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Encyclopedia > United Methodist Church
United Methodist Church

United Methodist Church logo Cross and flame
Classification Protestant
Orientation Mainline[1] & Evangelical[2]
Polity Episcopal (Connectionalism)
Origin 1968
Merge of The Methodist Church and the Evangelical United Brethren Church
Associations Churches Uniting in Christ, Christian Churches Together, National Council of Churches, World Council of Churches, World Methodist Council
Geographical Area Worldwide: divided into 122 Annual/Central Conferences,[5] and 69 Episcopal Areas[5]
Statistics
Congregations 41,826[5]
Members worldwide: 12 million (8.1 million in the United States; 3.5 million in Africa, Asia, and Europe)

The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination. It has both mainline and evangelical elements.[2][6] In the United States, it ranks as the largest mainline church and second largest Protestant church (after the Southern Baptist Convention). In 2007 worldwide membership was about 12 million members: 8.1 million in the United States,[7] 3.5 million in Africa, Asia and Europe.[8] The United Methodist Church in Great Britain had no connection with the much larger United Methodist Church in the United States. ... Image File history File links Umclogo. ... Official Symbol of the United Methodist Church since 1968. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Christian doctrine redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In the United States, the mainline... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Ecclesiastical polity is the operational and governance structure of a church or Christian denomination. ... It has been suggested that episcopal be merged into this article or section. ... Connectionalism is the theological understanding and foundation of Methodist polity. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Church union is the name given to a merger of two or more Christian denominations. ... The Methodist Church was the name adopted by the methodist denomination fformed by the reunion in 1939 of the northern and southern factions of the American Methodist Episcopal Church with the Methodist Protestant Church. ... The Evangelical United Brethren was an American Protestant church which was formed in 1946 by the merger of the Evangelical Association with the Church of the United Brethren in Christ (not to be confused with the current Church of the United Brethren in Christ, a denomination that split from the... Churches Uniting in Christ (CUIC) brings together nine mainline American denominations (including both predominantly white and predominantly black churches), and was inaugurated on January 20, 2002. ... Christian Churches Together in the USA (CCT) is a new ecumenical group growing out of a deeply felt need to broaden and expand fellowship, unity and witness among the diverse expressions of Christian faith today. CCT is envisioned as a place where people of widely differing Christian backgrounds can come... The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (usually identified as National Council of Churches, or NCC) is an association of 35 Christian faith groups in the United States with 100,000 local congregations and more than 45,000,000 adherents. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ... The World Methodist Council is a group composed of most of the worlds Wesleyan / Methodist denominations, working toward mission and unity. ... The following is a list of the Conferences of the United Methodist Church. ... An Episcopal Area in the United Methodist Church is a basic unit of this denomination. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In the United States, the mainline... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination that consists of numerous agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual meetings... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The history of this denomination is one of splits and mergers. In 1820, the Methodist Protestant Church split from the Methodist Episcopal Church over the issue of laity having a voice and vote in the administration of the church, insisting that clergy should not be the only ones to have any determination in how the church was to be operated. In 1844, the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church split into two conferences because of tensions over slavery and the power of bishops in the denomination. The two General Conferences, Methodist Episcopal Church (or northern section) and Methodist Episcopal Church, South remained separate until the 1939 merger of these two denominations plus a third, the Methodist Protestant Church, the resulting church being known as The Methodist Church. In 1968, The Methodist Church united with the Evangelical United Brethren, also a result of mergers, to become The United Methodist Church (UMC). Seal of the Methodist Protestant Church. ... The Methodist Episcopal Church, sometimes referred to as the M.E. Church, officially began at the Baltimore Christmas Conference in 1784. ... The Methodist Episcopal Church, sometimes referred to as the M.E. Church, officially began at the Baltimore Christmas Conference in 1784. ... The Methodist Episcopal Church, South was the so-called Southern Methodist Church resulting from the split in the Methodist Episcopal Church which had been brewing over several years until it came out into the open at a conference held in Louisville, Kentucky in 1845. ... Seal of the Methodist Protestant Church. ... The Methodist Church was the name adopted by the methodist denomination fformed by the reunion in 1939 of the northern and southern factions of the American Methodist Episcopal Church with the Methodist Protestant Church. ... The Evangelical United Brethren was an American Protestant church which was formed in 1946 by the merger of the Evangelical Association with the United Brethren in Christ. ...


Combining the personal holiness emphasis of the evangelical influence in the church with the outreach emphasis from the social gospel proponents has created a combination of practices within the United Methodist Church. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to...

Contents

Organization

Part of a series on
United Methodism
John Wesley

Background
Christianity · Protestantism
Anglicanism · Methodism
Evangelicalism · Pietism · Arminianism
Reformed · Brethren · Mennonite
The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination, and the second-largest Protestant one, in the United States. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Arminianism Methodism United Methodist Church George Whitefield John Wesley Francis Asbury Charles Wesley Pietism African Methodist Episcopal Church Thomas Coke (Methodist) Prevenient Grace Christian perfection Atonement (Governmental view) List of Methodist theologians Imparted righteousness World Methodist Council Template:Methodism Methodist Church... For other persons named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Pietism was a movement within Lutheranism, lasting from the late-17th century to the mid-18th century. ... Arminianism is a school of soteriological thought in Protestant Christian theology founded by the Dutch theologian Jacob Hermann, who was best known by the Latin form of his name, Jacobus Arminius. ... The Reformed churches are a group of Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organizationally independent. ... For the Jim Roberts religious movement, see The Brethren (cult). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Mennonites are a group of...

Doctrinal distinctives
Articles of Religion
Prevenient Grace
Governmental Atonement
Imparted righteousness
Christian perfection
The Articles of Religion are an official doctrinal statement of American Methodism. ... Prevenient grace is a Christian theological concept rooted in Augustinian theology[1] and embraced primarily by Arminian Christians who are influenced by the theology of John Wesley and who are part of the Methodist movement. ... The governmental view of the atonement (also known as the moral government theory) is a doctrine in Christian theology concerning the meaning and effect of the death of Jesus Christ and has been traditionally taught in Arminian circles that draw primarily from the works of Hugo Grotius, the governmental theory... Imputed righteousness, in Methodist theology, is that gracious gift of God given at the moment of the new birth which enables a Christian disciple to strive for holiness and sanctification. ... Christian Perfection is a Christian doctrine which maintains that after conversion, but before death, a Christians soul may be cleansed from the stain of original sin. ...

People
Charles Wesley
Francis Asbury
Thomas Coke
Jacob Albright
Philip William Otterbein
Martin Boehm
Albert C. Outler
Bishops · Theologians Charles Wesley (12 December 1707 - 29 March 1788) was a leader of the Methodist movement, the younger brother of John Wesley. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Right Reverend Thomas Coke, M.A., D.C.L. (9 September 1747-2 May 1814) is known as the Father of Methodist Missions. ... Jacob Albright (1759-1808) was an American Christian leader, founder of the Evangelical Association (later the Evangelical Church), born near Pottstown, PA. A German Lutheran in his heritage, he was converted in about 1790 to Methodism. ... Philip William Otterbein (1726 - 1813) was a German-American clergyman, who founded the Church of the United Brethren in Christ. ... Martin Boehm (November 30, 1725 – March 23, 1812) was an American clergyman and pastor. ... Albert Cook Outler (1908-1989) was a 20th century American Methodist theologian and philosopher. ...

