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Encyclopedia > United States Coast Guard
United States Coast Guard

Leadership
Secretary of Homeland Security
Commandant of the Coast Guard
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard
Personnel
Organization of the Coast Guard
Missions of the Coast Guard
Badges
Awards
Equipment
Coast Guard Auxiliary
Coast Guard Reserve
Coast Guard Intelligence
Coast Guard Investigative Service
Structure
Sectors
Air stations
History and Traditions
Coast Guard History
Coast Guard Academy
Coast Guard slogan
Coast Guard One
Coast Guard Flag
Predecessor organizations
Life-Saving Service
Revenue Cutter Service
Lighthouse Service
Steamboat Inspection Service
Bureau of Navigation
USCG HH-65 Dolphin
USCG HH-65 Dolphin
USCG HH-60J JayHawk
USCG HH-60J JayHawk
USCG HC-130H departs Mojave
USCG HC-130H departs Mojave
USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. The Coast Guard has eleven statutory missions: Migrant Interdiction, Defense Readiness, Drug Interdiction, Ports, Waterways and Coastal Security, Other Law Enforcement, Search and Rescue, Aids to Navigation, Marine Safety, Living Marine Resources, Marine Environmental Protection, and Ice Operations. As one of the seven uniformed services of the United States, and the smallest armed service of the United States, its stated mission is to protect the public, the environment, and the United States economic and security interests in any maritime region in which those interests may be at risk, including international waters and America's coasts, ports, and inland waterways. Image File history File links USCG_S_W.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Navy United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Air Force Military of the United States United States Coast Guard... The United States Secretary of Homeland Security is the head of the United States Department of Homeland Security, the body concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Commandant of the US Coast Guard is the highest ranking member of the US Coast Guard. ... Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard The Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard (MCPOCG) is a unique non-commisioned rank in the United States Coast Guard. ... This article covers the organization of the United States Coast Guard. ... The United States Coast Guard carries out five basic missions: maritime safety maritime mobility maritime security national defense protection of natural resources. ... Badges of the United States Coast Guard are military decorations issued by the Department of Homeland Security to members of the United States Coast Guard to denote certain qualifications, achievements, and postings to certain assignments. ... Awards and decorations of the United States Coast Guard are military decorations of the United States Coast Guard which are currently issued under the authority of the Department of Homeland Security. ... The United States Coast Guard uses cutters and small boats on the water, and fixed- and rotary wing (helicopters) aircraft in the air. ... Signature Mark of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary was established on June 23, 1939 by an act of Congress as the United States Coast Guard Reserve and re-designated as the Auxiliary on February 19, 1941. ... The United States Coast Guard Reserve , established in 1939 as a civilian reserve, is the military reserve component of the United States Coast Guard. ... Coast Guard intelligence is the Intelligence branch of the United States Coast Guard. ... Coast Guard Investigative Service also known as CGIS. CGIS is composed of civilian, officer, and enlisted Special Agents. ... A Sector is a shore-based operational unit of the United States Coast Guard. ... This is a list of United States Coast Guard air stations. ... The History of the United States Coast Guard goes back to the Revenue Cutter Service, which was founded on August 4, 1790 as part of the Department of the Treasury. ... The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), located in New London, Connecticut is a U.S. military academy that provides education to future officers of the United States Coast Guard. ... Semper Paratus (march) Semper Paratus (Latin for Always ready) is the official slogan of the United States Coast Guard. ... Coast Guard One is the air traffic control callsign of any United States Coast Guard aircraft carrying the President of the United States. ... The flag of the United States Coast Guard is white with a dark blue Great Seal of the United States. ... The United States Life-Saving Service was a Federal agency that grew out of private and local humanitarian efforts to save the lives of shipwrecked mariners and passengers. ... The United States Revenue Cutter Service was established by Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton in 1790 as an armed maritime law enforcement service. ... The US Lighthouse Service, also known as the Bureau of Lighthouses, was the agency of the US Federal Government that was responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of all lighthouses in the United States. ... The Steamboat Inspection Service was a United States agency created for the safeguarding of lives and property at sea in 1852. ... The Bureau of Navigation was an agency established in 1884 to enforce US laws laws relating to the construction, equipment, operation, inspection, safety, and documentation of merchant vessels. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3456 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3456 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 513 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,272 × 816 pixels, file size: 116 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 513 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,272 × 816 pixels, file size: 116 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The Mojave Spaceport (IATA: MHV, ICAO: KMHV) , also known as the Mojave Airport and Civilian Aerospace Test Center, is located in Mojave, California, at an elevation of 2,791 feet. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,570 × 1,740 pixels, file size: 332 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,570 × 1,740 pixels, file size: 332 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ... Admiralty law (also referred to as maritime law) is a distinct body of law which governs maritime questions and offenses. ... The United States has seven uniformed services as defined by Title 10 of the United States Code. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ...

Contents

Overview

The Coast Guard, in its literature, describes itself as "a military, maritime, multi-mission service within the Department of Homeland Security dedicated to protecting the safety and security of America." The other branches of the military are components of the Department of Defense. The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Department of Defense redirects here. ...


The United States Coast Guard has a broad and important role in homeland security, law enforcement, search and rescue, marine environmental pollution response, and the maintenance of river, intracoastal and offshore aids to navigation (ATON). It also lays claim to being the United States' oldest continuous seagoing service. As of October 2006, The United States Coast Guard has about 41,000 men and women on active duty, 8,100 reservists, 7,000 full time civilian employees and 37,000 auxiliarists. For the United States Cabinet department, see United States Department of Homeland Security. ... For the band, see The Police. ... Search and Rescue (acronym SAR) is an operation mounted by emergency services, often well-trained volunteers, to find someone believed to be in distress, lost, sick or injured either in a remote or difficult to access area, such as mountains, desert or forest (Wilderness search and rescue), or at sea... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... Tug and barge on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway Navigation on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW), where it intersects with Bayou Perot, in the vicinity of New Orleans The Intracoastal Waterway is a 4,800-km (3,000-mile) recreational and commercial waterway along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the...


The Coast Guard's motto is Semper Paratus, meaning "Always Ready". USCG has participated in every U.S. conflict from landing troops on D-Day and on the Pacific Islands in World War II, extensive patrols and shore bombardment during the Vietnam War, to Operation Iraqi Freedom. Maritime interception operations, coastal security patrols, and law enforcement detachments are the major roles in Iraq. Coast Guard shield The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is the coast guard of the United States. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq arguably without the explicit backing of the...


The legal basis for the Coast Guard is 14 U.S.C. § 1 which states: "The Coast Guard as established January 28, 1915, shall be a military service and a branch of the armed forces of the United States at all times." Coast Guard organization and operation is as set forth in Title 33 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Title 14 of the United States Code outlines the role of the United States Coast Guard in the United States Code. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Title 33 is the portion of the Code of Federal Regulations that governs Navigation and Navigable Waters within the United States. ...


