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Encyclopedia > United Kingdom general election, 2001
1997 election
2001 election
2005 election
Politics - Politics portal
United Kingdom

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
the United Kingdom
The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... Politics, sometimes defined as the art and science of government[1], is a process by which collective decisions are made within groups. ... Image File history File links UK_Royal_Coat_of_Arms. ... The politics of the United Kingdom are based upon a unitary state and a constitutional monarchy. ...

See also: History of the United Kingdom

edit The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... This article describes the British monarchy from the perspective of the United Kingdom. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born on 21 April 1926, is Queen of sixteen independent nations known as the Commonwealth Realms. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... Lord Falconer of Thoroton Charles Leslie Falconer, Baron Falconer of Thoroton, PC (born 19 November 1951) is a British barrister and Labour Party politician. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom, the Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, and is seen historically as the First Commoner of the Land. ... Michael Martin Michael John Martin MP (born July 3, 1945, Glasgow, Scotland) is the Speaker of the House of Commons in the United Kingdom. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and is a complete wanker and pussy boy is the head of government and so exercises many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service, and MP for Sedgefield. ... Prime Ministers Questions is a Parliamentary practice in the United Kingdom where every Wednesday when the House of Commons is sitting, the Prime Minister spends half an hour answering questions from MPs. ... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the Prime Minister. ... The Government of the United Kingdom contains a number of Ministries, known in the United Kingdom as Government Departments. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... The National Assembly for Wales (or NAfW) (Welsh: Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru) is a devolved assembly with power to make legislation in Wales, and also is responsible for most UK government departments in Wales. ... The Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) (Welsh: Llywodraeth Cynulliad Cymru, LlCC) is the executive body of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of the First Minister and his Cabinet. ... The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly is a six flowered linen or flax plant, chosen for the plants historical economic importance to the region. ... The Northern Ireland Executive as established by the Northern Ireland Act 1998 is the (currently suspended) executive body for Northern Ireland, answerable to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... In the United Kingdom reserved matters, also referred to as reserved powers, are those subjects over which power to legislate is retained by Westminster, as stated by the Scotland Act 1998, Northern Ireland Act 1998 or Government of Wales Act 1998. ... The United Kingdom is made up of four parts - England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... For more coverage on London, see the London Portal. ... The United Kingdom has five distinct types of elections: general, local, regional, European and mayoral. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... Under the provisions of the Parliament Act 1911, the next United Kingdom general election must be held on or before 3 June, 2010. ... Political parties in the United Kingdom lists political parties in the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom has a long and established tradition of respect for its citizens human rights. ... British Prime Minister Tony Blair (left) conducting diplomacy, hosted by the President of the United States, George W. Bush at Camp David in March 2003. ... The European Union or EU is a supranational and intergovernmental union of 25 European states. ... Image File history File links European_flag. ... This article or section needs to be updated. ...

The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed "the quiet landslide" by the media. There was little change at all outside Northern Ireland (which mostly has different parties and a different electoral landscape from the rest of the UK although a few UK-wide parties stand with minimal success). 620 out of 641 seats remained with the same party as they had been in 1997. The elections were marked by apathy from the voting public, with turnout falling by to 59%, the lowest since 1918. Throughout the election the Labour Party had maintained a significant lead in the opinion polls and the result was deemed to be so certain that some bookmakers paid out for a Labour majority before the election day. Labour retained almost all of its support and the only region where the Conservatives overtook Labour in terms of votes was Eastern England; which Labour had marginally taken in 1997. In Southern parts of England Conservative support increased but only marginally. Image File history File linksMetadata Tony_Blair. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Tony_Blair. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service, and MP for Sedgefield. ... This image is used with permission courtesey of the Conservative Party - see Wikipedia:Pictures from conservatives. ... This image is used with permission courtesey of the Conservative Party - see Wikipedia:Pictures from conservatives. ... William Hague The Right Honourable William Jefferson Hague (born March 26, 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and currently Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... used with permission courtesey of the Liberal Democrats - see Wikipedia:Pictures from libdems. ... used with permission courtesey of the Liberal Democrats - see Wikipedia:Pictures from libdems. ... Rt. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Dieu et mon droit (motto) (French for God and my right)2 Northern Irelands location within the UK Main language English Other recognised languages Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Peter Hain MP Area  - Total Ranked 4th... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... A bookmaker, bookie or turf accountant, is an organisation or a person that takes bets and may pay winnings depending upon results and, depending on the nature of the bet, the odds. ...


