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Encyclopedia > United States Department of Defense
United States
Department of Defense
Seal of the United States Department of Defense.
Seal of the United States Department of Defense.
Agency overview
Formed September 18, 1947
(By the National Security Act of 1947)
Preceding Agencies Department of War
 
Department of the Navy
Headquarters The Pentagon
Employees 700,000 civilian
2,300,000 military (2004)
Annual Budget $439.3 billion [1] (2007 est.)
Agency Executives Robert M. Gates, Secretary
 
Gordon R. England, Deputy Secretary
Website
http://www.defenselink.mil/

The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. The organization and functions of the DOD are set forth in Title 10 of the United States Code. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_Defense_Seal. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... Robert Michael Gates (born September 25, 1943) is currently serving as the 22nd United States Secretary of Defense. ... The United States Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) is the head of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and military matters. ... Gordon England Gordon Richard England (born 1938) is an American businessman who serves as United States Deputy Secretary of Defense. ... The United States Deputy Secretary of Defense is the second-highest ranking official in the United States Department of Defense. ... Security measures taken to protect the Houses of Parliament in London, England. ... Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. ... The United States Code (U.S.C.) is a compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal law of the United States. ...


The DOD is the major tenant of The Pentagon building near Washington, D. C., and has three major components — the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, and the Department of the Air Force. Among the many DOD agencies are the Missile Defense Agency, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Pentagon Force Protection Agency (PFPA), the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), and the National Security Agency (NSA). The department also operates several joint service schools, including the National War College. This article is about the United States military building. ... ... War Department may refer to the military establishments of several different countries: British War Department Confederate War Department United States Department of War, under the leadership of the United States Secretary of War (until 1947) See also: defense minister This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy. ... Categories: Stub | U.S. Dept. ... The Missile Defense Agency is the section of the United States governments Department of Defense responsible for developing a layered defense against ballistic missiles. ... The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense responsible for the development of new technology for use by the military. ... The Pentagon Force Protection Agency is a government agency comprised of both sworn police officers (PPD) and civilian CBRN technicians, as well as non-sworn civilian anti-terrorism investigative and physical security personnel, and is responsible for the protection of The Pentagon, headquarters of the United States Department of Defense... The Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, is a major producer and manager of military intelligence for the United States Department of Defense. ... The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is an agency of the United States Government with the primary mission of collection, analysis, and distribution of geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) in support of national security. ... “NSA” redirects here. ... The National War College (NWC) of the United States is a school in the National Defense University. ...

Contents

History

During 1945, specific plans for the proposed DoD were put forth by the Army, the Navy, and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In a special message to Congress on December 19, 1945, President Harry Truman proposed creation of a unified Department of National Defense. A proposal went to Congress in April 1946, but was held up by the Naval Affairs Committee hearings in July 1946, which raised objections to the concentration of power in a single department. Truman eventually sent new legislation to Congress in February 1947, where it was debated and amended for several months. Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... For the victim of Mt. ...


DoD was created in 1947 as a national military establishment with a single secretary as its head to preside over the former War Department (founded in 1789) and Navy Department (founded in 1798; formerly the Board of Admiralty, founded in 1780). The Department of the Air Force was also created as a new service at the same time (it had been part of the War Department as the United States Army Air Force), and made part of DoD. DoD was created in order to reduce interservice rivalry which was believed to have reduced military effectiveness during World War II. Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ... Categories: Stub | U.S. Dept. ... The United States Army Air Forces, or USAAF, was a part of the U.S. military during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... Interservice rivalry is a military term referring to rivalries that can arise between different branches of a countrys armed forces, such as between a nations land forces (army) and naval forces. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