On February 25, 2003, the Coast Guard was placed under the Department of Homeland Security. The Coast Guard reports directly to the Secretary of Homeland Security. However, under 14 U.S.C. § 3 as amended by section 211 of the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2006, upon the declaration of war and when Congress so directs in the declaration, or when the President directs, the Coast Guard operates under the Department of Defense as a service in the Department of the Navy. 14 U.S.C. § 2 authorizes the Coast Guard to enforce federal law. Further, the Coast Guard is not subject to the restrictions of the Posse Comitatus Act which restrict the law enforcement activities of the other four military services. is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... DHS redirects here. ... Title 14 of the United States Code outlines the role of the United States Coast Guard in the United States Code. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Department of Defense redirects here. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy and Marine Corps. ... Title 14 of the United States Code outlines the role of the United States Coast Guard in the United States Code. ... The Posse Comitatus Act is a United States federal law () passed on June 16, 1878 after the end of Reconstruction. ...


As members of a military service, Coast Guardsmen on active and reserve service are subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice and receive the same pay and allowances as members of the same pay grades in the other four armed services.


History

Marines holding a thanking sign for the US Coast Guard after the battle of Guam.
Marines holding a thanking sign for the US Coast Guard after the battle of Guam.

The roots of the Coast Guard lie in the United States Revenue Cutter Service established under the Department of the Treasury in 1790. Until the establishment of the United States Navy a decade later, the Cutter Service was the only naval force of the early U.S. The History of the United States Coast Guard goes back to the Revenue Cutter Service, which was founded on August 4, 1790 as part of the Department of the Treasury. ... Image File history File links MarinesUSCG.jpg‎ Marines holding a sign thanking the Coast Guard during WWII. This image is a work of a United States Coast Guard employee, taken or made during the course of an employees official duties. ... Image File history File links MarinesUSCG.jpg‎ Marines holding a sign thanking the Coast Guard during WWII. This image is a work of a United States Coast Guard employee, taken or made during the course of an employees official duties. ... Combatants United States Empire of Japan Commanders Roy S. Geiger Takeshi Takashima â€  Hideyoshi Obata â€  Strength 36,000 18,500 Casualties 3,000 killed, 7,122 wounded 18,000+ killed, 485 POWs Mariana and Palau Islands campaign Saipan – Philippine Sea – Guam – Tinian – Peleliu – Angaur The Guam Campaign The Battle of Guam... The United States Revenue Cutter Service was established by Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton in 1790 as an armed maritime law enforcement service. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ... USN redirects here. ...


"First Fleet" is a term occasionally used as an informal reference to the US Coast Guard, although as far as one can detect the United States has never in fact officially used this designation with reference either to the Coast Guard or any element of the US Navy. The informal appellation honors the fact that between 1790 and 1798, there was no United States Navy and the cutters which were the predecessor of the US Coast Guard were the only warships protecting the coast, trade, and maritime interests of the new republic. [1]


The modern Coast Guard can be said to date to 1915, when the Cutter Service merged with the United States Life-Saving Service and Congress formalized the existence of the new organization. In 1939, the U.S. Lighthouse Service was brought under its purview. In 1942, the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation was transferred to the Coast Guard. In 1967, the Coast Guard moved from the Department of the Treasury to the newly formed Department of Transportation, an arrangement that lasted until it was placed under the Department of Homeland Security in 2003. The United States Life-Saving Service was a Federal agency that grew out of private and local humanitarian efforts to save the lives of shipwrecked mariners and passengers. ... The US Lighthouse Service, also known as the Bureau of Lighthouses, was the agency of the US Federal Government that was responsible for the upkeep and maintenance of all lighthouses in the United States. ... The Steamboat Inspection Service was a United States agency created for the safeguarding of lives and property at sea in 1852. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ... The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a federal Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transportation. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ...


In times of war, the Coast Guard may operate as a service in the Department of the Navy. This arrangement has a broad historical basis, as the Guard has been involved in wars as diverse as the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War, and the American Civil War, in which the cutter Harriet Lane fired the first naval shots attempting to relieve besieged Fort Sumter. The last time the Coast Guard operated as a whole under the Navy was in World War II. This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Fort Sumter, a Third System masonry coastal fortification located in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Organization

The headquarters of the Coast Guard is on 2100 Second Street, SW, in Washington, D.C. In 2005, the Coast Guard announced tentative plans to relocate to the grounds of the former St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington. That project is currently on hold because of environmental, historical, and congressional concerns. As of July 2006, there are several possible locations being considered, including the current headquarters location. This article covers the organization of the United States Coast Guard. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... St. ...


Personnel

USCGC Steadfast
USCGC Steadfast

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 353 KB) Summary USCGC STEADFAST is pictured at the 17th pier in Astoria, Oregon. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 353 KB) Summary USCGC STEADFAST is pictured at the 17th pier in Astoria, Oregon. ...

Commissioned Officer Corps

There are many routes by which individuals can become commissioned officers in the US Coast Guard. The most common are:


United States Coast Guard Academy

The United States Coast Guard Academy is located on the Thames River in New London, Connecticut. It is the only military academy, apart from the specialized Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, to which no Congressional or presidential appointments are made. All cadets enter by open competition utilizing SAT scores, high school grades, extra-curricular activities, and other criteria. About 225 cadets are commissioned ensigns each year. Graduates of the Academy are obligated to serve five years on active duty. Most graduates (about 70%) are assigned to duty aboard a Coast Guard cutter after graduation, either as Deck Watch Officers (DWO) or as Engineer Officers in Training (EOIT). Smaller numbers are assigned to flight training (about 10% of the class) or to shore duty at Coast Guard Sectors, Districts, or Area headquarters unit. The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), located in New London, Connecticut is a U.S. military academy that provides education to future officers of the United States Coast Guard. ... The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), located in New London, Connecticut is a U.S. military academy that provides education to future officers of the United States Coast Guard. ... The Thames River, seen from the waterfront in New London, Connecticut The Thames River is a short river and tidal estuary in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ... The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), established by the United States Congress in 1972 and graduating its first class in 1980, is a center for military medical education and research. ... A cadet is a future officer in the military. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... A Sector is a shore-based operational unit of the United States Coast Guard. ...


College Student Pre-Comissioning Initiative (CSPI)

The College Student Pre-Commissioning Initiative (CSPI) is a scholarship program for college sophomores. This program provides students with valuable leadership, management, law enforcement, navigation and marine science skills and training. It also provides full payment of school tuition, fees, textbooks, a salary, medical insurance and other benefits during a student's junior and senior year of college. The CSPI program guarantees training at Officer Candidate School (OCS) upon successful completion of all program requirements. Each student is expected to complete his/her degree and all Coast Guard training requirements. Following the completion of OCS and commission as a Coast Guard officer, each student will be required to serve on active duty (full time) as an officer for 3 years.


Benefits: Full tuition, books and fees paid for two years, monthly salary of approximately $2,000, medical and life insurance, 30 days paid vacation per year, leadership training.