Predecessor groups
The Methodist Church
Evangelical United Brethren Church
Methodist Episcopal Church
Methodist Episcopal Church, South
Methodist Protestant Church
Evangelical Association
Church of the United Brethren in Christ The Methodist Church was the name adopted by the methodist denomination fformed by the reunion in 1939 of the northern and southern factions of the American Methodist Episcopal Church with the Methodist Protestant Church. ... The Evangelical United Brethren was an American Protestant church which was formed in 1946 by the merger of the Evangelical Association with the Church of the United Brethren in Christ (not to be confused with the current Church of the United Brethren in Christ, a denomination that split from the... The Methodist Episcopal Church, sometimes referred to as the M.E. Church, officially began at the Baltimore Christmas Conference in 1784. ... The Methodist Episcopal Church, South was the so-called Southern Methodist Church resulting from the split in the Methodist Episcopal Church which had been brewing over several years until it came out into the open at a conference held in Louisville, Kentucky in 1845. ... Seal of the Methodist Protestant Church. ... The Evangelical Church or Evangelical Association was founded by Jacob Albright, a German-speaking Christian influenced by John Wesley and the Methodist movement. ... The Church of the United Brethren in Christ is an evangelical Christian denomination based in Huntington, Indiana. ...

Related movements
Holiness movement
Salvation Army
Personalism
Pentecostalism
The Holiness movement is composed of people who believe and propagate the belief that the carnal nature of man can be cleansed through faith and by the power of the Holy Spirit if one has had his sins forgiven through faith in Jesus. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is an evangelical Christian charity and church that is internally organized like a military service. ... Personalism is the school of thought that consists of three main principles, and which can broadly be qualified as species of Humanism : Only people are real (in the ontological sense), Only people have value, and Only people have free will. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Pentecostal can...

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The United Methodist Church is organized into conferences. The highest level is called the General Conference and is the only organization which may speak officially for the church. The General Conference meets every four years (quadrennium). Legislative changes are recorded in The Book of Discipline which is revised after each General Conference. Non-legislative resolutions are recorded in the Book of Resolutions, which is published after each General Conference, and expire after eight years unless passed again by a subsequent session of General Conference. The last General Conference was held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 2004. The next General Conference is scheduled to be held in Fort Worth, Texas, in 2008. Bishops, Councils, Committees, Boards, Elders, etc., are not permitted to speak on behalf of The United Methodist Church as this authority is reserved solely for the General Conference in accordance with the Book of Discipline. Also the United Methodist Church does not support the Bible as truly inspired or else they would not have retarted doctrines. The General Conference of The United Methodist Church is the denominations top legislative body for all matters affecting the United Methodist connection. ... The Book of Discipline constitutes the law and doctrine of the United Methodist Church[1]. It follows similar works for its predecessor denominations. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant and Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City  298. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Subordinate to the General Conference are Jurisdictional and Central Conferences which also meet every four years. The United States is divided into five jurisdictions: Northeastern, Southeastern, North Central, South Central and Western. Outside the United States the church is divided into seven central conferences: Africa, Congo, West Africa, Central & Southern Europe, Germany, Northern Europe and Philippines. The main purpose of the jurisdictions and central conferences is to elect and appoint bishops, the chief administrators of the church. Bishops thus elected serve Episcopal Areas, which consist of one or more Annual Conferences. The following is a list of the Conferences of the United Methodist Church. ... An Episcopal Area in the United Methodist Church is a basic unit of this denomination. ... An Annual Conference in the United Methodist Church is a regional body that governs much of the life of the Connectional Church. ...


The Annual Conference, roughly the equivalent of a diocese in the Episcopal Church and the Roman Catholic Church or a synod in some Lutheran denominations such as the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, is the basic unit of organization within the UMC. The term Annual Conference is often used to refer to the geographical area it covers as well as the frequency of meeting. Clergy are members of their Annual Conference rather than of any local congregation, and are appointed to a local church or other charge annually by the conference's Resident Bishop at the meeting of the Annual Conference. In many ways, the United Methodist Church operates as a confederation of the Annual Conferences, and interpretations of the Book of Discipline by one conference are not binding upon another. The United Methodist Annual Conference is the regional body that governs much of the life of the Connectional Church. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... A congregation is the group of members who make up a local Christian church, Jewish synagogue, Mosque or other religious assembly. ... A Resident Bishop in the United Methodist Church is a Bishop appointed to a specific Episcopal Area (i. ...


Annual conferences are further divided into Districts, each served by a District Superintendent. The district superintendents are also appointed annually from the ordained elders of the Annual Conference by the bishop. District superintendents, upon completion of their service as superintendent, routinely return to serving local congregations. The Annual Conference cabinet is composed of the resident bishop and the district superintendents. A District Superintendent in the United Methodist Church is a clergyperson who serves in a supervisory position over a geographic District of churches (varying in size) providing spiritual and administrative leadership to those churches and their pastors. ... This article is about the sacrament. ... An Elder in Methodism -- sometimes called a Presbyter -- is someone who has been ordained by a Bishop to the ministry of Word, Sacrament, Order, and Service. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... A Resident Bishop in the United Methodist Church is a Bishop appointed to a specific Episcopal Area (i. ...


While the General Conference is the only organization that can officially speak for The United Methodist Church as a whole, there are several councils, boards, commissions, and agencies that the church operates on the denominational level. These organizations address specific topic areas of denomination-wide concern. General Conference can refer to: General Conferences, the recurring meetings of Member States for the specialized agencies of the United Nations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and UNESCO. General conference, a meeting open to all members of a particular Latter Day Saint denomination, most commonly indicating that of... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A denomination...

  • General Council on Finance and Administration (GCFA)
  • General Boards of Pension and Health Benefits (GBOPHB)
  • General Board of Church and Society (GBCS)
  • General Board of Discipleship (GBOD)
  • General Board of Global Ministries (GBGM)
  • General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (GBHEM)
  • General Commission on Archives and History (GCAH)
  • General Commission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns (GCCUIC)
  • General Commission on Religion and Race (GCORR)
  • General Commission on the Status and Role of Women (GCSRW)
  • General Commission on United Methodist Men (GCUMM)
  • United Methodist Publishing House (UMPH)
  • United Methodist Communications (UMCom)
  • United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR)
  • United Methodist Campus Ministers Association (UMCMA)

The United Methodist Board of Church and Society is the part of the UMC that decides what the Methodist Churchs stance will be on matters concerning secular issues. ... The General Commission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns (GCCUIC) addresses the interreligious and ecumenical concerns of The United Methodist Church. ... The United Methodist Committee on Relief, often referred to as UMCOR, is a prominent world-wide emergency relief organization. ... United Methodist Campus Ministers Association (UMCMA) is a national professional association of campus ministers serving college campuses on behalf of the United Methodist Church. ...

