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Encyclopedia > United States Army
United States Army

United States Army portal
Active 14 June 1775 - today
Country United States of America
Type army
Size approx. 1,055,000
Part of Department of Defense
Department of the Army
Colors Black & Gold
March The Army Goes Rolling Along
Engagements Revolutionary War
Northwest Indian War
Tecumseh's War
Creek War
Peoria War
War of 1812
Seminole Wars
Black Hawk War
Mexican-American War
Utah War
American Civil War
Spanish-American War
Philippine-American War
Banana Wars
Boxer Rebellion
The Banana Wars
World War I
World War II
Korean War
Vietnam War
Persian Gulf War
Kosovo War
Operation Enduring Freedom
Operation Iraqi Freedom
Commanders
Chief of Staff GEN George W. Casey, Jr.
Vice Chief of Staff GEN Richard A. Cody
Sergeant Major SMA Kenneth O. Preston

The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. Like all armies, it has the primary responsibility for land-based military operations. Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Army_Seal. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... Seal The Department of the Army is one of the three military departments in the United States Department of Defense. ... The song was originally written by field artillery First Lieutenant (later Brigadier General) Edmund L. Gruber, while stationed in the Philippines in 1908 as the Caisson Song. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Combatants United States Western Lakes Confederacy Commanders Josiah Harmar Arthur St. ... At Vincennes in 1810, Tecumseh loses his temper when William Henry Harrison refuses to rescind the Treaty of Fort Wayne. ... Combatants United States Lower Creeks Cherokees Red Sticks (Creek Indians) Commanders Andrew Jackson John Coffee William McIntosh William Weatherford Menawa Peter McQueen Strength 7,000 4,000 Casualties 500 Settlers 125 Soldiers 1,900 The Creek War (1813–1814), also known as the Red Stick War and the Creek Civil... The Peoria War was an armed conflict between the U. S. Army and the Native American tribes of the Potawatomi and the Kickapoo that took place in the Peoria County, Illinois area, near the current location of the city of Peoria, from September 19 to October 21, 1813. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Combatants United States Seminole Commanders Andrew Jackson Osceola The Seminole Wars, also known as the Florida Wars, were three wars or conflicts in Florida between various groups of Indians collectively known as Seminoles and the United States. ... For other uses, see Black Hawk War (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Belligerents United States Utah Territory Commanders Pres. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... Belligerents United States Philippine Constabulary Philippine Scouts First Philippine Republic several groups post-1902 Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Malvar several unofficial leaders post-1902 Strength 126,000 soldiers[1] First Philippine Republic: 80,000 soldiers Casualties and losses ~5,000-7,000[1][2] ~12,000... US Marines with the captured flag of Augusto César Sandino in Nicaragua in 1932 The Banana Wars is an unofficial term that refers to the United States military interventions into Central and South America. ... Combatants Eight-Nation Alliance (ordered by contribution): Empire of Japan Russian Empire British Empire French Third Republic United States German Empire Kingdom of Italy Austro-Hungarian Empire Righteous Harmony Society Qing Dynasty (China) Commanders Edward Seymour Alfred Graf von Waldersee Ci Xi Strength 20,000 initially 49,000 total 50... US Marines with the captured flag of Augusto César Sandino in Nicaragua in 1932 The Banana Wars is an unofficial term that refers to the United States military interventions into Central and South America from 1898 (following the Spanish-American War) through 1934. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... Combatants United States, Poland, France, Canada, Pakistan, India, Australia, United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only), Northern Alliance, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Ethiopia, Somalia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Albania, Macedonia, Romania, Portugal, Bulgaria, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Georgia Taliban, al-Qaeda, Abu Sayyaf, Jemaah... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq arguably without the explicit backing of the... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the highest ranking officer in the United States Army and is member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff [1]. Prior to 1903, the military head of the... Flag of the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army The Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army (VCSA) is the principal advisor and assistant to the Army Chief of Staff. ... GEN Richard A. Cody General Richard A. Cody became the 31st Vice Chief of Staff, United States Army, on June 24, 2004. ... Sergeant Major of the Army insignia (U.S. Army) Sergeant Major of the Army flag (U.S. Army) The Sergeant Major of the Army is a unique rank in the United States Army. ... Kenneth O. Preston (born February 18, 1957) is the current Sergeant Major of the Army in the United States. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ... The United States has seven uniformed services as defined by Title 10 of the United States Code. ... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ...


The modern Army had its roots in the Continental Army which was formed on June 14, 1775, before the establishment of the United States, to meet the demands of the American Revolutionary War. Congress created the United States Army on June 14, 1784 after the end of the war to replace the disbanded Continental Army. The Army considers itself to be descended from the Continental Army, and thus dates its inception from the origins of that force.[1] The Continental Army was an army formed after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the colonies that became the United States of America. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about military actions only. ... The Congress of the Confederation or the United States in Congress Assembled was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of the United States from March 1, 1781 to March 4, 1789. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Control and operation of the Army is administered by the Department of the Army, one of the three service departments of the Department of Defense. The civilian head is the Secretary of the Army and the highest ranking military officer in the department is the Chief of Staff, unless the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff or Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff are Army officers. As of August 31, 2007, the Regular Army reported a strength of 519,472 soldiers.[2] By the end of 2006, the Army National Guard (ARNG) reported 346,288 and the United States Army Reserve (USAR) reported 189,975, putting the approximate combined component strength total at 1,055,734.[3] Seal The Department of the Army is one of the three military departments in the United States Department of Defense. ... In the United States Department of Defense, executive civilian control over matters other than operations is exercised through the three service departments, the Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy (which includes the Marine Corps), and the Department of the Air Force. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Army The United States Secretary of the Army has statutory responsibility for all matters relating to the United States Army: manpower, personnel, reserve affairs, installations, environmental issues, weapons systems and equipment acquisition, communications, and financial management. ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the highest ranking officer in the United States Army and is member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff [1]. Prior to 1903, the military head of the... The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is by law the highest ranking military officer of the United States military, and the principal military advisor to the President of the United States. ... The position of Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was created by the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The United States Regular Army is the permanent force of the United States Army that is maintained during peacetime, as opposed to those persons who may be part of a reserve or national guard outfit. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Army National Guard consists of the land force of the United States National Guard, or organized militia, of the several States and Territories, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, active and inactive, as defined in Title 32, USC Section 101. ... The United States Army Reserve is the federal reserve force of the United States Army. ...

Contents

Structure

The United States Army is made up of three components: the active component, the Regular Army; and two reserve components, the Army National Guard and the Army Reserve. Both reserve components are primarily composed of part-time soldiers who train once a month, known as Battle Assembly or Unit Training Assemblies (UTAs), and conduct two to three weeks of annual training each year. Both the Regular Army and the Army Reserve are organized under Title 10 of the United States Code, while the National Guard is organized under Title 32. While the Army National Guard is organized, trained and equipped as a component of the U.S. Army, when it is not in federal service it is under the command of individual state's governors. However the National Guard can be federalized by presidential order and against the governor's wishes.[4] The United States Regular Army is the permanent force of the United States Army that is maintained during peacetime, as opposed to those persons who may be part of a reserve or national guard outfit. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Army National Guard consists of the land force of the United States National Guard, or organized militia, of the several States and Territories, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, active and inactive, as defined in Title 32, USC Section 101. ... The United States Army Reserve is the federal reserve force of the United States Army. ... Soldiers get ready to go to the Weapons Qualification Range at Fort Dix, New Jersey Battle Assembly is the term used by the United States Army Reserve to describe monthly drills, where soldiers practice their warrior skills one weekend per month as members of the Army Reserve. ... Title 10 of the United States Code outlines the role of armed forces in the United States Code. ... The United States Code (U.S.C.) is a compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal law of the United States. ... Title 32 of the United States Code outlines the role of the United States National Guard in the United States Code. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Army National Guard consists of the land force of the United States National Guard, or organized militia, of the several States and Territories, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, active and inactive, as defined in Title 32, USC Section 101. ... The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ...

HHC, U.S. Army Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

The U.S. Army is led by a civilian Secretary of the Army, who reports to the Secretary of Defense, and serves as civilian oversight for the U.S. Army Chief of Staff. The U.S. Army Chief of Staff is a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, a body composed of the service chiefs from each service who advise the President and Secretary of Defense on military matters under the guidance of the Chairman and Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Image File history File links HHCUSASSI.gif Headquarters Company, US Army Shoulder Sleeve Insignia. ... Image File history File links HHCUSASSI.gif Headquarters Company, US Army Shoulder Sleeve Insignia. ... In the United States Army, a Headquarters and Headquarters Company is a company sized military unit, found at the battalion level and higher. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Army The United States Secretary of the Army has statutory responsibility for all matters relating to the United States Army: manpower, personnel, reserve affairs, installations, environmental issues, weapons systems and equipment acquisition, communications, and financial management. ... The United States Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) is the head of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and military matters. ... The Flag of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army The Chief of Staff of the United States Army (CSA) is the professional head of the United States Army who is responsible for insuring readiness of the Army. ... Joint Chiefs of Staff of the United States of America symbol The Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) is a group comprising the Chiefs of service of each major branch of the armed services in the United States armed forces. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...


In 1986, the Goldwater-Nichols Act mandated that operational control of the services follows a chain of command from the President to the Secretary of Defense directly to the Unified Combatant Commanders, who have control of all armed forces units in their geographic or function area of responsibility. Thus, the Chief of Staff of each service only has the responsibility to organize, train and equip their respective service component. The services provide trained forces to the Combatant Commanders for use as they see fit. The Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 Pub. ... A Unified Combatant Command is composed of forces from two or more services, has a broad and continuing mission, and is organized either on a geographical basis (known as Area Of Responsibility, AOR) or on a functional basis. ...


The Army is currently undergoing a period of transformation, which is expected to be finished in 2009. When it is finished, there will be five geographical commands which will line up with the five geographical Unified Combatant Commands (COCOM).

Each command will receive a numbered army as operational command, except in the case of U.S. Army Pacific, which will not receive one but will have a numbered army for U.S. Army forces in South Korea. Distinctive Unit Insignia // The Third United States Army was first activated as a formation during the First World War on November 7, 1918, at Chaumont, France, when the General Headquarters of the American Expeditionary Forces issued General Order 198 organizing the Third Army and announcing its headquarters staff. ... Fort McPherson is a U.S. Army base located in southwest Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Fifth United States Army was a field army of the United States Army. ... Fort Sam Houston is a U.S. Army post in San Antonio, Texas. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... United States Army South is the Armys service component command of United States Southern Command. ... The Seventh United States Army is the land component of United States European Command. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... For other uses, see Heidelberg (disambiguation). ... // Also known as USARPAC, the U.S. Army Pacific Command is the army component unit of the U.S. Pacific Command, except the units in Korea. ... Fort Shafter is in Honolulu, Hawai‘i extending up the interfluve (ridgeline) between Kalihi and Moanalua valleys, as well as onto the coastal plain (as Shafter Flats) at Māpunapuna. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


As part of the same transformation plan, the U.S. Army is currently undergoing a transition from being a division-based force to a brigade-based force. When finished, the active army will have increased its number of combat brigades from 33 to 42, and increases of a similar scale will have taken place in the National Guard and Reserve forces. Division lineage will be retained, but the divisional HQs will be able to command any brigades, not just brigades that carry their divisional lineage. The central part of this plan is that each brigade will be modular, i.e., all brigades of the same type will be exactly the same, and thus any brigade can be commanded by any division. There will be three major types of ground combat brigades: Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ...

