States Congress which meets to pursue common legislative objectives. ... A Congressional committee is a legislative sub-organization in the United States Congress that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress). ... The Congress of the United States has demographics that are different from America as a whole in a number of ways. ... This is a list of Hispanic Americans who have served in the U.S. Congress. ... There have been 35 women in the United States Senate since the establishment of that body in 1789, meaning that out of the 1,895 Americans [1] who have served in the United States Senate since that time, 1. ... Throughout the history of the United States House of Representatives, there have been 214 women serving in that body. ... United States Capitol The Architect of the Capitol is responsible to the United States Congress for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, which includes the Capitol, the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the United States Supreme Court building, the United States... The United States Capitol Guide Service is a guide service charged by the United States Congress to provide guided tours of the interior of the United States Capitol Building for the education and enlightenment of the general public, without charge for such tours. ... The Capitol Guide Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Guide Service. ... The United States Capitol Police (USCP) is a police force charged with protecting the United States Congress within the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its territories. ... The Capitol Police Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Police. ... A U.S. Congressional Chief of Staff is the top executive in the office of a member of the United States Congress. ... General Accounting Office headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the non-partisan audit, evaluation, and investigative arm of Congress, and an agency in the Legislative Branch of the United States Government. ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) prints and provides access to documents produced by and for all three branches of the federal government, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and... The Office of the Law Revision Counsel prepares and publishes the United States Code, which is a consolidation and codification by subject matter of the general and permanent laws of the United States. ... Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is one of four official national libraries of the United States (along with the National Library of Medicine, National Agricultural Library, and National Archives and Records Administration). ... The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress is appointed by the United States Librarian of Congress and earns a stipend of $35,000 a year. ... The election of William Linn as Chaplain of the House on May 1, 1789, continued the tradition established by the Continental Congresses of each days proceedings opening with a prayer by a chaplain. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives is an employee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Doorkeeper of the United States House of Representatives office was abolished during the 104th Congress. ... The Office of Emergency Planning, Preparedness and Operations (OEPPO) provides emergency planning and operational support to the United States House of Representatives. ... The Historian of the United States House of Representatives is an official appointed by that legislative body to study and document its past. ... The United States House of Representatives Page Program is a program run by the United States House of Representatives in which appointed high school juniors act as non-partisan federal employees in the House of Representatives, providing supplemental administrative support to House operations in a variety of capacities in Washington... House Page Board is a the oversight group of elected official who oversee the United States House of Representatives Page. ... The office of the Parliamentarian of the United States House of Representatives is an office managed, supervised and administered by a non-partisan Parliamentarian appointed by the Speaker. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Reading Clerk of the United States House of Representatives reads bills, motions, and other papers before the House and keeps track of changes to legislation made on the floor. ... The House Recording Studio provides radio and television recording services to Members, Committees, and Officers of the United States House of Representatives. ... The United States House of Representatives Sergeant at Arms is an officer of the House with law enforcement, protocol, and administrative responsibilities. ... // Job description and selection Among his or her duties, the chaplains job is to open each session of the United States Senate with a prayer. ... The United States Senate Curator is an employee of the United States Senate who is responsible for developing and implementing the museum and preservation programs for the Senate Commission on Art. ... The Historian of the United States Senate and United States Senate Historical Office were created in 1975 to record and preserve historical information about the United States Senate. ... The Senate Library is an administrative office that reports into the Secretary of the United States Senate. ... A United States Senate Page (Senate Page or simply Page) is a non-partisan federal employee serving the United States Senate in Washington, DC. In many ways, Senate Pages are similar to their House counterparts. ... The Parliamentarian of the United States Senate serves at the pleasure of the Senate Majority Leader, and functions under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate as a non-partisan employee of the Senate. ... The Secretary of the Senate, as an elected officer of the United States Senate, supervises an extensive array of offices and services to expedite the day-to-day operations of that body. ... The Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate is the law enforcer for the United States Senate. ... An Act of Vaginapenis is a bill or resolution adopted by both houses of the United States Congress to which one of the following events has happened: Acceptance by the President of the United States, Inaction by the President after ten days from reception (excluding Sundays) while the Congress is... This is a partial list of notable United States federal legislation, in chronological order. ... A Congressional caucus is a group of members of the United States Congress which meets to pursue common legislative objectives. ... A