Officer Candidate School

In addition to the Academy, prospective officers may enter the Coast Guard through the Officer Candidate School (OCS) at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut. OCS is a rigorous 17-week course of instruction which prepares candidates to serve effectively as officers in the United States Coast Guard. In addition to indoctrinating students into a military life-style, OCS also provides a wide range of highly technical information necessary for performing the duties of a Coast Guard officer. Officer Candidate School or Officer Cadet School (OCS) are institutions which train civilians and enlisted personnel in order for them to gain a commission as officers in the armed forces of a country. ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ...


Graduates of the program receive a commission in the Coast Guard at the rank of Ensign and are required to serve a minimum of three years of active duty. Graduates may be assigned to a ship, flight training, to a staff job, or to an operations ashore billet. However, first assignments are based on the needs of the Coast Guard. Personal desires and performance at OCS are considered. All graduates must be available for world wide assignment.


In addition to United States citizens, foreign cadets and candidates also attend Coast Guard officer training.


Direct Commission Officer Program

The Coast Guard's Direct Commission Officer course is administered by the Officer Candidate School staff. Depending on the specific program and background of the individual, the course is three, four or five weeks long. The first week of the five-week course is an Indoctrination week. Military officers who serve on active duty or in the reserves in many cases receive their commission through a Direct Commission Officer (DCO) program. ...


ROTC

Unlike the other armed services, the Coast Guard does not sponsor a ROTC program. It does, however, sponsor one Junior ROTC ("JROTC") program at the MAST Academy. The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program of the United States armed forces present on college campuses to recruit and educate commissioned officers. ... The Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) is a program put forth by the United States Armed Forces in high schools across the nation that train highschool students in Leadership and Military Sciences. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Chief Warrant Officers

Highly qualified enlisted personnel from E-6 through E-9 compete every year for appointment as a Chief Warrant Officer (or CWO). Successful candidates are chosen by a board and then commissioned as Chief Warrant Officers (CWO-2) in one of sixteen specialties. Over time Chief Warrant Officers may be promoted to CWO-3 and CWO-4. The ranks of Warrant Officer (WO-1) and CWO-5 are not currently used in the Coast Guard. Chief Warrant Officers may also compete for the Chief Warrant Officer to Lieutenant program. If selected, the officer will be promoted to Lieutenant (O-3).


Enlisted Corps

Newly enlisted personnel are sent to eight weeks of Basic Training at Coast Guard Training Center Cape May in Cape May, New Jersey. U.S. Army recruits learn about bayonet fighting skills in an infantry Basic Combat Training at Fort Benning, Georgia. ... United States Coast Guard Training Center Cape May is the home of the Coast Guard enlisted corps and is the Coast Guards only enlisted accession point and recruit training center. ... Cape May City highlighted in Cape May County. ...


The training schedule includes:

  • Physical fitness
  • Water survival and swimming qualifications
  • Wellness and nutrition
  • Self-discipline
  • Military skills
  • Military bearing
  • Seamanship

Following graduation, most members are sent to their first unit while they await orders to attend advanced training, in Class "A" Schools, in their chosen rating, the naval term for Military Occupational Specialty (MOS). Some members go directly to "A" School upon graduation from Basic training. United States Coast Guard ratings are general occupations that consist of specific skills and abilities. ... A Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) is a job classification in use in the United States Army and Marine Corps. ...


Petty officers follow career development paths similar to those of Navy petty officers. A Petty Officer is a noncommissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ...


Enlisted Coast Guard members who have reached the pay grade of E-7, or Chief Petty Officer, must attend the U.S. Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Academy at Petaluma, California, or an equivalent Department of Defense school, to be advanced to pay grade E-8. United States Air Force master sergeants, as well as international students representing their respective maritime services, are also eligible to attend the Academy. The basic themes of this school are: Aerial view of Petaluma, California. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... // PAY GRADE In the United States Military, a Pay Grade is the rate at which all military members receive their basic pay. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ...

  • Professionalism
  • Leadership
  • Communications
  • Systems Thinking and Lifelong Learning

Ranks

Officer Grade Structure of the United States Coast Guard
Admiral

(ADM) For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ...

Vice Admiral

(VADM) Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ...

Rear Admiral (UH)

(RADM) The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ...

Rear Admiral (LH)

(RDML) The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ...

Captain

(CAPT) Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ...

Commander

(CDR) Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ...

Lieutenant Commander

(LCDR) In the Royal Navy, United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a lieutenant commander (lieutenant-commander or Lt Cdr in the RN) is a commissioned officer superior to a lieutenant and inferior to a commander. ...

Lieutenant

(LT) Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ...

Lieutenant, Junior Grade

(LTJG) LTJG insignia. ...

Ensign

(ENS) Ensign of the Imperial Japanese Navy. ...

O-10 O-9 O-8 O-7 O-6 O-5 O-4 O-3 O-2 O-1
Warrant Officer Grade Structure of the United States Coast Guard
CWO4 CWO3 CWO2
Non Commissioned Officer Grade Structure of the United States Coast Guard[1]
Crossed anchors in the graphics indicate a rating of Boatswain's Mate
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard

(MCPOCG) Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... These charts represents the United States Coast Guard enlisted rate insignia. ... Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard The Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard (MCPOCG) is a unique non-commisioned rank in the United States Coast Guard. ...

Command Master Chief Petty Officer

(CMC) A Command Master Chief Petty Officer is the senior enlisted person in a United States Navy command structure. ...

Master Chief Petty Officer

(MCPO)
Master Chief Boatswain's Mate (BMCM) insignia shown Good conduct variation Master Chief Petty Officer insignia Master Chief Petty Officer Sleeve Insignia Master Chief Petty Officer is the ninth, and highest, enlisted rank (E-9) in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Senior Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ...

Senior Chief Petty Officer

(SCPO)
Senior Chief Boatswain's Mate (BMCS) insignia shown Good conduct variation Senior Chief Petty Officer insignia Senior Chief Petty Officer is the eighth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Chief Petty Officer and below Master Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ...

Chief Petty Officer

(CPO)
Chief Boatswain's Mate (BMC) insignia shown Chief Petty Officer is a non-commissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ...

Petty Officer First Class

(PO1)
First Class Boatswain's Mate (BM1) insignia shown Good conduct variation Petty Officer First Class insignia Petty Officer First Class is the sixth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Petty Officer Second Class and below Chief Petty Officer, and is a non-commissioned officer. ...

Petty Officer Second Class

(PO2)
Second Class Boatswain's Mate (BM2) insignia shown Good conduct variation Petty Officer Second Class insignia Petty Officer Second Class is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Petty Officer Third Class and below Petty Officer First Class, and is a non-commissioned officer. ...

Petty Officer Third Class

(PO3)
Third Class Boatswain's Mate (BM3) insignia shown U.S. Navy Good conduct variation U.S. Navy Petty Officer Third Class insignia Petty Officer Third Class is the fourth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Seaman and below Petty Officer Second Class, and is the lowest form of non-commissioned...