  • Heavy brigades will have about 3,700 troops and be equivalent to a mechanized infantry brigade.
  • Infantry brigades will have around 3,300 troops and be equivalent to a light infantry or airborne brigade.
  • Stryker brigades will have around 3,900 troops and be based around the Stryker family of vehicles.

In addition, there will be combat support and service support modular brigades. Combat support brigades include Aviation brigades, which will come in heavy and light varieties, and Fires (artillery) brigades. Combat service support brigades include Sustainment brigades and come in several varieties and serve the standard support role in an army. Mechanized infantry are infantry equipped with armored personnel carriers (APCs), or infantry fighting vehicles (IFVs) for transport and combat (see also mechanized force). ... For other uses, see Stryker (disambiguation). ...

Most U.S. Army units can be operationally divided into the following components from largest to smallest: Graphic legend of Army Transformation Army Transformation describes the future-concept of the US Armys plan of modernization. ...

  • Corps: Formerly consisting of two or more divisions and organic support brigades, they are now termed an "operational unit of employment," that may command a flexible number of modular units. Usually commanded by a Lieutenant General. 20,000-45,000 soldiers.
  • Division: Formerly consisted of three maneuver brigades, an artillery brigade, a division support command, an aviation brigade, an engineer brigade (in heavy divisions only) and other support assets. Until the Brigade Combat Team program was developed, the division was the smallest self-sufficient level of organization in the U.S. Army. Current divisions are "tactical units of employment," and may command a flexible number of modular units, but generally will include four brigade combat teams and a combat aviation brigade. Usually commanded by a Major General. 10,000-15,000 soldiers.
  • Regiment: The Army, for the most part is no longer organized by Regiments. Rather, Battalions and Squadrons maintain Regimental Affiliations in that they are called (for example), 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry (Regiment is implied) and is written 1-8 Inf. In this case, there is no Regimental Commander and the Battlion is organizied as part of a Brigade for combat. The exceptions are those units, such as Armored Cavalry Regiments which remain organized, and fight, as a Regiment and have a Regimental Commander. The written designation is easy to distinguish and commonly misused. A "/" separates levels of command. 1st Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavaly Regiment is written 1/3 ACR where as the 1st Battalion, 6th Field Artillery (again, Regiment is implied) is written 1-6 FA.
  • Brigade (or group): Composed of two or more battalions, and usually commanded by a Colonel, supported by a staff in a Headquarters and Headquarters Company. Since the Brigade Unit of Action program was initiated, maneuver brigades have transformed into brigade combat teams, generally consisting of two maneuver battalions, a cavalry squadron, a fires battalion, a special troops battalion (with engineers, signals, and military intelligence), and a support battalion. Stryker Brigade Combat Teams have a somewhat larger structure. 3,000-5,000 soldiers.
  • Battalion (or Cavalry Squadron): Composed of two to five companies or batteries and led by a Battalion/Squadron Commander, usually a Lieutenant Colonel supported by a staff in a Headquarters and Headquarters Company/Battery. 300-1000 soldiers.
  • Company (or artillery battery/cavalry troop): Designated A thru C (plus HQ or support companies/batteries/troops) when in a 3 company/battery battalion or A thru D when organized in a 4 company/battery battalion. Regimental Troops are designated A thru T, depending on the number of Troops. The Troops are then divided into their like Squadrons. Each company/battery/troop is composed of three to four platoons and led by a Company/Battery/Troop Commander, usually a Captain supported by a First Sergeant. 62-190 soldiers.
  • Platoon: Composed of two or more squads and led by a Platoon Leader, usually a Second Lieutenant supported by a platoon sergeant (Sergeant First Class). 32 soldiers.
  • Section: Usually directed by a Staff Sergeant who supplies guidance for junior NCO Squad leaders. Often used in conjunction with platoons at the company level.
  • Squad: Composed of two teams and is typically led by a Staff Sergeant. 9-10 soldiers.
  • Team: The smallest unit. A fireteam consists of a team leader (usually a Sergeant, but may be a Corporal), a rifleman, a grenadier, and an automatic rifleman. A sniper team consists of a sniper who takes the shot and a spotter who assists in targeting. 2-4 soldiers.

Image File history File links FlagArmies. ... Image File history File links FlagArmies. ... The First United States Army is a field army of the United States Army. ... This article is about a military unit. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... Symbol of the Polish 1st Legions Infantry Division in NATO code A division is a large military unit or formation usually consisting of around ten to twenty thousand soldiers. ... The Brigade Combat Team (BCT) is the basic deployable unit of maneuver in the US Army. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... British regiment A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - commanded by a colonel. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ... In the United States Army, a Headquarters and Headquarters Company is a company sized military unit, found at the battalion level and higher. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols This article is about the military unit. ... A Squadron is a small unit or formation of cavalry, aircraft (including balloons), or naval vessels. ... Lieutenant Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces which is currently used by the United States Army, United States Air Force, United States Marine Corps, and United States National Guard. ... Standard NATO code for a friendly infantry company. ... Remains of a battery of English cannon from Youghal, County Cork. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... First Sergeant is the name of a military rank used in some countries. ... Platoon of the German Bundeswehr. ... Platoon is a term from military science. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... In most armies, a Platoon Sergeant is the title and position given to the senior enlisted member of a platoon, who advises and supports the platoons commanding officer in leading the unit. ... Sergeant First Class insignia Sergeant First Class (SFC) is the seventh enlisted rank in the U.S. Army, just above Staff Sergeant and below Master Sergeant, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... United States Military Staff Sergeant insignia (U.S. Air Force) Staff Sergeant is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Airman and below Technical Sergeant. ... In the fire service a Squad is a Engine Company with a compliment of rescue tools. ... United States Military Staff Sergeant insignia (U.S. Air Force) Staff Sergeant is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Airman and below Technical Sergeant. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... This article is about the military rank. ... Sniper teams are used in military doctrines of the United States, Canada and United Kingdom in sniper warfare, as well as in the police forces. ... For other uses, see Sniper (disambiguation). ...

Army components

U.S. Generals, World War II, Europe: back row (left to right): Stearley, Vandenberg, Smith, Weyland, Nugent; front row: Simpson, Patton, Spaatz, Eisenhower, Bradley, Hodges, Gerow.
U.S. Generals, World War II, Europe:
back row (left to right): Stearley, Vandenberg, Smith, Weyland, Nugent;
front row: Simpson, Patton, Spaatz, Eisenhower, Bradley, Hodges, Gerow.

During The First World War, the "National Army" was organized to fight the conflict. It was demobilized at the end of World War I, and was replaced by the Regular Army, the Organized Reserve Corps, and the State Militias. In the 1920s and 1930s, the "career" soldiers were known as the "Regular Army" with the "Enlisted Reserve Corps" and "Officer Reserve Corps" augmented to fill vacancies when needed. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2837x2264, 1239 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dwight D. Eisenhower George S. Patton European Theater of Operations Leonard T. Gerow Military history of... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2837x2264, 1239 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dwight D. Eisenhower George S. Patton European Theater of Operations Leonard T. Gerow Military history of... Ralph Francis Stearley (July 25, 1898 - February 3, 1973) was born at Brazil, Indiana, in 1898. ... General Hoyt Sanford Vandenberg was the second chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C. The general was born at Milwaukee, Wis. ... Walter Bedell Smith as U.S. Ambassador to the Soviet Union. ... General Otto P. Opie Weyland was the post-World War II Commander of Far East Air Forces during the Korean War and of Tactical Air Command. ... American Generals of World War II. Nugent is back row, right. ... Lieutenant General William Hood Simpson was a distinguished U.S. Army officer who commanded the U.S. Ninth Army in northern Europe, during World War II, among other roles. ... George Patton redirects here. ... Carl Spaatz Carl Andrew Tooey Spaatz (June 28, 1891 – July 14, 1974) was an American general in World War II. Carl Andrew Spatz was born on June 28, 1891, in Boyertown, Pennsylvania. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was one of the main U.S. Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II and a General of the Army of the United States Army. ... Courtney Hicks Hodges (January 5, 1887 – January 16, 1966) was an American military officer, most prominent for his role in World War II, in which he commanded the U.S. First Army in Northwest Europe. ... Leonard Townsend Gerow (July 13, 1888 - October 12, 1972) was born in Petersburg, Virginia. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The National Army was the combined conscript and volunteer force that was formed by the United States War Department in 1917 to fight in World War I. The National Army was formed from the old corps of the United States Army, augmented by units of the United States National Guard... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The United States Regular Army is the permanent force of the United States Army that is maintained during peacetime, as opposed to those persons who may be part of a reserve or national guard outfit. ...


In 1941, the "Army of the United States" was founded to fight the Second World War. The Regular Army, Army of the United States, the National Guard, and Officer/Enlisted Reserve Corps (ORC and ERC) existed simultaneously. After World War II, the ORC and ERC were combined into the United States Army Reserve. The Army of the United States was re-established for the Korean War and Vietnam War and was demobilized upon the suspension of the Draft. The Army of the United States is the official name for the conscription (U.S. term: draft) force of the United States Army that may be raised at the discretion of the United States Congress in the event of the United States entering into a major armed conflict. ... The United States Army Reserve is the federal reserve force of the United States Army. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Conscription in the United States has been employed several times, usually during war but also during the nominal peace of the Cold War. ...


Currently, the Army is divided into the Regular Army, the Army Reserve, and the United States National Guard. Prior to 1903 members of the National Guard were considered state soldiers unless federalized by the President. Since the Militia Act of 1903 all National Guard soldiers have held dual status: as National Guardsmen under the authority of the governor of their state and as a reserve of the U.S. Army under the authority of the President. Since the adoption of the total force policy, in the aftermath of the Vietnam War, reserve component soldiers have taken a more active role in U.S. military operations. Reserve and Guard units took part in the Gulf War, peacekeeping in Kosovo, and the 2003 invasion of Iraq. The United States Regular Army is the permanent force of the United States Army that is maintained during peacetime, as opposed to those persons who may be part of a reserve or national guard outfit. ... Army reserves are a part of an army which is normally activated only during emergencies such as a war. ... The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ... The Militia Act of 1903, also known as the Dick Act, was the result of a program of reform and reorganization in the military establishment initiated by Secretary of War Elihu Root following the Spanish-American War of 1898 after the war demonstrated weaknesses in the militia, as well as... The total force policy was adopted in the aftermath of the Vietnam War and involves treating the three components of the US Army - the Regular Army, the Army National Guard and the Army Reserve as a single force. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ...