Clergy

The first Methodist clergy were ordained by John Wesley, a minister in the Church of England, because of the crisis caused by the American Revolution which isolated the Methodists in the States from the Church of England and its sacraments. Today, the clergy includes men and women who are ordained by Bishops as Elders and Deacons and are appointed to various ministries. Elders in the United Methodist Church (UMC) are part of what is called the itinerating ministry and are subject to the authority and appointment of their bishops. They generally serve as pastors at local congregations. Deacons make up a serving ministry and may serve as musicians, liturgists, educators, business administrators, and a number of other ministries. Elders and deacons are generally required to obtain master's degrees (M.Div. or Th.M.), or other appropriate degrees that are at a minimum at the baccalaureate level, before commissioning and then ultimately ordination. Elders in full connection are each a member of their Annual Conference Order of Elders. Likewise each Deacon in full connection is a member of their Annual Conference Order of Deacons (abbr. OD, for Ordinarium Diaconates, lat.). For other persons named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other types of... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... A sacrament is a Christian rite that mediates divine grace. ... This article is about the sacrament. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... An Elder in Methodism -- sometimes called a Presbyter -- is someone who has been ordained by a Bishop to the ministry of Word, Sacrament, Order, and Service. ... For other uses, see Deacon (disambiguation). ... Master of Divinity is a common degree among theological seminaries and is considered the minimum academic requirement for ordination into pastoral ministry. ... North America The Master of Theology (Th. ... Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ... The United Methodist Annual Conference is the regional body that governs much of the life of the Connectional Church. ... The United Methodist Annual Conference is the regional body that governs much of the life of the Connectional Church. ...


The main difference between elders and deacons is that elders, in a priestly function, connect the people to God, while deacons, in a servant leadership function, connect the people of God to service in the world. In the priestly function, the elder has the authority to preside over the two United Methodist sacraments of baptism and holy communion, while deacons are to assist in the leadership of these sacraments. Elders itinerate: they are amenable to appointed to a place of leadership at the decision of their bishop. Deacons are also appointed to a place of service by the bishop, but they do not itinerate. They choose a place of service and request appointment from the bishop. Deacons whose primary appointment is beyond the local church also have a secondary appointment to a worshiping congregation. (The United Methodist Book of Discipline spells out these distinctions.)


The Methodist church has allowed ordination of women with full rights since 1956, the first U.S. mainstream Christian denomination to do so. In general religious use, ordination is the process by which one is consecrated (set apart for the undivided administration of various religious rites). ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


At the 1996 General Conference the ordination order of transitional deacon was abolished. This created a new order known as the "commissioned elder." The commissioned elder is a recent seminary graduate who serves three years in a full-time appointment. During this three-year probationary period, the commissioned elder is granted sacramental ministry in their local appointment. This was a change in its theology of ministry for the United Methodist Church in the ordering of its ministry. For the first time in its history non-ordained pastors became a normal expectation, rather than an extraordinary provision for ministry.


There is also another clerical classification called the Fellowship of Local Pastors. Elders may minister and celebrate the sacraments in any church or any other setting (where invited), while local pastors may only serve in ministry and administer the sacraments in the specific church to which they are appointed by their bishop; as such, their ministry is often understood as a direct extension of the ministry of the bishop, for its authority is directly and inseparably linked to it. Local pastors are not required to have advanced degrees but are required to pass licensing courses and examinations before the District Committee on Ministry, and are further required to take yearly classes, which if completed before retirement may also lead to ordination as an Elder. Local Pastors are not ordained. Local Pastors preside over the sacraments in their local appointments. A Methodist local preacher is a lay person who has been accredited by a Methodist church to lead worship on a regular basis. ... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... An Elder in Methodism -- sometimes called a Presbyter -- is someone who has been ordained by a Bishop to the ministry of Word, Sacrament, Order, and Service. ...

Photograph of Christ United Methodist Church in Rochester, Minnesota (2007)
Photograph of Christ United Methodist Church in Rochester, Minnesota (2007)

All clergy appointments are made and fixed annually by the Resident Bishop on the advice of the Annual Conference Cabinet, which is composed of the Area Provost/Dean (if one is appointed) and the several District Superintendents of the Districts of the Annual Conference. Until the Bishop has read the appointments at the session of the Annual Conference, no appointments are officially fixed. Many Annual Conferences try to avoid making appointment changes between sessions of Annual Conference. While an appointment is made one year at a time, it is most common for an appointment to be continued for multiple years. One recent survey concluded that small church appointments currently average three to four years, while large church appointments average seven to nine years. Appointment tenures in extension ministries, such as Campus Ministry, Missions, Higher Education and other ministries beyond the local church are often even longer. Across the denomination, longer tenures are becoming more common. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Coordinates: Country United States State Minnesota County Olmsted Founded 1854 Mayor Ardell Brede Area    - City 103. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... A Resident Bishop in the United Methodist Church is a Bishop appointed to a specific Episcopal Area (i. ... The United Methodist Annual Conference is the regional body that governs much of the life of the Connectional Church. ... A cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... A District Superintendent in the United Methodist Church is a clergyperson who serves in a supervisory position over a geographic District of churches (varying in size) providing spiritual and administrative leadership to those churches and their pastors. ... The United Methodist Annual Conference is the regional body that governs much of the life of the Connectional Church. ... ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A Christian...


Another position in the United Methodist Church is that of the lay speaker. Although not considered clergy, lay speakers often preach during services of worship when an ordained elder or deacon is unavailable.[9][10] There are two categories of lay speakers: local church lay speakers,[11] who serve in and through their local churches, and certified lay speakers, who serve in their own churches, in other churches, and through district or conference projects and programs.[11] To be recognized as local church lay speakers, they must be recommended by their pastor and Church Council or Charge Conference, and complete the basic course for lay speaking. Each year they must reapply, reporting how they have served and continued to learn during that year.[11] To be recognized as certified lay speakers, they must be recommended by their pastor and Church Council or Charge Conference, complete the basic course and one advanced lay speaking course, and be interviewed by the District or Conference Committee on Lay Speaking. They must report and reapply annually; and they must complete at least one advanced course every three years.[11] A lay speaker is a position in the United Methodist Church for the laity. ... In the protestant denominations of Christianity, a service of worship is a meeting whose primary purpose is the worship of God. ... An Elder in Methodism -- sometimes called a Presbyter -- is someone who has been ordained by a Bishop to the ministry of Word, Sacrament, Order, and Service. ... For other uses, see Deacon (disambiguation). ... The term local churches (地方教會) was originally used by Watchman Nee (倪柝聲) to describe Christian churches that form based upon the teaching of the ground of locality; however, its use to refer to any collection of independent Christian congregations in a city has become more... The United Methodist Annual Conference is the regional body that governs much of the life of the Connectional Church. ...


Laity

There are two classes of lay membership in the UMC: Baptized Members and Professing Members.


