FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > United States Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
Logo of the USDA
Logo of the USDA
Seal of the Department of Agriculture
Seal of the Department of Agriculture
Agency overview
Formed February 15, 1889
Jurisdiction Federal government of the United States
Employees 105,778 (June 2007)
Annual Budget $94 billion USD (2006)
Agency Executives Ed Schafer, Secretary of Agriculture
 
Charles F. Conner, Deputy Secretary of Agriculture
Child Agency Click here
Website
www.usda.gov

The United States Department of Agriculture (also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA) is a United States Federal Executive Department (or Cabinet Department). Its purpose is to develop and execute policy on farming, agriculture, and food. It aims to meet the needs of farmers and ranchers, promote agricultural trade and production, work to assure food safety, protect natural resources, foster rural communities and end hunger, in America and abroad. Ed Schafer is the department's secretary, following his nomination by President Bush on October 31, 2007[1] and confirmation by the Senate on January 28, 2008.[2] USDA may refer to: United States Department of Agriculture Union Solidarity and Development Association, a mass organisation in Myanmar United Streets Dopeboyz of America, a rap group led by Young Jeezy, which also features artists such as Slick Pulla and Bloodraw. ... Image File history File links USDA_logo. ... Image:US-DeptOfAgriculture-Seal. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the federal government of the United States. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Edward Thomas Ed Schafer (born August 8, 1946), U. S. Republican Party politician, He served as Governor of North Dakota from 1992 to 2000. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... Charles F. Conner Charles F. Conner is the current United States Deputy Secretary of Agriculture. ... The United States Deputy Secretary of Agriculture is the second-highest ranking official in the United States Department of Agriculture. ... The United States Federal Executive Departments are among the oldest primary units of the executive branch of the federal government of the United States—the Departments of State, War, and the Treasury all being established within a few weeks of each other in 1789. ... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in Indonesia Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... For other uses, see Farmer (disambiguation). ... Ranching is the raising of cattle or sheep on rangeland, although one might also speak of ranching with regard to less common livestock such as elk, bison or emu. ... This article is about economic exchange. ... Food safety is a scientific discipline describing the handling, preparation, and storage of food in ways that prevent Foodborne illness. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... Hunger is a feeling experienced when the glycogen level of the liver falls below a threshold, usually followed by a desire to eat. ... Edward Thomas Ed Schafer (born August 8, 1946), U. S. Republican Party politician, He served as Governor of North Dakota from 1992 to 2000. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

The United States had a largely agrarian economy early in its history. Officials in the federal government had long sought new and improved varieties of seeds, plants, and animals for importation to the United States. In 1836 Henry L. Ellsworth, a man interested in improving agriculture, became Commissioner of Patents, a position within the Department of State. He soon began collecting and distributing new varieties of seeds and plants through members of the Congress and agricultural societies. In 1839 Congress established the Agricultural Division within the Patent Office and allotted $1,000 for "the collection of agricultural statistics and other agricultural purposes." Agrarian has two meanings: It can mean pertaining to Agriculture It can also refer to the ideology of Agrarianism and Agrarian parties. ... American history redirects here. ... Henry Leavitt Ellsworth (1791 - 1858) was a U.S. administrator. ... Department of State redirects here. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... PTO headquarters in Alexandria The United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO or USPTO) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides patent and trademark protection to inventors and businesses for their inventions and corporate and product identification. ...


Ellsworth's interest in aiding agriculture was evident in his annual reports that called for a public depository to preserve and distribute the various new seeds and plants, a clerk to collect agricultural statistics, the preparation of statewide reports about crops in different regions, and the application of chemistry to agriculture. In 1849 the Patent Office was transferred to the newly created Department of the Interior. In the ensuing years, agitation for a separate bureau of agriculture within the Department or a separate department devoted to agriculture kept recurring. The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally owned land. ...