On July 26, 1947, Truman signed the National Security Act of 1947, which set up the National Military Establishment to begin operations on September 18, 1947, the day after the Senate confirmed James V. Forrestal as the first Secretary of Defense. The Establishment had the unfortunate abbreviation "NME" (the obvious pronunciation being "enemy"), and was renamed the "Department of Defense" (abbreviated as DOD or DoD) on August 10, 1949; in addition, the Secretary of Defense was given greater authority over three of the branches of the military (Army, Navy, and Air Force). Prior to the creation of the National Military Establishment / Department of Defense, the Armed Forces of the United States were separated into different cabinet-level departments without much central authority. The Marine Corps remained as a separate service under the Department of the Navy, and the Coast Guard remained in the Department of the Treasury, ready to be shifted to the Navy Department during time of declared war (as it was in both world wars). is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... President Truman signs the National Security Act Amendment of 1949 with guests in the Oval Office. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... James Vincent Forrestal (February 15, 1892–May 22, 1949) was a Secretary of the Navy and the first United States Secretary of Defense (1947 - 1949). ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... USN redirects here. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ...


Organization

The Pentagon is the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense.
The Pentagon is the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense.

The Pentagon, in Arlington County, Virginia across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., is the headquarters of the Department of Defense. The Department of Defense is protected by the Pentagon Force Protection Agency which ensures law enforcement and security for The Pentagon and various other jurisdictions throughout the National Capital Region (NCR). The Department includes the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, as well as non-combat agencies such as the National Security Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency. The DoD's annual budget was roughly $425 billion in 2006.[1] This figure does not include tens of billions more in supplemental expenditures allotted by Congress throughout the year, particularly for the war in Iraq. It also does not include expenditures by the Department of Energy on nuclear weapons design and testing. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2734x1726, 963 KB) The Pentagon, headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense, looking northeast with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2734x1726, 963 KB) The Pentagon, headquarters of the U.S. Department of Defense, looking northeast with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... Arlington County is an urban county of about 203,000 residents in the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the U.S., directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. [1] Originally part of the District of Columbia, the land now comprising the county was retroceded to Virginia in a July... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... The Pentagon Force Protection Agency is a government agency comprised of both sworn police officers (PPD) and civilian CBRN technicians, as well as non-sworn civilian anti-terrorism investigative and physical security personnel, and is responsible for the protection of The Pentagon, headquarters of the United States Department of Defense... The National Capital Region of the United States consists of Washington, D.C. and the surrounding counties and independent cities in Maryland and Virginia. ... “NSA” redirects here. ... The Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, is a major producer and manager of military intelligence for the United States Department of Defense. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ...


In wartime, the Department of Defense has authority over the Coast Guard; in peacetime, that agency is under the control of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Prior to the creation of DHS, the Coast Guard was under the control of the Department of Transportation and earlier under the Department of the Treasury. According to the U.S. Code, the Coast Guard is at all times considered one of the five armed services of the United States. During times of declared war (or by Congressional direction), the Coast Guard operates as a part of the Navy; the service has not been under the auspices of Navy since World War II, but members have served in the undeclared wars and conflicts since then while the service remained in its peacetime department. DHS redirects here. ... The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a federal Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transportation. ...


Command Structure

The command structure of the Department of Defense is defined by the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986. Under the act, the chain of command runs from the President of the United States, through the Secretary of Defense, to the combatant commanders (COCOM) who command all military forces within their area of responsibility. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the service Chiefs of Staff are responsible for readiness of the U.S. military and serve as the President's military advisers, but are not in the chain of command. The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is by law the highest ranking military officer in the United States. The Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 (PL 99-433) was a reorganization plan which focused the chain of command in military operations undertaken by the United States Department of Defense. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... A Unified Combatant Command is composed of forces from two or more services, has a broad and continuing mission, and is organized either on a geographical basis (known as Area Of Responsibility, AOR) or on a functional basis. ... The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is by law the highest ranking military officer of the United States military, and the principal military advisor to the President of the United States. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ...


Components

2005 DoD Structure.
2005 DoD Structure.

United States Secretary of Defense Image File history File links DOD_2005. ... Image File history File links DOD_2005. ... The United States Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) is the head of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and military matters. ...