E-9S E-9 E-9 E-8 E-7 E-6 E-5 E-4
Enlisted Grade Structure of the United States Coast Guard
Seaman

(SN) Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about a military rank. ...

Seaman Apprentice

(SA) Fireman variation Airman variation Seaman Apprentice insignia Seaman Apprentice is the second lowest enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Seaman Recruit and below Seaman; this rank was formerly known as Seaman Second Class. ...

Seaman Recruit

(SR) Seaman Recruit is the lowest enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just below Seaman Apprentice; this rank was formerly known as Seaman Third Class. ...

E-3 E-2 E-1

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Equipment

The equipment of the USCG consists of thousands of vehicles (boats, ships, helicopters, fixed-winged aircraft, automobiles), communication systems (radio equipment, radio networks, radar, data networks), weapons, infrastructure such as United States Coast Guard Air Stations and local Small Boat Stations, each in a large variety. A Coast Guard Air Station provides aviation support for the United States Coast Guard. ...

The United States Coast Guard uses cutters and small boats on the water, and fixed- and rotary wing (helicopters) aircraft in the air. ...

Symbols

Core values

The Coast Guard, like the other armed services of the United States, has a set of core values which serve as basic ethical guidelines to Coast Guard members. As listed in the recruit pamphlet, The Helmsman,[2] they are:

  • Honor: Absolute integrity is our standard. A Coast Guardsman demonstrates honor in all things: never lying, cheating, or stealing. We do the right thing because it is the right thing to do—all the time.
  • Respect: We value the dignity and worth of people: whether a stranded boater, an immigrant, or a fellow Coast Guard member; we honor, protect, and assist.
  • Devotion to Duty: A Coast Guard member is dedicated to five maritime security roles: Maritime Safety, Maritime Law Enforcement, Marine Environmental Protection, Maritime Mobility and National Defense. We are loyal and accountable to the public trust. We welcome responsibility.[3]

This article is about untruthfulness. ... Cheat redirects here. ... A young waif steals a pair of boots “Stealing” redirects here. ... Immigration is the movement of people into one place from another. ...

Coast Guard Ensign

Coast Guard Ensign

The Coast Guard Ensign (flag) was first flown by the Revenue Cutter Service in 1799 to distinguish revenue cutters from merchant ships. The order stated the Ensign would be "16 perpendicular stripes, alternate red and white, the union of the ensign to be the arms of the United States in a dark blue on a white field." (There were 16 states in the United States at the time). Image File history File links CoastGuardEnsign. ... Image File history File links CoastGuardEnsign. ... The United States Revenue Cutter Service was established by Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton in 1790 as an armed maritime law enforcement service. ...


The purpose of the flag is to allow ship captains to easily recognize those vessels having legal authority to stop and board them. This flag is flown only as a symbol of law enforcement authority and is never carried as a parade standard. See [2]


Coast Guard Standard

Parade Standard of the U.S. Coast Guard

The Coast Guard Standard is used in parades and carries the battle honors of the U.S. Coast Guard. It was derived from the jack of the Coast Guard ensign which used to fly from the stern of revenue cutters. The emblem is a blue eagle from the coat of arms of the United States on a white field. Above the eagle are the words "UNITED STATES COAST GUARD;" below the eagle is the motto, "SEMPER PARATUS" and the inscription "1790." Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A Maritime flag or Naval Jack is a national flag used exclusively on boats and other watercraft. ...


Racing Stripe

Racing Stripe

The Racing Stripe was designed in 1964 to give the Coast Guard a distinctive, modern image and was first used in 1967. The symbol is a narrow blue bar, a narrow white stripe between, and a broad red [4] bar with the Coast Guard shield centered. The stripes are canted at a 64 degree angle, coincidentally the year the Racing Stripe was designed. The Stripe has been adopted for the use of other coast guards, such as the Canadian Coast Guard, the Italian Guardia Costiera, the Indian Coast Guard, and the Australian Customs Service. Auxiliary vessels maintained by the Coast Guard also carry the Stripe in inverted colors. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x700, 22 KB) United States Coast Guard Official Mark Websafe Colors Provided by: USCGAUX Public Affairs Unoficially known as the Racing Stripe, originally conceived by President John F. Kennedy. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x700, 22 KB) United States Coast Guard Official Mark Websafe Colors Provided by: USCGAUX Public Affairs Unoficially known as the Racing Stripe, originally conceived by President John F. Kennedy. ... Flag of the Canadian Coast Guard. ... La Guardia Costiera is the coast guard of Italy. ... Indian Coast Guards coat of Arms. ... The Australian Customs Service (ACS) is responsible for overseeing international movement of trade goods and people into Australia, for the collection of customs and excises, for undertaking border management activities, and for detecting drugs coming into the country. ...


Semper Paratus

The official march of the Coast Guard is "Semper Paratus" (Latin for "Always Ready"). An audio clip can be found at [3]. Semper Paratus (march) Semper Paratus (Latin for Always ready) is the official slogan of the United States Coast Guard. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


Missions

Coast Guard Ensign (Photo U.S. Coast Guard)
Coast Guard Ensign (Photo U.S. Coast Guard)

The Coast Guard carries out five basic roles, which are further subdivided into eleven statutory missions. The five roles are: U.S. Coast Guard Office of Historian photo of Coast Guard Ensign (PD) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... U.S. Coast Guard Office of Historian photo of Coast Guard Ensign (PD) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The United States Coast Guard carries out five basic missions: maritime safety maritime mobility maritime security national defense protection of natural resources. ...

The eleven statutory missions, found in section 888 of the Homeland Security Act are: Maritime Security is concerned with the prevention of intentional damage through sabotage, subversion, or terrorism. ... In military science, defense (or defence) is the art of preventing an enemy from conquering territory. ...

  • Ports, Waterways and Coastal Security (PWCS)
  • Counter Drug Law Enforcement
  • Migrant Interdiction
  • Other Law Enforcement (foreign fisheries)
  • Living Marine Resources (domestic fisheries)
  • Marine Safety
  • Marine Environmental Protection
  • Ice Operations
  • Aids to Navigation (ATON)
  • Defense Readiness
  • Marine Environmental Response

The OMEGA navigation system and the LORAN-C transmitters outside the USA were also run by the United States Coast Guard. The U.S. Coast Guard Omega Stations at Lamoure, North Dakota and Kāne'ohe, Hawai'i (Oahu) were both formally decommissioned and shut down on September 30, 1997. A navigational aid or Navaid is any sort of marker which aids the traveler in navigation; the term is most commonly used to refer to nautical or aviation travel. ... LORAN (LOng RAnge Navigation) is a terrestrial navigation system using low frequency radio transmitters that use the time interval between radio signals received from three or more stations to determine the position of a ship or aircraft. ... KāneÊ»ohe is a town and census-designated place (CDP) included in the City & County of Honolulu and located in HawaiÊ»i state District of KoÊ»olaupoko on the Island of OÊ»ahu. ...