Various State Defense Forces also exist, sometimes known as State Militias, which are sponsored by individual state governments and serve as an auxiliary to the National Guard. Except in times of extreme national emergency, such as a mainland invasion of the United States, State Militias are operated independently from the U.S. Army and are seen as state government agencies rather than a component of the military. State Defense Forces (also known as State Guards, State Military Reserves, or State Militias) in the United States are military units that operate under the sole authority of a state government, although they are regulated by the National Guard Bureau (specifically the Army National Guard). ... An invasion is a military action consisting of armed forces of one geopolitical entity entering territory controlled by another such entity, generally with the objective of conquering territory, or altering the established government. ...


Although the present-day Army exists as an all volunteer force, augmented by Reserve and National Guard forces, measures exist for emergency expansion in the event of a catastrophic occurrence, such as a large scale attack against the U.S. or the outbreak of a major global war. A nuclear holocaust is often associated with World War III For other uses, see World War III (disambiguation). ...


The final stage of Army mobilization, known as "activation of the unorganized militia" would effectively place all able bodied males in the service of the U.S. Army. The last time an approximation of this occurred was during the American Civil War when the Confederate States of America activated the "Home Guard" in 1865, drafting all males, regardless of age or health, into the Confederate Army. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... This article is in need of attention. ...


Combat maneuver organizations

The U.S. Army currently consists of 10 divisions as well as several independent units. The force is in the process of growth, with five additional brigades scheduled to activate by 2013, with a total increase of 74,200 soldiers from January 2007. Each division will have four ground maneuver brigades, and will also include at least one aviation brigade as well as a fires brigade and a service support brigade. Additional brigades can be assigned or attached to a division headquarters based on its mission.

  • 170th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, scheduled for activation in September 2010.

Image File history File links US_1ADSSI.PNG // SHOULDER SLEEVE INSIGNIA. Description: An equilateral triangle, one point up, above a horizontal tab attached in base, the overall dimensions of triangle and tab is 4 1/16 inches in height and 3 7/8 inches in width. ... The 1st Armored Division —nicknamed “Old Ironsides”— is the standing armored division of the United States Army with base of operations in Wiesbaden, Germany. ... Fort Bliss is a census-designated place and United States Army post in El Paso County, Texas, United States. ... The 1st Cavalry Division (1st Cav Div) is a heavy armored division of the United States Army with base of operations in Fort Hood, Texas. ... Fort Hood is a census-designated place and US Army base located in Texas. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Big Red One redirects here. ... Fort Riley is a United States Army installation in northeastern Kansas, near Manhattan and Junction City. ... Fort Knox is a census-designated place on the border of Hardin and Meade Counties in Kentucky that includes the housing for the Fort Knox Army base and the Fort Knox Bullion Depository. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The 2nd Infantry Division (Heavy) is a formation of the United States Army. ... Camp Red Cloud (commonly reffered to as CRC) is a United States Army camp located in the city of Uijeongbu, approximately 40 kilometers north of Korea, between Seoul and the Korean Dimilitarized Zone (DMZ). ... Camp Casey, Korea Located in Dongducheon (also Tongduchon), Republic of Korea, Camp Casey (named in 1952 after Major Hugh B. Casey) is one of several US Army bases in South Korea near the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). ... Fort Lewis is a census-designated place and U.S. Army military base located in Pierce County, Washington. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The 3rd Infantry Division (Mechanized) —nicknamed the Rock of the Marne— is a United States Army infantry division based at Fort Stewart, Georgia. ... Fort Stewart is a census-designated place and US army base located in Liberty County, Georgia. ... Fort Stewart is a census-designated place and US army base located in Liberty County, Georgia. ... Fort Benning is a base facility of the United States military outside Columbus, Georgia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The 4th Infantry Division (Mechanized) is a combat division of the United States Army based at Fort Hood, Texas, with two maneuver brigades stationed at Fort Carson, Colorado. ... Fort Hood is a census-designated place and US Army base located in Texas. ... Fort Carson is a United States Army installation and a Census Designated Place located immediately south of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States and just north of Pueblo, Colorado in Pueblo County Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) is a light infantry division of the United States Army currently serving under the XVIII Airborne Corps. ... Fort Drum is a census-designated place and U.S. Army military reservation in Jefferson County, New York, United States. ... Soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division participate in an exercise in a simulated Iraqi village at the Joint Readiness Training Center. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... In American military history, the 25th Infantry Division (nicknamed Tropic Lightning) is a large military unit associated with operations in the Asia-Pacific region. ... A Army soldier practices with a M16A2 at Schofield Barracks Schofield Barracks is a United States Army installation (and census-designated place or CDP) located in the City & County of Honolulu and in the Wahiawa District of the island of O‘ahu, Hawai‘i. ... Fort Wainwright is located in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska. ... Fort Richardson is a United States Army installation in the U.S. state of Alaska, adjacent to the city of Anchorage. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army is an elite airborne infantry division and was constituted in the National Army as the 82nd Division on March 5, 1917, and was organized on March 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ... Troopers of the 82nd training on Fort Bragg Paratroopers in training at Fort Bragg Fort Bragg is a major United States Army installation, in Cumberland and Hoke Counties, North Carolina, USA, near Fayetteville. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)—nicknamed the “Screaming Eagles”—is an airborne division of the United States Army primarily trained for air assault operations. ... Fort Campbell is a United States Army installation located between Hopkinsville, Kentucky and Clarksville, Tennessee and is home to the 101st Airborne Division. ... Image File history File links 172InfantryBdeSSI.PNG‎ // On a upright blue rectangle with rounded ends 3 inches (7. ... The 172nd Infantry Brigade (Separate) (now designated the 1st brigade of the 25th Infantry Division) of the United States Army is a highly deployable unit capable of being sent to any destination worldwide in order to protect U.S. national interests and has proudly served the Army since its inception... Schweinfurt is a city in the Unterfranken region of Bavaria in Germany on the right bank of the canalized Main, which is here spanned by several bridges, 27 km North-East of Würzburg. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (751x1115, 38 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Army 173d Airborne Brigade ... The 173d Airborne Brigade of the United States Army is based in Vicenza, Italy. ... Vicenza (population 107,223) is the capital of the province of Vicenza in the Veneto region, northern Italy at the northern base of the Monti Berici, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... Image File history File links 2CRSSI.jpg US 2nd Cavalry Regiment SHOULDER SLEEVE INSIGNIA Description: On a black disc within a 1/8 inch (.32cm) yellow border 2 ¾ inches (6. ... The 2d Cavalry Regiment (2d ACR) is a military unit within the United States Army. ... Image File history File links 3dACRSSI.PNG‎ Summary From 3d ACR official unit history document: http://www. ... The 3d Armored Cavalry Regiment is a regiment of the United States Army currently stationed at Fort Carson, CO, near the city of Colorado Springs. ... Fort Hood is a census-designated place and US Army base located in Texas. ... Image File history File links 11CRSSI.gif SHOULDER SLEEVE INSIGNIA. Description: On a shield 2 3/4 inches (6. ... The 11th ACR is an armored cavalry regiment of the United States Army which is garrisoned at Fort Irwin, California. ... The entrance to the NTC. Fort Irwin Military Reservation, located in Fort Irwin, California, U.S., this military facility is used for live-fire training of brigade-sized forces. ... This article is about a military term. ... ...

History

1700s

The Continental Army was created on June 14, 1775 by the Continental Congress as a unified army for the states to fight Great Britain, with George Washington appointed as its commander. George Washington, although not a great tactician, made use of the Fabian strategy and used hit-and-run tactics, hitting where the enemy was weakest, to wear down the British forces and their Hessian mercenary allies. With a decisive victory at Yorktown, and the help of French, Spanish and Dutch, the Continental Army prevailed against the British, and with the Treaty of Paris, the independence of the United States was acknowledged. The Continental Army was an army formed after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the colonies that became the United States of America. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Continental Congress resulted from the American Revolution and was the de facto first national government of the United States. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The Fabian strategy is a military strategy where pitched battles are avoided in favor of wearing down an opponent through a war of attrition. ... The term Hessian refers to the inhabitants of the German state of Hesse. ... Belligerents United States Kingdom of France Great Britain German Mercenaries Commanders George Washington Jean-Baptiste de Rochambeau François de Grasse Charles Cornwallis # Charles O’Hara # Strength 19,300 soldiers (10,800 French 8,500 Americans) 24 French warships 375 guns (see below) 7,500 240 guns Casualties and losses... The Dutch (Ethnonym: Nederlanders meaning Lowlanders) are the dominant ethnic group[1] of the Netherlands[2]. They are usually seen as a Germanic people. ... Painting by Benjamin West depicting (from left to right) John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ...


After the war, though, the Continental Army was quickly disbanded as part of the Americans' distrust of standing armies, and amateur state militias became the new nation's sole ground army, with the exception of one battery of artillery guarding West Point's arsenal. However, because of continuing conflict with American Indians, it was soon realized that it was necessary to field a trained standing army. The first of these, the Legion of the United States, was established in 1791. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The Legion of the United States was a reorganization and extension of the United States Army in 1791 under the command of General Mad Anthony Wayne. ...


1800s

The War of 1812 (1812-1815), the second and last American war against the British, was mostly a series of defeats for the U.S. Army. An invasion of Canada completely failed, and U.S. troops were unable to stop the British from burning the new capital of Washington, D.C.. However, the Regular Army, under Generals Winfield Scott and Jacob Brown, proved they were professional and capable of defeating a British army in the Niagara Campaign of 1814. Two weeks after a treaty was signed, though, Andrew Jackson defeated the British invasion of New Orleans. However this had little effect, as per the treaty both sides returned to the status quo. This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Combatants Great Britain United States Commanders Robert Ross George Cockburn Unknown Strength 4,250 Unknown The Burning of Washington is the name given to the burning of Washington, D.C., by British forces in 1814, during the War of 1812. ... For other uses of Winfield Scott, see Winfield Scott (disambiguation). ... Jacob Jennings Brown (May 9, 1775-February 24, 1828) was an American army officer in the War of 1812. ... The Niagara campaign was the final campaign to invade Canada during the War of 1812. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... For other uses of the name, see Battle of New Orleans (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English rock band. ...


Between 1815 and 1860, a spirit of Manifest Destiny struck the United States, and as settlers moved west the U.S. Army engaged in a long series of skirmishes and battles with American Indians the colonists uprooted. The U.S. Army also fought the short Mexican–American War, which was a victory for the United States and resulted in the new territories of California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, Wyoming and New Mexico. This article is about the history and influence of the concept. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 18,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ...


