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Encyclopedia > United States Department of Justice
Department of Justice
Department of Justice
Agency overview
Formed June 22, 1870
July 1, 1870
Jurisdiction Federal government of the United States
Headquarters Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building
Washington, D.C.
Employees 112,500+ (2005)
Annual Budget $43.5 billion (2007)
Agency Executives Michael Mukasey, Attorney General
 
Craig S. Morford (Acting), Deputy Attorney General
Website
www.usdoj.gov
For animal rights group, see Justice Department (JD)

The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans (see 28 U.S.C. § 501). The DOJ is administered by the United States Attorney General (see 28 U.S.C. § 503), one of the original members of the cabinet. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the federal government of the United States. ... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Michael B. Mukasey (born 1941) is a Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Craig S. Morford is currently the Acting United States Deputy Attorney General. ... United States Deputy Attorney General is a high ranking official in the United States Department of Justice. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1433x954, 352 KB) Summary The John F. Kennedy Building in Washington, D.C., which is home to the headquarters of the United States Department of Justice. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1433x954, 352 KB) Summary The John F. Kennedy Building in Washington, D.C., which is home to the headquarters of the United States Department of Justice. ... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The Justice Department is a militant animal-rights organization, set up in Britain in 1993, and active there and in the United States. ... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Title 28 is the portion of the United States Code (federal statutory law) that governs the Federal Judicial System. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Title 28 is the portion of the United States Code (federal statutory law) that governs the Federal Judicial System. ...

Contents

Duties

  1. Responsible for investigating and prosecuting violations of federal laws.
  2. Represents the United States in all legal matters, including cases before the Supreme Court.
  3. Enforces all immigration laws, provides information, and processes applications for citizenship
  4. Maintains the federal prison system, halfway houses, and community programs.

History

The Attorney General was initially a one-person, part-time job, established by the Judiciary Act of 1789, but this grew with the bureaucracy. At one time the Attorney General gave legal advice to the U.S. Congress as well as the President, but this had stopped by 1819 on account of the workload involved. The first page of the Judiciary Act of 1789 The United States Judiciary Act of 1789 (1 Stat. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article is about the sociological concept. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Year 1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) in the [[Grhttp://en. ...


In 1867, the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, led by Congressman William Lawrence, conducted an inquiry into the creation of a "law department" headed by the Attorney General and composed of the various department solicitors and United States Attorneys. On February 19, 1868, Lawrence introduced a bill in Congress to create the Department of Justice. This first bill was unsuccessful, however, as Lawrence could not devote enough time to ensure its passage owing to his occupation with the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... William Lawrence (June 26, 1819-May 8, 1899) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ...


A second bill was introduced to Congress by Rhode Island Representative Thomas Jenckes on February 25, 1870, and both the Senate and House passed the bill. President Ulysses S. Grant then signed the bill into law on June 22, 1870. The Department of Justice officially began operations on July 1, 1870. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Thomas Allen Jenckes (November 2, 1818 - November 4, 1875) was a United States Congressional representative for the State of Rhode Island. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The bill, called the "Act to Establish the Department of Justice", did little to change the Attorney General's responsibilities, and his salary and tenure remained the same. The law did create a new office, that of Solicitor General, to supervise and conduct government litigation in the Supreme Court of the United States. The United States Solicitor General is the individual appointed to argue for the Government of the United States in front of the Supreme Court of the United States, when the government is party to a case. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ...


With the passage of the Interstate Commerce Act in 1870, the Federal government in the U.S. began to take on some law enforcement responsibilities, with the Department of Justice tasked to carry out these duties.[1] The American Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 created the Interstate Commerce Commissirs of the commission were appointed by the President with the consent of the Senate. ... This article is about the federal government of the United States. ...


In 1872, control of federal prisons was transferred to the new department, from the Department of Interior. New facilities were built, including the penitentiary at Leavenworth in 1895, and a facility for women located in West Virginia, at Alderson was established in 1924.[2] The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ... The United States Penitentiary (USP), Leavenworth is located in Leavenworth, Kansas on 1,583 acres (6. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Alderson Federal Prison Camp, also known as Federal Prison Camp, Alderson or FPC Alderson, is a federal prison in the United States for minimum-security female inmates. ...


