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Encyclopedia > United Nations Security Council Resolution 1747
Flag of the United Nations
Flag of Islamic Republic of Iran

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1747 was adopted unanimously by the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) on 24 March 2007. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Nations. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Nations. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iran. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iran. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... UNSC may refer to: United Nations Science Committee United Nations Security Council United Nations Staff College United Nations Space Command (Halo) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (84th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ...


In June 2006, the five permanent Security Council members plus Germany offered a package of economic incentives including transfer of technology in the civilian nuclear field, in exchange for Iran to give up permanently its disputed uranium enrichment programme.[1] June 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Extraordinary renditions. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... For the record label, see Incentive Records. ... Technology transfer is the process of developing practical applications for the results of scientific research. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ...


Iran did not accept this offer because it was not attractive, it says. To justify its position, Iran has referred to previous accords concluded between the late Shah of Iran and the West regarding Eurodif and Bushehr. Iran has also referred to accords between the West and other countries like North Korea or Libya, where agreements reached and promises made have not been kept. In August 2006, the UNSC resolved to impose sanctions against Iran if it did not suspend its uranium enrichment programme. His Majesty Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi (اعلیحضرت محمدرضا شاه پهلوی; October 26, 1919 – July 27, 1980) also knows as Aryamehr, was the last Shah of Iran, ruling from 1941 until... The term Western world or the West (also on rare occasions called the Occident) can have multiple meanings depending on its context (i. ... Eurodif, which means European Gaseous Diffusion Uranium Enrichment Consortium, is a subsidiary company of French company Cogéma which exploits a uranium enrichment plant established in the nuclear site of Tricastin in Pierrelatte in Drôme. ... Bushehr or Bushire (بوشهر), pop. ... This article outlines economic, trade, scientific and military Sanctions against Iran, which has been put forward by the U.S. government, or under U.S. pressure. ...


In the resolution, the Council decided to tighten the sanctions imposed on Iran in connection with that nation's nuclear programme. It also resolved to impose a ban on arms sales and to step up the freeze on assets already in place. The successive Security Council interventions and positions are summarized hereafter: A United Nations Security Council Resolution is voted on by the fifteen members of the United Nations Security Council, the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... This article is about Irans nuclear power programme. ...

Contents

Background on IAEA inspections

See also: Nuclear programme of Iran

Access to nuclear sites: According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Iran has not yet declared the full scope of its programme and has not allowed a full-unrestricted access to all its nuclear sites. The programme is 18 years old, and part of it was outside of the IAEA preview. This situation has worried the IAEA and the international community. Iran says it has allowed the IAEA to access all its nuclear sites, voluntarily and more than any other country. This article is about Irans nuclear power programme. ... The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957. ... It has been suggested that World community be merged into this article or section. ...


Iran's previous suspension: Iran has said that previous agreements of suspension of uranium enrichment for two years in 2004 did not yield any tangible results for any party. Iran has expressed an official concern to disclose more information to the IAEA because of the repeated military threats made by the West since 2005.[2] Subsequently, the IAEA has declared it is unable to conclude there are no undeclared nuclear materials or activities in Iran and has referred the file to the Security Council.[3] Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ...


Statement of intentions

United Nations position: The permanent Security Council members, including Russia and China, have declared their intentions to prevent Iran from acquiring weapons of mass destruction because of its belligerent rhetoric towards the West and Israel since the Iranian Revolution.[4] In principle, the UN Security Council (UNSC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have confirmed Iran’s right to peaceful nuclear technology under the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).[5] For the album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ... 1980 Iranian stamp commemorating the Islamic Revolution Protestors take to the street in support of Ayatollah Khomeini. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957. ... The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is a treaty, opened for signature on July 1, 1968, restricting the possession of nuclear weapons. ...