The Civil War (1861-1865) was the most costly war for the United States. After most states in the South seceded to form the Confederate States of America, CSA troops opened fire on the U.S. fort Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina, starting the war. For the first two years Confederate forces solidly defeated the U.S. Army, but after the decisive battles of Gettysburg in the East and Vicksburg in the West, combined with superior industrial might and numbers, Union troops fought a brutal campaign through Confederate territory and the war ended with a Confederate surrender at Appomatox Courthouse in April 1865. Based on 1860 census figures, 8% of all white males aged 13 to 43 died in the war, including 6% in the North and an extraordinary 18% in the South.[5] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Fort Sumter, a Third System masonry coastal fortification located in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... Battle of Vicksburg Conflict American Civil War Date May 18 - July 4, 1863 Place Warren County, Mississippi Result Union victory The Battle of Vicksburg was an American Civil War siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, on a well-fortified west-facing cliff on the Mississippi River. ... McLean house, April 1865. ... The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ...


Following the Civil War, the U.S. Army fought a long battle with American Indians, who resisted U.S. expansion into the center of the continent. But by the 1890s the U.S. saw itself as a potential player internationally. U.S. victories in the Spanish-American War (1898) and the more unknown and controversial Philippine-American War (1898-1913), as well as U.S. intervention in Latin America and the Boxer Rebellion, gained America more land and international prestige.[citation needed] This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Belligerents United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Manuel Macías y Casado Ramón Blanco y Erenas Casualties and losses 385 KIA USA 5,000... Belligerents United States Philippine Constabulary Philippine Scouts First Philippine Republic several groups post-1902 Commanders William McKinley Theodore Roosevelt Emilio Aguinaldo Miguel Malvar several unofficial leaders post-1902 Strength 126,000 soldiers[1] First Philippine Republic: 80,000 soldiers Casualties and losses ~5,000-7,000[1][2] ~12,000... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Combatants Eight-Nation Alliance (ordered by contribution): Empire of Japan Russian Empire British Empire French Third Republic United States German Empire Kingdom of Italy Austro-Hungarian Empire Righteous Harmony Society Qing Dynasty (China) Commanders Edward Seymour Alfred Graf von Waldersee Ci Xi Strength 20,000 initially 49,000 total 50...


1900s

The United States joined World War I (1914-1918) in 1917 on the side of Britain and France. U.S. troops were sent to the front and were instrumental in the push that finally broke through the German lines. With victory on November 11, 1918, the Army once again decreased its forces. “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


The U.S. joined World War II after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. On the European front, U.S. Army troops made up large portions of the forces that captured North Africa, Sicily, and Italy. On D-Day and in the subsequent liberation of Europe and defeat of Germany, the millions of U.S. Army troops played a central role. In the Pacific, Army soldiers participated alongside U.S. Marines in the "island hopping" campaign that wrested the Pacific islands from Japanese control. Following the Axis surrenders in May and September of 1945, Army troops were deployed to Japan and Germany to occupy the two nations. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the actual attack. ... Animation of the WWII European Theatre. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... Island hopping refers to crossing an ocean by a series of shorter journeys between islands, as opposed to a single journey directly across the ocean to the destination. ... Tuamotu, French Polynesia The Pacific Ocean contains an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 islands (the exact number has yet to be precisely determined). ... Black: Zenith of the Axis Powers Capital Not applicable Political structure Military alliance Historical era World War II  - Tripartite Pact September 27, 1940  - Anti-Comintern Pact November 25, 1936  - Pact of Steel May 22, 1939  - Dissolved 1945 This article is about the independent countries (states) that comprised the Axis powers. ...

Korea. Soldiers of the 2nd Infantry Division man a machine gun.
Korea. Soldiers of the 2nd Infantry Division man a machine gun.

However, the end of World War II set the stage for the West-East confrontation known as the Cold War (late 1940s to late 1980s/early 1990s). Hundreds of thousands of U.S. troops remained stationed in West Germany and across Europe until the 1990s in anticipation of Soviet attack. Download high resolution version (1191x798, 223 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1191x798, 223 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


During the Cold War, American troops and their allies fought Communist forces in Korea and Vietnam. (See Domino Theory.) The Korean War began in 1950. Under a United Nations umbrella, hundreds of thousands of U.S. troops fought to prevent the takeover of South Korea by North Korea, and later, to invade the northern nation. After repeated advances and retreats by both sides, and the Peoples' Republic of China's entry into the war, a cease-fire returned the peninsula to the status quo in 1953. This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... The domino theory was a mid-20th century foreign policy theory, promoted by the government of the United States, that speculated that if one land in a region came under the influence of communism, then the surrounding countries would follow in a domino effect. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... UN redirects here. ... The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) comprises most of the cultural, historic, and geographic area known as China. ...

Dak To, South Vietnam. An infantry patrol moves up to assault the last Viet Cong position after an attempted overrun of the artillery position by the Viet Cong during Operation Hawthorne.
Dak To, South Vietnam. An infantry patrol moves up to assault the last Viet Cong position after an attempted overrun of the artillery position by the Viet Cong during Operation Hawthorne.

The Vietnam War is often regarded as a low point in the Army's record. While American forces had been stationed in the Republic of Vietnam since 1959, they did not deploy in large numbers until 1965, after the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. American forces struggled to counter the guerrilla tactics of the communist Viet Cong and the North Vietnamese Army until 1973, when domestic political opposition to the war finally forced a US withdrawal. Two years later, the country was unified under a communist government. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2578 × 1718 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2578 × 1718 pixel, file size: 1. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Anthem Thanh niên Hành Khúc (Call to the Citizens) Capital Saigon Language(s) Vietnamese Government Republic Last President¹ Duong Van Minh Last Prime minister Vu Van Mau Historical era Cold War  - Regime change June 14, 1955  - Dissolution April 30, 1975 Area  - 1973 173,809 km² 67,108... Chart showing the U.S. Navys interpretation of the events of the first part of the Gulf of Tonkin incident The Gulf of Tonkin Incident was an alleged pair of attacks by naval forces of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (commonly referred to as North Vietnam) against two American... Guerrilla (also called a partisan) is a term borrowed from Spanish (from guerra meaning war) used to describe small combat groups. ... Viet Cong redirects here. ... 40th anniversary of Vietnam Peoples Army, commemorated on 1984 Vietnam postage stamp block The Vietnam Peoples Army (VPA) (Vietnamese: ) is official name for the armed forces of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. ...


The 1980s was mostly a decade of reorganization. The Army converted to an all-volunteer force with greater emphasis on training and technology. The Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986 created Unified Combatant Commands bringing the Army together with the other four U.S. Armed Forces under unified, geographically organized command structures. The Army also played a role in the invasions of Grenada in 1983 (Operation Urgent Fury) and Panama in 1989 (Operation Just Cause). The Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 Pub. ... A Unified Combatant Command is composed of forces from two or more services, has a broad and continuing mission, and is organized either on a geographical basis (known as Area Of Responsibility, AOR) or on a functional basis. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Combatants  United States  Antigua and Barbuda  Barbados  Dominica  Jamaica  Saint Lucia  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines  Grenada  Cuba Commanders Ronald Reagan Joseph Metcalf H. Norman Schwarzkopf Hudson Austin Pedro Tortolo Strength 7,300 Grenada: 1,500 regulars Cuba: about 722 (mostly military engineers)[1] Casualties 19 killed; 116 wounded[2... Combatants United States Panama Commanders General Carl W. Stiner Manuel Noriega Strength 27,684+ 3,000+ Casualties 23 Dead, 324 Wounded 450 Military, 200-4,000 Civilian U.S. Army 7th Infantry Division (light) soldiers prepare to take La Comandancia in the El Chorrillo neighborhood of Panama City, December 1989. ...


By 1991 Germany was reunited and the Soviet Union was near collapse. The Cold War was, effectively, over. Then Iraq invaded its tiny neighbor, Kuwait, and a U.S.-led coalition deployed over 500,000 troops, the bulk of them from U.S. Army formations, to drive out Iraqi forces. The war ended in convincing victory for the Army, as western coalition forces routed an Iraqi Army organized along Soviet lines in just one hundred hours. This article is about the 1990 German reunification. ... The Soviet Unions collapse into independent nations began in earnest in 1985. ... Combatants Republic of Iraq State of Kuwait Commanders Ali Hassan al-Majid N/A Strength 100,000[1] 16,000[2] Casualties 37+ aircraft (est. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Iraqi soldiers from the 2nd Iraqi Army Brigade, train on cordon and search procedures at Diyala Regional Training Facility in August 2005. ...


After the Gulf War, the Army did not see major combat operations for the remainder of the 1990s. Army units did participate in a number of peacekeeping activities, such as the UN peacekeeping mission in Somalia in 1993, where the abortive Operation Gothic Serpent led to the deaths of eighteen American soldiers and the withdrawal of international forces. The Army also contributed troops to a NATO peacekeeping force in former Yugoslavia in the middle of the decade. Somalia (Somali: Soomaaliya) is a coastal nation in East Africa, widely known as Horn of Africa. ... Combatants United States Habar Gedir other Mogadishu local militia Commanders Maj. ... “Operation Deliberate Force” was a sustained air campaign conducted by NATO to undermine the military capability of Bosnian Serb who threatened or attacked UN designated safe areas in Bosnia. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ...


21st century

U.S. soldiers take cover during a firefight with insurgents in the Al Doura section of Baghdad March 7, 2007
U.S. soldiers take cover during a firefight with insurgents in the Al Doura section of Baghdad March 7, 2007

After the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and as part of the Global War on Terror, U.S. and NATO combined arms (i.e., Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine, Special Operations) forces invaded Afghanistan in 2001, replacing the Taliban government. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 475 pixel Image in higher resolution (1438 × 854 pixel, file size: 987 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 475 pixel Image in higher resolution (1438 × 854 pixel, file size: 987 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://www. ... See also the town of Battle, East Sussex, England Generally, a battle is an instance of combat between two or more parties wherein each group will seek to defeat the others. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... The War on Terrorism (also known as the War on Terror) is campaign begun by the Bush administration which includes various military, political, and legal actions taken to ostensibly curb the spread of terrorism following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. ... Combined arms is an approach to warfare which seeks to integrate different arms of a military to achieve mutually complementary effects. ... The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim and ethnic Pashtun movement [2] that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the Northern Alliance, United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. ...


U.S. and allied forces invaded Iraq in 2003. Elements of the U.S. Army, British Army, U.S. Marine Corps, and other land forces, as well as air and naval components, defeated the regular military of Saddam Hussein. This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ...


