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Encyclopedia > United Presbyterian Church of Scotland

The United Presbyterian Church of Scotland (1847-1900) was a Scottish Presbyterian denomination. It was formed in 1847 by the union of the United Secession Church and the Relief Church, and in 1900 merged with the Free Church of Scotland to form the United Free Church of Scotland, which in turn united with the Church of Scotland in 1929. For most of its existence the United Presbyterian Church was the third largest Presbyterian Church in Scotland, and stood on the liberal wing of Scots Presbyterianism. The Church's name was often abbreviated to the initials U.P. 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages with Official Status1 English Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The United Secession Church (or properly the United Associate Synod of the Secession Church) was a Scottish Presbyterian denomination. ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... This article concerns the Free Church of Scotland 1843-1900, for the Free Church of Scotland existing from 1900 to the present day see Free Church of Scotland (post 1900). ... The United Free Church of Scotland was formed in 1900 by the unification of the United Presbyterian Church and the Free Church of Scotland (except for a dissident section who separated off and retained the name of Free Church). ... The Church of Scotland (CofS sometimes known as the Kirk) is the national church of Scotland. ... 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Contents


The Relief Church

The Presbytery of Relief was constituted in 1761 by three ministers of the Church of Scotland, one of whom was Thomas Gillespie, who had been deposed by the assembly in 1752 for refusing to take part in the intrusion of unacceptable ministers. The number of congregations under its charge increased with considerable rapidity, and a Relief Synod was formed in 1773, which in 1847 had under its jurisdiction 136 congregations. The Relief Church issued no distinctive testimonies, and a certain breadth of view was shown in the formal declaration of their terms of communion, first made in 1773, which allowed occasional communion with those of the Episcopal and Independent persuasion. who are visible saints. A Relief theological hall was instituted in 1824. 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Gillespie (1708 - January 19, 1774), was a Scottish church leader. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


The Union

In 1847 a union was formed between all the congregations of the United Secession Church and 118 out of 136 of the Relief Churches, in what now became the United United Presbyterian Church. It was the first Presbyterian body to relax the stringency of subscription, the Church Synod passing a declaratory act on the subject in 1879. On such points as that of the six days' creation, it was made clear that freedom was allowed; but when Mr David Macrae of Gourock claimed that it should also be allowed on the question of eternal punishment, he was at once declared to be no longer a minister of the church. He left behind him many who sympathized with his position, and in the remaining part of the 19th century the United Presbyterian Church came fully to share the forward movement of thought of the other Scottish churches. Doctrinally there was little difference between the United Presbyterian Church and the Free Church of Scotland, and between 1863 and 1873 negotiations were carried on for a union, which however were fruitless. But in 1896 the United Presbyterian Church again made advances, which were promptly met, and on October 31, 1900 the United Free Church of Scotland came into existence. 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article concerns the Free Church of Scotland 1843-1900, for the Free Church of Scotland existing from 1900 to the present day see Free Church of Scotland (post 1900). ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ...

This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Image File history File links 1911_Brittanica_Logo. ... Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


Church buildings

The United Presbyterian Church constructed a number of notable buildings, the largest of which often used a neoclassical design with a portico. A particularly fine example is Wellington Church, near the University of Glasgow, which was built in 1883-4 by the architect Thomas Lennox Watson. This preference for neoclasical architecture contrasts strongly with the prevailing mid-Victorian taste for Gothic Revival in most of the other Scottish churches. Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... The University of Glasgow is the largest of the three universities in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


The famous architect Alexander "Greek" Thomson (1817-1875) designed three striking U.P. church buildings in Glasgow at Caledonia Road (1865), St. Vincent Street (1859) and Queen's Park (1867). Of the three only St. Vincent Street survives intact, Caledonia Road being an empty shell and Queen's Park destroyed by World War II bombing. External link Thomsons Egyptian Halls on Union Street Alexander Greek Thomson (1817-1875) one of the great Glaswegian architects, who some believe to be the equal to Charles Rennie Mackintosh. ...


Alexander Thomson was a committed Christian and a member of the United Presbyterian Church. His architectural style was often eclectic; it cannot be described as truly neoclassical (he never managed to visit Greece), but he frequently used Egyptian and other Middle Eastern motifs. His interior designs and colour schemes for churches were strongly influenced by Biblical descriptions of King Solomon's Temple, for example the reference to pomegranates in 2 Chronicles 4:13 and the furnishings mentioned in 1 Kings 6:15-36.


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
United Presbyterian Church of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (685 words)
The United Presbyterian Church of Scotland (1847-1900) was a Scottish Presbyterian denomination.
It was formed in 1847 by the union of the United Secession Church and the Relief Church, and in 1900 merged with the Free Church of Scotland to form the United Free Church of Scotland, which in turn united with the Church of Scotland in 1929.
The Presbytery of Relief was constituted in 1761 by three ministers of the Church of Scotland, one of whom was Thomas Gillespie, who had been deposed by the assembly in 1752 for refusing to take part in the intrusion of unacceptable ministers.
United Presbyterian Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (154 words)
The United Presbyterian Church of Scotland (1847-1900), a union of the United Secession Church and the Relief Church which joined the Free Church of Scotland to form the United Free Church of Scotland
The United Presbyterian Church of North America (1858-1958), a union of the Associate Presbyterian Church with the northern part of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church and which itself was absorbed by the Presbyterian Church in the USA to form the
United Presbyterian Church in the USA (1958-83), which joined with the Presbyterian Church in the United States to form the Presbyterian Church USA.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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