Iranian stance: Iran wants to build a network of nuclear power plants with a capacity for 20,000 MW by 2020.[6] Iran has referred to its inalienable right to develop nuclear technology for civilian and peaceful purposes under the NPT to justify its position.[7] The Supreme Leader of Iran has stated in a fatwa that possession and use of nuclear weapons is "anti-Islamic".[8] Iranian officials have insisted that they have no intention to develop nuclear weapons. This point has been questioned by the West because uranium enrichment is a dual-use technology. The megawatt (symbol: MW) is a unit for measuring power corresponding to one million (106) watts. ... The term inalienable rights (or unalienable rights) refers to a set of human rights that are in some sense fundamental, are not awarded by human power, and cannot be surrendered. ... The post of Supreme Leader (Persian: ولی فقیه or رهبر, Rahbar, literally leader) was created in the constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran as the highest ranking political authority of the nation (see Guardianship of the jurists (doctrine)). Other Persian terms include the Valiye-Faqih (sometimes shortened to Faqih) or the Jurisprudent... A fatwa (Arabic: ‎; plural fatāwa), is a legal pronouncement in Islam made by a mufti, a scholar capable of issuing judgments on Sharia (Islamic law). ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( ▶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ... Dual-use is a term often used in politics and diplomacy to refer to technology which can be used for both peaceful and military aims, usually in regard to the proliferation of nuclear weapons. ...


Iran has dismissed the sanctions and said it did not intend to suspend its enrichment programme. Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki told the Security Council after the vote: "The world must know – and it does – that even the harshest political and economic sanctions or other threats are far too weak to coerce the Iranian nation to retreat from their legal and legitimate demands." He added: "Suspension is neither an option nor a solution".[9] Manouchehr Mottaki (In Persian: منوچهر متکی) is the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Iran) appointed by President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. ...


Non-Aligned Movement's position: Iran has reminded the Security Council of the Non-Aligned Movement's support for its civilian nuclear programme and its opposition to any military attack against Iran. This declaration by the Non-Aligned Movement, at the summit level, represents a majority of 118 countries at the United Nations and 55% of the world population.[10] Member states of the Non-Aligned Movement (2005). ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... Map of countries by population —showing the population of the Peoples Republic of China and India, the only two countries to have a population greater than a billion. ...


Nuclear disarmament

Iran and weapons of mass destruction: As of 2007, Iran is not known to possess weapons of mass destruction and has signed treaties repudiating their possessions, including the Biological Weapons Convention, the Chemical Weapons Convention, and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). A number of countries, including the U.S., United Kingdom, and France, have accused Iran of a clandestine intention to develop nuclear weapons.[11] By most estimates, Iran is still two to six years away from being able to produce an atomic bomb, even if it wanted to.[12] Nuclear disarmament is the proposed undeployment and dismantling of nuclear weapons, particularly those of the United States and the Soviet Union (later Russia) targeted on each other. ... This article is about Iran and weapons of mass destruction. ... Biological Weapons Convention Opened for signature April 10, 1972 at Moscow, Washington and London Entered into force March 26, 1975 Conditions for entry into force ??? Parties ??? The Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction (usually referred to... Chemical Weapons Convention Opened for signature January 13, 1993 in Paris Entered into force April 29, 1997 Conditions for entry into force Ratification by 50 states and the convening of a Preparatory Commission Parties 181 (as of Oct. ... The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is a treaty, opened for signature on July 1, 1968, restricting the possession of nuclear weapons. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ...


Western hypocrisy: Iran has said it does not accept to be lectured and pressured by the West and it has accused the West of "hypocrisy and double standard". Iran has condemned the Security Council members for not doing what they preach to others: namely, getting rid of their own weapons of mass destruction, as it is their duty under the NPT accords. [13][14] In March 2006, Iran strongly deplored United Kingdom's decision to renew its Trident missile nuclear weapons system. It also feels threatened by the United States military deployment in Iraq, Afghanistan and in the Middle East. Iran has pointed to the fact that the United States is the only country who has ever used nuclear weapons in history and has not ruled out the possibility to use them again in the future as part of the Bush doctrine, and against the UN Charter. A compass rose with west highlighted This article refers to the cardinal direction; for other uses see West (disambiguation). ... For the album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ... The Trident missile, named after the trident, is an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) which is armed with nuclear warheads and is launched from submarines (SSBNs), making it a SLBM. The Trident was built in two variants: the I (C4) UGM-96A and II (D5) UGM-133A. The C4 and D5... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The mushroom cloud over Hiroshima after the dropping of Little Boy. ... The Bush Doctrine is name given to a set of guidelines first unveiled by United States President George W. Bush in a speech given on June 1, 2002. ... The United Nations Charter is the constitution of the United Nations. ...