On May 15, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln established the independent Department of Agriculture to be headed by a Commissioner without cabinet status.[3] Lincoln called it the "people's department". In the 1880s, varied special interest groups were lobbying for Cabinet representation. Business interests sought a Department of Commerce and Industry. Farmers tried to raise the Department of Agriculture to Cabinet rank. In 1887, the House and Senate passed bills giving cabinet status to the Department of Agriculture and Labor, but farm interests objected to the addition of labor, and the bill was killed in conference. Finally, on February 9, 1889, President Grover Cleveland signed a bill into law elevating the Department of Agriculture to Cabinet level. is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Alternate meanings in cabinet (disambiguation) A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ...


In 1887, the Hatch Act provided for the Federal funding of agricultural experiment stations in each state. The Smith-Lever Act of 1914 then funded cooperative extension services in each state to teach agriculture, home economics and related subjects to the public. With these and similar provisions, the USDA reached out to every county of every state. The Hatch Act of 1887 was a piece of US legislation which authorized federal funding for agricultural experiment stations connected to each land-grant university. ... An agricultural experiment station is a research center that conducts scientific investigations to solve problems and suggest improvements in the food and agriculture industry. ... The Smith Lever Act of 1914 was a piece of US legislation which established a system of cooperative extension services, connected to the land-grant universities, in order to inform people about current developments in agriculture, home economics, and related subjects. ... The cooperative extension service, also known as the Extension Service of the USDA, is a non-formal educational program implemented in the United States that is designed to help people use research-based knowledge to improve their lives. ...


During the Great Depression, farming remained a common way of life for millions of Americans. The Department of Agriculture was crucial to providing concerned persons with the assistance that they needed to make it through this difficult period, helping to ensure that food continued to be produced and distributed to those who needed it, assisting with loans for small landowners, and contributing to the education of the rural youth. In this way, the Department of Agriculture became a source of comfort as people struggled to survive in rural areas. Allegations have been made that throughout the agency's history it discriminated against African-American farmers, denying them loans and access to other programs well into the 1990s.[4] In 1999, the USDA settled a class action lawsuit alleging discrimination against African-American farmers. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... For other uses, see Loan (disambiguation). ...


Today, many of the programs concerned with the distribution of food and nutrition to people of America and providing nourishment as well as nutrition education to those in need are run and operated under the USDA Food and Nutrition Service.


USDA also concerns itself with assisting farmers and food procucers with the sale of crops and food on both a domestic and on the world market.


USDA also plays an important role in overseas aid programs, by providing surplus foods to developing countries to support development programs, sometimes via USAID or directly to foreign governments, international bodies such as WFP or approved non profit organizations. The Agriculture Act of 1949, section 416 (b) and Agricultural Development and Trade Act of 1954 (also known as Public Law 480 or just PL 480) provides the legal basis of such actions. The United States Agency for International Development (or USAID) is the US government organization responsible for most non-military foreign aid. ... The World Food Programme (WFP) is an agency of the United Nations which distributes food commodities to support development projects, to long-term refugees and displaced persons and as emergency food assistance in situations of natural and man-made disasters. ... The Agricultural Act of 1949 (Pub. ...


The United States Secretary of Agriculture administers the USDA. The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ...


The USDA's National Animal Identification System assists large agri-business and factory farms track disease in herds, a necessary regulation for sale of meat overseas. The National Animal Identification System, otherwise known as NAIS, is a voluntary government-run program in the United States intended to permit improved animal health surveillance by identifying and tracking specific animals. ...

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Organic program

USDA National Organic Program official seal
USDA National Organic Program official seal

The USDA has maintained the United States's National Organic Program, which governs organic certification for the United States, since 2002.[1] Image File history File links USDA_organic_seal. ... Image File history File links USDA_organic_seal. ... In the United States, the National Organic Program (NOP) is the federal regulatory framework governing organic food. ... Mixed organic bean sprouts Organic certification is a certification process for producers of organic food and other organic agricultural products. ...