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Michael G. Mullen (USN)
Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. James E. Cartwright (USMC)
Chief of Staff of the United States Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr. (USA)
Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James T. Conway (USMC)
Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead (USN)
Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force Gen. T. Michael Moseley (USAF)

The United States Naval Observatory falls under the Chief of Naval Operations. In 2003, the National Communications System was moved to the Department of Homeland Security, but only for executive purposes. The National Communications System still centralizes its activities within the Department of Defense, since the human resources required by NCS (example: Military Departments) still reside within the Department of Defense, or for retention of practical maintenance. The United States Deputy Secretary of Defense is the second-highest ranking official in the United States Department of Defense. ... The Office of the Secretary of Defense is part of the U.S. Department of Defense and includes the entire staff of the Secretary of Defense. ... The Defense Policy Board Advisory Committee (DPBAC or DPB) is a federal advisory committee to the United States Department of Defense. ... The United States Department of Defenses Office of Net Assessment was created in 1973. ... The Pentagon Force Protection Agency is a government agency comprised of both sworn police officers (PPD) and civilian CBRN technicians, as well as non-sworn civilian anti-terrorism investigative and physical security personnel, and is responsible for the protection of The Pentagon, headquarters of the United States Department of Defense... The Defense Criminal Investigative Service (DCIS) is the criminal investigative arm of the Inspector General of the United States Department of Defense (DoD). ... Under Secretary Stephen Cambone The Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence is a position within the United States government that acts as the principal advisor to the United States Secretary of Defense on matters relating to intelligence. ... The Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, is a major producer and manager of military intelligence for the United States Department of Defense. ... This article is about the Defense Security Service. ... Counterintelligence Field Activity (CIFA) is a US Department of Defense (DoD) agency whose size and budget are classified. ... The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is an agency of the United States Government with the primary mission of collection, analysis, and distribution of geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) in support of national security. ... The National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) is one of the 16 intelligence agencies in the U.S. It designs, builds and operates the reconnaissance satellites of the United States government. ... “NSA” redirects here. ... This is a position for policy in the defense department. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO), as part of the United States Department of Defense, reports to the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy through Assistant Secretary of Defense (International Security Affairs). ... The Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics is the title of a high-level civilian official in the United States Department of Defense. ... The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense responsible for the development of new technology for use by the military. ... The Missile Defense Agency is the section of the United States governments Department of Defense responsible for developing a layered defense against ballistic missiles. ... The Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA) is the United States Department of Defense (DoD) agency responsible for performing contract administration services (CAS) for DoD and other authorized Federal Agencies. ... The Defense Logistics Agency headquarters building at Fort Belvoir The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) is the largest agency in the United States Department of Defense, with about 22,000 civilian and military personnel throughout the world. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Office of Economic Adjustment (OEA) is the U.S. Department of Defenses (DoD) primary source for assisting communities that are adversely impacted by Defense program changes, including base closures or realignments, base expansions, and contract or program cancellations. ... // The Defense Acquisition University (DAU) is a United States military training establishment which trains and enables military and civilian Department of Defense personnel in the fields of Acquisition, Technology and Logistics; including Leadership and Program Management. ... Business Transformation Agency logo The Business Transformation Agency (BTA) is an organization of the United States Department of Defense (DoD) responsible for guiding the Department’s business operations modernization. ... Under Secretary of Defense Dr. David S. C. Chu The Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness is a high-ranking position in the United States Department of Defense responsible for advising the Secretary of Defense on recruitment, career development, pay and benefits, and oversight of the state of... The Defense Commissary Agency is an agency of the Federal government of the United States which is under the authority of the Department of Defense. ... The Defense Human Resources Activity (DHRA) is a U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Field Activity chartered to support the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness (USD(P&R)). The scope of DHRAs mission is very broad, giving the USD flexibility to explore and field new technologies... The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) is a civilian agency of the U.S. Department of Defense. ... The Department of Defense Dependents Schools (usually shortened to just DoDDS) is a network of schools, both primary and secondary, that serve dependents of United States military- and other non-US - personnel. ... TRICARE is the United States militarys health plan for military personnel and their dependents. ... The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), established by the United States Congress in 1972 and graduating its first class in 1980, is a center for military medical education and research. ... Under Secretary of Defense Tina W. Jones The Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) is the Chief Financial Officer of the United States Department of Defense. ... The Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), under the authority, direction, and control of the United States Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), is responsible for performing all contract audits for the Department of Defense (DoD), and providing accounting and financial advisory services regarding contracts and subcontracts to all DoD Components responsible... The Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS), an agency of the United States Department of Defense, provides finance and accounting services for the military and other members of defense. ... The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA, formerly known as the Defense Communications Agency) is a combat support agency of the United States Department of Defense (DoD) responsible for planning, developing, fielding, operating, and supporting command, control, communications, and information systems that serve the needs of the President, the Secretary of... Washington Headquarters Services (WHS) was established as a U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Field Activity on October 1, 1977 as part of a DoD headquarters streamlining initiative. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Army The United States Secretary of the Army has statutory responsibility for all matters relating to the United States Army: manpower, personnel, reserve affairs, installations, environmental issues, weapons systems and equipment acquisition, communications, and financial management. ... Seal The Department of the Army is one of the three military departments in the United States Department of Defense. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is a federal agency made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ... USN redirects here. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... The Secretary of the Air Force is the civilian head of the United States Department of the Air Force, a component organization of the Department of Defense. ... Seal The United States Department of the Air Force was formed in 1949 and is a component agency of the United States Department of Defense. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ... The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is by law the highest ranking military officer of the United States military, and the principal military advisor to the President of the United States. ... Admiral Michael Glenn Mullen (born October 4, 1946) is currently the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff as of October 1, 2007. ... USN redirects here. ... The position of Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was created by the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986. ... James Cartwright may refer to: James Cartwright (athlete), Olympic athlete James E. Cartwright (born 1949), United States Marine Corps general Jamie Hunter Cartwright Category: ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the professional head of the United States Army who is responsible for ensuring readiness of the Army. ... General George Casey General George William Casey, Jr. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... James Terry Conway (born December 26, 1947) is a General in the United States Marine Corps. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) is the senior military officer in the United States Navy. ... Admiral Roughead Admiral Gary Roughead is the 31st Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet of the United States Navy. ... USN redirects here. ... The Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force (CSAF) serves as the senior uniformed United States Air Force officer responsible for the organization, training, and equipage of more than 700,000 active-duty, National Guard, Reserve, and civilian forces serving in the United States and overseas. ... Teed Michael Moseley, KBE[1], is the current Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Aerial view of USNO. The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) is one of the oldest scientific agencies in the United States. ... NSC seal The National Communications System is an office within the United States Department of Homeland Security charged with enabling national security and emergency preparedness communications (NS/EP telecommunications) using the national telecommunications system. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... NSC seal The National Communications System is an office within the United States Department of Homeland Security charged with enabling national security and emergency preparedness communications (NS/EP telecommunications) using the national telecommunications system. ...