Congressional committee is a legislative sub-organization in the United States Congress that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress). ... Congressional hearings are the principal formal method by which committees collect and analyze information in the early stages of legislative policymaking. ... Joint Sessions of the United States Congress are the gathering together of both House and Senate which occur on special occasions such as the State of the Union Address and Presidential Inauguration. ... Congress, in addition to its lawmaking duties, has oversight authority over the Executive Branch. ... The following table lists the party divisions for each United States Congress: U.S. Senate: Party Divisions Office of the House Clerk: Party Divisions of the House of Representatives Categories: | | ... In legislative practice, a rider is an additional provision annexed to a bill under the consideration of a legislature, having little connection with the subject matter of the bill. ... Members of the Committee on Financial Services sit in the tiers of raised chairs (R), while those testifying and audience members sit below (L). ... George W. Bush delivered his annual State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on January 28, 2003, in the House chamber. ... Jeffersons Manual of Parliamentary Practice is a book of parliamentary procedure and additional guidelines for the United States House of Representatives, written by Thomas Jefferson in 1801. ... At a hearing during the 109th Congress, then-Chairman Vernon J. Ehlers greets then-Ranking Member Juanita Millender-McDonald. ... The Senate Committee on Budget (ca. ... As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... Debate over Compromise of 1850 in the Old Senate Chamber. ... The United States Senate observes a number of traditions, some formal and some informal. ... The Vice President of the United States is, ex officio, the President of the United States Senate and votes only to break a tie. ... The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is a botanic garden run by the Congress of the United States. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Aerial view of the United States Capitol Complex from the northweat The United States Capitol Complex is group of about a dozen buildings and facilities in Washington D.C. that are used by the Federal government of the United States. ... The largely ceremonial space within the United States Capitol is augmented by office, meeting and service spaces within the Congressional office buildings. ... The Cannon House Office Building, completed in 1908, is the oldest congressional office building as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ... The Ford House Office Building is one of the four office buildings containing U.S. House of Representatives staff on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. It is the only House Office Building that is not connected underground to either one of the other office buildings or to the Capitol itself. ... The Longworth House Office Building The Longworth House Office Building (LHOB) is one of three office buildings used by the United States House of Representatives. ... The ONeill House Office Building is the name of a former Congressional Office Building, located near the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. It was named after former Speaker of the House Thomas Tip ONeill (December 9, 1912 – January 5, 1994). ... The Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB), named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, is located between South Capitol Street and First Street in Southwest Washington, D.C. // History The newest of three U.S. House of Representatives office buildings, the Rayburn House Office Building was completed in early... This Washington, DC congressional office building is named for former Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL). ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ... This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E. The rotunda of the Russell Building featuring the sculpture by Frederick Hart. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... Congressional Quarterly (CQ) produces a number of publications that report primarily on the United States Congress. ... The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. ... The Congressional Research Service is the public policy research arm of the United States Congress. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The Hill is a non-partisan, non-ideological newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It is written for and about the U.S. Congress. ... For other senses of this term, see roll call (disambiguation). ... Look up Thomas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... This is a complete list of congressional districts by area for current representation in the United States House of Representatives. ... The Mace of the US House of Representatives The Mace of the United States House of Representatives is one of the oldest symbols of the United States government. ... A number of amendments to the United States Constitution include a Congressional power of enforcement. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Congressional committee is a legislative sub-organization in the United States Congress that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress). ... Members of the Committee on Financial Services sit in the tiers of raised chairs (R), while those testifying and audience members sit below (L). ... The Committee on Appropriations, or Appropriations Committee (often referred to as simply Appropriations, as in Hes on Appropriations) is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services, commonly known as the House Armed Services Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. ... The U.S. House Committee on the Budget, commonly known as the House Budget Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. ... The Committee on Education and Labor is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... The U.S. House Commerce Committee on Energy and Commerce residing at 2125 Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, DC is the oldest (208 years) legislative standing committee in the U.S. House of Representatives. ... Meeting of the House Financial Services Committee The United States House Committee on Financial Services (or House Banking Committee) oversees the entire financial services industry, including the securities, insurance, banking, and housing industries. ... The U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs (also known as the House Foreign Affairs Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives which is in charge of bills and investigations related to the foreign affairs of the United States. ... The U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. ... The United States House Committee on House Administration deals with the general administration matters of the United States House of Representatives. ... The U.S. House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence is a committee of the United States House of Representatives, currently chaired by Peter Hoekstra. ... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform is a United States House of Representatives committee that has existed in varying forms since 1816. ... The Committee on Rules, or (more commonly) Rules Committee, is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... The Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration was established in 1958 in response to the Soviet Sputnik program in the late 1950s. ... // History Jurisdiction Subcommittees Subcommittee on Workforce, Empowerment, and Government Programs Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform and Oversight Subcommittee on Tax, Finance, and Exports Subcommittee on Rural Enterprises, Agriculture, and Technology Members Republicans Donald A. Manzullo (R-IL), Chairman Roscoe Bartlett (R-MD) Sue W. Kelly (R-NY) Steve Chabot (R-OH... The Committee on Standards of Official Conduct, often known simply as the Ethics Committee, is one of the committees of the United States House of Representatives. ... The U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives, the lower house of Congress. ... The standing Committee on Veterans Affairs in the United States House of Representatives oversees agencies, reviews current legislation, and recommends new bills or amendments concerning veterans. ... The Committee on Ways and Means is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... In the United States House of Representatives, the Committee of the Whole, short for Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union, is a parliamentary device in which the House of Representatives is considered one large Congressional committee. ... The Senate Committee on Budget (ca. ... The United States Senate Special Committee on Aging was initially established in 1961 as a temporary committee; it became a permanent committee in 1977. ... The Committee of Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of all matters relating to the nations agriculture industry, farming programs, forestry and logging, and legislation relating to nutrition and health. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nations military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other... The United States Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs has jurisdiction over matters related to banks and banking, price controls, deposit insurance, export promotion and controls, federal monetary policy, financial aid to commerce and industry, issuance of redemption of notes, currency and coinage, public and private housing, urban... The United States Senate Committee on Budget was established in 1974 by the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act. ... The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation is a standing committee of the United States Senate in charge of all senate matters related to the following subjects: Coast Guard Coastal zone management Communications Highway safety Inland waterways, except construction Interstate commerce Marine and ocean navigation, safety, and transportation Marine... The United States Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources has jurisdiction over matters related to energy and nuclear waste policy, territorial policy, native Hawaiian matters, and public lands. ... The U.S. Senate Select Committee on Ethics is a select committee of the United States Senate charged with dealing with matters related to senatorial ethics. ... The United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works is responsible for dealing with matters related to the environment and infrastructure. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance (or, less formally, Senate Finance Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) has jurisdiction over matters relating to health, education, labor, and pensions. ... The United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs has jurisdiction over matters related to the Department of Homeland Security and other homeland security concerns, as well as the functioning of the government itself, including the National Archives, budget and accounting measures other than appropriations, the Census, the... The United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs is responsible for dealing with matters related to the American Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native peoples. ... The United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence is dedicated to overseeing the United States Intelligence Community—the agencies and bureaus of the U.S. federal government who provide information and analysis for leaders of the executive and legislative branches. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... The Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control was created to monitor and encourage the U.S. government and private programs seeking to expand international cooperation against drug abuse and narcotics trafficking, and promote international compliance with narcotics control treaties, including eradication. ... The United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration is responsible for dealing with the rules of the United States Senate, with administration of congressional buildings, and with credentials and qualifications of members of the Senate, including responsibility for dealing with contested elections. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs is responsible for dealing with matters related to veterans. ... This is a list of active joint United States Congressional committees. ... A conference committee in the United States Congress is a committee appointed by the members of the upper and lower houses to resolve disagreements on a bill passed in different versions of each House. ... The Joint Economic Committee is one of only four joint committees of the U.S. Congress. ... The Joint Committee on the Library is a joint committee of the U.S. Congress devoted to the affairs and administration of the U.S. Library of Congress, which is the library of the federal legislature. ... The Joint Committee on Printing is a joint committee of the U.S. Congress devoted to overseeing the functions of the Government Printing Office and general printing procedures of the Federal Government. ... Many committees of the United States Congress are now defunct. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The U.S. House election, 1789 was the first election for the United States House of Representatives in 1789 which coincided with the election of President George Washington. ... The U.S. House election, 1790 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1790 which occurred in the middle of President George Washingtons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1792 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1792 which coincided with the re-election of President George Washington. ... The U.S. House election, 1794 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1794 which occurred in the middle of President George Washingtons second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1796 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1796 which coincided with the election of President John Adams. ... The U.S. House election, 1798 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1798 which occurred in the middle of President John Adams first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1800 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1800 which coincided with the election of President Thomas Jefferson. ... The U.S. House election, 1802 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1802. ... The U.S. House election, 1804 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1804. ... The U.S. House election, 1806 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1806. ... The U.S. House election, 1808 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1808. ... The U.S. House election, 1810 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1810. ... The U.S. House election, 1812 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1812. ... The U.S. House election, 1814 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1814. ... The U.S. House election, 1816 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1816. ... The U.S. House election, 1818 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1818. ... The U.S. House election, 1820 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1820. ... The U.S. House election, 1822 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1822. ... The U.S. House election, 1824 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1824. ... The U.S. House election, 1826 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1826. ... The U.S. House election, 1828 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1828. ... The U.S. House election, 1830 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1830. ... The U.S. House election, 1832 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1832. ... The U.S. House election, 1834 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1834. ... The U.S. House election, 1836 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1836. ... The U.S. House election, 1838 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1838. ... The U.S. House election, 1840 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1840. ... The U.S. House election, 1842 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1842. ... The United States House election, 1844 was an election in 1844 in which all 227 members of the United States House of Representatives were elected and who took their seats in March 1845. ... The U.S. House election, 1846 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1846. ... The U.S. House election, 1848 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1848. ... The U.S. House election, 1850 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1850. ... The U.S. House election, 1852 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1852. ... The U.S. House election, 1854 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1854. ... The U.S. House election, 1856 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1856. ... The U.S. House election, 1858 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1858. ... The U.S. House election, 1860 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1860 which coincided with the election of President Abraham Lincoln. ... The U.S. House election, 1862 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1862 which occurred in the middle of President Abraham Lincolns first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1864 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1864 which coincided with the re-election of President Abraham Lincoln. ... The U.S. House election, 1866 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1866. ... The U.S. House election, 1868 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1868 which coincided with the election of President Ulysses S. Grant. ... The U.S. House election, 1870 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1870 which occurred in the middle of President Ulysses S. Grants first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1872 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1872 which coincided with the re-election of President Ulysses S. Grant. ... The U.S. House election, 1874 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1874, which occurred in the middle of President Ulysses S. Grants second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1876 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1876 which coincided with the (heavily contested) election of President Rutherford B. Hayes. ... The U.S. House election, 1878 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1878 which occurred in the middle of President Rutherford B. Hayes term. ... The U.S. House election, 1880 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1880 which coincided with the election of President James A. Garfield. ... The U.S. House election, 1882 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1882 which occurred during President Chester A. Arthurs term. ... The U.S. House election, 1884 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1884 which coincided with the election of President Grover Cleveland. ... The U.S. House election, 1886 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1886 which occurred in the middle of President Grover Clevelands first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1888 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1888 which coincided with the election of President Benjamin Harrison. ... The U.S. House election, 1890 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1890 which occurred in the middle of President Benjamin Harrisons term. ... The U.S. House election, 1892 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1892 