The United Methodist Church (UMC) practices infant and adult baptism. Baptized Members are those who have been baptized as an infant or child, but who have not subsequently professed their own faith. These Baptized Members become Professing Members through confirmation and sometimes the profession of faith. Individuals who were not previously baptized are baptized as part of their profession of faith and thus become Professing Members in this manner. Water is poured on the head of an infant held over the baptismal font of a Catholic church in the United States in 2004 In Christian religious practice, infant baptism is the baptism of young children or infants. ... See Reform Judaism article about its Confirmation ceremony. ... Profession, in Christian monasticism, is the act of embracing the religious state by the three vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience according to the rule of a canonically approved religious order; it involves then a triple vow made to God, and binding oneself to the rule of a certain order. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Baptism is a sacrament in the UMC, but confirmation and profession of faith are not. The profession of faith is used mainly for individuals transferring from another body of the Christian Church or those who have not been baptized whereas confirmation is used mainly for youth who have been baptized as infants. The Book of Discipline of the United Methodist Church directs the local church to offer confirmation preparation classes to all people, including adults. Classes are usually offered to youth. The Book of Discipline normally allows any youth at least completing sixth grade to participate, although the pastor has discretionary authority to allow a younger person to participate. In confirmation class students learn about Church and the Methodist-Christian theological tradition in order to profess their ultimate faith in Christ. This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... See Reform Judaism article about its Confirmation ceremony. ... Profession, in Christian monasticism, is the act of embracing the religious state by the three vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience according to the rule of a canonically approved religious order; it involves then a triple vow made to God, and binding oneself to the rule of a certain order. ... Profession, in Christian monasticism, is the act of embracing the religious state by the three vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience according to the rule of a canonically approved religious order; it involves then a triple vow made to God, and binding oneself to the rule of a certain order. ... St. ... See Reform Judaism article about its Confirmation ceremony. ... The Book of Discipline constitutes the law and doctrine of the United Methodist Church[1]. It follows similar works for its predecessor denominations. ... The term local churches (地方教會) was originally used by Watchman Nee (倪柝聲) to describe Christian churches that form based upon the teaching of the ground of locality; however, its use to refer to any collection of independent Christian congregations in a city has become more...


The lay members of the church are extremely important in the UMC. The Professing Members are part of all major decisions in the church. General, Jurisdictional, Central, and Annual Conferences are all required to have an equal number of laity and clergy.


In a local church, all decisions are made by an administrative board or council. This council is made up of laity representing various other organizations within the local church. The elder or local pastor sits on the council but only as a non-voting member. The term local churches (地方教會) was originally used by Watchman Nee (倪柝聲) to describe Christian churches that form based upon the teaching of the ground of locality; however, its use to refer to any collection of independent Christian congregations in a city has become more...


Beliefs

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Christian doctrine redirects here. ... For the Celtic Frost album, see Monotheist (album) In theology, monotheism (from Greek one and god) is the belief in the existence of one deity, or in the oneness of God. ... This article is about the Christian Trinity. ... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... 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Therefore sanctification refers to the state or process of being set apart, i. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In Eastern Orthodox and... Monument honoring the right to worship, Washington, D.C. In Christianity, worship has been considered by most Christians to be the central act of Christian identity throughout history. ... 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Covenant Theology is not to be confused with the Covenanters For Covenantal Theology in the Roman Catholic perspective, see Covenantal Theology (Roman Catholic). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      New Covenant Theology refers to a...


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The United Methodist Church is a Protestant denomination which seeks to create disciples for Christ through outreach, evangelism, and through seeking holiness through the process of sanctification. With a focus on triune worship, United Methodists seek to bring honor to God by following the model of Jesus Christ, which is made possible by the power of the Holy Spirit. The flame in the church logo represents the work of the Holy Spirit in the world, which is seen in believers through spiritual gifts. The two parts of the flame represent the predecessor denominations, the Methodist Church and the Evangelical United Brethren, and are united at the base symbolizing the 1968 merger. Sanctification or in its verb form, sanctify, literally means to set apart for special use or purpose, that is to make holy or sacred (compare Latin sanctus holy). Therefore sanctification refers to the state or process of being set apart, i. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Official Symbol of the United Methodist Church since 1968. ...


While many United Methodist congregations operate in the evangelical tradition, others are similar to many mainline Protestant denominations. Although United Methodist beliefs have evolved over time, these beliefs can be traced to the writings of the church's founders, John Wesley and Charles Wesley (Methodist), Philip William Otterbein and Martin Boehm (United Brethren), and Jacob Albright (Evangelical). With the formation of The United Methodist Church in 1968, theologian Albert C. Outler led the team which systematized denominational doctrine. Outler's work proved pivotal in the work of union, and he is largely considered the first United Methodist theologian. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In the United States... For other persons named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ... Charles Wesley (12 December 1707 - 29 March 1788) was a leader of the Methodist movement, the younger brother of John Wesley. ... Philip William Otterbein (1726 - 1813) was a German-American clergyman, who founded the Church of the United Brethren in Christ. ... Martin Boehm (November 30, 1725 – March 23, 1812) was an American clergyman and pastor. ... Jacob Albright (1759-1808) was an American Christian leader, founder of the Evangelical Association (later the Evangelical Church), born near Pottstown, PA. A German Lutheran in his heritage, he was converted in about 1790 to Methodism. ... Albert Cook Outler (1908-1989) was a 20th century American Methodist theologian and philosopher. ...


The officially established Doctrinal Standards of United Methodism are:

These Doctrinal Standards are constitutionally protected and nearly impossible to change or remove.[12] Other doctrines of the United Methodist Church are found in the Book of Discipline of the United Methodist Church. The Articles of Religion are an official doctrinal statement of American Methodism. ... This Confession of faith forms part of the established Doctrinal Standards of the United Methodist Church along with the Articles of Religion and the Standard Sermons of John Wesley. ... Book of Discipline could refer to any of the following: Book of Discipline (Church of Scotland): the Book of Discipline of the Church of Scotland. ...


The basic beliefs of The United Methodist Church include:

  • Inclusivity. The UMC includes and welcomes people of all races, cultures, and ages.
  • Free will. The UMC believes that people, while corrupted by sin, are free to make their own choices because of God's divine grace.
  • Grace. The UMC believes that God gives unmerited favor freely to all people, though it may be resisted.

The United Methodist Church recognizes the historic ecumenical creeds,[26] the Apostle's Creed[27] and the Nicene Creed;[28]they are used frequently in services of worship.[29] The Book of Discipline also recognizes the importance of the Chalcedonian Creed of the Council of Chalcedon. This article is about the Christian Trinity. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... The term God is used to designate a Supreme Being, however, there are countless definitions of God. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ... For other uses, see Sign (disambiguation). ... Regeneration in Christian theology is a doctrine related to spiritual rebirth or being born again. ... The New Birth is how John Wesley and Methodism have traditionally referred to the born again experience. ... The Means of Grace in Christian theology are those things (the means) through which God gives His grace. ... The trinitarian formula is the phrase in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit (original Greek εις το ονομα του πατρος και του υιου και του αγίου πνεύματος, eis to onoma tou patros kai tou huiou kai tou hagiou pneumatos), or words to that form and effect referring to the persons of the Holy Trinity. ... List of Christian denominations ordered by historical and doctrinal relationships. ... The Real Presence is the term various Christian traditions use to express their belief that, in the Eucharist, Jesus the Christ is really (and not merely symbolically, figuratively or by his power) present in what was previously just bread and wine. ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ... The Resurrection—Tischbein, 1778. ... A reliquary in the form of an ornate Christian Cross Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope... Concord grapes being cooked down into grape juice for use in making jelly. ... The Means of Grace in Christian theology are those things (the means) through which God gives His grace. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... For other uses, see Race (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Free-Will is a Japanese independent record label founded in 1986. ... For other uses, see Sin (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In Christianity... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In Christianity... Ecumenical creeds is an umbrella term used in the western church to refer to the Nicene Creed, Apostles Creed and Athanasian Creed. ... The Apostles Creed is an early statement of Christian belief, probably from the first or second century. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... In the protestant denominations of Christianity, a service of worship is a meeting whose primary purpose is the worship of God. ... The Chalcedonian Creed was adopted at the Council of Chalcedon in 451 in Asia Minor. ... The Council of Chalcedon was an ecumenical council that took place from October 8 to November 1, 451, at Chalcedon (a city of Bithynia in Asia Minor), today part of the city of Istanbul on the Asian side of the Bosphorus and known as the district of Kadıköy. ...