In the following years the mission changed from conflict between regular militaries to counterinsurgency. with large numbers of suicide bomb attacks, and the loss of over 4,000 U.S. servicemen (as of March 2008) and thousands more injured [6]. The lack of stability in the theater of operations has led to longer deployments for Regular Army as well as Reserve and Guard troops. Counter-insurgency is the combatting of insurgency, by the government (or allies) of the territory in which the insurgency takes place. ... A suicide attack is an attack on a military or civilian target, in which an attacker intends to kill others, knowing that he or she will either certainly or most likely die in the process (see suicide). ...


Rank structure

These are the U.S. Army ranks and their equivalent NATO designations. Ranks and insignia of NATO are combined military insignia used by the member countries of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation. ... This chart represents the U.S. Army enlisted rank insignia with seniority decreasing left-to-right inside a given pay grade. ... This chart represents the U.S. Army officer rank insignia. ...


Commissioned Officers:[7] In the military, a commissioned officer is a member of the service who derives authority directly from a sovereign power, and as such holds a commission from that power. ...

There are several paths to becoming a commissioned officer including Army ROTC, the United States Military Academy at West Point or the United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, and Officer Candidate School. Certain professionals, physicians, nurses, lawyers, and chaplains are commissioned directly into the Army. But no matter what road an officer takes, the insignia are the same.

The highest officer rank is the five-star general (General of the Army) and the lowest is the second lieutenant. USMA redirects here. ... The United States Merchant Marine Academy is one of the five United States service academies. ...


Address all personnel with the rank of general as "General (last name)" regardless of the number of stars. Likewise, address both colonels and lieutenant colonels as "Colonel (last name)" and first and second lieutenants as "Lieutenant (last name)."

US DoD Pay Grade no paygrade O-10 O-9 O-8 O-7 O-6 O-5 O-4 O-3 O-2 O-1
Insignia (no authorized insignia)
Title General of the Armies General of the Army1 General Lieutenant General Major General Brigadier General Colonel Lieutenant Colonel Major Captain First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant
Abbreviation General of the Armies GA GEN LTG MG BG COL LTC MAJ CPT 1LT 2LT
NATO Code - OF-10 OF-9 OF-8 OF-7 OF-6 OF-5 OF-4 OF-3 OF-2 OF-1
1 Awarded only in times of Congressionally declared war.

Warrant Officers[7]: Image File history File links US-OF1A.svg‎ US military insignia Pay Grade: O-2 NATO Equivalent: OF-1 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): First Lieutenant Philadelphia Fire Department Category: ... Image File history File links US-OF1B.svg Summary US 2nd Lt (and equivalents) insignia Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Second Lieutenant Table of ranks in Battlefield 2 User:CShuts14 ... General of the Armies of the United States is the highest possible rank in the United States military hierarchy, equal to a Generalissimo. ... This article is about the United States Army rank General of the Army. ... A General is a high rank in the United States military. ... US Lieutenant General insignia In three branches of the United States Army, United States Marine Corps and United States Air Force, a Lieutenant General is also called a three-star general, named for the three stars worn on the uniform. ... For the 17th Century Cromwellian regime see Rule of the Major-Generals Major General or Major-General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Brigadier General is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually just above colonel and just below major general. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ... Lieutenant Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces which is currently used by the United States Army, United States Air Force, United States Marine Corps, and United States National Guard. ... Insignia of a Major in the United States Military Major is a rank used in the United States Army, United States Air Force, and United States Marine Corps, and is the equivalent of a Lieutenant Commander in the United States Navy and United States Coast Guard. ... Please see Captain (military) for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the United States armed forces that ranks between a First Lieutenant and Major (O-3 in the United States Army, U.S. Air Force, and United States Marines), or a rank between a Commander and... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ...

Warrant Officers are single track, specialty officers with subject matter expertise in a particular area. They are initially appointed as warrant officers (in the rank of WO1) by the Secretary of the Army, but receive their commission upon promotion to Chief Warrant Officer Two (CW2).


Technically, warrant officers are to be addressed as "Mr. (last name)" or "Ms. (last name)." However, many personnel do not use those terms, but instead say "Sir", "Ma'am", or most commonly, "Chief".

US DoD Pay Grade W-5 W-4 W-3 W-2 W-1
Insignia
Title Chief Warrant Officer 5 Chief Warrant Officer 4 Chief Warrant Officer 3 Chief Warrant Officer 2 Warrant Officer 1
Abbreviation CW5 CW4 CW3 CW2 WO1
NATO Code WO-5 WO-4 WO-3 WO-2 WO-1

Enlisted Personnel[7]: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Warrant officer insignia File links The following pages link to this file: Warrant Officer Categories: U.S. military awards ... Warrant officer insignia File links The following pages link to this file: Warrant Officer Categories: U.S. military awards ... Warrant officer insignia File links The following pages link to this file: Warrant Officer Categories: U.S. military awards ... Warrant officer insignia File links The following pages link to this file: Warrant Officer Categories: U.S. military badges ... For other uses of Warrant Officer, see Warrant Officer. ... For other uses of Warrant Officer, see Warrant Officer. ... For other uses of Warrant Officer, see Warrant Officer. ... For other uses of Warrant Officer, see Warrant Officer. ... For other uses of Warrant Officer, see Warrant Officer. ...

Sergeants are referred to as NCOs, short for noncommissioned officers. Corporals are also called "hard stripes", in recognition of their leadership position. This distinguishes them from specialists who might have the same pay grade, but not the leadership responsibilities.


Address privates (E1 and E2) and privates first class (E3) as "Private (last name)." Address specialists as "Specialist (last name)." Address sergeants, staff sergeants, sergeants first class, and master sergeants as "Sergeant (last name)." Address higher ranking sergeants by their full ranks in conjunction with their names.

U.S. DoD Pay Grade E-9 E-8 E-7 E-6 E-5 E-4 E-3 E-2 E-1
Insignia No Insignia
Title Sergeant Major of the Army Command Sergeant Major Sergeant Major First Sergeant Master Sergeant Sergeant First Class Staff Sergeant Sergeant Corporal Specialist Private First Class Private Private
Abbreviation SMA CSM SGM 1SG MSG SFC SSG SGT CPL SPC ² PFC PV2 ¹ PV1 ¹
NATO Code OR-9 OR-9 OR-9 OR-8 OR-8 OR-7 OR-6 OR-5 OR-4 OR-4 OR-3 OR-2 OR-1
¹ PVT is also used as an abbreviation for both Private ranks when pay grade need not be distinguished
² SP4 is sometimes encountered as an abbreviation for Specialist. This is a holdover from when there were additional specialist ranks at higher pay grades.

Image File history File links US_Army_E-9_SMA.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Army United States Army enlisted rank insignia Template:Ranks and Insignia of NATO Armies/OR/United States Ranks and insignia... Image File history File links USAr. ... Image File history File links US_Army_E-9_SGM.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Army Sergeant Major United States Army enlisted rank insignia Template:Ranks and Insignia of NATO Armies/OR/United States Ranks... Image File history File links US_Army_E-8_1SG.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Army United States Army enlisted rank insignia Template:Ranks and Insignia of NATO Armies/OR/United States Ranks and insignia... Image File history File links US_Army_E-8_MSG.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Army United States Army enlisted rank insignia Template:Ranks and Insignia of NATO Armies/OR/United States Ranks and insignia... Image File history File links US_Army_E-7. ... Image File history File links US_Army_E-6. ... Image File history File links US_Army_E-5. ... Image File history File links US_Army_E-4. ... Image File history File links US_Army_E-4_SPC.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Army United States Army enlisted rank insignia Template:Ranks and Insignia of NATO Armies/OR/United States Ranks and insignia... Image File history File links US_Army_E-3. ... Image File history File links US_Army_E-2. ... Sergeant Major of the Army insignia (U.S. Army) Sergeant Major of the Army flag (U.S. Army) The Sergeant Major of the Army is a unique rank in the United States Army. ... This article is about a military rank and position. ... This article is about a military rank and position. ... First Sergeant is the name of a military rank used in some countries. ... United States Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Marine Corps Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Army Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Air Force A Master Sergeant is: the eighth enlisted rank in the United States Marine Corps, just above Gunnery Sergeant, below Master Gunnery Sergeant, Sergeant Major, and Sergeant Major of... Sergeant First Class insignia Sergeant First Class (SFC) is the seventh enlisted rank in the U.S. Army, just above Staff Sergeant and below Master Sergeant, and is a non-commissioned officer. ... United States Military Staff Sergeant insignia (U.S. Air Force) Staff Sergeant is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Airman and below Technical Sergeant. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... This article is about the military rank. ... Specialist arm patch (U.S. Army) Specialist is one section of the fourth enlisted rank in the U.S. Army, just above Private First Class and below Corporal. ... US Military In the U.S. Army, Private First Class is the third lowest enlisted rank, just above Private and below Corporal or Specialist. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ...

Uniforms

Main article: Uniforms of the United States Army

As of fiscal year '08, or 1 October 2007, the Battle Dress Uniform (BDU) and Desert Combat Uniform (DCU) have been phased out of normal wear in Garrison and in Combat Zones by the Army. The BDU and DCU have been replaced with the Army Combat Uniform (ACU), which features a digital camouflage pattern and is designed for use in woodland, desert, and urban environments. is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Two soldiers wearing the ACU, as well as ACU-patterned patrol cap (left) and boonie hat (right). ...


The Army plans to deploy the Future Force Warrior system starting in 2010, with upgrades in subsystems deployed every two years following. Designed as a fully integrated infantryman combat system, initial versions are to be simple in operation with basic electronics; final versions (2032) involve such technologies as a powered armor system and various nanotechnologies. The Armys Future Force Warrior system is one step closer to being fielded as the Ground Soldier System following a successful demonstration in August 2006 of its electronic networking capability. ... It has been suggested that the section Exoskeletons in modern and near-future technology from the article Exoskeleton be merged into this article or section. ...