Double standard: Iran has said the double standard applied to Israel is unjust and disturbing given its possession of nuclear weapons, its non-adherence to the NPT, and its treatment of the Palestinians over many years. Israel has unofficially stated it needs to have nuclear weapons to assure its survival in a predominantly hostile Middle East environment, since its independence in 1948 and following the Holocaust. Iran has responded that Arabs and the Middle East should not bear responsibility for crimes against humanity and atrocities committed by the Nazis during World War II against the Jews in Europe.[15] A double standard, according to the World Book Dictionary, is a standard applied more leniently to one group than to another. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Survival may refer to: Survival skills Survival kit Survivalism Survival, a studio album by Grand Funk Railroad Survival (album), a Bob Marley reggae album Survival (Doctor Who), an episode of Doctor Who Survival (television), a British wildlife television program Survival International a charity Survival Festival, Australia This is a disambiguation... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب ) are an ethnic group found throughout the Middle East and North Africa. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... World map showing the location of Europe. ...


Bushehr nuclear power plant

Nuclear fuel: In 1995, Russia signed a contract to supply a light water reactor for the plant (the contract is believed to be valued between $700,000,000 and $1,200,000,000 USD).[16] Although the agreement calls for the spent fuel rods to be sent back to Russia for reprocessing, the US has expressed concern that Iran would reprocess the rods itself, in order to obtain plutonium for atomic bombs. In March 2007, following Iran's refusal to halt enrichment, Russia announced it will withhold the delivery of nuclear fuel, pretexting overdue payments vis-à-vis the Bushehr reactor even though Iran has denied any late payment. Consequently, Bushehr should be commissioned by early 2008, after five delays of two years each.[17] A light water reactor or LWR is a thermal nuclear reactor that uses ordinary water (as opposed to heavy water) as its neutron moderator. ... Nuclear power station at Leibstadt, Switzerland. ... General Name, Symbol, Number plutonium, Pu, 94 Chemical series actinides Group, Period, Block n/a, 7, f Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight (244) g·mol−1 Electron configuration [Rn] 5f6 7s2 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 24, 8, 2 Physical properties Phase solid Density (near r. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Nuclear Fuel Process A graph compairing nucleon number against binding energy Nuclear fuel is any material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned to derive energy. ... Bushehr or Bushire (بوشهر), pop. ...


Tor Missile System: Russia has declared repeatedly its opposition to any military attack against Iran's civilian nuclear facilities. In January 2007, Russia announced the sale of 29 units of its Tor Missile System to Iran as part of a one billion dollar deal to protect its installations.[18] A 9K330 TELAR. Photo from Field Artillery Magazine. ...