Unified Combatant Commands

There are nine, soon to be ten Unified Combatant Commands; five (soon to be six) regional and four functional. United States Africa Command became initially operational in October of 2007. A Unified Combatant Command is composed of forces from two or more services, has a broad and continuing mission, and is organized either on a geographical basis (known as Area Of Responsibility, AOR) or on a functional basis. ...

Command Commander Home Base Area of Responsibility
United States Northern Command (NORTHCOM) General Victor E. Renuart Jr. (USAF) (also Chief of NORAD) Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado North American homeland defense and coordinating homeland security with civilian forces.
United States Central Command (CENTCOM), Admiral William J. Fallon (USN) MacDill Air Force Base, Florida Egypt through the Persian Gulf region, into Central Asia; handing over responsibility of Horn of Africa to AFRICOM.
United States European Command (EUCOM) General John Craddock (USA) (also Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR) SHAPE (Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe), Belgium (USEUCOM HQ in Stuttgart, Germany) Europe and Israel; handing over responsibility of Africa to AFRICOM.
United States Pacific Command (PACOM) Admiral Timothy J. Keating (USN) Camp H. M. Smith, Oahu, Hawaii The Asia-Pacific region including Hawaii.
United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) Admiral James Stavridis (USN) Miami, Florida South, Central America and the surrounding waters
United States Africa Command (AFRICOM) General William E. Ward (US Army) Stuttgart, Germany for now; to be relocated to African continent Africa excluding Egypt
U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Admiral Eric T. Olson (USN) MacDill Air Force Base, Florida Provides special operations for the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps.
U.S. Joint Forces Command (JFCOM) General James Mattis (USMC) (also Supreme Allied Commander Transformation (SACT)) Naval Support Activity Headquarters (Norfolk) and Suffolk, Virginia Supports other commands as a joint force provider.
United States Strategic Command (STRATCOM) General Kevin P. Chilton (USAF) Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska Covers the strategic deterrent force and coordinates the use of space assets.
United States Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) General Norton A. Schwartz (USAF) Scott Air Force Base, Illinois Covers global mobility of all military assets for all regional commands.