The standard garrison service uniform is known as "Army Greens" or "Class As" and has been worn by all officers and enlisted personnel since its introduction in 1956 when it replaced earlier Olive Drab (OD) and khaki (and tan worsted or TW) uniforms worn between the 1890s and 1985. The "Army Blue" uniform, dating back to the mid-19th century, is currently the Army's formal dress uniform, but in 2009 it will replace the Army Green and the Army White uniforms (a uniform similar to the Army Green uniform, but worn in tropical postings) and will become the "new" Army Service Uniform, which will function as both a garrison uniform (when worn with a gray shirt and necktie) and a dress uniform (when worn with a white shirt and either a necktie for parades or a bow tie for "after six" or "black tie" events). The beret, adopted Army-wide in 2001, will continue to be worn with the new ACU for garrison duty and with the Army Service Uniform for non-ceremonial functions. Olive Drab is the color olive shaded green. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Equipment

Individual weapons

U.S. Army soldier with M249 SAW Para
U.S. Army soldier with M249 SAW Para

The primary individual weapons of the Army are the M16 series assault rifle[8] and its compact variant, the M4 carbine[9], which is slowly replacing selected M16 series rifles in some units and is primarily used by infantry, Ranger, and Special Operations forces.[10] Optionally the M9 bayonet can be attached to either variant for close-quarters fighting.[11] The 40 mm M203 grenade launcher can also be attached for additional firepower.[12] Soldiers whose duties require a more compact weapon, such as combat vehicle crew members, staff officers, and military police, are issued a sidearm in lieu of (or in addition to) a rifle. The most common sidearm in the U.S. Army is the 9 mm M9 pistol[13] which is issued to the majority of combat and support units. Other, less commonly issued sidearms include the M11, used by Special Agents of the CID,[14][15][16] and the MK23, used by some Army Special Forces units.[17] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1989x1542, 820 KB) Summary From: http://www4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1989x1542, 820 KB) Summary From: http://www4. ... Individual weapons by type and current level of use. ... M16 (more formally United States Rifle, Caliber 5. ... M4A1 redirects here. ... The 75th Ranger Regiment—also known as the United States Army Rangers—is an elite light infantry special operations force of the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) headquartered in Fort Benning, Georgia. ... The United States Special Operations Forces is the official category which the United States Department of Defense lists the U.S. military units that have a training specialization in unconventional warfare and special operations. ... M9 bayonet and scabbard The M9 Bayonet is a multi-purpose knife and bayonet officially adopted in 1984 by the U.S.. It is issued with a special sheath designed to double as a wire cutter, developed by Qual-A-Tec (later development and production by Phrobis III) from the... M203 generally refers to the United States Army designation for a single shot 40 mm grenade launcher that attaches to the M16 assault rifle or the M4 Carbine. ... The M9 handgun, formally Pistol, Semiautomatic, 9mm, M9, is a 9mm pistol of the U.S. military adopted in the 1980s. ... The SIG Sauer P226 is a full-sized, service type pistol chambered for the 9x19mm Parabellum, .40 S&W and . ... The U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID) is an American federal law enforcement agency that investigates serious violations of military law within the United States Army. ... The MK23 Mod 0 is an offensive handgun system consisting of a match grade semi-automatic pistol, a laser aiming module (LAM), and suppressor. ...


In addition to these basic rifles and sidearms, many combat units' arsenals are supplemented with a variety of specialized weapons, including the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW) light machine-gun, to provide suppressive fire at the fire-team level,[18] the M1014 Joint Service Combat Shotgun or the Mossberg 590 Shotgun for door breaching and close-quarters combat, the M14 Rifle for long-range marksmen, and the M107 Long Range Sniper Rifle, the M24 Sniper Weapon System, or the M110 Semi-Automatic Sniper Rifle for snipers. Hand grenades, such as the M67 fragmentation grenade and M18 smoke grenade, are also used by combat troops. The M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (M249 SAW) is the United States military designation for a sub-family of the FN MINIMI squad automatic weapon (from Mini-mitrailleuse French: mini-machine gun. Both are 5. ... The Benelli Super 90 M4 also known as the M1014 Combat Shotgun is an Italian-made shotgun manufactured by Benelli Armi S.P.A. It is currently used by the United States Armed Forces as their Joint Service Combat Shotgun. The M4 was developed in Italy by Benelli. ... The Mossberg 500 is a shotgun manufactured by O.F. Mossberg & Sons [1]. Rather than a single model, the 500 is really a series of widely varying hammerless, pump action repeaters, all of which share the same basic receiver and action, but differ in bore size, barrel length, choke options... The M14 rifle (more formally the United States Rifle, Caliber 7. ... For the assault rifle, see Valmet M82. ... The M24 SWS (Sniper Weapon System) is the military and police version of the Remington 700 rifle, M24 being the model name assigned by the United States Army after adoption as their standard sniper rifle in 1988. ... The M110 SASS (Semi-Automatic Sniper System), is a semi-automatic rifle that uses 7. ... Grenade redirects here. ... The M67 grenade is a fragmentation hand grenade used by the US armed forces and Canadian forces - where it is referred to as the C13. ... Smoke grenade A purple smoke grenade being used during a military training exercise Main article: Hand grenade Smoke grenades are canister-type grenades used as ground-to-ground or ground-to-air signaling devices, target or landing zone marking devices, or a screening devices for unit movements. ...


Crew-served weapon systems

M120 120 mm mortar
Main article: List of crew-served weapons of the U.S. Armed Forces

The Army employs various crew-served weapons (so named because they are operated by two or more soldiers in order to transport items such as spare barrels, tripods, base plates, and extra ammunition) to provide heavy firepower at ranges exceeding that of individual weapons. The M240 is the Army's standard medium general-purpose machine gun.[19] The M240 (left-hand feed) and M240C (right-hand feed) variants are used as coaxial machine guns on the M1 Abrams tank and the M2 Bradley IFV, respectively; the M240B is the infantry variant and can be fired from a bipod or tripod if carried by hand, or employed from a pintle mount atop a vehicle. The M2 .50-caliber heavy machine gun has been in use since 1932 in a variety of roles, from infantry support to air defense. The M2 is also the primary weapon on most Stryker ACV variants and the secondary weapon system on the M1 Abrams tank. The MK 19 40 mm grenade machine gun is mainly used by motorized units, such as Stryker Brigades, HMMWV-mounted cavalry scouts, and Military Police.[20] It is commonly employed in a complementary role to the M2. Image File history File links M120-mortarfired. ... Image File history File links M120-mortarfired. ... This list contains weapons that are classified as crew-served, as the term is used in the United States military. ... M240B pictured Caliber: 7. ... Coaxially mounted weapons refer to those weapon systems that are mounted coaxially, side-by-side, with the main weapon system. ... The M1 Abrams is a military tank produced in the United States. ... The M2 Bradley IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle) and M3 Bradley CFV (Cavalry Fighting Vehicle) are American infantry fighting vehicles manufactured by BAE Systems Land and Armaments, (formerly United Defense, originally FMC). ... This article is about the . ... For other uses, see Stryker (disambiguation). ... Mk19 40mm grenade launcher MK-19 40mm grenade launcher during MIL-EX 2003 Mk19 40mm grenade launcher with cover open and training ammunition loaded The Mk 19 Grenade Launcher is a belt-fed automatic 40mm grenade launcher or grenade machine gun entered U.S. military service during the Cold War...


The Army uses three types of mortar for indirect fire support when heavier artillery may not be appropriate or available. The smallest of these is the 60 mm M224, normally assigned at the infantry company level.[21] At the next higher echelon, infantry battalions are typically supported by a section of 81 mm M252 mortars.[22] The largest mortar in the Army's inventory is the 120 mm M120/M121, usually employed by mechanized battalions, Stryker units, and cavalry troops because its size and weight require it to be transported in a tracked carrier or towed behind a truck.[23] US soldier loading a M224 60-mm mortar. ... The M224 60 mm Lightweight Mortar is a smooth bore, muzzle-loading, high-angle-of-fire weapon used for close-in support of ground troops. ... Bore diameter: 81 mm Length: 50 in (1. ... M120 Mortar fired during Operation Iraqi Freedom The M120 120 mm mortar replaced the M30 107 mm (4. ...


Vehicles

A U.S. Army M1A2 Abrams in Iraq
A U.S. Army M1A2 Abrams in Iraq
M2A3 Bradley IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle)
M2A3 Bradley IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle)
and

The U.S. Army spends a sizable portion of its military budget to maintain a diverse inventory of vehicles. The U.S. Army maintains the highest vehicle-to-soldier ratio in the world. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1564x1276, 243 KB) Soldiers from 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment conduct security with their M1 Abrams Main Battle Tank for a cordon and search operation in Biaj, Iraq. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1564x1276, 243 KB) Soldiers from 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment conduct security with their M1 Abrams Main Battle Tank for a cordon and search operation in Biaj, Iraq. ... The M1 Abrams main battle tank is the principal combat tank of the United States Army, with three main versions being deployed starting in 1980: the M1, M1A1, and M1A2. ... Image File history File links Pi111804a1. ... Image File history File links Pi111804a1. ... This is a list of all armoured fighting vehicles, sorted by country of origin. ... Land vehicles by type and current level of use. ...


The Army's most common vehicle is the HMMWV (High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle), which is capable of serving as a cargo/troop carrier, weapons platform, and ambulance, among many other roles.[24] The M1A2 Abrams is the Army's primary main battle tank,[25] while the M2A3 Bradley is the standard infantry fighting vehicle.[26] Other vehicles include the M3A3 cavalry fighting vehicle, the Stryker,[27] and the M113 armored personnel carrier.[28] This article refers to the Military HMMWV, not the civilian Hummer sold by General Motors The M998 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV or Humvee) is a military 4WD motor vehicle created by AM General. ... The M1 Abrams is a military tank produced in the United States. ... The US M1A1 Abrams tank is a typical modern main battle tank. ... The M2 Bradley IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle) and M3 Bradley CFV (Cavalry Fighting Vehicle) are American infantry fighting vehicles manufactured by BAE Systems Land and Armaments, (formerly United Defense, originally FMC). ... An M2 Bradley Infantry fighting vehicle. ... General Characteristics (M2 Bradley) Length: 21 ft 2 in (6. ... For other uses, see Stryker (disambiguation). ... The M113 is an armored personnel carrier family of vehicles in use with the US military and many other nations. ... East German BRDMs on parade during celebrations of the 40th anniversary of East Germany in 1989 Armoured personnel carriers (APCs) are light armoured fighting vehicles for the transport of infantry. ...


Artillery

Main article: List of crew-served weapons of the U.S. Armed Forces#Artillery

The U.S. Army's principal artillery weapons are the M109A6 Paladin self-propelled howitzer[29] and the M270A1 Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS),[30] both mounted on tracked platforms and assigned to heavy mechanized units. Fire support for light infantry units is provided by towed howitzers, including the 105 mm M119A1[31] and the 155 mm M777 (which will replace the M198).[32] This list contains weapons that are classified as crew-served, as the term is used in the United States military. ... For other uses, see Artillery (disambiguation). ... M109 self-propelled howitzer. ... A Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) is a form of rocket artillery that can be reused. ... A M119 Howitzer being fired as part of an exercise near Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan The M119 A1 Howitzer is a lightweight howitzer used by the United States Army. ... USMC gunners test a new M777 howitzer. ... The M198 Howitzer during the Persian Gulf War The M198 howitzer is a medium-sized, towed artillery piece. ...