National Response Center

Operated by the U.S. Coast Guard, the National Response Center (NRC) is the sole U.S. Government point of contact for reporting environmental spills, contamination, and pollution

The primary function of the National Response Center (NRC) is to serve as the sole national point of contact for reporting all oil, chemical, radiological, biological, and etiological discharges into the environment anywhere in the United States and its territories. In addition to gathering and distributing spill data for Federal On-Scene Coordinators and serving as the communications and operations center for the National Response Team, the NRC maintains agreements with a variety of federal entities to make additional notifications regarding incidents meeting established trigger criteria. The NRC also takes Terrorist/Suspicious Activity Reports and Maritime Security Breach Reports. Details on the NRC organization and specific responsibilities can be found in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan. ... Subsequent to an Oil Spill An oil spill is the unintentional release of a liquid petroleum hydrocarbon into the environment as a result of human activity. ... Air pollution Pollution is the introduction of pollutants (whether chemical substances, or energy such as noise, heat, or light) into the environment to such a point that its effects become harmful to human health, other living organisms, or the environment. ... The radiation warning symbol (trefoil). ... Air pollution Pollution is the introduction of pollutants (whether chemical substances, or energy such as noise, heat, or light) into the environment to such a point that its effects become harmful to human health, other living organisms, or the environment. ... This article is about the medical term. ... Air pollution Pollution is the introduction of pollutants (whether chemical substances, or energy such as noise, heat, or light) into the environment to such a point that its effects become harmful to human health, other living organisms, or the environment. ...


Uniforms

In 1972, the current Coast Guard dress blue uniform was introduced for wear by both officers and enlisted personnel (Prior to 1972, they wore U.S. Navy-style uniforms with Coast Guard insignia). Relatively similar in appearance to the old-style U.S. Air Force uniforms, the uniform consists of a blue four-pocket single breasted jacket and trousers in a slightly darker shade. A light-blue button-up shirt with a pointed collar, two front button-flap pockets, "enhanced" shoulder boards for officers, and pin-on collar insignia for Chief Petty Officers and enlisted personnel is worn when in shirt-sleeve order (known as "Tropical Blue Long"). It is similar to the World War II-era uniforms worn by Coast Guard Surfmen. Officer rank insignia parallels that of the U.S. Navy but with the gold Navy "line" star being replaced with the gold Coast Guard Shield and with the Navy blue background color replaced by Coast Guard blue. Enlisted rank insignia is also similar to the Navy with the Coast Guard shield replacing the eagle on collar and cap devices. Group Rate marks (stripes) for junior enlisted members (E-3 and below) also follow U. S. Navy convention with white for seaman, red for fireman, and green for airman. In a departure from the U. S. Navy conventions, all petty Officers E-6 and below wear red chevrons and all Chief Petty Officers wear gold. Unlike the US Navy, officers and CPO's do not wear khaki; all personel wear the same color uniform. See USCG Uniform Regulations [4] for current regulations. See military uniform and full dress for wider coverage of dress uniforms. ... Business shirt In American English, shirt can refer to almost any upper-body garment other than coats and bras (the term top is sometimes used in ladieswear). ...


The Coast Guard uses a white uniform, but it is worn only by officers during the summer for formal parade and change-of-command ceremonies— Chief Petty Officers, Petty Officers, and enlisted rates wear the blue uniform year round. When worn as a dress uniform, a white shirt replaces the light-blue shirt and a white belt may be worn for honor guards. A mess dress uniform is worn by members for formal (black tie) evening ceremonies.


The current working uniform of the Coast Guard is the Operational Dress Uniform (ODU), which is similar to the Battle Dress Uniform worn by the other U.S. armed services, but is in dark blue with no camouflage patterns and does not have lower pockets on the blouse. Rather, the blouse is tucked into the trousers. The ODU is worn with steel-toed boots in most circumstances, but low-cut black or brown boat shoes may be prescribed for certain situations. The former dark blue working uniform has been withdrawn from use by the Coast Guard but may be worn by Auxiliarists until no longer serviceable.


Enlisted Coast Guardsmen wear the combination covers for full dress, a garrison cover for Class "B," wear, and a baseball-style cover either embroidered with "U.S. Coast Guard" in gold block lettering or the name of their ship, unit or station in gold, for the ODU uniform. Male and female company commanders (the Coast Guard equivalent of Marine Corps drill instructors) at Training Center Cape May wear the traditional "Smokey the Bear" campaign hat. United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Smokeys instant catch-phrase is Only you can prevent forest fires! Smokey Bear is a mascot of the United States Forest Service created in 1944 to educate the public on the dangers of forest fires. ... A USMC drill instructor wearing a campaign hat A Canadian Mountie wearing the familiar Stetson and Red Serge tunic at Expo 67 in Montreal. ...


The Coast Guard Auxiliary wears uniforms identical to Coast Guard officers but with silver stripes denoting office held by the Auxiliarist (rather than rank). Insignia are marked with an "A" in the center.


A recent issue of the Reservist magazine was devoted to a detailed and easy to understand graphical description of all the authorized uniforms.


Issues

A Coast Guard helicopter crew member looks out over post-Katrina New Orleans
A Coast Guard helicopter crew member looks out over post-Katrina New Orleans

The Coast Guard faces several issues in the near future. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1180x757, 412 KB) Summary New Orleans (August 30, 2005) – U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Shawn Beaty of Long Island, N.Y., looks for survivors in the wake of Hurricane Katrina as he flies in an HH-60J Jayhawk... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1180x757, 412 KB) Summary New Orleans (August 30, 2005) – U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Shawn Beaty of Long Island, N.Y., looks for survivors in the wake of Hurricane Katrina as he flies in an HH-60J Jayhawk...


Lack of coverage affects many areas with high maritime traffic. For example, local officials in Scituate, Massachusetts, have complained that there is no permanent Coast Guard station, and the presence of the Coast Guard in winter is vital. One reason for this lack of coverage is the relatively high cost of building storm-proof buildings on coastal property; the Cape Hatteras station was abandoned in 2005 after winter storms wiped out the 12-foot sand dune serving as its protection from the ocean. Scituate, Massachusetts is a small seacoast town located in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod Bay midway between Boston and Plymouth. ... An aerial view of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse prior to its 1999 relocation. ...


Lack of strength to meet its assigned missions is being met by a legislated increase in authorized strength from 39,000 to 45,000. In addition, the volunteer Auxiliary is being called to take up more non-combatant missions. However, volunteer coverage does have limits.


Aging vessels are another problem. In 2005, the Coast Guard terminated contracts to upgrade the 110-foot (33.5 m) Island Class Cutters to 123-foot (37.5 m) cutters because of warping and distortion of the hulls. In late 2006, Admiral Allen, Commandant of the Coast Guard, decommissioned all eight 123-foot cutters due to dangerous conditions created by the lengthening of the hull- to include compromised watertight integrity. The Coast Guard has, as a result of the failed 110-ft conversion, revised production schedules for the Fast Response Cutter (FRC). Of the navies and coast guards of the world's 40 major maritime countries, the U.S. Coast Guard's is the 38th oldest. USCG Matagorda. ... Fast Response Cutter The Fast Response Cutter is part of the United States Coast Guards deepwater initiative. ...