The election had been expected in May, to coincide with local elections, but both were postponed because of rural movement restrictions imposed in response to a foot and mouth outbreak. One of the more noted events of a quiet campaign was when a countryside protester Craig Evans threw an egg at Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott in Rhyl; Prescott then punched him and a struggle ensued, in front of television cameras. The 2001 Election also saw the rare election of an independent. Dr. Richard Taylor of Independent Kidderminster Hospital Health Concern unseated a government minister. There was also a high vote for British National Party leader Nick Griffin in Oldham,in the wake of recent race riots in the town. The outbreak of foot and mouth disease in the United Kingdom in the spring and summer of 2001 caused a crisis in British agriculture and tourism. ... A Deputy Prime Minister is the deputy of a Prime Minister, and a member of a nations cabinet. ... Rt. ... Rhyl (Welsh: Y Rhyl) is a seaside town located on the Irish Sea, in the administrative county of Denbighshire and the traditional county of Flintshire, North Wales, United Kingdom, at the mouth of the River Clwyd (Welsh: Yr Afon Clwyd). ...


Labour enjoyed its second landslide victory in a row, maintaining its position from the previous election. Tony Blair became the first Labour prime minister to win enough seats to have a full second consecutive term in office. Labour won a majority of 167 overall (previously 179) and 247 over the Conservatives (previously 254). The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service, and MP for Sedgefield. ...


The Conservatives netted a gain of only 1 seat after their crushing defeat of 1997 (gaining a few seats from Labour, but losing to the Liberal Democrats). Conservative leader William Hague resigned immediately, becoming the first Conservative leader since Austen Chamberlain not to become Prime Minister. The Liberal Democrats, under Charles Kennedy, made a gain of 6 more seats from their already historical high of 1997. With 52 seats, the Lib Dems pushed open even more the door to genuine 'three party politics', having the best third party result since the 1920s. The Conservative Party is one of the two largest political party in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... William Hague The Right Honourable William Jefferson Hague (born March 26, 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and currently Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... The Rt. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and is a complete wanker and pussy boy is the head of government and so exercises many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Rt. ... The 1920s was a decade sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ...


In Northern Ireland, the election was far more dramatic and marked a move by unionists away from support for the Good Friday Agreement, with the moderate unionist UUP losing to the more hardline (DUP. This polarisation was also seen in the the nationalist community, with the SDLP vote losing out to the hardline republican Sinn Féin. It also saw a tightening of the parties as the small UK Unionist Party lost its only seat. Dieu et mon droit (motto) (French for God and my right)2 Northern Irelands location within the UK Main language English Other recognised languages Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Peter Hain MP Area  - Total Ranked 4th... In the context of Irish politics, Unionists are people in Northern Ireland, who wish to see the continuation of the Act of Union 1800, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which Northern Ireland, created in that latter Act, remains part of the United Kingdom of Great... The Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was signed in Belfast on April 10, 1998 by the British and Irish Governments and endorsed by most Northern Ireland political parties. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... The Democratic Unionist Party is the largest of two unionist parties in Northern Ireland and is led by Ian Paisley. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... It has been suggested that Provisional Sinn Féin be merged into this article or section. ... The UK Unionist Party (UKUP) is a small political party operating in Northern Ireland. ...