which coincided with the election of Grover Cleveland as President for the second time, defeating incumbent Benjamin Harrison. ... The U.S. House election, 1894 was a realigning election--a major Republican landslide that set the stage for the decisive Election of 1896. ... The U.S. House election, 1896 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1896 which coincided with the election of President William McKinley. ... The U.S. House election, 1898 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1898 which occurred in the middle of President William McKinleys first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1900 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1900 which coincided with the re-election of President William McKinley. ... The 1902 elections for the United States House of Representatives occurred in the middle of President Theodore Roosevelts first term, about a year after the assassination of President William McKinley in September 1901. ... The U.S. House election, 1904 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1904 which coincided with the re-election of President Theodore Roosevelt. ... The U.S. House election, 1906 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1906 which occurred in the middle of President Theodore Roosevelts second term. ... The U.S. House election in 1908 for the U.S. House of Representatives coincided with the 1908 presidential election, which William Howard Taft won. ... The U.S. House election, 1910 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1910 which occurred in the middle of President William Howard Tafts term. ... The U.S. House election, 1912 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1912 which coincided with the election of President Woodrow Wilson. ... The U.S. House election, 1914 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1914 which occurred in the middle of President Woodrow Wilsons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1916 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1916 which coincided with President Woodrow Wilsons re-election. ... The U.S. House election, 1918 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1918 which occurred in the middle of President Woodrow Wilsons second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1920 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1920 which coincided with the election of President Warren G. Harding. ... The U.S. House election, 1922 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1922 which occurred in the middle of President Warren G. Hardings term. ... The U.S. House election, 1924 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1924 which coincided with the election of President Calvin Coolidge, who had replaced Warren Harding following his death. ... The U.S. House election, 1926 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1926 which occurred in the middle of President Calvin Coolidges second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1928 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1928 which coincided with the election of President Herbert Hoover. ... The U.S. House election, 1930 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1930 which occurred in the middle of President Herbert Hoovers term. ... The U.S. House election, 1932 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1932 which coincided with the landslide election of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. ... The U.S. House elections, 1934 were elections for the United States House of Representatives in 1934 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Delano Roosevelts first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1936 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1936 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelts landslide re-election. ... The U.S. House election, 1938 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1938 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Roosevelts second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1940 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1940 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelts re-election to an unprecedented third term. ... The U.S. House election, 1942 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1942 which occurred in the middle of President Franklin Delano Roosevelts third term. ... The U.S. House election, 1944 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1944 which coincided with President Franklin Delano Roosevelts re-election to a fourth term. ... The U.S. House election, 1946 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1946 which occurred in the middle of President Harry Trumans first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1948 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1948 which coincided with President Harry Trumans re-election. ... The U.S. House election, 1950 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1950 which occurred in the middle of President Harry Trumans second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1952 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1952 which coincided with the election of President Dwight Eisenhower. ... The U.S. House election, 1954 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1954 which occurred in the middle of President Dwight Eisenhowers first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1956 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1956 which coincided with the re-election of President Dwight Eisenhower. ... The U.S. House election, 1958 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1958 which occurred in the middle of Dwight Eisenhowers second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1960 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1960 which coincided with the election of President John F. Kennedy. ... The U.S. House election, 1962 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1962 which occurred in the middle of President John F. Kennedys term. ... The U.S. House election, 1964 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1964 which coincided with the re-election of President Lyndon Johnson. ... The U.S. House election, 1966 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1966 which occurred in the middle of President Lyndon Johnsons second term. ... The U.S. House elections, 1968 were elections for the United States House of Representatives in 1968 which coincided with Richard M. Nixons election as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1970 was an election for the United States House of Representatives held on November 3, 1970, in the middle of President