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Encyclopedia > United States Department of State
United States
Department of State
Seal of the United States Department of State
Seal of the United States Department of State
Agency overview
Formed July 27, 1789
Headquarters Harry S Truman Building
Employees 30,266 (2004)
Annual Budget $35.1 billion (2007)
Agency Executives Condoleezza Rice, Secretary
 
John Negroponte, Deputy Secretary
Website
www.state.gov

The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. It is administered by the Secretary of State. The Irish Government contains a number of departments or ministries, known in the Republic of Ireland as a Department of State (Roinn Stáit in Irish). ... Image File history File links Department_of_state. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section needs to be wikified. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... John Dimitri Negroponte (born July 21, 1939 in the United Kingdom) (IPA ) is an American (of Greek origin) career diplomat. ... The Deputy Secretary of State of the United States is the chief assistant to the Secretary of State who is responsible for foreign affairs. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... This article is about a journal. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ...


It is headquartered in the Harry S Truman Building at 2201 C Street, N.W., a few blocks from the White House in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The Department's Secretary is the first Cabinet member in the line of succession in the event of the disability or death of the President, and is fourth after the Vice President, the Speaker of the House, and the President pro tempore of the United States Senate. This article or section needs to be wikified. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Map of Washington, D.C., with Foggy Bottom highlighted in red Map showing Hamburgh, Maryland Foggy Bottom is one of Washington, D.C.s oldest 19th century neighborhoods, thought to have been named because, as a low-lying area, fog (widespread in the swamps of early Washington) tended to concentrate... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The presidential line of succession defines who may become or act as President of the United States upon the incapacity, death, resignation, or removal from office (by impeachment and subsequent conviction) of a sitting president or a president-elect. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ...

Contents

History

The U.S. Constitution, drafted in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1787 and ratified by the states the following year, gave the President the responsibility for the conduct of the nation's foreign relations. It soon became clear, however, that an executive department was necessary to support the President in the conduct of the affairs of the new federal government. Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...


The House of Representatives and Senate approved legislation to establish a Department of Foreign Affairs on July 21, 1789, and President Washington signed it into law on July 27, making the Department of Foreign Affairs the first Federal agency to be created under the new Constitution. Furthermore, this legislation remains the basic law of the Department of State. In September 1789, additional legislation changed the name of the agency to the Department of State and assigned to it a variety of domestic duties. Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


These responsibilities grew to include management of the United States Mint, keeper of the Great Seal of the United States, and the taking of the census. President George Washington signed the new legislation on September 15. Most of these domestic duties of the Department of State were eventually turned over to various new Federal departments and agencies that were established during the 19th century. Seal of the U.S. Mint The United States Mint primarily produces circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. ... Obverse The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States government. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On September 29, 1789, President Washington appointed Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, then Minister to France, to be the first United States Secretary of State, although John Jay, had been serving in that capacity as a holdover from the Confederation since before Washington had taken office and would continue in that capacity until Jefferson would return from Europe many months later. is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat, and jurist. ...


Duties and responsibilities

The Executive Branch and the U.S. Congress have constitutional responsibilities for U.S. foreign policy. Within the Executive Branch, the Department of State is the lead U.S. foreign affairs agency, and its head, the Secretary of State, is the President's principal foreign policy advisor, though other officials or individuals may have more influence on his foreign policy decisions. The Department advances U.S. objectives and interests in the world through its primary role in developing and implementing the President's foreign policy. The Department also supports the foreign affairs activities of other U.S. Government entities including the United States Department of Commerce and the U.S. Agency for International Development. It also provides an array of important services to U.S. citizens and to foreigners seeking to visit or immigrate to the U.S. Congress in Joint Session. ... The United States has a rich and complicated diplomatic history. ... The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ... The United States Agency for International Development (or USAID) is the US government organization responsible for most non-military foreign aid. ...


All foreign affairs activities—U.S. representation abroad, foreign assistance programs, countering international crime, foreign military training programs, the services the Department provides, and more—are paid for by the foreign affairs budget, which represents little more than 1% of the total federal budget, or about 12 cents a day for each American citizen. As stated by the Department of State, its purpose includes:

  • Protecting and assisting U.S. citizens living or traveling abroad;
  • Assisting U.S. businesses in the international marketplace;
  • Coordinating and providing support for international activities of other U.S. agencies (local, state, or federal government), official visits overseas and at home, and other diplomatic efforts.
  • Keeping the public informed about U.S. foreign policy and relations with other countries and providing feedback from the public to administration officials.
  • Providing automobile registration for non-diplomatic staff vehicles and the vehicles of diplomats of foreign countries having diplomatic immunity in the United States.

