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Encyclopedia > United Nations Charter
UN Charter signing ceremony.
United Nations Charter
Opened for signature June 26, 1945 in San Francisco
Entered into force October 24, 1945
Conditions for entry into force Ratification by the Republic of China, France, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the United States of America, and by a majority of the other signatory states.
Parties 192

The United Nations Charter is the treaty that forms and establishes the international organization called the United Nations. While this document is often misconstrued as a constitution it is, in fact, an agreement between states and not a compact among the individual peoples to create a government. It was signed at the United Nations Conference on International Organization in San Francisco on June 26, 1945 by 50 of the 51 original member countries (Poland, the other original member, which was not represented at the conference, signed it later). It entered into force on October 24, 1945, after being ratified by the five permanent members of the Security Council—the Republic of China (later replaced by People's Republic of China), France, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (later replaced by the Russian Federation), the United Kingdom, and the United States—and a majority of the other signatories. A close-up of the United Nations Charter with the Egyptian delegation in background at the signing ceremony in San Francisco. ... John Hancocks signature is one of the most prominent on the United States Declaration of Independence. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Coming into force refers to the date on which a legislation, or part of legislation, becomes a law. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Ratification includes the process of adopting an international treaty by the legislature, a constitution, or another nationally binding document (such as an amendment to a constitution) by the agreement of multiple sub-national entities. ... The Republic of China is commonly known as Taiwan or Chinese Taipei, and it is not to be confused with the Peoples Republic of China. ... Soviet redirects here. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... A majority is a subset of a group that is more than half of the entire group. ... Ô John Hancocks signature on the United States Declaration of Independence A signature is a usually stylized version of someones name written on documents as a proof of identity and will, like a seal, but handwritten. ... A party is a person or group of persons that compose a single entity which can be identified as one for the purposes of the law. ... Single European Act A treaty is a binding agreement under international law entered into by actors in international law, namely states and international organizations. ... An international organization, or more formally intergovernmental organization (IGO), is an organization, such as the European Community or the WTO, with sovereign states or other IGOs as members. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... The United Nations Conference on International Organization was a convention of delegates from 50 nations that took place from April 25, 1945 to June 26, 1945 in San Francisco. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... The Republic of China is commonly known as Taiwan or Chinese Taipei, and it is not to be confused with the Peoples Republic of China. ... Soviet redirects here. ...


As a Charter it is a constituent treaty, and all members are bound by its articles. Furthermore, the Charter states that obligations to the United Nations prevail over all other treaty obligations [1]. Most countries in the world have now ratified the Charter. One notable exception is the Holy See, which has chosen to remain a permanent observer state and therefore is not a full signatory to the Charter. It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...

Contents

Organization of the document

The Charter consists of a preamble and a series of articles divided into chapters. The Preamble to the United Nations Charter is the opening of the United Nations Charter. ...

  • Chapter I sets forth the purposes of the United Nations, including the important provisions of the maintenance of international peace and security.
  • Chapter II defines the criteria for membership in the United Nations.
  • Chapters III-XV, the bulk of the document, describe the organs and institutions of the UN and their respective powers.
  • Chapters XVI and XVII describes arrangements for integrating the UN with established international law.
  • Chapters XVIII and XIX provide for amendment and ratification of the Charter.

The following chapters deal with the enforcement powers of UN bodies: The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... A peace dove, widely known as a symbol for peace, featuring an olive branch in the doves beak. ... For other uses, see Security (disambiguation). ... Membership can refer to: Set membership - comprising part of a set in mathematics Social group membership - in sociology, the process of socialisation aims/results in achieving membership of a social group This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Institutions are structures and mechanisms of social order and cooperation governing the behavior of two or more individuals. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Amendments to the United Nations Charter can be made by a procedure set out in Chapter XVIII of the UN Charter. ... Ratification includes the process of adopting an international treaty by the legislature, a constitution, or another nationally binding document (such as an amendment to a constitution) by the agreement of multiple sub-national entities. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... For the band, see The Police. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ...

“UNSC” redirects here. ... A controversy is a contentious dispute, a disagreement over which parties are actively arguing. ... Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter sets out the UN Security Councils powers to maintain peace. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations assists the General Assembly in promoting international economic and social cooperation and development. ... The United Nations Trusteeship Council, one of the principal organs of the United Nations, was established to help ensure that non-self-governing territories were administered in the best interests of the inhabitants and of international peace and security. ... Colonialism in 1945 Decolonization refers to the achievement of independence by the various Western colonies and protectorates in Asia and Africa following World War II. This conforms with an intellectual movement known as Post-Colonialism. ... The International Court of Justice (known colloquially as the World Court or ICJ; French: ) is the primary judicial organ of the United Nations. ... The United Nations Secretariat is one of the principal organs of the United Nations and it is headed by the United Nations Secretary General, assisted by a staff of international civil servants worldwide. ...

Purposes of the United Nations

Chapter 1, Article 1 of the UN Charta states:


The Purposes of the United Nations are

  1. To maintain international peace and security, and to that end: to take effective collective measures for the prevention and removal of threats to the peace, and for the suppression of acts of aggression or other breaches of the peace, and to bring about by peaceful means, and in conformity with the principles of justice and international law, adjustment or settlement of international disputes or situations which might lead to a breach of the peace;
  2. To develop friendly relations among nations based on respect for the principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples, and to take other appropriate measures to strengthen universal peace;
  3. To achieve international co-operation in solving international problems of an economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian character, and in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language, or religion; and
  4. To be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations in the attainment of these common ends.

A peace dove, widely known as a symbol for peace, featuring an olive branch in the doves beak. ... For other uses, see Security (disambiguation). ... Equal Rights can be: One of several groups called the Equal Rights Party. ... Self-determination is a principle in international law that a people ought to be able to determine their own governmental forms and structure free from outside influence. ...

See also

Portal:United Nations
United Nations Portal

The Nuremberg Principles were a set of guidelines for determining what constitues a war crime. ... The Bush Doctrine is name given to a set of guidelines first unveiled by United States President George W. Bush in a speech given on June 1, 2002. ... Dumbarton Oaks is a nineteenth-century mansion located in the Georgetown section of Washington, DC. It houses the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, a leading center for scholarship in Byzantine studies, Pre-Columbian studies and the history of landscape architecture. ... San Francisco City Hall on Civic Center plaza in 2004 San Franciscos Civic Center is an area of a few blocks north of the intersection of Market Street and Van Ness Avenue that contains many of the citys largest government and cultural institutions. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1150x1150, 77 KB) Summary square version of Image:Flag_of_the_United_Nations. ...

References

External links

  • Full text of the charter
  • Searchable/cross-referenced/Trackback-enabled text of the charter
  • Charter of the United Nations at Law-Ref.org - fully indexed and crosslinked with other documents
  • Full text of the charter in PDF Format at filepedia.org

 
 

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