Distinctive Wesleyan emphases

The key emphasis of Wesley's theology relates to how Divine grace operates within the individual. Wesley defined the Way of Salvation as the operation of grace in three parts: Prevenient Grace, Justifying Grace, and Sanctifying Grace. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In Christianity... Prevenient grace is a Christian theological concept rooted in Augustinian theology[1] and embraced primarily by Arminian Christians who are influenced by the theology of John Wesley and who are part of the Methodist movement. ... The Harrowing of Hell as depicted by Fra Angelico In Christian theology, justification is Gods act of declaring or making a sinner righteous before God. ... Sanctification or in its verb form, sanctify, literally means to set apart for special use or purpose, that is to make holy or sacred (compare Latin sanctus holy). Therefore sanctification refers to the state or process of being set apart, i. ...


Prevenient grace, given to all people, is that power which enables us to love and that which motivates us to seek a relationship with God through Jesus Christ.[30] This grace effects a partial restoring of our sin-corrupted human will so that we might sense both our sinfulness before God and God’s offer of salvation. Prevenient grace allows those tainted by sin to nevertheless make a truly free choice to accept or reject God's salvation in Christ.[30] Prevenient grace is a Christian theological concept rooted in Augustinian theology[1] and embraced primarily by Arminian Christians who are influenced by the theology of John Wesley and who are part of the Methodist movement. ... For other uses, see Salvation (disambiguation). ...


Justifying Grace or Accepting Grace[30] is that grace, offered by God to all people, that we receive by faith and trust in Christ, through which God pardons the believer of sin. It is justifying grace that enables God to receive us, in spite of our sin, and to forgive us through the life, and especially the death on the cross, and the resurrection of Jesus Christ. The justifying grace cancels our guilt and empowers us to resist the power of sin and to fully love God and neighbor. Today, justifying grace is also known as conversion, "accepting Jesus as your personal Lord and Savior," or being "born again." [30][31] John Wesley originally called this experience the New Birth.[32] This experience can occur in different ways; it can be one transforming moment, such as an altar call experience,[33] or it may involve a series of decisions across a period of time.[34] The Harrowing of Hell as depicted by Fra Angelico In Christian theology, justification is Gods act of declaring or making a sinner righteous before God. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Conversion to Christianity is the religious conversion of a previously non-Christian person to some form of Christianity. ... In Christianity, the term born again or regenerated is synonymous with spiritual rebirth—salvation. ... The New Birth is how John Wesley and Methodism have traditionally referred to the born again experience. ... An altar call is a practice in some evangelical churches in which those who wish to make a new spiritual commitment to Jesus Christ are invited to come forward publicly. ...


Sanctifying Grace is that grace which sustains the believers in the journey toward "perfection of love": a genuine love of God with heart, soul, mind, and strength, and a genuine love of our neighbors as ourselves. Sanctifying grace enables us, once justified, to respond to God by leading a Spirit-filled and Christ-like life aimed toward love. Wesleyan theology maintains that salvation is the act of God's grace entirely, from invitation, to pardon, to growth in holiness. Sanctification or in its verb form, sanctify, literally means to set apart for special use or purpose, that is to make holy or sacred (compare Latin sanctus holy). Therefore sanctification refers to the state or process of being set apart, i. ... Christian Perfection is a Christian doctrine which maintains that after conversion, but before death, a Christians soul may be cleansed from the stain of original sin. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Holiness is the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of God or gods. ...


For Wesley, good works were the fruit of one's salvation, not the way in which that salvation was earned. Faith and good works go hand in hand in Methodist theology: a living tree naturally and inevitably bears fruit. Wesleyan theology rejects the doctrine of eternal security, believing that salvation can possibly, in extreme cases, be lost. Wesley emphasized that believers must continue in their relationship with Christ, preferably improving this relationship, throughout their lifetime in order to remain in grace with God. Perseverance of the saints (or preservation of the saints or eternal security) is a controversial Christian doctrine which maintains that none who are truly saved can be condemned for their sins or finally fall away from the faith. ...


A key outgrowth of this theology is the United Methodist dedication not only to the Evangelical Gospel of repentance and a personal relationship with God, but also to the Social Gospel and a commitment to social justice issues that have included abolition, women's suffrage, labor rights, civil rights, and others. Thus, Wesleyan theology is sometimes characterized as "progressive evangelical." Look up evangelist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Social Gospel movement is a Protestant Christian intellectual movement that was most prominent in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ...


Characterization of Wesleyan theology

Wesleyan theology stands at a unique cross-roads between evangelical and sacramental, between liturgical and charismatic, and between Anglo-Catholic and Reformed theology and practice. It has been characterized by Arminian theology with an emphasis on the work of the Holy Spirit to bring holiness into the life of the participating believer. The United Methodist Church believes in prima scriptura, seeing the Holy Bible as the primary authority in the Church and using tradition, reason, and experience to interpret it, with the aid of the Holy Spirit (see Wesleyan Quadrilateral).[35] Today, the UMC is generally considered one of the more moderate and tolerant denominations with respect to race, gender, and ideology though the denomination itself actually includes a very wide spectrum of attitudes. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... The charismatic movement began with the adoption of certain Pentecostal beliefs—specifically what are known as the biblical charisms of Christianity: speaking in tongues, prophesying, etc. ... ... -1... Arminianism is a Protestant Christian theology founded by the Dutch theologian Jacobus Arminius. ... The Bible is considered as first or above all sources of divine revelation. ... The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... Christian traditions are traditions of practice or belief associated with Christianity. ... For other uses, see Reason (disambiguation). ... In Christianity, the term born again or regenerated is synonymous with spiritual rebirth—salvation. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... The Wesleyan Quadrilateral is a methodology for theological reflection that is credited to John Wesley, leader of the Methodist movement in the late 18th Century. ... “Moderates” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that toleration be merged into this article or section. ... Gender in common usage refers to the sexual distinction between male and female. ... Political Ideologies Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      An ideology is an organized collection of ideas. ...


Diversity within Methodist beliefs

In making an appeal to a toleration of diversity of theological opinion, John Wesley said, "Though we may not think alike, may we not all love alike?" The phrase "In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity" has also become a maxim among Methodists, who have always maintained a great diversity of opinion on many matters within the Church.


The United Methodist Church allows for a wide range of theological and political beliefs. For example, both Republican President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney are practicing United Methodists as are Democratic Senator Hillary Clinton and former Senator John Edwards. Many practicing United Methodists believe this flexibility is one of the UMC's strongest qualities. This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ...


