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Encyclopedia > United Reformed Church
Logo of The United Reformed Church
Logo of The United Reformed Church

The United Reformed Church (URC) is a Christian denomination (church) in the United Kingdom. Image File history File links United_Reformed_Church_logo. ... Image File history File links United_Reformed_Church_logo. ... A denomination, in the Christian sense of the word, is an identifiable religious body under a common name, structure, and/or doctrine. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...

Contents

History

The URC is the result of a union between the Presbyterian Church of England and the Congregational Church in England and Wales in 1972 and subsequent unions with the Re-formed Association of Churches of Christ in 1981 and the Congregational Union of Scotland in 2000. Logo of The United Reformed Church The United Reformed Church (URC) is a Christian denomination (church) in the United Kingdom. ... Logo of The United Reformed Church The United Reformed Church (URC) is a Christian denomination (church) in the United Kingdom. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Logo of The United Reformed Church The United Reformed Church (URC) is a Christian denomination (church) in the United Kingdom. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of The United Reformed Church The United Reformed Church (URC) is a Christian denomination (church) in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the year 2000. ...


Belief

The URC is a trinitarian church with strong historical roots in the Presbyterian (Reformed and Calvinist) and Congregational traditions. Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Reformed churches are a group of Christian Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Calvinist system of doctrine, which first arose especially in the Swiss Reformation led by Huldrych Zwingli, but soon afterward appeared in nations throughout Western Europe. ... In an unadorned church, the 17th century congregation stands to hear the sermon. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ...

Image File history File linksMetadata BishopLesslieNewbigin. ... Image File history File linksMetadata BishopLesslieNewbigin. ... Bishop Lesslie NEWBIGIN in 1996 James Edward Lesslie NEWBIGIN (December 8, 1909 - January 30, 1998 ) was a Christian theologian and bishop involved in missiology and the Gospel & Our Culture Movement. ... The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland is an honorary role, held for 12 months. ...

Polity

The URC is governed by a combined form of Presbyterian polity and Congregationalist polity. Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders. ... Congregationalist polity, often known as congregationalism, is a system of church governance in which every local congregation is independent. ...


Each congregation (local church) within the URC is governed by a Church Meeting consisting of all the members, and also a council of the (elected) Elders' Meeting (similar to the presbyterian Kirk Session in the Church of Scotland.) Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders. ... The Church of Scotland (CofS, known informally as The Kirk, Eaglais na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the national church of Scotland. ...


Several congregations organize at roughly the county level to form a district, each with a District Council (or Area Council in Scotland). Districts vary in size between 5 to 45 churches. The District Council offer oversight (the etymological sense of 'episcopate' or 'supervision') to the churches, giving pastoral care and making important decisions about where ministers serve and how churches share ministry. They normally meet 4 or 5 times a year and do much of their work through committees, like district pastoral committee and the district finance and property committee. The District Council has a president. This does not cite its references or sources. ... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... Look up oversight in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Not to be confused with Entomology, the study of insects. ... Episcopalian government in the church is rule by a hierarchy of bishops (Greek: episcopoi). ... Supervision can refer to: SuperVision Videogame system A tutorial in Britain This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Pastoral care is the ministry of care and counseling provided by pastors, chaplains and other religious leaders to members of their group (church, congregation, etc). ... In most Protestant churches, a minister is a member of the ordained clergy who leads a congregation; such a person may also be called a Pastor, Preacher, or Elder. ... A committee is a (relatively) small group that can serve one of several functions: Governance: in organizations too large for all the members to participate in decisions affecting the organization as a whole, a committee (such as a Board of Directors) is given the power to make decisions. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... // Use of the term In common usage, property means ones own thing and refers to the relationship between individuals and the objects which they see as being their own to dispense with as they see fit. ...


Several districts are grouped at regional level into a Synod, there being 11 of these for different Provinces of England; and one each for Nations of Scotland and Wales. The 13 Synods are served by a Moderator and often a training officer and other staff. Through the synod, the URC relates to other regional denominational structures (Anglican diocese and Methodist districts, for example). Synods now usually hold the property in trust and many key financial decisions are made here. Synods also have committee structure and employ staff to encourage and serve local churches. A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff Official language(s) Welsh, English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total 20,779... Moderator, a Latin word for he who moderates, can refer to: Moderator provinciae was the title of certain Roman provincial governors Moderator is a Scots, and Scottish English, gender-neutral word that approximates chairman or convener. ... A denomination, in the Christian sense of the word, is an identifiable religious body under a common name, structure, and/or doctrine. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Local government areas called districts are used, or have been used, in several countries. ... Escrow is a legal arrangement whereby an asset (often money, but sometimes other property such as art, a deed of title, website, or software source code) is delivered to a third party (called an escrow agent) to be held in trust pending a contingency or the fulfillment of a condition...


The URC has a General Assembly which gathers representatives of the whole of the URC to meet annually; advised by the Mission Council, it plans the activity of the URC across the United Kingdom. It makes key policy decisions about the direction of the life of the denomination. It also appoints national (that is, UK-level) staff, receives reports from national committees, and deals with large reports and initiatives such as the recent Catch the Vision exercise [1]. Districts and synods are represented, along with national committee convenors.


The United Reformed Church has embarked on a major programme of change and revitalisation, known as Catch the Vision. Part of this involves some changes to the Structure and governance of the church. Sometime during 2007 - 2008 (depending upon the granting of an order in council) District Councils will be dissolved and their functions transferred to Synods. From 2008, the General Assembly will only meet in every other year. In addition the central work of the Assembly will be reconfigured, and the Mission Council will become the Assembly Council.