Headquarters

The building was completed in 1935 from a design by Milton Bennett Medary. Upon Medary's death in 1929, the other partners of his Philadelphia firm Zantzinger Borie and Medary took over the project. On a lot bordered by Constitution and Pennsylvania Avenues and Ninth and Tenth Streets, Northwest, it holds over one million square feet of space. The sculptor C. Paul Jennewein served as overall design consultant for the entire building, contributing more than 50 separate sculptural elements inside and outside. Milton Bennett Medary, Jr. ... Zantzinger, Borie and Medary was an American architectural firm active from 1910 through 1929, specializing in institutional and civic projects. ... Pediment, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Carl Paul Jennewein (December 2, 1890 - February 23, 1978) American sculptor, was born in Stuttgart, Germany and arrived in the United States in 1907. ...


Various efforts, none entirely successful, have been made to determine the meaning of the Latin motto appearing on the Department of Justice seal, Qui Pro Domina Justitia Sequitur. It is not even known exactly when the original version of the DOJ seal itself was adopted, or when the motto first appeared on the seal. The most authoritative opinion of the DOJ suggests that the motto refers to the Attorney General (and thus to the Department of Justice) "who prosecutes on behalf of justice (or the Lady Justice)". For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ...


The building was renamed in honor of former Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy in 2001. It is sometimes referred to as "Main Justice."[3] Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ...


Organization

Leadership offices

Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... United States Deputy Attorney General is a high ranking official in the United States Department of Justice. ... Robert McCallum, Jr. ... The United States Solicitor General is the individual appointed to argue for the Government of the United States in front of the Supreme Court of the United States, when the government is party to a case. ...

Divisions

The United States Department of Justice Antitrust Division is responsible for enforcing the antitrust laws of the United States. ... The U.S. Department of Justice Civil Division represents the United States, its departments and agencies, members of Congress, Cabinet officers and other Federal employees in civil litigation. ... The U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division is the institution within the federal government responsible for enforcing federal statutes prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, sex, disability, religion, and national origin. ... The U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division develops, enforces, and supervises the application of all federal criminal laws in the United States, except those specifically assigned to other divisions. ... United States Department of Justice, Environment and Natural Resources Division The Environment and Natural Resources Division (ENRD) is a litigating component of the United States Department of Justice. ... The Justice Management Division (JMD) of the US Department of Justice is the administrative arm of the department, whose mission is to support the Senior Management Offices (SMOs), Offices, Bureaus and Divisions (called Components, of which there are somewhere around 40) which make up DOJ. Common functions such as Finance... The U.S. Department of Justices National Security Division (NSD) is a new division within the Department designed to consolidate the Departments national security efforts within one unit, fulfilling a recommendation of the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction. ... The United States Department of Justice Tax Division is responsible for the prosecution of both civil and criminal cases arising under the Internal Revenue Code and other tax laws of the United States. ...

Law Enforcement Agencies

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (BATF) is a law enforcement agency within the United States Department of Justice. ... The DEAs enforcement activities may take agents anywhere from distant countries to suburban U.S. homes. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... The Federal Bureau of Prisons is a subdivision of the United States Department of Justice, and is responsible for the administration of the federal prison system. ... The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is an agency of the United States government. ... “U.S. Marshals” redirects here. ...