Operating units

The headquarters of the USDA are on the National Mall at Washington, D.C.
The headquarters of the USDA are on the National Mall at Washington, D.C.
USDA building (photo taken in 1934)
USDA building (photo taken in 1934)

Image:Dept of Agriculture. ... Image:Dept of Agriculture. ... Facing east across the Mall with ones back towards the Lincoln Memorial. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... United States Department of Agriculture building in Washington, DC. [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... United States Department of Agriculture building in Washington, DC. [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Agricultural Marketing Service - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is the principal in-house research agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is an operating unit of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). ... The Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNPP) is an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture created on December 1, 1994, and is the focal point within the USDA where scientific research is linked with the nutritional needs of the American public. ... The Cooperative State Research Service (CSRS) is a branch of the US Department of Agriculture and administers Hatch Act and Morrill-Nelson funds. ... The Economic Research Service (ERS) is the main source of economic information and research from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ... The Farm Service Agency (FSA) is the USDA agency into which were merged several predecessor agencies, including the Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS). ... The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) administers food security programs. ... The United States Food Safety Inspection Service is charged with ensuring that all meat and egg products in the United States are safe to consume and accurately labeled. ... The Foreign Agricultural Service of the United States Department of Agriculture is a information provider, targeted at American businesses which want to import or export agricultural products. ... Logo of the U.S. Forest Service. ... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The National Agricultural Library is one of the worlds largest and most accessible agricultural research libraries. ... The National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), as part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, collects, summarizes, analyzes, and publishes agricultural production and marketing data on a wide range of items; statistical highlights summarize frequently requested data for the most recent year. ... In the United States, the National Organic Program (NOP) is the federal regulatory framework governing organic food. ... The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is a relatively small government agency in the United States Department of Agriculture currently comprised of about 12,000 employees. ... Risk Management Agency - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Rural development in general is used to denote the actions and initiatives taken to improve the standard of living in non-Urban neighbourhoods, countryside, and remote villages. ... The Office of Community Development (OCDT) is a part of the U.S. Department of Agricultures Rural Development activities. ... Rural Housing Service - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...

Defunct units

Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service (ASCS) is an agency of the United States Department of Agriculture. ...

Related legislation

The Secretary of Agriculture's office is located in the Jamie L. Whitten Building.
The Secretary of Agriculture's office is located in the Jamie L. Whitten Building.

Important legislation setting policy of the USDA includes the: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ...

1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Meat Inspection Act of 1906 authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to order meat inspections and condemn any meat product found unfit for human consumption. ... This is an article about the United States Food and Drug Act; for the Canadian version see Food and Drugs Act. ... The Federal Farm Loan Act of 1916 established 12 regional Farm Loan Banks to serve members of Farm Loan Associations. ... Grain Futures Act (Grain Futures Act of 1922) is a federal statute passed on September 21, 1922 by the U.S Government that established the law that all trading in grain futures must be done on regulated commodity exchanges. ... The Agricultural Adjustment Act (or AAA) (Pub. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Farm Credit Administration. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Soil Conservation and Domestic Allotment Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act was signed by United States President Harry S. Truman in 1964. ... is only done after a period of data collection to determine the effectiveness for its intended use, appropriate dosage, and hazards of the particular material. ... Agricultural Act, the name of several United States federal laws, may refer to: Agricultural Act of 1949 Agricultural Act of 1954 Agricultural Act of 1958 Agricultural Act of 1961 Agricultural Act of 1964 Agricultural Act of 1970 Category: ... Agricultural Act, the name of several United States federal laws, may refer to: Agricultural Act of 1949 Agricultural Act of 1954 Agricultural Act of 1958 Agricultural Act of 1961 Agricultural Act of 1964 Agricultural Act of 1970 Category: ... The Mutual Security Act of 1951 distributed $7 billion in foreign aid. ... The Humane Slaughter Act, or the Humane Methods of Livestock Slaughter Act, is a United States federal law designed to protect food animals during the moment of their slaughter. ... Agricultural Act, the name of several United States federal laws, may refer to: Agricultural Act of 1949 Agricultural Act of 1954 Agricultural Act of 1958 Agricultural Act of 1961 Agricultural Act of 1964 Agricultural Act of 1970 Category: ... Agricultural Act, the name of several United States federal laws, may refer to: Agricultural Act of 1949 Agricultural Act of 1954 Agricultural Act of 1958 Agricultural Act of 1961 Agricultural Act of 1964 Agricultural Act of 1970 Category: ... Agricultural Act, the name of several United States federal laws, may refer to: Agricultural Act of 1949 Agricultural Act of 1954 Agricultural Act of 1958 Agricultural Act of 1961 Agricultural Act of 1964 Agricultural Act of 1970 Category: ... The Food Stamp Program served an average of 25. ... The Child Nutrition Act (CNA) is politically correct. ... Agricultural Act, the name of several United States federal laws, may refer to: Agricultural Act of 1949 Agricultural Act of 1954 Agricultural Act of 1958 Agricultural Act of 1961 Agricultural Act of 1964 Agricultural Act of 1970 Category: ... The Environmental Quality Improvement Act was an act which amended the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. ... The Food Stamp Program served an average of 25. ... The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) is a program of the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for healthcare and nutrition of low-income mothers and children under the age of five. ... The Safe Drinking Water Act was an act passed by Congress on December 16, 1974. ... The Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 is a United States federal law that, among other provisions, revises and simplifies direct payment programs for crops and eliminates milk price supports through direct government purchases. ... The Food Quality Protection Act[1] (FQPA) of 1996 is a United States federal law. ... Known as the farm bill, the Farm Security and Rural Invesment Act of 2002 is the most recent incarnation of federal assistance to farmers. ...