Justification for the programme

See also: Economy of Iran and Energy in Iran

Economic reasons: Iran has stated its programme is motivated by economic needs and scientific progress only. Iran has said its large petroleum reserves will inevitably extinguish, given its increasing domestic energy consumption pattern and because of its oil exports. Iran has referred to US Government reports from the time of the Shah and independent U.S. estimates as recent as 2006 to justify its position.[19] Iran has also referred to Russia's recent decision to withhold fuel delivery for its nuclear power plant as an additional reason why it cannot rely on other countries for its nuclear fuel needs.[20]. The economy of Iran has been improving steadily over the past two decades but a continuing strong labour force growth unmatched by commensurate real economic growth is driving up unemployment to a level considerably higher than the official estimate of 11%. According to experts, annual economic growth above five per... As a further drive toward diversification of energy sources, Iran has also established wind farms in several areas, this one near Manjeel. ... Economics (deriving from the Greek words οίκω [okos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... Peak Oil Depletion Scenarios Graph which depicts cumulative published depletion studies by ASPO and other depletion analysts. ... ... His Majesty Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi (اعلیحضرت محمدرضا شاه پهلوی; October 26, 1919 – July 27, 1980) also knows as Aryamehr, was the last Shah of Iran, ruling from 1941 until... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... A nuclear power station. ... Nuclear Fuel Process A graph compairing nucleon number against binding energy Nuclear fuel is any material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned to derive energy. ...


Financial investment: Iran has said it has spent too much money - over ten billion U.S. dollars in the past 30 years - on its civilian nuclear programme to give it up now.[21][22] Furthermore, it has argued that suspension is a way for the West to undermine Iran's independence and progress. If its rights are not respected by the Security Council, Iran has threatened to withdraw from the Non-Proliferation Treaty. Iran has also justified its uranium enrichment programme because it has plans to construct more nuclear power plants in the future.[23] Progress can refer to: The idea of a process in which societies or individuals become better or more modern (technologically and/or socially). ... The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is a treaty, opened for signature on July 1, 1968, restricting the possession of nuclear weapons. ... A nuclear power station. ...


National pride: In March 2007, it was announced that Iran would issue a 50,000 rial banknote with the subject being the Iranian nuclear energy programme. This has become an object of national pride and the symbol of independence for many Iranians.[24] March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... ISO 4217 Code IRR User(s) Iran Inflation 15. ... This article is about Irans nuclear power programme. ... Defense of the homeland is a commonplace of military patriotism: The statue in the courtyard of École polytechnique, Paris, commemorating the students involvement in defending France against the 1814 invasion of the Coalition. ...


United States-Iran relations

Iranian concerns: Other subjects interfere with Iran's international file at the Security Council, including: Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Shah of Iran, shakes hands with a US Air Force general officer prior to his departure from the United States. ... Opposition to a perceived risk of a military attack on Iran by the United States is known to have started during 2005-2006. ... On 4th February 2007 Iranian diplomat Jalal Sharafi, the second secretary of the Iranian embassy, was kidnapped in Baghdad by Iraqi special forces. ... Petrodollar warfare is a hypothesis that many international manœuvres in recent decades are taken to support the current dollar hegemony over other currencies. ... Iran Political & transportation map of the traditional Middle East today As negotiations continue over the nuclear program of Iran, many press reports have revealed claims of covert military actions by US military inside of Iran and of possible military plans for airstrikes by the Israeli and/or the US military...

Propaganda: Both parties have resorted to propaganda, psychological war, ideology and defamation through the media to galvanize their audience and win the public debate.[26] Iran has labeled the United States "the Great Satan" and chants "Death to America". Meanwhile, the US Government said that Iran is part of the "Axis of Evil". Iran and the United States accuse each other of not working for the benefit of their own people but for a small group holding to power, even if both parties claim a broad democratic support for their endeavor. A BBC poll conducted in June 2006 found that world public opinion considered the United States, along with Iran, to be the greatest threats to world peace.[27] Economics (deriving from the Greek words οίκω [okos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... This article outlines economic, trade, scientific and military Sanctions against Iran, which has been put forward by the U.S. government, or under U.S. pressure. ... 1980 Iranian stamp commemorating the Islamic Revolution Protestors take to the street in support of Ayatollah Khomeini. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Soldiers surround the Parliament building in Tehran on August 19, 1953. ... Mohammed Mossadegh (Persian: محمد مصدق‎) (May 19, 1882 - March 4, 1967) was prime minister of Iran from 1951 to 1953. ... ... Propaganda is a type of message aimed at influencing the opinions or behavior of people. ... The U.S. Department of Defense defines psychological warfare (PSYWAR) as: The planned use of propaganda and other psychological actions having the primary purpose of influencing the opinions, emotions, attitudes, and behavior of hostile foreign groups in such a way as to support the achievement of national objectives. ... An ideology is an organized collection of ideas. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... The Great Satan (Persian شيطان بزرگ, Shaytan Bozorg) is a common epithet for the United States of America in Iranian foreign policy statements. ... The Great Satan (Persian شيطان بزرگ Shaytan Bozorg, Arabic الشيطان الأكبر Al-Shaytan Al-Akbar) is a common epithet for the United States of America in Iranian foreign policy statements. ... ... Behind Enemy Lines II: Axis of Evil, see Behind Enemy Lines II. Bushs axis of evil includes Iran, Iraq, and North Korea (darker red). ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... Public Opinion is a book on media and democracy by Walter Lippmann. ... World peace is an ideal of freedom, peace, and happiness among and within all nations. ...