Richard M. Nixons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1972 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1972 which coincided with the landslide re-election victory of President Richard M. Nixon. ... The U.S. House election, 1974 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1974 that occurred in the wake of the Watergate scandal, which had forced President Richard M. Nixon to resign in favor of Gerald Ford. ... The U.S. House election, 1976 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1976 which coincided with Jimmy Carters election as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1978 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1978 which occurred in the middle of President Jimmy Carters term. ... The U.S. House election, 1980 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1980 which coincided with the election of Ronald Reagan as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1982 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1982 which occurred in the middle of President Ronald Reagans first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1984 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1984 which coincided with the re-election of President Ronald Reagan in a landslide. ... The U.S. House election, 1986 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1986 which occurred in the middle of President Ronald Reagans second term. ... The U.S. House election, 1988 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1988 which coincided with the election of George H. W. Bush as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1990 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1990 which occurred in the middle of President George H. W. Bushs term. ... The U.S. House election, 1992 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1992 which coincided with the election of Bill Clinton as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1994 was an election for the United States House of Representatives on November 8, 1994, in the middle of President Bill Clintons first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1996 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1996 which coincided with the re-election of Bill Clinton as President. ... The U.S. House election, 1998 was the midterm Congressional election during President Bill Clintons second term. ... The elections for the United States House of Representatives in 2000 coincided with the disputed election of George W. Bush as President. ... Dark Blue Indicates Democrat Hold, Light Blue Indicates Democrat Gain, Dark Red Indicates Republican Hold, Light Red Indicates Republican Gain, Gray Indicates Independent Hold. ... Summary of party change of U.S. house seats in the 2004 House election. ... President Bush meets with Nancy Pelosi and Steny Hoyer (then House Minority Leader and Minority Whip, respectively) at the Oval Office in the White House. ... Elections for the United States House of Representatives will be held on November 4, 2008, with all of the 435 seats in the House being contested. ... This is an incomplete[1] list of special elections to the United States House of Representatives. ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      All United States states are required to possess a legislative branch. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Alabama Legislature met at the Alabama State Capitol between 1851 to 1985. ... The seal of the Alabama Senate. ... The Alaska Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... The Alaska House of Representatives is the lower house in the Alaska Legislature of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... The Alaska Senate in session. ... The Arizona State Legislature is the legislative branch of the state government of Arizona. ... The Arizona House of Representatives is the lower legislative body for the State of Arizona. ... The debating chamber of the Arizona Senate The Arizona Senate is part of the Arizona Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Arizona. ... The Arkansas General Assembly is the legislative branch of the Arkansas government. ... The Arkansas House of Representatives legislative chamber. ... The Arkansas State Senate is the upper branch of the Arkansas General Assembly. ... Californias Capitol, where the State Legislature meets California State Assembly chamber California state Senate chamber The California Legislature is the legislative branch of the state government of California. ... The California State Assembly chamber California State Assembly Chamber in the State Capitol The California State Assembly is the lower house of the California State Legislature. ... California State Senate chamber The California State Senate is the upper house of the California State Legislature. ... The Colorado General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Colorado. ... The Colorado House of Representatives has 65 members elected for two-year terms. ... The Colorado Senate has 35 members each elected to four-year terms. ... The Connecticut General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... The Hall of the Connecticut House of Representatives. ... The Connecticut State Senate is the upper house of the Connecticut General Assembly. ... The Delaware General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Delaware. ... The Delaware House of Representatives is the lower house of the Delaware General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. State of Delaware. ... The Delaware Senate is the upper house of the Delaware General Assembly, the legislature of the U.S. State of Delaware. ... The Florida Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Florida. ... The Florida House of Representatives, one of the two Chambers of the Florida Legislature, is composed of 120 members, each representing a district. ... The Florida Senate is part of the Legislative branch of government for the state of Florida. ... The Georgia House of Representatives is the lower house of the General Assembly (the state legislature) of Georgia. ... Seal of the Georgia Senate The Georgia Senate is the upper house of the Georgia General Assembly (the state legislature of Georgia). ... Hawaii Governor Benjamin J. Cayetano speaks before a special session of the legislature on January 24, 2000. ... The Hawaii House of Representatives is the lower house of the Hawaii State Legislature. ... The Hawaii State Senate is the upper chamber of the Hawaii State Legislature which governs from Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. There are twenty-five members from various electoral districts. ... The Idaho Legislature is the lawmaking body of the State of Idaho. ... The Idaho House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the Idaho State Legislature. ... The Idaho Senate is the upper chamber of the Idaho State Legislature. ... The Illinois General Assembly convenes at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield. ... The Illinois House of Representatives convenes at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield. ... The Illinois Senate convenes at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield. ... Image:Indianapolis Capitol. ... The Indiana General Assembly is the state legislature, or legislative branch, of the state government of Indiana. ... The Indiana Senate comprises, along with the Indiana House of Representatives, the Indiana General Assembly. ... 