Live fire exercises by Coast Guard boat and cutter crews in the U.S. waters of the Great Lakes attracted attention in the U.S. and Canada. The Coast Guard had proposed the establishment of 34 locations around the Great Lakes where live fire training using vessel-mounted machine guns were to be conducted periodically throughout the year. The Coast Guard said that these exercises are a critical part of proper crew training in support of the service's multiple missions on the Great Lakes. Those that raised concerns about the firing exercises commented about safety concerns and that the impact on commercial shipping, tourism, recreational boating and the environment may be greater than what the Coast Guard had stated. The Coast Guard took public comment and conducted a series of nine public meetings on this issue. After receiving more than 1,000 comments, mostly opposing the Coast Guard's plan, the Coast Guard announced that they were withdrawing their proposal for target practice on the Great Lakes, although a revised proposal may be made in the future. [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] A M4 Carbine is in the forground and the M16A2 in the background in the hands of these two Marines during a live fire exercise in 2003 A live fire exercise is any exercise in which a realistic scenario for the use of specific equipment is simulated. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ...


Notable Coast Guardsmen and others associated with the USCG

Source: U.S. Coast Guard

Vitals: November 27th 1925-February 6th 2000 aged 75 Yin/Yang: ?/Sagittarius Place of Birth: Portland, OR Place of Death: unknown, probably somewhere in Belgium Derroll Adams was a tall, lanky banjo player with a deep voice. ... Nick Adams born Nicholas Aloysius Adamshock (July 10, 1931, Nanticoke, Pennsylvania -- February 7, 1968, Hollywood, California), was an American actor. ... Beau Bridges, (born Lloyd Vernet Bridges III on December 9, 1941 in Los Angeles, California), is an American actor. ... Bridges in The Sound of Fury (1950) Lloyd Vernet Bridges, Jr. ... Sid Caesar (born September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning American comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television series Your Show of Shows, and to younger generations as Coach Calhoun in Grease and Grease 2. ... Luigi P. Carnesecca (born January 5, 1925 in New York City, United States) is a former basketball coach at St. ... Saint Johns University can refer to: College of Saint Benedict/Saint Johns University in St. ... Rep. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Christopher W. Cooper (born July 9, 1951) is an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Richard Cromwell (January 8, 1910 - October 11, 1960) was an American actor, born LeRoy Melvin Radabaugh. ... Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. ... William D. Delahunt (born July 18, 1941), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1997, representing the 10th District of Massachusetts. ... William Harrison Jack Dempsey (June 24, 1895 – May 31, 1983) was an American boxer who held the world heavyweight title between 1919 and 1926. ... Buddy Ebsen (April 2, 1908 – July 6, 2003) was an American actor and dancer, who is best-remembered for his role as Jed Clampett in the popular television series The Beverly Hillbillies. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Edwin Duing Eshleman (December 4, 1920-January 10, 1985) was an American politician who represented Pennsylvania in the United States House of Representatives as a Republican from 1967 to 1977. ... Arthur Fiedler (December 17, 1894 – July 10, 1979) was the long-time conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, a symphony orchestra that specialized in popular music. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Charles Charlie Dewolf Gibson (born March 9, 1943) is an American media personality best known as co-anchor of Good Morning America on ABC from January 1987 to May 1998 and from January 1999 to June 28, 2006, a span of 19 years. ... In this CBS publicity photo of Arthur Godfrey Time, vocalist Patti Clayton is seen at the far right and Godfrey sits in the foreground. ... Otto Everett Graham Jr. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Alexander Murray Palmer Haley (August 11, 1921 – February 10, 1992) was an American writer. ... Roots: The Saga of an American Family book cover Roots: The Saga of an American Family is a novel written by Alex Haley and first published in 1976. ... William Hopper (January 26, 1915 – March 6, 1970) was an American actor. ... Hunter (left) with actor John Bromfield Arthur Andrew Kelm (born July 11, 1931, in New York City, New York) is an American actor and singer, and goes by the pseudonym Tab Hunter. ... Harvey E. Johnson Jr. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... Flipsyde redirects here. ... Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku (August 24, 1890 - January 22, 1968), The Big Kahuna, is generally regarded as the inventor of the modern sport of surfing. ... Jack Kramer can refer to: Jack Kramer: a Major League Baseball player Jack Kramer: a tennis player This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Jacob Lawrence taken by Kenneth Space. ... Victor Mature (29 January 1913 – 4 August 1999), an American film actor, was born in Louisville, Kentucky to a Tyrolean father, Marcellus George Mature, a cutler, and a Swiss-American mother, Clara Mature. ... Douglas A. Munro Douglas Albert Munro (11 October 1919 – 27 September 1942) is the only member of the United States Coast Guard to have received the Medal of Honor, the U.S. militarys highest decoration. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... Francis Hughes Murkowski (born March 28, 1933) is an American politician and a member of the Republican Party. ... This is a list of the governors of the U.S. state of Alaska, of Alaska Territory and of the District of Alaska, and the military commanders of the District of Alaska. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Samuel Augustus Nunn, Jr. ... This article is about the golfer. ... Edmund Kealoha Parker (March 19, 1931–December 15, 1990) was an American martial artist, exhibitionist, and teacher, perhaps most famous as the founder of American Kenpo. ... Claiborne Pell Claiborne de Borda Pell (born November 22, 1918) was a United States Senator from Rhode Island from 1961 to 1997. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Cesar Julio Romero, Jr. ... Sloan Wilson (8 May 1920 - 25 May 2003) was an American author. ... Dorothy Constance Stratton (b. ... SPARS was the United States Coast Guard Womens Reserve created in 1942 by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. ... Gary Eugene Gene Taylor (born September 17, 1953) is an American politician of the Democratic Party and a U.S. Representative from the 4th District of Mississippi (map). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other persons named Ted Turner, see Ted Turner (disambiguation). ... Rudy Vallee (July 28, 1901 - July 3, 1986) was a popular United States singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer. ... Image:Thorntonwilderteeth. ... Gig Young (November 4, 1913 – October 19, 1978) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ...