Proxy wars: The United States has accused Iran of undermining peace in the Middle East by supporting economically and militarily warring parties beyond its borders, especially: A peace dove, widely known as a symbol for peace, featuring an olive branch in the doves beak. ...

Iran has denied any military involvement in Iraq, even though American forces have said they have proof of it. On 25 December 2006, US armed forces arrested and later released four senior Iranian military officials in Baghdad. On January 2007, US controlled forces kidnapped and allegedly tortured five Iranians in Irbil, Iraq, which have not been released yet. In April 2007, these prisoners were allowed visits by ICRC delegates for the first time.[29] Iran has accused the United States of supporting armed opposition groups against its Government inside and outside of Iran, and conducting UAV reconnaissance flights over Iran since 2005.[30] For other uses, see Hezbollah (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Palestinian territories as a geopolitical phenomenon. ... Hamas (Arabic: ; acronym: Arabic: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement; the Arabic acronym means zeal) is a Palestinian Islamist organization that currently (since January 2006) forms the majority party of the Palestinian National Authority. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... Torture is defined by the United Nations Convention Against Torture as any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he... This article is about the province of Iraq. ... The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is historically a committee of Swiss nationals, although non-Swiss nationals have recently been allowed (the committee appoints new members to itself to replace those who resign or die) which leads the international Red Cross movement (often simply known after its symbol... Unmanned Aerial Vehicle over Iraq. ...


Iranian Oil Bourse: According to some experts, Iran is seeking to weaken the US global hegemony by creating an International Oil Bourse that will trade in euros instead of dollars, as well as a gas cartel with Russia, which has the greatest proven gas reserves in the world. Iran has denied this and has justified both projects based on their sole economic merits. Hegemony (pronounced or ) (Greek: ) is the dominance of one group over other groups, with or without the threat of force, to the extent that, for instance, the dominant party can dictate the terms of trade to its advantage; more broadly, cultural perspectives become skewed to favor the dominant group. ... International Oil Bourse is International stock exchange where oil is sold. ... The Greek name for the rainy, stormy southeast wind. ... Alternate uses: Dollar (disambiguation) The dollar is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions (see list below). ... A cartel is a group of legally independent producers whose goal it is to fix prices, limit supplies and limit competition. ...


Iran-Israel relations

Iranian threats: Iran has denied it wants to see "Israel wiped off the map" as reported by the foreign media. Iran's foreign minister has affirmed that Iran's stated policy on Israel is to urge a one-state solution through a countrywide referendum in which a government would be elected that all Palestinians and all Israelis would jointly vote for. This would normally be an end to the "Zionist state", similarly to the end of the Soviet Union. [31][32][33][34] Relations between Iran and Israel have alternated from close political alliances between the two states during the era of the Pahlavi dynasty to hostility following the rise to power of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. ... During his presidency, Mahmoud Ahmadinejads speeches and statements have contributed to increased tensions between Iran and Israel, and between Iran and a few Western nations. ... The supply of military aid to combatants during the course of the 2006 Lebanon War has been an important aspect of both the hostilities and the diplomatic wrangling surrounding them, including figuring prominently into UN Security Council resolutions on the topic. ... Ballots of the Argentine plebiscite of 1984 on the border treaty with Chile A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The Palestinian flag, adopted in 1948, is a widely recognized modern symbol of the Palestinian people. ... A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ...