Until 2007, five geographical commands were given responsibilities for United States military operations in various areas of the world as shown on the following map. Emblem of the United States Northern Command. ... Victor Eugene Renuart Jr. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... NORAD is short for: North American Aerospace Defense Command Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Peterson Air Force Base (Peterson AFB) is a base of the United States Air Force located in El Paso County, Colorado near Colorado Springs. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... North American redirects here. ... Military personnel have started to guard transportation facilities such as Penn Station as part of homeland security efforts. ... The United States Central Command (CENTCOM) is a theater-level Unified Combatant Command unit of the U.S. armed forces, established in 1983 under the operational control of the U.S. Secretary of Defense. ... William Joseph Fallon (born December 30, 1944) is an Admiral in the United States Navy and the Commander of U.S. Central Command. ... USN redirects here. ... Aerial Photo of MacDill Air Force Base, Florida - March 1987 MacDill Air Force Base Emblem showing a KC-135 Stratotanker of the 6th Air Mobility Wing with the Tampa Skyline and Gasparilla ship in the background. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... The Horn of Africa. ... The United States Africa Command (USAFRICOM or AFRICOM) is a new Unified Combatant Command of the United States Department of Defense, to have an area of responsibility covering Africa and to be fully operational by September 2008. ... The U.S. European Command (EUCOM) is a Unified Combatant Command of the United States military, headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany. ... For other persons of the same name, see John Craddock. ... Supreme Allied Commander is the title given to the most senior commander of some multinational organisations. ... Look up shape in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Stuttgart (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... The United States Africa Command (USAFRICOM or AFRICOM) is a new Unified Combatant Command of the United States Department of Defense, to have an area of responsibility covering Africa and to be fully operational by September 2008. ... Emblem of the United States Pacific Command New emblem: [1] The United States Pacific Command (USPACOM), led by the Commander, Pacific Command (CDRUSPACOM), is the supreme military authority for the various branches of the Armed Forces of the United States serving within its area of responsibility (AOR). ... Timothy J. Keating (here depicted as Vice Admiral) Admiral Timothy J. Keating is Commander, North American Aerospace Defense Command and United States Northern Command at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. ... USN redirects here. ... Camp H. M. Smith is a United States Marine Corps installation on the Hawaiian island of Oahu. ... OÊ»ahu (usually Oahu outside Hawaiian and Hawaiian English), the Gathering Place, is the third largest of the Hawaiian Islands and most populous island in the State of HawaiÊ»i. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Pacific redirects here. ... USSOUTHCOM emblem The United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM, or informally: SOUTHCOM) is a Unified Combatant Command responsible for all United States military activities in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean basin (except Cuba and Puerto Rico, which are the responsibility of United States Northern Command). ... Adm. ... USN redirects here. ... Miami redirects here. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... The United States Africa Command (USAFRICOM or AFRICOM) is a new Unified Combatant Command of the United States Department of Defense, to have an area of responsibility covering Africa and to be fully operational by September 2008. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... General William E. Kip Ward is the first and current Commander, United States Africa Command. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... For other uses, see Stuttgart (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Emblem of the United States Special Operations Command. ... Admiral Eric Thor Olson, USN, (born 1951 or 1952 in Tacoma, Washington[1]) is the 8th and current Commander, United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM). ... USN redirects here. ... Aerial Photo of MacDill Air Force Base, Florida - March 1987 MacDill Air Force Base Emblem showing a KC-135 Stratotanker of the 6th Air Mobility Wing with the Tampa Skyline and Gasparilla ship in the background. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... USJFCOM Logo U.S. Joint Forces Command is one of nine unified combatant commands of the U.S. military. ... General James N. Mattis, USMC is the current Commander, U.S. Joint Forces Command and Supreme Allied Command Transformation. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Supreme Allied Commander is the title given to the most senior commander of some multinational organisations. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM) is one of the nine Unified Combatant Commands of the United States Department of Defense. ... Kevin P. Chilton (b November 3, 1954) is a Lieutenant General in the USAF who was also a NASA astronaut. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Offutt Air Force Base (Offutt AFB) is a base of the United States Air Force and a census-designated place (CDP) in Sarpy County, Nebraska, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... The United States Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM) is one of ten unified commands of the United States Department of Defense. ... General Norton A. Schwartz, USAF, is Commander, United States Transportation Command, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Scott Air Force Base (Scott AFB) (IATA: BLV, ICAO: KBLV) is an base of the United States Air Force in St. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...