At the 2004 General Conference, one of the speakers at a Good News movement (a conservative caucus) breakfast floated the notion of an "amicable" separation due to the divisive theological issues that have occurred among Methodists. Later, a proposed resolution unrelated to the speaker [36] was circulated that suggested a Task Force of 21 persons to be set up to come up with a proposal for an “amicable separation” within the UMC to be presented at a special session of General Conference in 2006. On Friday morning a delegate from Eastern Pennsylvania was recognized and presented a resolution for unity. The resolution passed overwhelmingly as delegates confirmed their desire to remain united in ministry. The General Conference of The United Methodist Church is the denominations top legislative body for all matters affecting the United Methodist connection. ...


Social issues

Part of a series on
Methodism
John Wesley
George Whitefield

Background
Christianity
Protestantism
Pietism
Anglicanism
Arminianism
Calvinism
For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other persons named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 475 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (790 × 996 pixel, file size: 41 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From:George Whitefield: a biography, with special reference to his labors in America; Belcher, Joseph; New York : American Tract Society; 1857 This image is in the... George Whitefield (December 16, 1714 - September 30, 1770), was a minister in the Church of England and one of the leaders of the Methodist movement. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Pietism was a movement within Lutheranism, lasting from the late-17th century to the mid-18th century. ... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... Arminianism is a school of soteriological thought in Protestant Christian theology founded by the Dutch theologian Jacob Hermann, who was best known by the Latin form of his name, Jacobus Arminius. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Calvinism is...

Doctrinal distinctives
Articles of Religion
Prevenient Grace
Governmental Atonement
Imparted righteousness
Christian perfection
The Articles of Religion are an official doctrinal statement of American Methodism. ... Prevenient grace is a Christian theological concept rooted in Augustinian theology[1] and embraced primarily by Arminian Christians who are influenced by the theology of John Wesley and who are part of the Methodist movement. ... The governmental view of the atonement (also known as the moral government theory) is a doctrine in Christian theology concerning the meaning and effect of the death of Jesus Christ and has been traditionally taught in Arminian circles that draw primarily from the works of Hugo Grotius, the governmental theory... Imputed righteousness, in Methodist theology, is that gracious gift of God given at the moment of the new birth which enables a Christian disciple to strive for holiness and sanctification. ... Christian Perfection is a Christian doctrine which maintains that after conversion, but before death, a Christians soul may be cleansed from the stain of original sin. ...

People
Richard Allen
Francis Asbury
Thomas Coke
Albert C. Outler
James Varick
Charles Wesley
Bishops · Theologians Richard Allen (February 14, 1760 - March 26, 1831) an African American pastor and the founder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Right Reverend Thomas Coke, M.A., D.C.L. (9 September 1747-2 May 1814) is known as the Father of Methodist Missions. ... Albert Cook Outler (1908-1989) was a 20th century American Methodist theologian and philosopher. ... James Varick was the first Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. ... Charles Wesley (12 December 1707 - 29 March 1788) was a leader of the Methodist movement, the younger brother of John Wesley. ...

Largest groups
World Methodist Council
United Methodist Church
AME Church
AME Zion Church
Church of the Nazarene
British Methodist Church
CME Church
Uniting church, Australia
The World Methodist Council is a group composed of most of the worlds Wesleyan / Methodist denominations, working toward mission and unity. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, or AME Zion Church, was officially formed in 1821, but operated for a number years before then. ... The Church of the Nazarene, more commonly called the Nazarene Church, is an Christian evangelical denomination. ... The Methodist Church of Great Britain or British Methodist Church is the largest Wesleyan / Methodist body in the United Kingdom, with congregations across Great Britain (although more limited in Scotland). ... The Christian Methodist Epsicopal Church is a historically black denomination within the broader context of Methodism. ... Logo of the UCA The Uniting Church in Australia (UCA) was formed on June 22, 1977 when the Methodist Church of Australasia, Presbyterian Church of Australia and Congregational Union of Australia came together under the Basis of Union document. ...

Related movements
Holiness movement
Salvation Army
Personalism
Pentecostalism
The Holiness movement is composed of people who believe and propagate the belief that the carnal nature of man can be cleansed through faith and by the power of the Holy Spirit if one has had his sins forgiven through faith in Jesus. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organisation. ... Personalism is the school of thought that consists of three main principles, and which can broadly be qualified as species of Humanism : Only people are real (in the ontological sense), Only people have value, and Only people have free will. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Pentecostal can...

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Abortion

The United Methodist Church upholds the sanctity of unborn human life and condemns abortion as morally wrong except in cases where the well being of the mother's life is threatened.[37] However, it believes in the civil right of the mother to choose whether to have an abortion and is thus often regarded as pro-choice.[38] Nevertheless, many United Methodist clergy and laymen formally align themselves with the pro-life position.[39] Symbol of Jain philosophy It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Inviolability. ... Issues of discussion Pro-choice describes the political and ethical view that a woman should have complete control over her fertility and pregnancy. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... In religious organizations , the laity comprises all lay persons, i. ... This article is about the social movement. ...


Alcohol

Historically, the Methodist Church has supported the temperance movement.[40] John Wesley warned against the dangers of drinking in his famous sermon "The Use of Money"[41] and in his letter to an alcoholic.[42] At one time, Methodist ministers had to take a pledge not to drink and encouraged their congregations to do the same.[43] Today, the United Methodist Church states that it "affirms our long-standing support of abstinence from alcohol as a faithful witness to God's liberating and redeeming love for persons."[44] In fact, the United Methodist Church uses unfermented grape juice in the sacrament of Holy Communion, thus "expressing pastoral concern for recovering alcoholics, enabling the participation of children and youth, and supporting the church's witness of abstinence."[45] A cartoon from Australia ca. ... For other persons named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ... An Elder in Methodism -- sometimes called a Presbyter -- is someone who has been ordained by a Bishop to the ministry of Word, Sacrament, Order, and Service. ... Concord grapes being cooked down into grape juice for use in making jelly. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ...


Capital punishment

The United Methodist Church, along with other Methodist churches, also condemns capital punishment, saying that it cannot accept retribution or social vengeance as a reason for taking human life.[46] The Church also holds that the death penalty falls unfairly and unequally upon marginalized persons including the poor, the uneducated, ethnic and religious minorities, and persons with mental and emotional illnesses.[47] The United Methodist Church also cites the fact that Jesus explicitly repudiated the lex talionis in Matthew 5:38-39 and abolished the death penalty in John 8:31.[46] The General Conference of the United Methodist Church calls for its bishops to uphold opposition to capital punishment and for governments to enact an immediate moratorium on carrying out the death penalty sentence. The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Lex talionis (literally the Latin for law as retaliation) or law of retaliation is the belief that one of the purposes of the law is to provide retaliation for an offended party. ... The General Conference of The United Methodist Church is the denominations top legislative body for all matters affecting the United Methodist connection. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article...


Gambling

The United Methodist Church opposes gambling believing that it feeds on human greed and invites persons to place their trust in possessions rather than in God (therefore violating Mark 12:29-30).[48] It quotes the Apostle Paul who states that: Caravaggio, The Cardsharps, c. ... The Gospel of Mark, anonymous[1] but traditionally ascribed to Mark the Evangelist, is a synoptic gospel of the New Testament. ... St. ...