Offices

The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) is an office of the United States Department of Justice and is responsible for adjudicating immigration cases in the United States. ... The Executive Office for United States Attorneys (EOUSA) provides the 93 United States Attorneys (94 United States Attorneys offices) with: general executive assistance and direction, policy development, administrative management direction and oversight, operational support, coordination with other components of the United States Department of Justice and other federal agencies. ... The United States Trustee Program is an agency of the United States Department of Justice that is responsible for overseeing the administration of bankruptcy cases and private trustees. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Office of Intelligence Policy and Review is a staff agency within the United States Department of Justice. ... The Office of Justice Programs (OJP) is the branch of the United States Department of Justice that focuses on crime prevention through research & technology development, assistance to state and local law enforcement and criminal justice agencies through grants, and assistance to crime victims. ... The Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) is a component of the Office of Justice Programs, part of the U.S. Department of Justice. ... The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) is a department of the US Department of Justice which is responsible for maintaining criminal justice data and statistics. ... The Community Capacity Development Office (CCDO) is an office of the United States Department of Justice and a component of the Office of Justice Programs. ... The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is the research, development and evaluation agency of the United States Department of Justice. ... The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (or OJJDP) is an office of the United States Department of Justice and a component of the Office of Justice Programs. ... The Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) is a part of the Office of Justice Programs, part of the U.S. Department of Justice. ... The Office of Legal Counsel is an American government legal office. ... The Office Of Legal Policy is a division within the United States Department of Justice which describes itself as the focal point for the development and coordination of Departmental policy. In addition to rendering legal advice to the Attorney General and subordinate offices within the Justice Department, it serves as... The Office of the Pardon Attorney is an office within the United States Department of Justice that recommends to the President of the United States who should receive a presidential pardon. ... The Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) is part of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ... The United States Trustee is the appointee charged with enforcing civil bankruptcy laws in the U.S.A. The U.S. Trustee also makes reference in criminal cases to the United States Attorney. ... The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) is an agency within the United States Department of Justice. ...

Other offices and programs

In March 2003, the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service was abolished and its functions transferred to the United States Department of Homeland Security. The Executive Office for Immigration Review and the Board of Immigration Appeals which review decisions made by government officials under Immigration and Nationality law remain under jurisdiction of the Department of Justice. Similarly the Office of Domestic Preparedness left the Justice Department for the Department of Homeland Security, but only for executive purposes. The Office of Domestic Preparedness is still centralized within the Department of Justice, since its personnel are still officially employed within the Department of Justice. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The United States Parole Commission is responsible to grant or deny parole and to supervise those released on parole to incarcerated individuals who come under its jurisdiction. ... The United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) was a part of the United States Department of Justice which used to handle legal and illegal immigration and naturalization. ... DHS redirects here. ... The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) is an office of the United States Department of Justice and is responsible for adjudicating immigration cases in the United States. ... The Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) is the part of the Executive Office for Immigration Review that reviews decisions of the Immigration Courts and some decisions of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. ...


Also in 2003, the Department of Justice created the website LifeAndLiberty.gov which supported the PATRIOT ACT.[4] LifeAndLiberty.gov currently promotes reenacting the PROTECT AMERICA ACT before it expires. This web site has received criticism from government watchdog groups.[5]


Corruption, Dissent, and Criticism

Current and former U.S. attorneys are known to have engaged in a wide variety of criminal conduct including association with prostitution rings[6], sexual battery[7] , sexual abuse of children[8], failures to make mandatory conflict of interest disclosures[9]. A separate Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) within the DOJ is responsible for investigating attorney employees of the DOJ who have been accused of misconduct or criminal activity with respect to their professional functions as DOJ attorneys. An additional danger is that U.S. Attorneys may be affected by the temptations of corruption with respect to their abuse of prosecutorial discretion to favor past or prospective law firm partners. Huge financial windfalls often await DOJ attorneys upon their move into a private practise partnership, referred to as the revolving door of government regulation. This inherent conflict of interest exists with all U.S. Attorneys as their Federal Jobs are not lifetime appointments and often involved shifs into private practise partnerships among the same law firms which they were charged with regulating as public law enforcement prosecutors. While connections between the intent of organized crime in their employment of DOJ alumni can be difficult to prove and rarely prosecution, the issue of a significant undetected and unprosecuted component of U.S. government officials was directly candidly admitted by the DOJ through public statements of their own senior law enforcement official, the former U.S. Attorney General John D. Ashcroft: A conflict of interest is a situation in which someone in a position of trust, such as a lawyer, a politician, or an executive or director of a corporation, has competing professional or personal interests. ... The Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) is part of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... For the revolving door syndrome, see Recidivism. ... A conflict of interest is a situation in which someone in a position of trust, such as a lawyer, a politician, or an executive or director of a corporation, has competing professional or personal interests. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ...