The Five Geographic Commands
February 2007 Draft Map of the United States Africa Command (USAFRICOM) showing its creation from parts of USEUCOM, USCENTCOM and USPACOM. (Click to see enlarged image).
February 2007 Draft Map of the United States Africa Command (USAFRICOM) showing its creation from parts of USEUCOM, USCENTCOM and USPACOM. (Click to see enlarged image).

Beginning in 2007, a new geographical command for Africa was authorized. This proposed significant changes to the areas of responsibility for other adjacent geographical commands as shown in the accompanying graphic. world map of divided by regional Unified Commands-public resource from pentagon website File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (960x720, 141 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Military of the United States Unified Combatant Command United States Africa Command ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (960x720, 141 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Military of the United States Unified Combatant Command United States Africa Command ... The United States Africa Command (USAFRICOM or AFRICOM) is a new Unified Combatant Command of the United States Department of Defense, to have an area of responsibility covering Africa and to be fully operational by September 2008. ... The U.S. European Command (EUCOM) is Unified Combatant Command of the United States military, headquartered in Stuttgart, Germany. ... Emblem of the United States Central Command. ... The United States Pacific Command operates from suburban Honolulu in south central Oahu at the Nimitz-MacArthur Pacific Command Center. ... The United States Africa Command (USAFRICOM or AFRICOM) is a new Unified Combatant Command of the United States Department of Defense, to have an area of responsibility covering Africa and to be fully operational by September 2008. ...

Expenditures

Military spending as a percentage of GDP.
Military spending as a percentage of GDP.

The military expenditure of the United States Department of Defense for fiscal year 2007 is: GDP is an acronym which can stand for more than one thing: (in economics) an abbreviation for Gross Domestic Product. ... The US military budget is that portion of the United States discretionary federal budget that is allocated for the funding of the Department of Defense. ...

Total Funding $439.3 Billion
Operations and maintenance $152.2 Bil.
Military Personnel $110.8 Bil.
Procurement $84.2 Bil.
Research, Development, Testing & Evaluation $73.2 Bil.
Military Construction $12.6 Bil.
Family Housing $4.1 Bil.
(The War on terror, Iraq, Afghanistan are not included)

The United States and its closest allies are responsible for approximately two-thirds of global military spending (of which, in turn, the U.S. is responsible for the vast majority). Military spending accounts for 19% of the United States' federal budget, and approximately half of its federal discretionary spending, which comprises all of the U.S. government's money not accounted for by pre-existing obligations.[2] [2] This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ...


However, in terms of per capita spending, the U.S. ranks third behind Israel and Singapore[3].


According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, in 2003 the United States spent approximately 47% of the world's total military spending of US $956,000,000,000.