Israeli threats: Iran has referred to Israel's Defense Forces surprise attack in 1981 on the Osirak nuclear reactor in Iraq and its recent threats against Tehran as additional reasons why it cannot disclose more information to the IAEA. Israel has stated that "a nuclear armed Iran is not acceptable for Israel" and that it will take military action if the international community fails to curb Iran's nuclear programme.[35] [36] If attacked, Iran has vowed its readiness to retaliate in asymmetric warfare and by using its vast arsenal of missile forces to reach Tel Aviv.[37] The Israel Defense Forces are part of the Israeli Security Forces. ... The reactor after the Israeli raid. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about Irans nuclear power program. ... Asymmetric warfare is a term that describes a military situation in which two belligerents of unequal power or capacity of action, interact and take advantage of the strengths and weaknesses of themselves and their enemies. ... Despite earlier roots, Iran started its missile development program in earnest during its long and costly war with Iraq. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ...


Iran's proposed solution

Comprehensive negotiations: Iran has repeatedly agreed to hold further talks, without the precondition to halt its uranium enrichment programme. The United States has opposed this, even though it has agreed to hold direct talks relating to other subjects like the war in Iraq.[38] In 2003, Iran was known to have made a similar confidential proposal to the United States through the Swiss Embassy in Tehran. Switzerland is the US protecting power in Iran since the Iranian Revolution in 1979. The United States is said to have rejected these comprehensive discussions, at that time.[39] In logic a precondition is a condition that has to be met, before a main argument can have any value. ... Enriched uranium is uranium whose uranium-235 content has been increased through the process of isotope separation. ... There have been three conflicts in the late 20th century and early 21st century called Gulf War, all of which refer to conflicts in the Persian Gulf region: Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988) (aka First Gulf War). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... In diplomatic usage, the term protecting power refers to a relationship that may occur when two countries do not have diplomatic relations. ... 1980 Iranian stamp commemorating the Islamic Revolution Protestors take to the street in support of Ayatollah Khomeini. ...


International consortium: Iran is ready to consider the creation of an international consortium for uranium enrichment as a solution to the current standoff at the Security Council. [40] In April 2007, Iran declared it had reached the early stage in industrial nuclear fuel production following the installation of more than a thousand centrifuges at the Natanz underground facility. Iran has declared it was planning to install 55,000 more centrifuges in the future.[41] In 2005, Iran inaugurated an uranium conversion facility in Isfahan, and a heavy water production plant in Arak in 2006. All declared Iranian installations are under the strict supervision of the IAEA. link titleThe word international can mean: Between nations or encompassing several nations. ... A consortium is an association of two or more individuals, companies, organisations or governments (or any combination of these entities) with the objective of participating in a common activity or pooling their resources for achieving a common goal. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Iran geography stubs | Cities in Iran ... Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan This article is about the city of Isfahan. ... Heavy water is dideuterium oxide, or D2O or 2H2O. It is chemically the same as normal water, H2O, but the hydrogen atoms are of the heavy isotope deuterium, in which the nucleus contains a neutron in addition to the proton found in the nucleus of any hydrogen atom. ... Arak may refer to: Arak, a city in centeral Iran Arak, an alcoholic beverage made from grapes and anise This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Earlier resolutions

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1696 was passed by the United Nations Security Council on 31 July 2006. ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 153 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... United Nations Security Council Resolution 1737 was unanimously passed by the United Nations Security Council on 23 December 2006. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (358th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

See also

This article outlines economic, trade, scientific and military Sanctions against Iran, which has been put forward by the U.S. government, or under U.S. pressure. ... This article is about Irans nuclear power programme. ... The Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) is the main official body responsible for implementing regulations and operating nuclear energy installations in Iran. ... As negotiations continue over the Iranian nuclear program, many press reports have revealed possible military plans for airstrikes against facilities connected to the program by the Israeli and or US military. ... Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Shah of Iran, shakes hands with a US Air Force general officer prior to his departure from the United States. ... Despite earlier roots, Iran started its missile development program in earnest during its long and costly war with Iraq. ...