Aircraft

AH-64 Apache helicopter
AH-64 Apache helicopter

While the U.S. Army operates a few fixed-wing aircraft, it mainly operates several types of rotary-wing aircraft. These include the AH-64 Apache attack helicopter,[33] the OH-58D Kiowa Warrior armed reconnaissance/light attack helicopter,[34] the UH-60 Black Hawk utility tactical transport helicopter,[35] and the CH-47 Chinook heavy-lift transport helicopter.[36] Image File history File links AH-64_Apache. ... Image File history File links AH-64_Apache. ... This list of military aircraft of the United States includes prototype, pre-production and operational types. ... The AH-64 Apache is the United States Armys principal attack helicopter, and is the successor to the AH-1 Cobra. ... A Russian Mil Mi-24 attack helicopter. ... The OH-58 Kiowa is a family of single-engine, single-rotor, observation and light attack helicopters manufactured by Bell Helicopter Textron and originally based on the companys Bell 206A JetRanger helicopter. ... For other uses of Blackhawk/Black Hawk, see Black Hawk. ... The Boeing CH-47 Chinook is a versatile, twin-engine, tandem rotor heavy-lift helicopter. ...


The Army's 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment operates the MH-6/AH-6 small assault/attack helicopters, as well as highly-modified versions of the Black Hawk and Chinook, primarily in support of U.S. Army Special Operations Forces, but also those of the other U.S. armed forces. .[37] The 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) (160th SOAR (A)) is a special operations force of the United States Army that provides aviation support by helicopters to general purpose forces and other special operations forces. ... The Hughes H-6 is a family of light utility civilian and assault helicopters of the United States Army. ...


Training

Training in the United States Army is generally divided into two categories - individual and collective.


Individual training for enlisted soldiers usually consists of 14 weeks for those who hope to hold the MOS, 11B (Infantryman). Other combat MOSs consist of similar training length. Support and other MOS hopefuls attend nine weeks of Basic Combat Training followed by Advanced Individual Training in their primary Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) at any of the numerous MOS training facilities around the country. The length of time spent in AIT depends on the MOS of the soldier. Depending on the needs of the Army BCT is conducted at a number of locations, but two of the longest running are the Armor School at Fort Knox, Kentucky and the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia. For officers this training includes pre-commissioning training either at USMA, ROTC, or OCS. After commissioning, officers undergo six weeks of training at the Basic Officer Leaders Course, Phase II at Ft. Benning or Ft. Sill, followed by their branch specific training at the Basic Officer Leaders Course, Phase III (formerly called Officer Basic Course) which varies in time and location based on their future jobs. Basic training in the US Army United States Army Basic Training is a rigorous program of physical and mental training required in order for an individual to become a soldier in the United States Army, United States Army Reserve, or United States Army National Guard. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Armys Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) is a system of categorizing career fields. ... This article is about United States Army post. ... The United States Army Infantry School is located in Fort Benning, Georgia. ... Fort Benning is a United States Army base, located southwest of Columbus in Muscogee and Chattahoochee counties in Georgia and Russell County, Alabama It is part of the Columbus, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program of the United States armed forces present on college campuses to recruit and educate commissioned officers. ... The United States Army Officer Candidate School (OCS) is a school located at Fort Benning, providing training to become a commissioned officer. ... The Basic Officer Leaders Course (BOLC for short) is a three-phased training course designed to produce commissioned officers in the United States Army. ... Fort Benning is a United States Army base, located southwest of Columbus, Georgia in Muscogee County, Chattahoochee County and Russell Counties. ... Fort Sill is a United States Army post near Lawton, Oklahoma, about 85 miles southwest of Oklahoma City. ...


Collective training takes place both at the unit's assigned station, but the most intensive collective training takes place at the three Combat Training Centers (CTC); the National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California, the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC) at Fort Polk, Louisiana, and the Combined Maneuver Training Center (CMTC) at the Hohenfels Training Area in Hohenfels, Germany. ... The entrance to the NTC. Fort Irwin Military Reservation, located in Fort Irwin, California, U.S., this military facility is used for live-fire training of brigade-sized forces. ... Fort Polk is a United States Army base located in Leesville, Louisiana. ... Soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division participate in an exercise in a simulated Iraqi village at the Joint Readiness Training Center. ... Hohenfels is a town in the district of Konstanz in Baden-Württemberg in Germany. ...


Values

In the mid- to late 1990s, the Army officially adopted what have come to be known as "The 7 Army Core Values." The Army began to teach these values as basic warrior traits. The seven Army Core Values are as follows:

  1. Loyalty - Bear true faith and allegiance to the U.S. Constitution, the Army, your unit, and fellow Soldiers.
  2. Duty - Fulfill your obligations.
  3. Respect - Treat others as they should be treated.
  4. Selfless Service - Put the welfare of the nation, the Army, and your subordinates before your own.
  5. Honor - Live the Army Values.
  6. Integrity - Do what's right, both legally and morally.
  7. Personal Courage - Face fear, danger, or adversity, both physical and moral.

The values were arranged to form the acronym LDRSHIP (leadership).[38]


Major commands

[39]

Major Command Current Commander Location of Headquarters
Forces Command (FORSCOM) GEN Charles C. Campbell Fort McPherson, Georgia
Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) GEN William S. Wallace Fort Monroe, Virginia
Army Materiel Command (AMC) GEN Benjamin S. Griffin Fort Belvoir, Virginia
U.S. Army Central (USARCENT) LTG Jim Lovelace Fort McPherson, Georgia
United States Army North (USANORTH) LTG Thomas R. Turner II Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas
United States Army South (USARSO) BG Ken Keen Fort Sam Houston, Texas
U.S. Army Europe & Seventh Army (USAREUR) GEN David D. McKiernan Campbell Barracks, Heidelberg, Germany
Army Pacific Command (USARPAC) LTG John M. Brown III Fort Shafter, Hawaii
Eighth United States Army (EUSA) LTG Joseph F. Fil, Jr. Yongsan Army Garrison, Seoul
Special Operations Command (USASOC) LTG Robert W. Wagner Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command (SDDC) MG Kathleen M. Gainey Fort Eustis, Virginia
Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Strategic Command (USASMDC/ARSTRAT) LTG Kevin T. Campbell Redstone Arsenal, Alabama

Other Commands United States Army Forces Command DUI U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) is the Armys largest major command. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Fort McPherson is a U.S. Army base located in southwest Atlanta, Georgia. ... TRADOC shoulder sleeve patch. ... William Scott Wallace is a 4-star General of the United States Army. ... Satellite Photo of Fort Monroe Fort Monroe, Virginia (also known as Fortress Monroe) is a military installation located at Old Point Comfort on the tip of the Virginia Peninsula at the mouth of Hampton Roads on the Chesapeake Bay in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC) is an Army Major Command (MACOM) responsible for materiel readiness, to include technology, acquisition support, materiel development, logistics power projection, and sustainment. ... GEN Benjamin S. Griffin General Benjamin S. Griffin assumed the duties of Commanding General, U.S. Army Materiel Command on November 5, 2004. ... Fort Belvoir is a United States military installation and a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A number of nations have had a Third Army British Third Army German Third Army Soviet Third Army US Third Army This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Fort McPherson is a U.S. Army base located in southwest Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Fifth United States Army was a field army of the United States Army. ... Major General Thomas R. Turner II Major General Thomas R. Turner II graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1974 and was commissioned as as second lieutenant in the infantry. ... Fort Sam Houston is a U.S. Army post in San Antonio, Texas. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Bexar County Government  - Mayor Phil Hardberger Area  - City  412. ... United States Army South is the Armys service component command of United States Southern Command. ... Fort Sam Houston is a U.S. Army post in San Antonio, Texas. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... The Seventh United States Army is the land component of United States European Command. ... General David McKiernan speaking. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... For other uses, see Heidelberg (disambiguation). ... // Also known as USARPAC, the U.S. Army Pacific Command is the army component unit of the U.S. Pacific Command, except the units in Korea. ... LTG John M. Brown III Lieutenant General John M. Brown III is Commander of United States Army Pacific Command, headquartered at Fort Shafter, Hawaii. ... Fort Shafter is in Honolulu, Hawai‘i extending up the interfluve (ridgeline) between Kalihi and Moanalua valleys, as well as onto the coastal plain (as Shafter Flats) at Māpunapuna. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Eighth United States Army—often abbreviated EUSA—(the acronym EUSA was deemed unauthorized by LTG Charles Campbell in 2002) is the commanding formation of all US Army troops in South Korea. ... The Yongsan Garrison is a US military base located in Seoul, South Korea. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... USASOC shoulder patch. ... Troopers of the 82nd training on Fort Bragg Paratroopers in training at Fort Bragg Fort Bragg is a major United States Army installation, in Cumberland and Hoke Counties, North Carolina, USA, near Fayetteville. ... Fort Eustis is a military base facility of the United States military located in Newport News, Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command shoulder sleeve insignia United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command DUI The U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command (SMDC) is a specialized major command within the United States Army. ... Lieutenant General Kevin T. Campbell is the current commander of the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command. ... Redstone Arsenal is a U.S. Army post and a census-designated place (CDP) located next to the city of Huntsville in Madison County, Alabama, and is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...

The United States Army Intelligence and Security Command[1] (INSCOM). ... Fort Belvoir is a United States military installation and a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is a federal agency made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... U.S. Army Medical Command Patch The U.S. Army Medical Medical Command (MEDCOM) is a major command of the U.S. Army that provides command and control of the Armys fixed-facility medical, dental, and veterinary treatment facilities, providing preventive care, medical research, development and training institutions. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Fort Sam Houston is a U.S. Army post in San Antonio, Texas. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Military District of Washington Shoulder Sleeve Insignia Military District of Washington Distinctive Unit Insignia The Military District of Washington (MDW), is one of nineteen major commands of the U.S. Army. ... Fort Lesley J. McNair is an American military installation located at the confluence of the Potomac and Anacostia rivers in Washington, District of Columbia, across the Washington Channel from East Potomac Park. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... United States Army Criminal Investigation Command (CID) conducts and controls all Army investigations of serious crimes. ... BG Rodney L. Johnson Brigadier General Rodney L. Johnson is Provost Marshal General of the United States Army and Commanding General, United States Army Criminal Investigation Command (CIC). ... Fort Belvoir is a United States military installation and a census-designated place (CDP) in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... USAF security troops on a training exercise on Fort Huachuca. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Location in Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Founded 1749 Government  - Mayor William D. Euille Area  - Total 15. ...

See also

United States Army Portal
Military of the United States Portal
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Army_Seal. ... Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ... Baron von Steuben Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin Steuben, Baron von Steuben (* September 17, 1730; † November 28, 1794) was a German-Prussian General who served with George Washington in the American Revolutionary War and is credited with teaching the Continental Army the essentials of military drill and discipline. ... Basic training in the US Army United States Army Basic Training is a rigorous program of physical and mental training required in order for an individual to become a soldier in the United States Army, United States Army Reserve, or United States Army National Guard. ... The Army Medical Department (AMEDD) of the U.S. Army comprises the six medical Special Branches of the Army. ... There are only two authorized methods of making bumper numbers: using adhesive vinyl (stickers) and paint. ... Branch insignia of the United States Army refers to one of several military emblems that may be worn on the uniform of the United States Army to denote membership in a particular area of expertise. ... Comparative military ranks are a means of comparing military rank systems of different nations as a means of categorizing the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ... A military unit is an organisation within an armed force. ... Special forces or special operations forces is a term used to describe relatively small military units raised and trained for reconnaissance, unconventional warfare and special operations. ... Graphic legend of Army Transformation Army Transformation describes the future-concept of the US Armys plan of modernization. ... From 1776 to 2007, there have been hundreds of instances of the deployment of United States military forces abroad and domestically. ...