9But those who want to be rich fall into temptation and are trapped by many senseless and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. 10For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil, and in their eagerness to be rich some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pains. (1 Timothy 6:9-10a NRSV)[49]

The United Methodist Church therefore holds that: The First Epistle to Timothy is one of the three Pastoral Epistles, traditionally attributed to Saint Paul and part of the New Testament of the Bible. ... Categories: Stub | 1989 books | Bible versions and translations ...

  • Gambling is a menace to society, deadly to the best interests of moral, social, economic, and spiritual life, and destructive of good government. As an act of faith and concern, Christians should abstain from gambling and should strive to minister to those victimized by the practice.[48]
  • Where gambling has become addictive, the Church will encourage such individuals to receive therapeutic assistance so that the individual's energies may be redirected into positive and constructive ends.[48]
  • The Church should promote standards and personal lifestyles that would make unnecessary and undesirable the resort to commercial gambling — including public lotteries — as a recreation, as an escape, or as a means of producing public revenue or funds for support of charities or government.[48]

Homosexuality

The United Methodist Church maintains that "Homosexual persons no less than heterosexual persons are individuals of sacred worth...," (Book of Discipline 2004, "Social Principles") and encourages United Methodists to be in ministry with and for all people.[50] This is a list of Christian denominational positions on homosexuality. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Heterosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love or sexual desire exclusively for members of the opposite sex or gender, contrasted with homosexuality and distinguished from bisexuality and asexuality. ...


The Church officially considers, however, "the practice of homosexuality (to be) incompatible with Christian teaching." It states that "self-avowed practicing homosexuals" cannot be ordained as ministers, and supports "…laws in civil society that define marriage as the union of one man and one woman." (Book of Discipline - 2004, "Social Principles").[50]


In addition, the United Methodist Church prohibits the celebration of same-sex unions[50] and forbids any United Methodist board, agency, committee, commission, or council to give United Methodist funds to any gay caucus or group, or otherwise use such funds to promote the acceptance of homosexuality.[50] The blessing of same-sex unions is currently an issue about which some Christian Churches are at present in disagreement with other Christian churches. ...


In 1987, a United Methodist church court in New Hampshire defrocked Methodist minister Rose Mary Denman for being openly gay.[51] In 2005, clergy credentials were removed from Elizabeth Stroud after she was convicted in a church trial of violating Church law by engaging in a lesbian relationship; this conviction was later upheld by the Church Judicial Council, the highest court in the denomination.[52] The Judicial Council also affirmed that a Virginia pastor had the right to deny local church membership to an openly gay man, though the UM Council of Bishops disagreed with the ruling. Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... To defrock a priest is to deprive him of the right to exercise the functions of the priestly office. ... Irene Elizabeth (Beth) Stroud is a United Methodist pastor, ordained in 1997, whose credentials as an ordained minister were revoked because she is in a committed relationship with another woman. ...


Military service

According to The Book of Resolutions of The United Methodist Church,

"The United Methodist Church calls upon all who choose to take up arms or who order others to do so to evaluate their actions in accordance with historic church teaching limiting resort to war, including questions of proportionality, legal authority, discrimination between combatants and noncombatants, just cause, and probability of success....[53]

The United Methodist Church opposes conscription as incompatible with the Gospel message.[54] Therefore, the Church supports and extends its ministry to those persons who conscientiously oppose all war, or any particular war, and who therefore refuse to serve in the armed forces or to cooperate with systems of military conscription. However, the United Methodist Church also supports and extends its ministry to those persons who conscientiously choose to serve in the armed forces or to accept alternative service. This is because as Christians they are aware that neither the way of military action, nor the way of inaction is always righteous before God.[54] Military service in its simplest sense, is service by an individual or group in an army or other military organisation, whether as a chosen job or as a result of an involuntary draft (conscription). ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... A conscientious objector is an individual whose personal beliefs are incompatible with military service, or sometimes with any role in the armed forces. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


War

The United Methodist Church believes war is incompatible with the teachings of Christ. Therefore, the Church rejects war as an instrument of national foreign policy, to be employed only as a last resort in the prevention of such evils as genocide, brutal suppression of human rights, and unprovoked international aggression.[55] It insists that the first moral duty of all nations is to resolve by peaceful means every dispute that arises between or among them; that human values must outweigh military claims as governments determine their priorities; that the militarization of society must be challenged and stopped; that the manufacture, sale, and deployment of armaments must be reduced and controlled; and that the production, possession, or use of nuclear weapons be condemned. Consequently, The United Methodist Church endorses general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control.[55] For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ...


Ecumenical relations

According to the United Methodist Book of Discipline, The United Methodist Church is just one branch of the universal Christian church. Therefore, The United Methodist Church is active in ecumenical relations with other denominations, such as the Roman Catholic Church. It is a member of both the National Council of Churches, the World Council of Churches, Churches Uniting in Christ, and Christian Churches Together. Christian ecumenism is the promotion of unity or cooperation between distinct religious groups or denominations of the Christian religion, more or less broadly defined. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (usually identified as National Council of Churches, or NCC) is an association of 35 Christian faith groups in the United States with 100,000 local congregations and more than 45,000,000 adherents. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ... Churches Uniting in Christ (CUIC) brings together nine mainline American denominations (including both predominantly white and predominantly black churches), and was inaugurated on January 20, 2002. ... Christian Churches Together in the USA (CCT) is a new ecumenical group growing out of a deeply felt need to broaden and expand fellowship, unity and witness among the diverse expressions of Christian faith today. CCT is envisioned as a place where people of widely differing Christian backgrounds can come...


In April 2005, the United Methodist Council of Bishops approved "A Proposal for Interim Eucharistic Sharing." This document is the first step toward full communion with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, which the UMC bishops hope will happen by 2008. The ELCA approved this same document in August 2005.[56] Full communion is completeness of that relationship between Christian individuals and groups which is known as communion. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Church is also in dialogue with the Episcopal Church for full communion by 2012.[57] The two denominations are working on a document called "Confessing Our Faith Together." This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... 2012 (MMXII) will be a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A denomination...


The United Methodist Church has since 1985 been exploring a possible merger with three historically African-American Methodist denominations: the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, and the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church.[5] A Commission on Pan Methodist Cooperation and Union formed in 2000 to carry out work on such a merger.[58] Church union is the name given to a merger of two or more Christian denominations. ... The term black church refers to Christian churches that minister to the African American community. ... List of Christian denominations ordered by historical and doctrinal relationships. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, or AME Zion Church, was officially formed in 1821, but operated for a number years before then. ... The Christian Methodist Epsicopal Church is a historically black denomination within the broader context of Methodism. ...


There are also a number of churches such as the Methodist Church in India (MCI), that are "autonomous affiliated" churches in relation to the United Methodist Church.[59][60]


The United Methodist Church (UMC) is also active in the World Methodist Council, an interdenominational group comprised of various churches in the tradition of John Wesley to promote the Gospel throughout the world. The World Methodist Council is a group composed of most of the worlds Wesleyan / Methodist denominations, working toward mission and unity. ... For other persons named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ... Look up evangelist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ...