Deployable Operations Group (DOG)

The Deployable Operations Group is a recently formed Coast Guard command. The DOG brings numerous existing deployable law enforcement, tactical and response units under a single command headed by a rear admiral. The planning for such a unit began after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and culminated with its formation on July 20th, 2007. The unit will contain several hundred highly trained Coast Guardsmen. Its missions will include maritime law enforcement, antiterrorism, port security, and pollution response. Full operational capability is planned by summer 2008. [10]


Coast Guard Auxiliary

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer component of the United States Coast Guard, established on June 23, 1939 as the United States Coast Guard Reserve, that works within the Coast Guard in carrying out its noncombatant and non-law enforcement missions. As of December 17, 2006, there were 30,840 active Auxiliarists. The Coast Guard has assigned primary responsibility for most recreational boating safety tasks to the Auxiliary, including public boating safety education and voluntary vessel safety checks. In recent history prior to 1997, Auxiliarists were limited to those tasks and on-water patrols supporting recreational boating safety. Signature Mark of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary was established on June 23, 1939 by an act of Congress as the United States Coast Guard Reserve and re-designated as the Auxiliary on February 19, 1941. ... Image File history File links AUX_W.png‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Coast Guard ... Signature Mark of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary was established on June 23, 1939 by an act of Congress as the United States Coast Guard Reserve and re-designated as the Auxiliary on February 19, 1941. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Coast Guard Reserve , established in 1939 as a civilian reserve, is the military reserve component of the United States Coast Guard. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1997, however, new legislation authorized the Auxiliary to participate in any and all Coast Guard missions except military combat and law enforcement. 33 CFR 5.31 states that: Members of the Auxiliary, when assigned to specific duties shall, unless otherwise limited by the Commandant, be vested with the same power and authority, in execution of such duties, as members of the regular Coast Guard assigned to similar duties. Commandant of the US Coast Guard is the highest ranking member of the US Coast Guard. ...


Auxiliarists may support the law enforcement mission of the Coast Guard but do not directly participate in it. Auxiliarists and their vessels are not allowed to carry any weapons while serving in any Auxiliary capacity; however, they may serve as scouts, alerting regular Coast Guard units. Auxiliarists use their own vessels (i.e. boats) and aircraft, in carrying out Coast Guard missions, or apply specialized skills such as Web page design or radio watchstanding to assist the Coast Guard. When appropriately trained and qualified, they may serve upon Coast Guard vessels.


Auxiliarists undergo one of several levels of background check. For most duties, including those related to recreational boating safety, a simple identity check is sufficient. For some duties in which an Auxiliarist provides direct augmentation of Coast Guard forces, such as tasks related to port security, a more in-depth background check is required. Occasionally an Auxiliarist will need to obtain a security clearance through the Coast Guard in order to have access to classified information in the course of assigned tasking.


The basic unit of the Auxiliary is the Flotilla, which has at least 10 members and may have as many as 100. Five Flotillas in a geographical area form a Division. There are several divisions in each Coast Guard District. The Auxiliary has a leadership and management structure of elected officers, including Flotilla Commanders, Division Captains, and District Commodores, Atlantic and Pacific Area Commodores, and a national Commodore. However, legally, each Auxiliarist has the same 'rank', Auxiliarist. The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ...


In 2005, the Coast Guard transitioned to a geographical Sector organization. Correspondingly, a position of 'Sector Auxiliary Coordinator' was established. The Sector Auxiliary Coordinator is responsible for service by Auxiliarists directly to a Sector, including augmentation of Coast Guard Active Duty and Reserve forces when requested. Such augmentation is also referred to as force multiplication. A Sector is a shore-based operational unit of the United States Coast Guard. ...


Auxiliarists wear the same uniform as Coast Guard officers with modified officers' insignia based on their office: the stripes on uniforms are silver, and metal insignia bear a red or blue "A" in the center. Unlike their counterparts in the Civil Air Patrol, Auxiliarists come under direct orders of the Coast Guard. Civil Air Patrol seal The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is the civilian auxiliary of the United States Air Force (USAF). ...


Coast Guard Reserve

The United States Coast Guard Reserve is the military reserve of the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard Reserve was founded on February 19, 1941. Although Reservists normally train on a schedule of one weekend a month and for 15 days every year, many Reservists are integrated directly with Coast Guard units. The United States Coast Guard Reserve , established in 1939 as a civilian reserve, is the military reserve component of the United States Coast Guard. ... The United States Coast Guard Reserve , established in 1939 as a civilian reserve, is the military reserve component of the United States Coast Guard. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ...


During the Vietnam War period and shortly thereafter, the Coast Guard considered abandoning the Reserve program, but the force was instead reoriented into force augmentation. Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Since September 11, 2001, over 8,500 Reservists have been activated and 400 Reservists are currently on active duty. All the Coast Guard's Port Security Units and most of its Naval Coastal Warfare units are staffed primarily by Reservists. is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... // Overview A US Coast Guard PSU TPSB guarding th USS John F. Kennedy in the Middle East . Coast Guard Port Security Units are elite deployable units organized for sustained force protection operations. ...


The Reserve is managed by the Director of Reserve and Training, RDML Cynthia A. Coogan.


Medals and honors

See also: Awards and decorations of the United States military

One Coast Guardsman, Douglas Albert Munro, has earned the Medal of Honor, the highest military award of the United States.[11] Awards and decorations of the United States military are military decorations which recognize a service members service and personal accomplishments while a member of the United States armed forces. ... Douglas Munro giving covering fire Douglas Albert Munro (11 October 1919 – 27 September 1942) is the only member of the United States Coast Guard to have received the Medal of Honor, the U.S. militarys highest decoration. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ...


Six Coast Guardsmen have earned the Navy Cross and numerous men and women have earned the Distinguished Flying Cross. The Navy Cross is the second highest medal that can be awarded by the Department of the Navy and the second highest award given for valor. ... The Distinguished Flying Cross. ...


Prior to the transfer of the Coast Guard to the Department of Homeland Security, the highest peacetime decoration was the Department of Transportation Distinguished Service Medal. The highest unit award was the Secretary of Transportation Outstanding Unit Award. The Department of Transportation Distinguished Service Medal is the highest non-combat military decoration which may be bestowed to members of the U.S. Coast Guard. ... The Secretary of Transportation Outstanding Unit Award is a decoration of the United States Coast Guard which was issued from 1992 to 2003. ...


In wartime, members of the Coast Guard are eligible to receive the U.S. Navy version of the Medal of Honor. A Coast Guard Medal of Honor is authorized but has not yet been developed or issued.


In May 2006, at the Change of Command ceremony when Admiral Thad Allen took over as Commandant, President George W. Bush awarded the entire Coast Guard, including the Coast Guard Auxiliary, the Presidential Unit Citation for its efforts after Hurricane Katrina. Please see Presidential Unit Citation for other versions of this award The Presidential Unit Citation is awarded to units of the Armed Forces of the United States and allies for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy on or after 7 December 1941 (the date of the Attack on...


Organizations

Ancient Order of the Pterodactyl

Those who have piloted or flown in U.S. Coast Guard aircraft under official flight orders may join the Ancient Order of the Pterodactyl ("Flying Since the World was Flat"). The Ancient Order of the Pterodactyl (AOP) is a fraternal association which focuses on United States Coast Guard aviation. ...