The Department of State conducts these activities with a civilian workforce. This workforce, which is sometimes referred to as the diplomatic service, consists of Foreign Service personnel (including officers, and specialists) and domestic civil service employees. Although the vast majority of State Department employees serving overseas are part of the Foreign Service system, many civil service employees have been given temporary overseas assignments in certain hard to fill missions such as Iraq where no Foreign Service Officer is available to serve. These civil service employees assigned temporarily overseas officially serve under Limited Non-Career Appointments to the Foreign Service (or "LNA" assignments), however, such assignments are often referred to as excursionists within internal department communications and the FAM. This workforce represents America abroad; analyze and report on political, economic, and social trends in the host country; adjudicate visas; and respond to the needs of American citizens abroad. The U.S. maintains diplomatic relations with about 180 countries and also maintains relations with many international organizations, adding up to a total of more than 250 posts around the world. In the United States, about 5,000 professional, technical, and administrative domestic employees work alongside members of the Diplomatic Service compiling and analyzing reports from overseas, providing logistical support to posts, communicating with the American public, formulating and overseeing the budget, issuing passports and travel warnings, and more. In carrying out these responsibilities, the Department of State works in close coordination with other federal agencies, such as the Department of Defense. As required by the principle of checks and balances, the Department also consults with Congress about foreign policy initiatives and policies. In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... Diplomatic License Plates are issued by the United States Department of State to approved diplomats. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A diplomatic service is the body of diplomats and foreign policy officers maintained by the government of a country to communicate with the governments of other countries. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... The doctrine and practice of dispersing political power and creating mutual accountability between political entities such as the courts, the president or prime minister, the legislature, and the citizens. ...


Organization

This chart from the U.S. Department of State website displays the hierarchy of the agency. Click the image to enlarge.
This chart from the U.S. Department of State website displays the hierarchy of the agency. Click the image to enlarge.

United States Secretary of State: Chief Executive Officer of the Department and answerable directly to the President of the United States. He or she organizes and supervises the entire department and its staff: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1375x872, 179 KB) Summary Taken from the U.S. Department of State website, which states everything on that website is public domain unless stated otherwise. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1375x872, 179 KB) Summary Taken from the U.S. Department of State website, which states everything on that website is public domain unless stated otherwise. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... “Chief executive” redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...

  • Under Secretary for Economic, Energy, and Agricultural Affairs: The senior economic advisor for the Secretary and Deputy Secretary on international economic policy. He or she is responsible for bureaus, headed by Assistant Secretaries, dealing with trade, agriculture, aviation, and bilateral trade relations with America's economic partners:
    • Bureau of Economic, Energy, and Business Affairs
  • Counselor: Ranking with the Under Secretaries, the Counselor is the Secretary's and Deputy Secretary's special advisor and consultant on major problems of foreign policy. He or she provides guidance to the appropriate bureaus with respect to such matters, conducts special international negotiations and consultations, and undertakes special assignments from time to time as directed by the Secretary.