Contents


Results

UK General Election 2001
Party Seats Gains Losses Net Gain/Loss Seats % Votes % Votes +/-
  Labour 412 2 8 −6 62.5 40.7 10,724,953 −2.5%
  Conservative 166 9 8 +1 25.2 31.7 8,357,615 +1.0%
  Liberal Democrats 52 8 2 +6 7.9 18.3 4,814,321 +1.5%
  Scottish National Party 5 0 1 −1 0.8 1.8 464,314 −0.2%
  UK Independence 0 0 0 0 0.0 1.5 390,563 1.2%
  Ulster Unionist 6 1 5 −4 0.9 0.8 216,839 0.0%
  Plaid Cymru 4 1 1 0 0.6 0.7 195,893 +0.2%
  Democratic Unionist 5 3 0 +3 0.8 0.7 181,999 +0.4%
  Sinn Féin 4 2 0 +2 0.6 0.7 175,933 +0.3%
  Social Democratic & Labour 3 0 0 0 0.5 0.6 169,865 0.0%
  Green 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.6 166,477 +0.3%
  Independent 0 0 1 −1 0.0 0.4 97,070 +0.3%
  Scottish Socialist 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.3 72,516 N/A
  Socialist Alliance 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.2 57,553 N/A
  Socialist Labour 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.2 57,288 0.0%
  British National 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.2 47,129 +0.1%
  Alliance (NI) 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.1 28,999 −0.1%
  Health Concern 1 1 0 +1 0.2 0.1 28,487 N/A
  Liberal 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.1 13,685 0.0%
  UK Unionist 0 0 1 −1 0.0 0.1 13,509 +0.1%
  ProLife Alliance 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 9,453 −0.1%
  Legalise Cannabis 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 8,677 N/A
  People's Justice 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 7,443 N/A
  Monster Raving Loony 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 6,655 0.0%
  Progressive Unionist 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 4,781 0.0%
  Mebyon Kernow 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 3,199 0.0%
  NI Women's Coalition 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 2,968 0.0%
  Scottish Unionist 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 2,728 N/A
  Rock 'n' Roll Loony 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 2,634 N/A
  National Front 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 2,484 0.0%
  Workers Party 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 2,352 0.0%
  Neath Port Talbot Ratepayers 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,960 N/A
  NI Unionist 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,794 N/A
  Socialist Alternative 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,454 0.0%
  Reform 2000 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,418 N/A
  Isle of Wight 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,164 N/A
  Muslim 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,150 N/A
  Communist 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,003 0.0%
  New Britain 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 888 0.0%
  Free Party 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 832 N/A
  Left Alliance 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 770 N/A
  New Millennium Bean Party 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 727 N/A
  Workers' Revolutionary 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 607 0.0%
  Tatton 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 505 N/A

Total votes cast: 26,368,204. All parties with more than 500 votes shown. The Labour Party has since its formation in the early 20th century been the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Conservative Party is one of the two largest political party in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... Plaid, in full Plaid Cymru (pronounced IPA: ) – The Party of Wales, is the principal nationalist political party in Wales. ... The Democratic Unionist Party is the largest of two unionist parties in Northern Ireland and is led by Ian Paisley. ... It has been suggested that Provisional Sinn Féin be merged into this article or section. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) is a far left wing Scottish political party which campaigns for a socialist economic platform and Scottish independence. ... The Socialist Alliance was a left-wing electoral alliance in England in existence between 1992 and 2005. ... The Socialist Labour Party (SLP) is a small left-wing political party in the United Kingdom. ... The British National Party (BNP) is the most popular political party of the far right in the United Kingdom. ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... Independent Kidderminster Hospital and Health Concern (often known by the shorter name Health Concern) is a political party based in Kidderminster, England. ... The Liberal Party is a minor United Kingdom political party. ... The UK Unionist Party (UKUP) is a small political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... ProLife, otherwise The ProLife Party and formerly The ProLife Alliance is a minor political party in the United Kingdom. ... Cannabis leaves The Legalise Cannabis Alliance (LCA) is a political party registered in the United Kingdom with the cannabis leaf image as its emblem. ... The Peoples Justice Party (PJP) are a minor political party operating in the United Kingdom. ... The Official Monster Raving Loony Party (OMRLP) is a registered political party established in the United Kingdom in 1983 by musician and anti-politician David Sutch, also known as Screaming Lord Sutch (1940 - 1999). ... The Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) are a small political party from Northern Ireland. ... Mebyon Kernow (Cornish for Sons of Cornwall, often abbrieviated MK) is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Northern Ireland Womens Coalition is a non-sectarian political party in Northern Ireland. ... The Scottish Unionist Party is a name of two organisations, one now subsumed into the UK Conservative Party, and the other being a recent creation in response to the Conservative Partys support of the Anglo-Irish Agreement. ... The Rock n Roll Loony Party is a minor political party in the United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom, the British National Front (most commonly called the National Front or NF) is a far right-wing political party that had its heyday during the 1970s and 80s. ... The Workers Party (in Irish Páirtí na nOibrithe) is an Irish left wing political party that evolved from Official Sinn Féin. ... The Northern Ireland Unionist Party (NIUP) is a small political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The Socialist Party is a Trotskyist political party active in England and Wales and part of the Committee for a Workers International. ... The Reform 2000 Party is a minor political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Isle of Wight Party is a minor British political party, formed in January 2001 to contest the Isle of Wight constituency at the 2001 United Kingdom General Election. ... The Communist Party of Britain is a small socialist party operating in the United Kingdom, although it chooses not to be active in Northern Ireland where the Communist Party of Ireland works. ... In existence since 1977, the New Britain Party (NBP) has been led since its inception by Dennis Delderfield, a newspaper owner. ... The Free Party was a frivolous political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Alliance for Green Socialism is a socialist grouping in Leeds in the United Kingdom. ... The New Millennium Bean Party is a frivolous political party in the United Kingdom, based in Wales. ... The Workers Revolutionary Party was a Trotskyist political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Tatton Group was a minor political party in the United Kingdom. ...