References

  1. ^ June 14th: The Birthday of the U.S. Army
  2. ^ http://siadapp.dmdc.osd.mil/personnel/MILITARY/ms1.pdf DoD PERSONNEL & PROCUREMENT STATISTICS, retrieved 2007-10-31
  3. ^ army.mil
  4. ^ Perpich v. Department of Defense, 496 U.S. 334 (1990)
  5. ^ The Deadliest War
  6. ^ U.S. Casualties in Iraq
  7. ^ a b c From the Future Soldiers Web Site.
  8. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  9. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  10. ^ Army position: M4 Carbine is Soldier's battlefield weapon of choice
  11. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  12. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  13. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  14. ^ SIG SAUER P228
  15. ^ http://www.wood.army.mil/MPBULLETIN/pdfs/April%2006/Miklos.pdf
  16. ^ http://www.wood.army.mil/qaosurvey/mp/eocq/asaceocq.htm
  17. ^ SOCOM Pistol Mk 23 Mod 0
  18. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  19. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  20. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  21. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  22. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  23. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  24. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  25. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  26. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  27. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  28. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  29. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  30. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  31. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  32. ^ M777 Lightweight 155mm howitzer (LW155)
  33. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  34. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  35. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  36. ^ U.S. Army Fact Files
  37. ^ 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment
  38. ^ The 7 Army Values, verified 2007-01-05
  39. ^ The United States Army | Organization

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Basic training in the US Army United States Army Basic Training is a rigorous program of physical and mental training required in order for an individual to become a soldier in the United States Army, United States Army Reserve, or United States Army National Guard. ... The United States Army Officer Candidate School (OCS) is a school located at Fort Benning, providing training to become a commissioned officer. ... The Basic Officer Leaders Course (BOLC for short) is a three-phased training course designed to produce commissioned officers in the United States Army. ... USMA redirects here. ... The Armys Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) is a system of categorizing career fields. ... Awards and decorations of the United States Army are those military decorations which are issued to members of the United States Army under the authority of the Secretary of the Army. ... 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USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The United States has seven uniformed services as defined by Title 10 of the United States Code. ... Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Army_Seal. ... Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Image File history File links United_States_Department_of_the_Navy_Seal. ... USN redirects here. ... Image File history File links Seal_of_the_US_Air_Force. ... USAF redirects here. ... Image File history File links USCG_S_W.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): United States Navy United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Air Force Military of the United States United States Coast Guard... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... PHS Cap Device The United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC), also known as the Meditary, is the uniformed division of the United States Public Health Service (PHS) and one of the seven Uniformed Services of the United States. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 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The War on Terrorism (also known as the War on Terror) is campaign begun by the Bush administration which includes various military, political, and legal actions taken to ostensibly curb the spread of terrorism following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... // 2000 282,338,631 2010 309,162,581 2020 336,031,546 2030 363,811,435 2040 392,172,658 2050 420,080,587 2060 450,505,985 2070 480,568,004 2080 511,442,859 2090 540,405,985 2100 571,440,474 The US population in 1900 was... 48-star flag, 1957 This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of the United States. ... The United States Constitution, the supreme law of the United States The United States Reports, the official reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States The law of the United States was originally largely derived from the common law of the system of English law, which was in force... The United States Bill of Rights consists of the first 10 amendments to the United States Constitution. ... theSeparation of powers is a political doctrine under which the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government are kept distinct, to prevent abuse of power. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... This is an incomplete list of federal agencies, which are either departmental agencies within the executive branch of the United States government or are Independent Agencies of the United States Government (including regulatory agencies and government corporations). ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building, Washington, D.C. For animal rights group, see Justice Department (JD) The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... Logo used on the Intelligence Community web site. ... CIA redirects here. ... The Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, is a major producer and manager of military intelligence for the United States Department of Defense. ... For other uses of NSA, see NSA (disambiguation). ... USN redirects here. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... USAF redirects here. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Union Jack. ... Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential republic, whereby the President of the United States is head of state, head of government, and of a two-party legislative and electoral system. ... Political parties in the United States lists political parties in the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Third parties in the United States are political parties other than the two... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and... Political Compass. ... This article provides a list of major political scandals of the United States. ... Map of results by state of the 2004 U.S. presidential election, representing states won by the Democrats as blue and those won by the Republican Party as red. ... This article is about the national personification of the USA. For other uses, see Uncle Sam (disambiguation). ... Flag of Puerto Rico The political movement for Puerto Rican Independence (Lucha por la Independencia Puertorriqueña) has existed since the mid-19th century and has advocated independence of the island of Puerto Rico, in varying degrees, from Spain (in the 19th century) or the United States (from 1898 to... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... United States territory is any extent of region under the jurisdiction of the federal government of the United States,[1] including all waters[2] (around islands or continental tracts). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This is a list of the cities, towns, and villages of the United States. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... This list of regions of the United States includes official (governmental) and non-official areas within the borders of the United States, not including U.S. states, the federal district of Washington, D.C. or standard subentities such as cities or counties. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... Historic Southern United States. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Southwest could be defined as the states west, or for the most part west, of the mississippi river, with the qualification of a certain northern limit, such as the 37, or 38, or 39, or 40 degree north line. ... The list of mountains of the United States shows the location of mountains in a given state. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Rivers in the United States is a list of rivers in the United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River from Laughlin Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page, Arizona The Colorado River is... This is a list of the extreme points of the United States, the points that are farther north, south, east, or west than any other location in the country. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ... Water supply and sanitation in the United States is provided by towns and cities, public utilities that span several jurisdictions and rural cooperatives. ... USD redirects here. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... The Fed redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The standard of living in the United States is one of the highest in the world by almost any measure. ... For information on household income, see Household income in the United States. ... For information on the income of individuals, see Personal income in the United States. ... This graph shows the household income of the given percentiles from 1967 to 2003, in 2003 dollars. ... Single family homes such as this are indicative of the American middle class. ... The primary regulator of communications in the United States is the Federal Communications Commission. ... This article adopts the US Department of Transportation definition of passenger vehicle The United States is home to the largest passenger vehicle market of any country,[1] which is a consequence of the fact that it has the largest Gross Domestic Product of any country in the world. ... Current U.S. Route shield Current U.S. Route shield in California The system of United States Numbered Highways (often called U.S. Routes or U.S. Highways) is an integrated system of roads and highways in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ... There arergwertwertert[1] Kyle Railroad (KYLE) [2] Missouri and Northern Arkansas Railroad (MNA) [3] Montana Rail Link (MRL) [4] Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway (MMA) [5] Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado RailNet (NKCR) New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway (NYSW) [6] Northern Plains Railroad Paducah and Louisville Railway (PAL) [7] Palouse... The United States of America has a large and lucrative tourism industry serving millions of international and domestic tourists. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... The first U.S. census, in 1790, recorded four million Americans. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens of thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... For other uses, see American Dream (disambiguation). ... The percentage of households and individuals over the age of 25 with incomes exceeding $100,000 in the US.[1][2] Affluence in the United States refers to an individuals or households state of being in an economically favorable position in contrast to a given reference group. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... Percent below each countrys official poverty line, according to the CIA factbook. ... This graph shows the educational attainment since 1947. ... Violent conforntation between working class union members and law enforecement such as the one between teamsters and Minneapolis police above were commonly frowned upon by professional middle class. ... Strictly speaking, the United States does not have national holidays (i. ... Health care in the United States is provided by many separate legal entities. ... This article is about the high culture and popular culture of the United States. ... The United States is home to a wide array of regional styles and scenes. ... American classical music refers to music written in the United States but in the European classical music tradition. ... American folk music, also known as Americana, is a broad category of music including Native American music, Bluegrass, country music, gospel, old time music, jug bands, Appalachian folk, blues, Tejano and Cajun. ... The first major American popular songwriter, Stephen Foster Even before the birth of recorded music, American popular music had a profound effect on music across the world. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... This article is about television in the United States, specifically its history, art, business and government regulation. ... Hollywood redirects here. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ... The folklore of the United States, or American folklore, is one of the folk traditions which has evolved on the North American continent since Europeans arrived in the 16th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Transcendentalism was a group of new ideas in literature, religion, culture, and philosophy that emerged in New England in the early-to mid-19th century. ... The Harlem Renaissance was named after the anthology The New Negro, edited by Alain Locke in 1925. ... Beats redirects here. ... The Rocky Mountains, Landers Peak, 1863 by Albert Bierstadt, one of the Hudson River School painters Visual arts of the United States refers to the history of painting and visual art in the United States. ... Jackson Pollock, No. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Closely related to the development of American music in the early 20th century was the emergence of a new, and distinctively American, art form -- modern dance. ... The United States has a history of architecture that includes a wide variety of styles. ... Social issues are matters which directly or indirectly affect many or all members of a society and are considered to be problems, controversies related to moral values, or both. ... Main articles: Adolescent sexuality and Adolescent sexual behavior Adolescent sexuality in the United States relates to the sexuality of American adolescents and its place in American society, both in terms of their feelings, behaviors and development and in terms of the response of the government, educators and interested groups. ... Affirmative action is a policy or a program of giving preferential treatment to certain designated groups allegedly seeking to redress discrimination or bias through active measures, as in education and employment. ... Progress of America, 1875, by Domenico Tojetti American exceptionalism (cf. ... Anti-Americanism, often Anti-American sentiment, is defined as being opposed or hostile to the United States of America, its people, its principles, or its policies. ... Capital punishment is the legal process which ends the life of a felon. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine underground brewery during the prohibition era. ... The Energy policy of the United States is determined by federal, state and local public entities, which address issues of energy production, distribution and consumption. ... 1970s US postage stamp block In the United States today, the organized environmental movement is represented by a wide range of organizations sometimes called non-governmental organizations or NGOs. ... Gun Politics in the United States, incorporating the political aspects of gun politics, and firearms rights, has long been among the most controversial and intractable issues in American politics. ... The human rights record of the United States of America has featured an avowed commitment to the protection of specific personal political, religious and other freedoms. ... - Fence barrier on the international bridge near McAllen, TX . ... Pornography may use any of a variety of media — written and spoken text, photos, movies, etc. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... Racism in the United States has been a major issue in America since the colonial era. ... International recognition Civil unions and domestic partnerships Recognized in some regions Unregistered co-habitation Recognition debated Civil unions legal, same-sex marriage debated See also Same-sex marriage Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage, also called gay...

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The United States Army Homepage (326 words)
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United States Army, military force of the United States with the chief responsibility for land combat.
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