"In the real world of limited resources, we know that we can only detect, investigate and prosecute a small percentage of those officials who are corrupt."[10]

"I remain convinced that there is no more important area in the fight against corruption than the challenge for us within the law enforcement and justice sectors to keep our own houses clean." [11]

See also

Many of the divisions and offices of the United States Department of Justice are headed by an Assistant Attorney General. ...

References

  1. ^ Langeluttig, Albert (1927). The Department of Justice of the United States. Johns Hopkins Press, pp. 9-14. 
  2. ^ Langeluttig, Albert (1927). The Department of Justice of the United States. Johns Hopkins Press, pp. 14-15. 
  3. ^ Partisan Civil Rights: Bush's Long History of Politicizing Justice - International - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News
  4. ^ Law and Politics Worldwide, August 20 2003
  5. ^ .gov Watch, October 18, 2007
  6. ^ No Puritans in this Mayflower. Retrieved on April 18, 2008.
  7. ^ CNN finds a real expert on sex scandals: Kendall Coffey. Retrieved on April 18, 2008.
  8. ^ Federal Prosecutor Arrested In Child Sex Sting. Retrieved on April 18, 2008.
  9. ^ http://laserhaas.wordpress.com/2008/03/05/doj-efforts-to-cover-up-mnat-perjury-and-fraud-now-receives-national-attention/. Retrieved on April 18, 2008.
  10. ^ The Second Global Forum on Fighting Corruption -- U.S. Attorney General John D. Ashcroft remarks at the U.S. Department of State website. Retrieved on April 18, 2008.
  11. ^ U.S. Attorney General John D. Ashcroft addressing The Hague. Retrieved on April 18, 2008.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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This article is about the national personification of the USA. For other uses, see Uncle Sam (disambiguation). ... Flag of Puerto Rico The political movement for Puerto Rican Independence (Lucha por la Independencia Puertorriqueña) has existed since the mid-19th century and has advocated independence of the island of Puerto Rico, in varying degrees, from Spain (in the 19th century) or the United States (from 1898 to... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... United States territory is any extent of region under the jurisdiction of the federal government of the United States,[1] including all waters[2] (around islands or continental tracts). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This is a list of the cities, towns, and villages of the United States. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... This list of regions of the United States includes official (governmental) and non-official areas within the borders of the United States, not including U.S. states, the federal district of Washington, D.C. or standard subentities such as cities or counties. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... Historic Southern United States. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The list of mountains of the United States shows the location of mountains in a given state. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Rivers in the United States is a list of rivers in the United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River from Laughlin Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page, Arizona The Colorado River is... This is a list of the extreme points of the United States, the points that are farther north, south, east, or west than any other location in the country. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ... Water supply and sanitation in the United States is provided by towns and cities, public utilities that span several jurisdictions and rural cooperatives. ... USD redirects here. ... This is a list of companies from the United States: #Current companies #Former companies, including acquired and merged ones #By industry #By location #See also Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... The Fed redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The standard of living in the United States is one of the highest in the world by almost any measure. ... For information on household income, see Household income in the United States. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This graph shows the household income of the given percentiles from 1967 to 2003, in 2003 dollars. ... Single family homes such as this are indicative of the American middle class. ... The primary regulator of communications in the United States is the Federal Communications Commission. ... This article adopts the US Department of Transportation definition of passenger vehicle The United States is home to the largest passenger vehicle market of any country,[1] which is a consequence of the fact that it has the largest Gross Domestic Product of any country in the world. ... Current U.S. Route shield Current U.S. Route shield in California The system of United States Numbered Highways (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated system of roads and highways in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ... There arergwertwertert[1] Kyle Railroad (KYLE) [2] Missouri and Northern Arkansas Railroad (MNA) [3] Montana Rail Link (MRL) [4] Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway (MMA) [5] Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado RailNet (NKCR) New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway (NYSW) [6] Northern Plains Railroad Paducah and Louisville Railway (PAL) [7] Palouse... The United States of America has a large and lucrative tourism industry serving millions of international and domestic tourists. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... Population of the United States, 1790 to 2000 The demographics of the United States depict a largely urban nation, with 57 percent of its population living in places more than 100 miles away from the ocean (2003). ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens of thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... For other uses, see American Dream (disambiguation). ... The percentage of households and individuals over the age of 25 with incomes exceeding $100,000 in the US.