The seat gains reflect changes on the 1997 general election result. Two seats had changed hands in by-elections in the intervening period. These were as follows: The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ...

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Map sources for Romsey at grid reference SU3521 Romsey is a small market town, in the county of Hampshire, England. ... The Conservative Party is one of the two largest political party in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... South Antrim is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... The Democratic Unionist Party is the largest of two unionist parties in Northern Ireland and is led by Ian Paisley. ... United Kingdom general elections are the elections held when the Members of Parliament (MPs) forming the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom are elected. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The election to the 2nd Parliament of the United Kingdom was the first to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland (as the 1801-1802 Parliament was composed of members elected to the former Parliaments of Great Britain and Ireland). ... The election to the 3rd Parliament of the United Kingdom was the second general election to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The election to the 4th Parliament of the United Kingdom was the third general election to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The election to the 5th Parliament of the United Kingdom was the fourth general election to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The 1818 UK general election saw the Whigs gain a few seats, but the Tories under the Earl of Liverpool retained a majority of around 90 seats. ... The 1820 UK general election, held shortly after the Radical War in Scotland and the Cato Street Conspiracy. ... The 1826 UK general election saw the Tories under the Earl of Liverpool win a substantial an increased majority over the Whigs. ... The 1830 UK general election, fought in the aftermath of the Swing Riots, saw electoral reform as a major election issue. ... The 1831 UK general election, the last before the Reform Act of 1832, saw electoral reform as the major election issue. ... The 1832 UK general election, the first after the Reform Act, saw the Whigs win a large majority, with the Tories winning less than 30% of the vote. ... The 1835 UK general election saw Robert Peels Conservatives make large gains from their low of the 1832 election, but the Whigs maintained a large majority. ... The 1837 UK general election saw Robert Peels Conservatives close further on the position of the Whigs, who won their third election of the decade. ... The 1841 UK general election saw a big swing as Robert Peels Conservatives took control of the House of Commons. ... The 1847 UK general election saw candidates calling themselves Conservatives win the most seats, in part because they won a number of uncontested seats. ... The 1852 UK general election was very close, Lord John Russells Whigs again winning the popular vote, but once again Conservative candidates won a very slight majority. ... The 1857 UK general election saw the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, finally win a majority in the House of Commons as the Conservative vote fell significantly. ... The 1859 UK general election saw the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, hold their majority in a much enlarged House of Commons over the Earl of Derbys Conservatives. ... The 1865 UK general election saw the Liberals, led by Lord Palmerston, increase their large majority over the Earl of Derbys Conservatives. ... The 1868 UK general election was the first after passage of the Reform Act 1867, which enfranchised all male householders, thus greatly increasing the number of men who could vote in elections in the United Kingdom. ... The 1874 UK general election ended with the Liberals, led by William Gladstone, winning a majority of the votes cast, but Benjamin Disraelis Conservatives winning the majority of seats in the House of Commons, largely because they won a number of uncontested seats. ... In the UK general election of 1880, also known as the Midlothian Campaign, the Liberals, led by the fierce oratory of retired former Liberal leader William Gladstone in attacking the supposedly immoral foreign policy of the Beaconsfield government, secured one of their largest ever majorities, leaving the Conservatives a distant... The 1885 UK general election was from the 24th November - 18th December 1885. ... The 1886 UK general election took place from July 1-27, 1886. ... The 1892 UK general election was held from 4th - 26th July 1892. ... The UK general election of 1895 was held from 13th July - 7th August 1895. ... The UK general election of 1900 was from 25th September - 24th October 1900. ... The UK general election of 1906 was from 12th January – 8th February 1906. ... The UK general election of January 1910 was held from 15th January – 10th February 1910. ... The UK general election of December 1910 was the last held over several days, from 3rd – 19th December 1910. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1918 held on 14th December 1918, after the Representation of the People Act 1918. ... The UK general election of 1922 was held on 15th November 1922. ... The UK general election of 1923 was held on 5th December 1923. ... The 1924 UK general election was held on 29th October 1924. ... The 1929 UK general election was held on 30th May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament. ... The UK general election on Tuesday 27 October 1931 was the last in the United Kingdom not held on a Thursday. ... Stanley Baldwin Clement Attlee The UK general election held on 14th November 1935 resulted in a large, though reduced, majority for the National Government now led by Stanley Baldwin. ... Clement Attlee Winston Churchill The United Kingdom General Election of 1945 held on 5 July 1945 but not counted and declared until 26 July 1945 (due to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas) was one of the most significant general elections of the 20th... The United Kingdom general election in 1950 was the first general election ever after a full term of a Labour government. ... The 1951 election was held soon after the UK general election, 1950, which Labour won, but with an unworkable majority. ... The 1955 United Kingdom general election was held on May 26, 1955, four years after the previous general election. ... This United Kingdom general election was held on October 8, 1959, and marked a third successive victory for the ruling Conservative party, led by Harold MacMillan. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1964 result was a very slim majority for the Labour Party, of 4, and led to their first government since 1951. ... The UK general election in 1966 was called by Harold Wilson because his government, elected in the 1964 election, had an unworkably small majority. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1970 was held on June 18, 1970, and resulted in a surprise loss of power for Labour under Harold Wilson, who was replaced as Prime Minister by the Conservative leader, Edward Heath. ... The UK general election of February 1974 was held on February 28, 1974. ... The UK general election of October 1974 took place on October 10, 1974. ... Margaret Thatcher James Callaghan David Steel The UK general election, 1979 was held on May 3, 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ... The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... The UK general election, 1987 was held on June 11, 1987 and was the third victory in a row for Margaret Thatcher and the Conservatives. ... The UK general election, 1992 was held on April 9, 1992, and was the fourth victory in a row for the Conservatives. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. ... Under the provisions of the Parliament Act 1911, the next United Kingdom general election must be held on or before 3 June, 2010. ...

See also

This is a list of MPs elected to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Third Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2001, arranged by constituency. ... The outbreak of foot and mouth disease in the United Kingdom in the spring and summer of 2001 caused a crisis in British agriculture and tourism. ...

Manifestos

  • Labour (Ambitions for Britain)
  • Conservative (Time for Common Sense)
  • Liberal Democrat (Freedom, Justice, Honesty)
  • UK Independence Party

External links

  • BBC News: Vote 2001 - in depth coverage.

  Results from FactBites:
 
United Kingdom general election, 2001 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (614 words)
The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed "the quiet landslide" by the media.
The elections were marked by apathy from the voting public, with turnout falling by to 59%, the lowest since 1918.
The election had been expected in May, to coincide with local elections, but both were postponed because of rural movement restrictions imposed in response to a foot and mouth outbreak.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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