On July 18, 2006, delegates to the World Methodist Council voted unanimously to adopt the "Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification," which was approved in 1999 by the Vatican and the Lutheran World Federation.[61][62] is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification [1] is a document created by and agreed to by clerical representatives of the Roman Catholic Church and the Lutheran World Federation as a result of extensive ecumenical dialogue, apparently resolving the conflict over the nature of Justification which was at the... LWF logo The Lutheran World Federation (LWF) is a global association of national and regional Lutheran churches headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. ...


References

  1. ^ Mainline Denominations. The Association of Religion Data Archives. Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  2. ^ a b Is the concept “saved, born-again” unique to evangelicals?. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  3. ^ The United Methodist Church. University of Virginia. Retrieved on 2007-08-03.
  4. ^ What We Believe - Founder of the United Methodist Church. United Methodist Church of Whitefish Bay. Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  5. ^ a b c d Quick Facts. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  6. ^ Understanding American Evangelicals. Ethics and Public Policy Center. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  7. ^ 2007 Yearbook of American and Canadian Churches. The National Council of Churches. Retrieved on 2007-08-07.
  8. ^ Boom in Christianity Reshapes United Methodists. The Christian Post. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  9. ^ Lay Speaking Ministries and The Book of Discipline. The United Methodist Church LSM. Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  10. ^ A History of the Office of Lay Speaker in United Methodism. The United Methodist Church GBOD. Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  11. ^ a b c d Lay Speaking Ministry in the United Methodist Church. The United Methodist Church GBOD. Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  12. ^ a b c d e Doctrinal Standards in The United Methodist Church. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  13. ^ The General Rules of the Methodist Church. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  14. ^ The Articles of Religion of the Methodist Church: Article I—Of Faith in the Holy Trinity. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-08-31.
  15. ^ The Articles of Religion of the Methodist Church: Article XVII—Of Baptism. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  16. ^ a b c A United Methodist Understanding of Baptism. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  17. ^ What does The United Methodist Church believe about baptism?. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  18. ^ Baptism. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  19. ^ The Sacraments. Grand Ledge First United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  20. ^ By Water & The Spirit. The United Methodist Church GBOD. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  21. ^ This Holy Mystery. The United Methodist Church GBOD. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  22. ^ Communion: Overview. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  23. ^ Luke 22:14-23 (The Institution of the Lord’s Supper). National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  24. ^ The Means of Grace by John Wesley. The United Methodist Church GBOD. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  25. ^ Our Christian Roots. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  26. ^ Our Common Heritage as Christians. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  27. ^ The Apostles' Creed. The United Methodist Church GBGM. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  28. ^ The Nicene Creed. The United Methodist Church GBGM. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  29. ^ Is the United Methodist Church a Creedal Church? by G. Richard Jansen. Colorado State University. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  30. ^ a b c d God's Preparing, Accepting, and Sustaining Grace. The United Methodist Church GBGM. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  31. ^ Statement of Belief. Cambridge Christ United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  32. ^ The New Birth by John Wesley (Sermon 45). The United Methodist Church GBGM. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  33. ^ Altar Call. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  34. ^ Quotes by various Methodist Bishops and Leaders of the Past. The Independent Methodist Arminian Resource Center. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  35. ^ Wesleyan Quadrilateral. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  36. ^ [1]
  37. ^ Abortion. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  38. ^ Abortion: Current Beliefs by Various Religious and Secular Groups. Religious Tolerance. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  39. ^ Lifewatch Home Page. Taskforce of United Methodists on Abortion and Sexuality (TUMAS). Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  40. ^ 200 Years of United Methodism: An Illustrated History. Drew University. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  41. ^ The Use of Money by John Wesley. The United Methodist Church GBGM. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  42. ^ John Wesley and His Challenge to Alcoholism. Wesley Heritage Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  43. ^ The Methodist Church: Alcohol and gambling. British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  44. ^ Alcohol and Other Drugs. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  45. ^ Why do most Methodist churches serve grape juice instead of wine for Holy Communion?. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-07-07.
  46. ^ a b Capital Punishment. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  47. ^ Official church statements on capital punishment. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  48. ^ a b c d Gambling. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  49. ^ 1 Timothy 6:9-10a. National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  50. ^ a b c d What is the denomination’s position on homosexuality?. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  51. ^ United Methodists Move to Defrock Lesbian. New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  52. ^ United Methodist Church (UMC): The trial of Irene Elizabeth Stroud. Religious Tolerance. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  53. ^ What is The United Methodist Church's position on just war?. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  54. ^ a b Military Service. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  55. ^ a b War and Peace. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  56. ^ Lutheran - United Methodist Dialogue. Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  57. ^ Council approves interim pacts with Episcopalians, Lutherans. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  58. ^ Mission. Commission on Pan-Methodist Cooperation & Union. Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  59. ^ The Methodist Church in India: Bangalore Episcopal Area. The United Methodist Church GBGM. Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  60. ^ India Methodists celebrate 150 years of ministry. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  61. ^ World Methodists approve further ecumenical dialogue. The United Methodist Church. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  62. ^ Methodists adopt Catholic-Lutheran declaration on justification. Catholic News Service (CNS). Retrieved on 2007-06-08.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

... The following is a list of the Conferences of the United Methodist Church. ... The Confessing Movement is a neo-Evangelical movement within several American mainline Protestant denominations to return those churches to what the members of the movement see as theological orthodoxy. ... Connectionalism is the theological understanding and foundation of Methodist polity. ... Official Symbol of the United Methodist Church since 1968. ... The General Commission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns (GCCUIC) addresses the interreligious and ecumenical concerns of The United Methodist Church. ... The International Council of the United Methodist Church in Germany (Internationaler Ausschuss) grew out of a pilot project approved by the United Methodist General Conference in 1988. ... A lay speaker is a position in the United Methodist Church for the laity. ... Bishops of The United Methodist Church and its predecessor denominations, in order of their election to the Episcopacy, both living and dead. ... Proto-Methodist theologians Jacobus Arminius Hugo Grotius 18th century John Wesley Charles Wesley John Fletcher 19th century Adam Clarke Richard Watson Wilbur Fisk Nathan Bangs Hugh Price Hughes William Burt Pope John Miley Borden Parker Bowne 20th century Edgar S. Brightman E. Stanley Jones Albert C. Knudson Edwin Lewis H... The Methodist Federation for Social Action (MFSA) is an independent Methodist organization concerned with issues of peace and social justice, with a particular interest in the United Methodist Church. ... The Order of Saint Luke is a religious order in the United Methodist Church dedicated to sacramental and liturgical scholarship, education, and practice. ... The Reconciling Ministries Network (RMN) is an organisation dedicated to the inclusion of people of all sexual orientations and gender identities in the United Methodist Church. ... The American Methodist Episcopal Church was the first denomination in Christendom to adopt an official Social Creed. ... This refers to the arm of the United Methodist Church. ... The United Methodist Committee on Relief, often referred to as UMCOR, is a prominent world-wide emergency relief organization. ... A Wesley Foundation is a campus ministry sponsored in full or in part by the United Methodist Church on a non-church owned and operated campus. ...

External links


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