Since the 1996 reorganization, the Administrator of the U.S. Administration for International Development (AID), while leading an independent agency, has also reported to the Secretary of State, as does the Permanent Representative to the United Nations, or U.N. Ambassador. The Deputy Secretary of State of the United States is the chief assistant to the Secretary of State who is responsible for foreign affairs. ... The Department of States Executive Secretariat (or S/ES), is comprised of the Executive Secretary of the Department and three Deputy Executive Secretaries. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Patterns of Global Terrorism is a report published each year on or before April 30 by the United States Department of State. ... The George P. Shultz National Foreign Affairs Training Center (NAFTC) is the U.S. governments primaring training institution for officers and support personnel of the foreign affairs community. ... The US Department of States Bureau of International Information Programs (also called IIP) describes itself as follows: Among other things, IIP operates the USINFO website to deliver information about current U.S. foreign policy and about American life and culture. ... This office was created by Executive Order in 1931. ... The Chief of Protocol is an officer of the United States Department of State responsible for advising the President of the United States, the Vice President, and the Secretary of State on official matters of national and international diplomatic protocol. ... The Bureau of Intelligence and Research (or INR) is a small bureau in the U.S. State Department tasked with analyzing information for the State Department. ... The Bureau of Legislative Affairs is seen as the United States Office that handles the coordination, perservation, and correspondance of passed legislation that affects foreign policy and recations to such laws that are passed and such policies implemented at either the legislative or executive level of the U.S. Government. ... The Bureau of Resource Management assists foreign affairs agency heads with developing policies, plans, and programs to achieve foreign policy goals. ... Ambassador R. Nicholas Burns The Under Secretary for Political Affairs is the third ranking position in the United States Department of State, after the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary. ... The State Department did not create a Bureau of African Affairs until 1958. ... Assistant Secretary Christopher R. Hill In the United States Government, the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs is part of the U.S. Department of State and is charged with advising the Secretary of State and Under Secretary for Political Affairs on matters of the Asia-Pacific region, as... Assistant Secretary Daniel Fried In the United States Government, the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs is part of the U.S. Department of State, charged with implementing U.S. foreign policy and promoting U.S. interests in Europe and Eurasia, as well as advising the Under Secretary for Political... Assistant Secretary Anne W. Patterson The Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs is a part of the Department of State within the United States government that advises the President, Secretary of State, other bureaus in the Department of State, and other departments and agencies within the U.S... The Bureau of International Organization Affairs (IO) is a bureau in the United States Department of State that creates and executes U.S. policy in the United Nations and other international organizations. ... Assistant Secretary C. David Welch The Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs is an agency of the Department of State within the United States government that deals with U.S. foreign policy and diplomatic relations with the countries and geographic entities of Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon... Assistant Secretary Christina B. Rocca, left. ... Assistant Secretary Thomas A. Shannon, Jr. ... Under Secretary Henrietta Fore Under Secretary for Management is also a position within the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The mission of the Bureau of Consular Affairs (CA) is to administer laws, formulate regulations and implement policies relating to the broad range of consular services and immigration. ... The Bureau of Diplomatic Security, more commonly known as Diplomatic Security, or DS, includes the Diplomatic Security Service (DSS), DSs most high profile branch. ... See also the Bureau of Diplomatic Security // The Diplomatic Security Service is the law enforcement arm of the U.S. State Department. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations is the branch of the United States Department of State charged with constructing, purchasing, and maintaining buildings and real estate in other countries. ... Karen Hughes The Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs is a position within the U.S. Department of State that is intended to help ensure that public diplomacy is practiced in combination with public affairs and traditional diplomacy to advance U.S. interests and security. ... The United States Information Agency (USIA), which existed from 1953 to 1999, was a United States agency devoted to what it called public diplomacy. ... The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) of the United States Department of State fosters mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries around the world. ... The Internet Access and Training Program (IATP) is a program of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), US Department of State, funded under the Freedom Support Act (FSA). ... The Bureau of Public Affairs is the part of the United States Department of State that carries out the Secretary of States mandate to help Americans understand the importance of foreign affairs. ... The Office of the Historian, United States Department of State, is within the Bureau of Public Affairs. ... The US Department of States Bureau of International Information Programs (also called IIP) describes itself as follows: Among other things, IIP operates the USINFO website to deliver information about current U.S. foreign policy and about American life and culture. ... Robert G. Joseph The Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security is a position within the U.S. Department of State that serves as Senior Adviser to the President and the Secretary of State for Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Disarmament. ... Scud Missile The U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) was established as an independent agency by the Arms Control and Disarmament Act (75 Stat. ... Acting Assistant Secretary Stephen Rademaker The Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation is an agency within the United States Department of State responsible for managing a broad range of nonproliferation, counterproliferation, and arms control functions. ... Assistant Secretary John Hillen The Bureau of Political-Affairs is an agency within the United States Department of State that bridges the Department of State with the Department of Defense. ... Assistant Secretary Paula DeSutter The Bureau of Verification, Compliance, and Implementation is an agency within the United States Department of State. ... Paula J. Dobriansky The Under Secretary for Democracy and Global Affairs is a position within the American Department of State that, according to the Department website, coordinates U.S. foreign relations on a variety of global issues, including democracy, human rights, and labor; environment, oceans, and science; population, refugees, and... The Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor Affairs (DRL) at the United States Department of State is one of four bureaus that comprise the Office of the Under Secretary for Global Affairs. ... The Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs (OES) is a burean within the United States Department of State. ... The Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) is a bureau within the United States Department of State. ... Counselor Eliot A. Cohen The Counselor of the United States Department of State is a position within the United States Department of State that serves the Secretary of State as a special advisor and consultant on major problems of foreign policy and who provides guidance to the appropriate bureaus with... The Global AIDS Coordinator at the U.S. State Department is the official responsible for overseeing U.S.-sponsored humanitarian aid programs to combat the AIDS epidemic in Africa and Asia. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Look up Aid in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... United States Ambassador to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the...


See also

American Embassy in Athens American Embassy in Brussels American Embassy in Budapest American Embassy in Dublin American Consulate General in Kraków American Embassy in London American Embassy in Moscow American Embassy in Oslo American Embassy in Stockholm American Embassy in Vienna American Embassy in Ottawa American Embassy in Bridgetown... The United States Foreign Service represents the United States to the world. ...

External links


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