Ecumenism

Make Poverty History banner in front of St Columba's URC, Oxford.
Make Poverty History banner in front of St Columba's URC, Oxford.

The URC is a member of the many ecumenical organizations, a fact which reflects the church's strong commitment to Christian unity. There are different ecumenical bodies in the component parts of the UK. In the England, these include Churches Together in England, amongst others. In Wales, the URC is a member of Cytûn (Churches Together in Wales) and the Enfys covenant. In Scotland, the URC participates in Action of Churches Together in Scotland (ACTS). Some UK wide work is co-ordinated by Churches Together in Britain and Ireland. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 408 KB) Make Poverty History banner in front of St Columbas United Reformed Church, Oxford, 2005-07-03. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1760x1168, 408 KB) Make Poverty History banner in front of St Columbas United Reformed Church, Oxford, 2005-07-03. ... // The Make Poverty History campaign (which is written as MAKEPOVERTYHISTORY) was a British and Irish coalition of charities, religious groups, trade unions, campaigning groups and celebrities who mobilized around the UKs prominence in world politics in 2005 to increase awareness and pressure governments into taking actions towards relieving absolute... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... The word ecumenical comes from a Greek word that means pertaining to the whole world. ... Churches Together in England (CTE) is an ecumenical organisation and national Christian church council in England. ... Cytûn is the ecumenical Christian organisation of Churches Together in Wales. ... Action of Churches Together in Scotland (ACTS) is an ecumenical grouping of churches and associated organisations founded in 1990. ... An ecumenical organisation, often abbreviated to CTBI. The members include most of the major churches in England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. ...


A former Moderator of the URC General Assembly, the Rev'd. Dr. Philip Morgan, himself a former General Secretary of the Association of Churches of Christ, was the last General Secretary of the British Council of Churches. [1] During his ten year term of office at the BCC, he oversaw the Council's transformation into Churches Together in Britain and Ireland in 1990.


The URC is also a member of many international ecumenical organisations, including the World Council of Churches, the Conference of European Churches, the Community of Protestant Churches in Europe, the World Alliance of Reformed Churches, and the Council for World Mission. It has a partnership with Christian Aid and the World Development Movement, called Commitment for Life. The World Council of Churches (WCC) is the principal international Christian ecumenical organization. ... The Conference of European Churches (CEC) was founded in 1959 to promote reconciliation, dialogue and friendship between the churches of Europe at a time of growing Cold War political tensions and divisions. ... The World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC) is a fellowship of more than 200 churches with roots in the 16th-century Reformation. ... The Council for World Mission (CWM) is a worldwide community of Christian churches. ... Activists from Christian Aid lobbying for Trade Justice Christian Aid promotion to buy goats to assist children of Rwanda Christian Aid is an agency of the major Christian churches in the United Kingdom and Ireland. ... The World Development Movement (WDM) exists to mobilise public pressure for fundamental change. ... Commitment for Life is a programme of the United Reformed Church with Christian Aid and the World Development Movement to work for a fairer world and for peace with justice. ...


FURY: Fellowship of United Reformed Youth

FURY, standing for the Fellowship of United Reformed Youth, is an umbrella organisation of which all youth in the URC between the ages of 11 and 25 are automatically members. Whether they attend a United Reformed Church or are associated with an organisation using a United Reformed Church such as the Scouts, Boys' Brigade, Girls' Brigade or Pilots, they are a member of FURY. Scouts and Guides from different countries on World Scout Moot 1996 Scouting, or the Scout movement, is a worldwide youth movement of multiple organizations for both boys and girls whose aim is to develop young people physically, spiritually and mentally so that youth may take a constructive place in society. ... The Boys Brigade Corporate Logo The Boys Brigade (the BB) is an international non-denominational Christian youth organisation. ... The Girls Brigade is an international non-denominational Christian youth organization. ...


FURY stands to bring forward the views of young people on the URC and what it should be doing. Views are gathered through FURY Assembly, an event where "FURYens" as they have been termed, can meet and discuss the URC as well as worship God together.


FURY Council is an elected body charged with carrying out the desires of FURY Assembly, as given in motions and resolutions voted for at the Assembly.


FURY is currently undergoing a regeneration and hopes to become a nationwide forum for the young people of the URC rather than an umbrella organisation. It feels that it can offer a better service to young people in this way.


See also

St Pauls Cathedral The United Kingdom is traditionally a Christian state, though of the four constituent countries, only England still has a state faith in the form of an established church. ...

External links

  • United Reformed Church official website

Polity information

  • The Basis of Union A statement concerning the nature, faith and order of the United Reformed Church
  • The Structure of the United Reformed Church
  • United Reformed Church Act 2000 The 1972 and 1981 Acts are not available at Her Majesty's Stationery Office website

Organizations for young people

Internal ginger groups

Continuing Congregational churches that did not unite organically with the URC

Continuing Churches of Christ that did not unite organically with the URC


  Results from FactBites:
 
United Reformed Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (932 words)
The URC is the result of a union between the Presbyterian Church of England and the Congregational Church in England and Wales in 1972 and subsequent unions with the Re-formed Association of Churches of Christ in 1981 and the Congregational Union of Scotland in 2000.
The URC is a trinitarian church with strong historical roots in the Presbyterian (Reformed and Calvinist) and Congregational traditions.
Each congregation (local church) within the URC is governed by a church meeting consisting of all the members, with the counsel of the (elected) elders' meeting (similar to the Scottish Kirk's session).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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