See also

Agriculture is a major industry in the United States and the country is a net exporter of food. ... The Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNPP) is an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture created on December 1, 1994, and is the focal point within the USDA where scientific research is linked with the nutritional needs of the American public. ... Germplasm Resources Information Network or GRIN is an online software project of National Genetic Resources Program of USDA to provide germplasm information about plants, animals, microbes and invertebrates. ... The Graduate School, USDA is a non-degree granting, continuing education institution headquartered in Washington, D.C. The organization is composed of several branches, including: the International Institute (II) is the global arm of the Graduate School, which works on several government grants: the International Visitor Leadership Program (the U... The current food guide pyramid, called My Pyramid MyPyramid, released by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) on April 19, 2005, is an update on the ubiquitous U.S. food guide pyramid. ...

External links

Influenza A virus subtype H5N1, also known as A(H5N1) or simply H5N1, is a subtype of the Influenza A virus which can cause illness in humans and many other animal species. ...

References

  1. ^ White House (2007-10-31). "President Bush Nominates Ed Schafer for Secretary of Agriculture". Press release. Retrieved on 2008-01-25.
  2. ^ Jalonick, Mary Clare. "Senate Confirms Secretary of Agriculture", AP, 2008-01-28. Retrieved on 2008-01-28. 
  3. ^ 12 Stat. 387, now codified at 7 U.S.C. § 2201.
  4. ^ General Accounting Office,USDA - Problems Continue to Hinider the Timely Processing of Discriminatinon Complaints, January 1999
The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ... Bold text Seal of the United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare The United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (also known as HEW) was a cabinet-level department of the United States government from 1953 until 1979. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ... The Post Office Department was the former name of the United States Postal Service when it was a Cabinet department. ... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
United States Department of Agriculture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (786 words)
Ellsworth's interest in aiding agriculture was evident in his annual reports that called for a public depository to preserve and distribute the various new seeds and plants, a clerk to collect agricultural statistics, the preparation of statewide reports about crops in different regions, and the application of chemistry to agriculture.
In 1887, the House and Senate passed bills giving the Department of Agriculture and Labor, cabinet status but farm interests objected to the inclusion of labor, and the bill was killed in conference.
The USDA is administered by the United States Secretary of Agriculture.
United States Secretary of Agriculture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (137 words)
The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development.
The 190 million acres (770,000 km²) of national forests and grasslands are managed by the United States Forest Service.
Advice for farmers and gardeners is provided by the United States Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m