As a percentage of its GDP, the United States spends 4.06% on military, ranking it 28th in the world. This is higher by percent than France's 2.6%, and lower than Saudia Arabia's 10%[4]. This 3.7% is low relative to the United States's past 60-some years. [5]


Also, since it is an all-volunteer force and since most jobs within it require high degrees of technical skill and personnel retention, the United States armed forces have dramatically higher personnel costs, both military and civilian, compared to the militaries of countries which use conscription, many of which have far more troops than the United States. However, only China has more standing troops than the United States. Number of total troops per country This is a list of countries sorted by the number of total troops within the command of that country, including reserve forces that can aid a depleted active military and/or paramilitary. ...


Current issues

On February 26, 2002, the Department of Defense Office of the Inspector General has reported that DOD has not and will not account for $1.1 trillion of "unsupported accounting entries".[6] In addition, there have been several high-profile Government Accountability Office (GAO) investigations of the Department of Defense. is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... General Accounting Office headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the non-partisan audit, evaluation, and investigative arm of Congress, and an agency in the Legislative Branch of the United States Government. ... Government Accountability Office investigations of the Department of Defense are typically audits in which the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the United States Congress’ investigative arm, studies how the Department of Defense spends taxpayer dollars. ...


The GAO is also interested in ways DOD can partner with other government agencies to save money and create efficiencies. One way was through use of the Veterans Administration's Consolidated Mail Outpatient Pharmacy (CMOP) program. The CMOP fills continuation of therapy or refill prescriptions only. Initial prescriptions are written for veterans at one of the Veteran Administration’s health care facilities. When a refill is needed, the heath care facilities process the prescriptions. The CMOP then uploads this information from multiple facilities in its region. Once filled, the United States Postal Service (USPS) delivers the prescriptions. The health care facility or clinic is notified of the prescription’s completion electronically. As of 2000, the annual workload was near 50 million prescriptions. Processing and filling prescriptions took two days; three more days were required for mail delivery. The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for administering programs of veterans benefits for veterans, their families, and survivors. ... The Consolidated Mail Outpatient Pharmacy (CMOP) is an initiative by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs to provide mail order prescriptions to veterans using computerization at strategic locations throughout the country. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ...


The DOD and VA conducted a pilot program in FY 2003. In its 2005 report, GAO-05-555, the GAO found that the DOD could generate savings because CMOP's size allows it to negotiate volume discounts. The CMOP program is now serving the entire country from a number of locations including West Los Angeles, California; Bedford, Massachusetts; Dallas, Texas; Hines, Illinois, Charleston, South Carolina; Leavenworth, Kansas; and Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The Westside as seen looking north from Loyola Marymount University . ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1640 Incorporated 1729 Government  - Type Open town meeting  - Town Administrator Richard Reed Area  - Town  13. ... Dallas redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Leavenworth redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ...


The military's analysis of the missile strike on a dead U.S. spy satellite has revealed no sign of danger from debris, including no hazard from the satellite's fuel tank, a Pentagon spokesman said February 22, 2008.[7]The launched missile successfully destroyed the fuel tank of an inoperable spy satellite, U.S. military officials said February 25, 2008.[8] is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Military Buildup

To meet the growing demands in the Middle East and around the world, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates proposed to the President to increase the overall size of the military by approximately 92,000 troops over the course of five years. Specifically, the proposal calls for an Army troop cap of 545,000 to 550,000 active duty soldiers and a troop cap of 202,000 active duty Marines. The total active duty force of the United States after the buildup will be about 1,479,000.[9] There have also been calls to increase the sizes of the other branches of the Military to match the increase in the Marines and Army.


Related legislation

President Truman signs the National Security Act Amendment of 1949 with guests in the Oval Office. ... The Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1958 is an American law which was created to provide for more effective administration for the Department of Defense (DoD). ... Editing Department of Defense Appropriations Act From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. ... An appropriation bill or supply bill is a legislative motion which authorizes the government to spend money. ... The Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 (PL 99-433) was a reorganization plan which focused the chain of command in military operations undertaken by the United States Department of Defense. ... The Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 (also known as AEDPA) is a series of laws in the US signed into law[1] on April 24, 1996 to deter terrorism, provide justice for victims, provide for an effective death penalty, and for other purposes. ...