2002 Senate District Map 2002 House District Map The Iowa General Assembly (IGA) is the legislative branch for the state of Iowa. ... 2002 House District Map The Iowa House of Representatives is the lower house of the Iowa General Assembly. ... The current senate that was ellected in 2006 consists of these people: Senate (50) Name District Party Home County Senator Jeff Angelo Senate District 48 Republican Union Senator Daryl Beall Senate District 25 Democrat Webster Senator Jerry Behn Senate District 24 Republican Boone Senator Dennis H. Black Senate District 21... The Kansas Legislature meet at the State Capitol in Topeka. ... The Kansas House of Representatives chamber in the State Capitol. ... The Kansas Senate in legislative session in January 2006. ... The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Kentucky House of Representatives is the lower house of the Kentucky General Assembly, the state legislature of Kentucky. ... The Kentucky Senate is the upper house of the Kentucky General Assembly. ... The Louisiana State Legislature is the legislative branch of the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... The Louisiana House of Representatives is the lower house in the Louisiana State Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... The Louisiana Senate is the upper house of the state legislature of Louisiana. ... The Maine Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maine. ... The debating chamber of the Maine House of Representatives inside the State House The Maine House of Representatives is the lower house of the Maine Legislature. ... The debating chamber of the Maine Senate in the State House in Augusta The Maine Senate is the upper house of the Maine Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maine. ... The Maryland State House in downtown Annapolis. ... The Maryland House of Delegates is the lower house of the General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maryland. ... The Maryland State Senate is the upper house of the General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maryland. ... The Massachusetts General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts House of Representatives is the lower house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts Senate is the upper house of the Massachusetts General Court, the bicameral state legislature of Massachusetts. ... The Michigan Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House Andy Dillon, Democratic since November 7, 2006 Minority Leader Craig DeRoche, Republican since November 7, 2006 Members 110 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Meeting place Michigan State Capitol, Lansing, Michigan Web site Michigan House of Representatives Cora B. Anderson House of Representatives... Billie S. Farnum Senate Office Building, Downtown Lansing The Michigan Senate is the upper body of the Michigan Legislature. ... The Minnesota State Legislature is the legislative branch of government in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... The Minnesota House of Representatives is the lower house in the Minnesota State Legislature. ... The Minnesota Senate is the upper house in the Minnesota Legislature. ... The Mississippi Legislature is comprised of the Mississippi House of Representatives and the Mississippi Senate. ... The Mississippi House of Representatives is the lower house of the state legislature of Mississippi. ... The Mississippi Senate, in American politics, is the upper house of the state legislature of Mississippi. ... The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. ... The Missouri State House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the Missouri General Assembly It has 163 members, representing districts with an average size of 31,000 residents. ... The Missouri State Senate is the upper chamber of the Missouri General Assembly. ... The Montana State Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Montana. ... The Montana House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Montana Legislature. ... The Montana Senate is, with the Montana House of Representatives, part of the Montana State Legislature. ... The Nebraska Legislature is the U.S. state of Nebraskas legislative branch. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of Nevada The Nevada Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Nevada. ... The Nevada Assembly is the lower house of the Nevada Legislature. ... The Nevada Senate is one of the two houses of the Nevada Legislature. ... The New Hampshire General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... The New Hampshire General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... The General Court meets in the New Hampshire State House The New Hampshire General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ... The New Jersey General Assembly is the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature. ... The New Jersey Senate is the upper house of the New Jersey Legislature. ... The New Mexico Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of New Mexico. ... The New Mexico House of Representatives is the lower house of the New Mexico State Legislature. ... The New Mexico State Senate is the upper house of the New Mexico State Legislature. ... The New York Legislature is the legislative branch of the U.S. state of New York, seated at the states capital, Albany. ... The chamber of the New York State Assembly. ... The New York State Senate is one of two houses in the New York State Legislature and has members each elected to two-year terms. ... The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The North Dakota Legislative Assembly is the legislative branch of the government of North Dakota. ... The North Dakota House of Representatives is the lower house of the North Dakota Legislative Assembly, larger than the North Dakota Senate. ... The North Dakota Senate is the upper house of the North Dakota Legislative Assembly, smaller than the North