USCGA Alumni Association

The United States Coast Guard Academy Alumni Association is devoted to providing service to and promoting fellowship among all U.S. Coast Guard Academy alumni and members of the Association. The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), located in New London, Connecticut, is a U.S. military academy that provides education to future officers of the United States Coast Guard. ...


Membership Types: Academy graduates and those who have attended the Academy are eligible for Regular membership; all others interested in the Academy and its Corps of Cadets are eligible for Associate membership. (Website)


Coast Guard CW Operators Association

The Coast Guard CW Operators Association (CGCWOA) is a membership organization comprised primarily of former members of the United States Coast Guard who held the enlisted rating of Radioman (RM) or Telecommunications Specialist (TC), and who employed International Morse Code (CW) in their routine communications duties on Coast Guard cutters and at shore stations. (Website)


U.S. Coast Guard in popular culture

The Coast Guard has been featured in several television series, such as Baywatch and CSI: Miami, and in film. A comedy, Onionhead, portrayed Andy Griffith as a Coast Guard recruit. The 2000 film The Perfect Storm depicted the rescue operations of the USCGC Tamaroa (WMEC-166) as one of its subplots. The special Counter-Drugs Helicopter Unit HITRON is seen in action on Bad Boys II. In the 2005 family comedy Yours, Mine, and Ours, Dennis Quaid plays a fictional U.S. Coast Guard Academy superintendent who marries a character played by Rene Russo and together have 18 children. The 2006 film The Guardian, starring Kevin Costner and Ashton Kutcher was based on the training and operation of Coast Guard Rescue Swimmers. Additionally, a Coast Guard cutter and its commander and crew figured prominently in Tom Clancy's book Clear and Present Danger. Baywatch was a popular American television series about the Los Angeles County Lifeguards who patrol the crowded beaches of Los Angeles County, California. ... CSI: Miami is a spinoff of the popular CBS network series CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. ... Onionhead is a 1958 movie set on a Coast Guard ship during World War II starring Andy Griffith, Felicia Farr, Walter Matthau, and Erin OBrien. ... Not to be confused with Andy Griffiths. ... The Perfect Storm is a 2000 film adapted from the book of the same title by Sebastian Junger. ... The USCGC Tamaroa (WMEC-166) is a United States Coast Guard cutter, originally the United States Navy salvage tug USS Zuni (ATF-95). ... Bad Boys II is a 2003 action comedy film directed by Michael Bay and produced by Jerry Bruckheimer. ... Yours, Mine & Ours is a 2005 film starring Dennis Quaid and Rene Russo. ... Dennis William Quaid (born April 9, 1954) is an American actor. ... The United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA), located in New London, Connecticut, is a U.S. military academy that provides education to future officers of the United States Coast Guard. ... Rene Russo Rene Russo (born February 17, 1954 in Burbank, California, USA) is an American film actress and model. ... The Guardian is a 2006 film starring Kevin Costner and Ashton Kutcher that was released on September 29, 2006. ... Kevin Michael Costner (born January 18, 1955) is an American film actor, director and producer. ... This article is about the actor. ... The United States Coast Guards Rescue Swimmers are trained at its Aviation Survival Technican / Rescue Swimmer school in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. ... For the member of the Irish folk band The Clancy Brothers, see Tom Clancy (singer) and for the American Celticist, see Thomas Owen Clancy. ... For the book, see Clear and Present Danger. ...


See also

Military of the United States Portal
United States Coast Guard Portal

Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ... Image File history File links CoastGuardEnsign. ...

Coast Guard

A Cutter is a United States Coast Guard vessel 65 feet in length or greater, having adequate accommodations for crew to live on board. ... The List of United States Coast Guard cutters is a listing of all cutters to have been commissioned by the United States Coast Guard during the history of that service. ... A Coast Guard Air Station provides aviation support for the United States Coast Guard. ... Coast Guard Investigative Service also known as CGIS. CGIS is composed of civilian, officer, and enlisted Special Agents. ... Coast Guard intelligence is the Intelligence branch of the United States Coast Guard. ... // The Coast Guard Legal Program is a “full-service” legal support organization, providing legal advice and counsel for any and all requirements the service’s decision makers choose. ... A typical deep-sea NDBC discus buoy in the Gulf of Mexico. ...

Related agencies

Seal of the US Maritime Administration MARAD, or the U.S. Maritime Administration, maintains the National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) as a ready source of ships for use during national emergencies and assists in fulfilling its traditional role as the nations fourth arm of defense in logistically supporting the... One of 19 patrol boats of NOAA OLE The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Office for Law Enforcement (NOAA OLE) is a federal police part of the National Marine Fisheries Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/navy/unit/fleet_n.htm
  2. ^ United States Coast Guard. The Helmsman
  3. ^ Coast Guard Training Center Cape May. Core Values
  4. ^ US Coast Guard History FAQs. US Coast Guard. Retrieved on 2006-12-30.
  5. ^ http://www.uscgd9safetyzones.com Ninth Coast Guard District – U.S. Great Lakes proposed permanent safety zones information site
  6. ^ http://dmses.dot.gov/docimages/p86/413031.pdf United States Federal Register – August 1, 2006 – Notice of Proposed Rulemaking
  7. ^ http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2006/10/16/coast-guard-guns.html?ref=rss CBC News – October 16, 2006 – U.S. machine-gun fire suspended on Great Lakes
  8. ^ http://www.dispatch.com/outdoors/outdoors.php?story=dispatch/2006/09/10/20060910-E17-02.html Columbus Dispatch - September 10, 2006 - Some up in arms over fire zones
  9. ^ http://www.CitizensForLakeSafety.org Opponents of the Coast Guard's live fire plan
  10. ^ Coast Guard Expects New Deployable Group Operating By Next Summer
  11. ^ United States Coast Guard. Douglas Albert Munro, USCG. Accessed November 6, 2006.
  • Coast Guardsman's Manual / George Krietemeyer - Naval Institute Press, 2000 - ISBN 1557504687

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
United States Coast Guard

  Results from FactBites:
 
United States Coast Guard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2864 words)
The headquarters of the Coast Guard is on 2100 Second Street, SW, in Washington, D.C. In 2005, the Coast Guard announced tentative plans to relocate to the grounds of the former St.
It was derived from the jack of the Coast Guard ensign which used to fly from the stern of revenue cutters.
In 2005, the Coast Guard terminated contracts to upgrade the 110-foot (33.5 m) Island Class Cutters to 123-foot (37.5 m) cutters because of warping and distortion of the hulls.
Coast Guard - MSN Encarta (745 words)
The Coast Guard’s duties include ensuring the safety of recreational and commercial boaters in U.S. waters, protecting the country’s marine environment, and helping protect the nation’s ports and coastal areas from terrorist attack.
An SAR unit boat or aircraft is required to mobilize within 30 minutes of notification of distress, and should arrive on the scene or within the search area in 90 minutes or less.
For example, the USCG protects right whales during their annual migration through busy shipping lanes in the Atlantic Ocean and enforces fishing regulations that protect endangered sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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