See also

DOD Information Assurance Certification and Accreditation Program, or DIACAP, is the United States Department of Defense Information Assurance Certification and Accreditation Program. ... Military badges of the United States Department of Defense are insignia of the United States Department of Defense which are presented to service members for performing certain duties in the both the Department of Defense and the Office of the Secretary Defense. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The United States Code (U.S.C.) is a compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal law of the United States. ... Early detection of chemical agents Sociopolitical climate of chemical warfare While the study of chemicals and their military uses was widespread in China, the use of toxic materials has historically been viewed with mixed emotions and some disdain in the West (especially when the enemy were doing it). ... The defense industry refers primarily to: Defense contractors: business organizations or individuals that provide products or services to a defense department of a government. ... A defense contractor (sometimes called a military contractor) is a business organization or individual that provides products or services to a defense department of a government. ... Geographic distance is a key factor in military affairs. ... The Exceptional Family Member Program or EFMP is a mandatory U.S. Department of Defense enrollment program that works with other military and civilian agencies to provide comprehensive and coordinated community support, housing, educational, medical, and personnel services worldwide to U.S. military families with special needs. ...

References

  1. ^ Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) (April 2005). National Defense Budget Estimates for FY 2006 (PDF). U.S. Department of Defense. Retrieved on 2007-11-11.
  2. ^ Global Issues That Affect Everyone. High Military Expenditure in Some Places. Retrieved on May 8, 2006.
  3. ^ NationMaster. Military Statistics > Expenditures > Dollar figure (per capita) by country. Retrieved on July 4, 2006.
  4. ^ CIA World Factbook. Military expenditures percent of GDP. Retrieved on Jan 17, 2008.
  5. ^ Truth and Politics. Relative Size of US Military Spending from 1940 to 2003. Retrieved on May 26, 2006.
  6. ^ Steensma, David K. (February 26, 2002), Independent Auditor's Report on the Department of Defense Fiscal Year 2001 Agency-Wide Financial Statements, DoD Inspector General, p. 2, Report No. D-2002-055, <http://www.dodig.osd.mil/Audit/reports/fy02/02-055.pdf>. Retrieved on November 11, 2007
  7. ^ CNN (February 22, 2008), Pentagon: No signs of danger from satellite debris, <http://edition.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/22/spy.satellite.ap/index.html>. Retrieved on February 22, 2008
  8. ^ CNN (February 25, 2008), Military: Satellite's downing worked as planned, <http://edition.cnn.com/2008/TECH/02/25/dead.satellite/index.html>. Retrieved on February 25, 2008
  9. ^ Bender, Bryan (January 12, 2007), "Gates calls for buildup in troops", The Boston Globe, <http://www.boston.com/news/nation/washington/articles/2007/01/12/gates_calls_for_buildup_in_troops/>. Retrieved on November 11, 2007

Under Secretary of Defense Tina W. Jones The Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) is the Chief Financial Officer of the United States Department of Defense. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • United States DOD website
  • Read Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports regarding the Department of Defense
  • U.S. Department of Defense Profile: Making the Tail Smaller and the Tooth Stronger
  • Entire Collection of DoD Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Reading Room
  • The Budget Graph A graphical representation of the 2007 United States federal discretionary budget, including all military related funding.
  • DOD property auctions
  • Title 10 U.S.C.
  • Department Of Defense Meeting Notices and Rule Changes from The Federal Register RSS Feed
The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ... Bold text Seal of the United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare The United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (also known as HEW) was a cabinet-level department of the United States government from 1953 until 1979. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ... The Post Office Department was the former name of the United States Postal Service when it was a Cabinet department. ... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
United States Department of Defense - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (808 words)
The Establishment had the unfortunate abbreviation 'NME' (the obvious pronunciation being "enemy"), and was renamed the "Department of Defense" (abbreviated as DOD or DoD) on August 10, 1949; in addition, the secretary was given greater authority over the military departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force.
The Department of Defense is based in The Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia outside Washington, DC, across the Potomac River.
The command structure of the Department of Defense is defined by the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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