References

  1. ^ Iran to Abandon Incentives Package if Security Council Takes Action Over Nukes. Associated Press (2006-07-30). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  2. ^ Report: Iran To Start Hiding Its Nuclear Plans. CBS (2007-03-30). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  3. ^ Report: Newest IAEA report on Iran cites continued concerns in anticipation of full UNSC consideration. Center for Defense Information (2006-03-03). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  4. ^ Israel should be wiped off map, says Iran's president. The Guardian (2005-10-27). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  5. ^ SECURITY COUNCIL TOUGHENS SANCTIONS AGAINST IRAN, ADDS ARMS EMBARGO. UN News Centre. United Nations (2007-03-24). Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  6. ^ "Iran to seek bids for two atomic power plants", Reuters, April 15, 2007. 
  7. ^ EU to seek new Iran nuclear talks. BBC news site. BBC (2007-03-25). Retrieved on 2007-04-18.
  8. ^ EU to seek new Iran nuclear talks. Iran Daily (2005-11-08). Retrieved on 2007-04-18.
  9. ^ Iran rejects new UN sanctions. Al Bawaba (2007-03-25). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  10. ^ Iran Wins Backing From Non-Aligned Bloc. Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty (2006). Retrieved on 2006-09-29.
  11. ^ Transcript of the Director General´s Interview on Iran and DPRK. Financial Times (2005-02-19). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  12. ^ Iran 'years from nuclear bomb'. BBC news site. BBC (2006-01-12). Retrieved on 2007-04-18.
  13. ^ Nuclear Guarantees On Offer, Discrimination Damages Credibility Of Int’l Bodies. Iran Daily (2007-02-21). Retrieved on 2007-04-18.
  14. ^ Iran: Bush and Blair Practicing Atomic Hypocrisy. Tony Benn. The Guardian (2005-12-01). Retrieved on 2007-04-18.
  15. ^ Polling only solution to Palestine problem, President. Iran IRNA - Islamic Republic News Agency (2004-12-14). Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  16. ^ Iran's Nuclear Chronology (1995). NTI (2006-05-01). Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  17. ^ Russia nuclear delay angers Iran. BBC (2007-03-13). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  18. ^ Russian rocket deliveries to Iran started. Agence France Presse (2006-11-24). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  19. ^ The Iranian petroleum crisis and United States national security. Roger Stern. John Hopkins University (2006-12-26). Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  20. ^ Iran says delay in Russian fuel delivery justifies nuclear stance. Earth Times (2007-04-03). Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
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  23. ^ Iran to build new nuclear plant. BBC (2005-12-05). Retrieved on 2007-05-06.
  24. ^ Across Iran, Nuclear Power Is a Matter of Pride. New York Times (2005-05-19). Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  25. ^ U.S. Comes Clean About The Coup In Iran. CNN (2000-04-19). Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  26. ^ Leader warns of “psychological war” against Iran. Mehr News (2000-03-23). Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  27. ^ US 'biggest global peace threat'. BBC (2006-06-14). Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
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  30. ^ Country Reports on Terrorism. US State Department (2006-04-28). Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  31. ^ President considers Zionists aggression on Lebanon as unusual. IRNA (2006-08-03). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  32. ^ Iranian president condemns Zionist atrocities in Gaza. IRNA (2006-07-03). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  33. ^ President stresses need for int'l support for Palestine. IRNA (2006-06-12). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
  34. ^ Ahmadinejad cautions Muslims not to let enemies turn into their speakers. IRNA (2006-06-02). Retrieved on 2007-04-27.
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2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (127th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (117th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (117th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (117th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (117th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (117th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ...

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