Dakota House of Representatives. ... The Ohio General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Ohio has a bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly, consisting a House of Representatives and Senate (the Ohio State Senate), based on its constitution of 1851. ... The Ohio Senate is the upper house in Ohios bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly; the lower house is the Ohio House of Representatives. ... The State Capitol of Oklahoma The Legislature of the State of Oklahoma is the biennial meeting of the legislative branch of the Government of Oklahoma. ... The Oklahoma House of Representatives meets in the State Capitol of Oklahoma The Oklahoma House of Representatives is the larger body of the two houses of the Oklahoma Legislature, the other being the Oklahoma Senate. ... The Oklahoma Senate meets in the State Capitol of Oklahoma The Oklahoma Senate is the smaller body of the two houses of the Legislature of Oklahoma, the other being the Oklahoma House of Representatives. ... The Oregon Legislative Assembly is the legislature for the U.S. state of Oregon. ... The Oregon House of Representatives chamber in the State Capitol The Oregon House of Representatives is the lower house of the Oregon Legislative Assembly. ... The Oregon State Senate chamber in the State Capitol. ... Capitol Building The Pennsylvania General Assembly is the U.S. state of Pennsylvanias legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Harrisburg. ... The Pennsylvania House of Representatives is the lower house of the bicameral Pennsylvania General Assembly, the legislature of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... The Pennsylvania State Senate is the upper house of the Pennsylvania General Assembly, the legislative branch of Pennsylvania government. ... The Rhode Island General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Rhode Island. ... The Rhode Island House of Representatives is the lower body of the Rhode Island General Assembly, and consists of 75 members. ... The Rhode Island Senate chamber in the State Capitol The Rhode Island Senate is the upper house of the Rhode Island General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. State of Rhode Island. ... The South Carolina General Assembly, also called the South Carolina Legislature, is the legislative branch of South Carolina and consists of the South Carolina House of Representatives and the South Carolina Senate. ... The South Carolina House of Representatives is the lower house of the South Carolina General Assembly. ... The South Carolina Senate is the upper house of the South Carolina General Assembly. ... The South Dakota State Legislature meets at the state capitol in Pierre. ... The South Dakota State Legislature meets at the state capitol in Pierre. ... The South Dakota State Legislature meets at the state capitol in Pierre. ... The Tennessee General Assembly is the formal name of the legislature of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ... The Tennessee Senate is the upper house of the Tennessee General Assembly, the formal name of the Tennessee state legislature. ... Texas Senate in session The Texas Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Texas. ... The Texas Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Texas. ... The Texas Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Texas. ... The Utah State Capitol, home of the Utah State Legislature. ... Utah State House Seal. ... The Utah State Senate is the upper house of the Utah State Legislature. ... The Legislature of Vermont is the U.S. state of Vermonts legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Montpelier. ... Representatives Hall, where the Vermont House of Representatives convenes in the Vermont State House. ... The Vermont Senate is the upper house of the Vermont General Assembly, which is the states legislature. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... The Virginia House of Delegates is the lower house of the Virginia General Assembly. ... The Senate of Virginia is the upper house of the Virginia General Assembly. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate Brad Owen, D since January 13, 1997 Speaker of the House of Representatives Frank Chopp, D since January 14, 2001 Members 147 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Washington State Capitol, Olympia... The floor of the Washington House of Representatives in the Legislative Building. ... The Washington State Senate passing the 2005 budget. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The West Virginia House of Delegates is the lower house of the West Virginia Legislature. ... The West Virginia Senate is the upper house of the West Virginia Legislature. ... The Wisconsin Legislature, based in Madison, is bicameral and is composed of the Wisconsin State Assembly and the Wisconsin Senate. ... The Wisconsin State Assembly is the lower house of the Wisconsin Legislature. ... The Wisconsin State Senate, based off of the U.S. Senate, is the upper house of the Wisconsin State Legislature, smaller than the Wisconsin State Assembly. ... The Wyoming State Capitol in Cheyenne where the legislature meets. ... The Wyoming House of Representatives is the lower house of the Wyoming State Legislature. ... The Wyoming Senate is the upper house of the Wyoming State Legislature. ... Political divisions of the United States as they were from 1868 to 1876, including 9 organized territories and 2 unorganized territories Territories of the United States are one type of political division of the United States, administered by the U.S. government but not any part of a U.S... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... The Legislature or Fono of American has two chambers. ... The Legislature or Fono of American Samoa has two chambers. ... The Council of the District of Columbia is the legislative branch of the local government of Washington, D.C.. As such, it is analogous to the city councils of other cities in the United States, but in some manners it is also analogous to state legislatures. ... The Northern Mariana Islands House of Representatives is the lower house of the Northern Mariana Islands Commonwealth Legislature. ... The Northern Mariana Islands Senate is the upper house of the Northern Mariana Islands Commonwealth Legislature. ... The House of Representatives of Puerto Rico is the lower house of the Legislative Assembly of Puerto Rico, larger than the Senate. ... Seal of the Senate of Puerto Rico. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Local government in the United States (sometimes referred to as municipal government) is generally structured...


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