[1][2] Affluence in the United States refers to an individuals or households state of being in an economically favorable position in contrast to a given reference group. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... Percent below each countrys official poverty line, according to the CIA factbook. ... This graph shows the educational attainment since 1947. ... Violent conforntation between working class union members and law enforecement such as the one between teamsters and Minneapolis police above were commonly frowned upon by professional middle class. ... Holidays of the United States vary with local observance. ... Health care in the United States is provided by many separate legal entities. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... The United States is home to a wide array of regional styles and scenes. ... American classical music refers to music written in the United States but in the European classical music tradition. ... American folk music, also known as Americana, is a broad category of music including Native American music, Bluegrass, country music, gospel, old time music, jug bands, Appalachian folk, blues, Tejano and Cajun. ... The first major American popular songwriter, Stephen Foster Even before the birth of recorded music, American popular music had a profound effect on music across the world. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... This article is about television in the United States, specifically its history, art, business and government regulation. ... Hollywood redirects here. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... The folklore of the United States, or American folklore, is one of the folk traditions which has evolved on the North American continent since Europeans arrived in the 16th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Transcendentalism was a group of new ideas in literature, religion, culture, and philosophy that emerged in New England in the early-to mid-19th century. ... The Harlem Renaissance was named after the anthology The New Negro, edited by Alain Locke in 1925. ... Beats redirects here. ... The Rocky Mountains, Landers Peak, 1863 by Albert Bierstadt, one of the Hudson River School painters Visual arts of the United States refers to the history of painting and visual art in the United States. ... Jackson Pollock, No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Closely related to the development of American music in the early 20th century was the emergence of a new, and distinctively American, art form -- modern dance. ... The United States has a history of architecture that includes a wide variety of styles. ... Social issues are matters which directly or indirectly affect many or all members of a society and are considered to be problems, controversies related to moral values, or both. ... Main articles: Adolescent sexuality and Adolescent sexual behavior Adolescent sexuality in the United States relates to the sexuality of American adolescents and its place in American society, both in terms of their feelings, behaviors and development and in terms of the response of the government, educators and interested groups. ... Affirmative action is a policy or a program of giving preferential treatment to certain designated groups allegedly seeking to redress discrimination or bias through active measures, as in education and employment. ... Progress of America, 1875, by Domenico Tojetti American exceptionalism (cf. ... Anti-Americanism, often Anti-American sentiment, is defined as being opposed or hostile to the United States of America, its people, its principles, or its policies. ... Capital punishment is a controversial issue in the United States and, indeed, in most of the world, with many prominent organizations and individuals participating in the debate. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine underground brewery during the prohibition era. ... The Energy policy of the United States is determined by federal, state and local public entities, which address issues of energy production, distribution and consumption. ... 1970s US postage stamp block In the United States today, the organized environmental movement is represented by a wide range of organizations sometimes called non-governmental organizations or NGOs. ... Gun Politics in the United States, incorporating the political aspects of gun politics, and firearms rights, has long been among the most controversial and intractable issues in American politics. ... The Statue of Liberty. ... - Fence barrier on the international bridge near McAllen, TX . ... Pornography may use any of a variety of media — written and spoken text, photos, movies, etc. ... Racial profiling, also known as ethnic profiling, is the inclusion of racial or ethnic characteristics in determining whether a person is considered likely to commit a particular type of crime (see Offender Profiling). ... International recognition Civil unions and domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated Civil unions legal, same-sex marriage debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage, also called gay...

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United States Department of Justice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (515 words)
In 1867, the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, led by William Lawrence, conducted an inquiry into the creation of a "law department" headed by the Attorney General and composed of the various department solicitors and district attorneys.
At last, eighty-one years after the establishment of the Office of the Attorney General, the Department of Justice was established as it officially began operations on July 1, 1870.
In March 2003, the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service was abolished and its functions transferred to the United States Department of Homeland Security.
United States Department of Justice - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article (517 words)
The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans.
It is administered by the United States Attorney General, one of the original members of the cabinet.
Officially, the Department of Justice began operations on July 1, 1870.
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