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Encyclopedia > United Kingdom general election, 1997
1987 election MPs
1992 election MPs
1997 election MPs
2001 election MPs
2005 election MPs

The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. The Labour Party won the general election in a landslide victory with 418 seats, the most seats the party has ever held. The Conservatives ended up with 165 seats, the fewest seats they have held since the 1906 General Election, and with no MPs for seats in Scotland and Wales. This marked the beginning of what has become the longest spell in opposition for the Conservative Party since the 19th century, as well as the longest spell in government ever for the Labour Party. Margaret Thatcher David Steel Election 1987 Titles The United Kingdom general election of 1987 was held on 11 June 1987 and was the third consecutive victory for the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher. ... This is a list of members of Parliament elected to the Parliament of the United Kingdom in 1987 in the 1987 general election, for the Fiftieth Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992, and was the fourth consecutive victory for the Conservative Party. ... This is a list of members of Parliament elected to the Parliament of the United Kingdom in the United Kingdom in the 1992 general election, for the Fifty First Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the House of Commons at the 1997 General Election, arranged by constituency. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... This is a list of Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Third Parliament of the United Kingdom at the 2001 General Election, arranged by constituency. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... This is a list of Members of Parliament elected to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the 2005 general election, arranged by constituency. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The UK general election of 1906 was from 12th January – 8th February 1906. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ...

Contents

The Campaign

Prime Minister John Major obtained a dissolution on Monday 17 March 1997 - so ensuring the formal campaign would be unusually long, at six weeks. It was stated at the time by Conservatives that a long campaign would expose Labour and allow the Conservative message to be heard. In fact the Conservative campaign was quickly blown off course when Major was accused of arranging an early dissolution to protect Neil Hamilton from a pending parliamentary report into his conduct: a report that Major had earlier guaranteed would be published before an election. Labour also had their difficulties - in particular an argument about whether or not the party would privatise the air traffic control system, and over the party's relationship with the trade unions. For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... Dissolution or dissolvetiyny can have the following meanings: Dissolve (song), a song on Gusters album Parachute to crumble into a liquid. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This page is about Neil Hamilton, former MP and media personality. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or — especially in India — disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership. ... For the Canadian musical group, see Air Traffic Control (band). ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers...


By the middle of campaign, the large number of Conservative candidates became a key issue, including some serving ministers, who publicly repudiated government policy on the European single currency. Labour were cautious about this issue, but the symbolism of the deeply divided Conservative party helped them still. For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ...


In the final stages of the campaign, Labour concentrated heavily on projecting an image of Tony Blair as a dynamic and energetic young leader while the Conservatives were seen to indulge in infighting - with the-then Chancellor of the Exchequer Kenneth Clarke describing the views of the Home Secretary, Michael Howard, on Europe as "paranoid nonsense". For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... This article is about Kenneth Clarke, the English politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... The Rt Hon. ...


Overall picture and background

Labour won a Landslide victory with their largest parliamentary majority (179) to date, Professor Anthony King describing the election as being like "an asteroid hitting the planet and destroying practically all life on earth". The Liberal Democrat vote fell, but in terms of seats, it was their best General Election since 1929 under David Lloyd George's leadership. A heavy defeat for the Conservative Party, but not a wipeout, with the party having its lowest percentage share of the popular vote since 1832 under the Duke of Wellington's leadership, being left with no seats outside England. Several prominent members of the party also lost their seats, including: In politics, a landslide victory (or just a landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming majority in an election. ... Professor Anthony King (born 17 November 1934) is a Canadian-born professor of government in the United Kingdom at Essex University, psephologist and commentator. ... The 1929 UK general election was held on 30th May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who was Prime Minister throughout the latter half of World War I and the first four years of the subsequent peace. ... An election might be judged to have a lopsided or wipeout result if the winning party wins far more seats than its share of the votes would justify, winning most if not all of the seats. ... The 1832 UK general election, the first after the Reform Act, saw the Whigs win a large majority, with the Tories winning less than 30% of the vote. ... Italic text His Grace Field Marshal the Most Noble Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

The poor results for the Conservative Party led to infighting, with the One Nation Tory Reform Group and right wing Maastricht rebels blaming each other for the defeat. Party Chairman Brian Mawhinney said on the night of the election, that it was due to disillusionment with 18 years of Conservative rule. John Major resigned as party leader, saying "When the curtain falls, it is time to leave the stage". Michael Denzil Xavier Portillo (born 26 May 1953) is an English journalist, broadcaster, and former Conservative party politician and Cabinet Minister. ... The Secretary of State for Defence is the senior United Kingdom government minister in charge of the Ministry of Defence. ... Sir Malcolm Leslie Rifkind, KCMG, QC (born 21 June 1946) is a Scottish Conservative and Unionist politician and Member of Parliament for the constituency of Kensington and Chelsea. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... Ian Bruce Lang, Baron Lang of Monkton, PC, (born June 27, 1940) is a Scottish Conservative & Unionist politician. ... The Secretary of State for Trade and Industry is a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Michael Bruce Forsyth, Baron Forsyth of Drumlean, PC, is a Conservative politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... William Arthur Waldegrave, Baron Waldegrave of North Hill, PC (born August 15, 1946), educated at Corpus Christi College, Oxford and now a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford is a British Conservative politician who served in the Cabinet from 1990 until 1997. ... The Chief Secretary to the Treasury is a junior position in the British Cabinet. ... Nicholas William Budgen (November 3, 1937–October 26, 1998) was a British politician. ... A backbencher is a Member of Parliament or a legislator who does not hold governmental office and is not a Front Bench spokesperson in the Opposition. ... The Maastricht Treaty (formally, the Treaty of European Union, TEU) was signed on February 7, 1992 in Maastricht, Netherlands after final negotiations in December 1991 between the members of the European Community and entered into force on November 1, 1993 during the Delors Commission. ... Edwina Currie Jones née Cohen, (born 13 October 1946) is a former British Member of Parliament. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... A television presenter is a British term for a person who is known for introducing or hosting television programmes. ... Dame Angela Christina Rosemary Rumbold (born 11 August 1932) is a British Conservative politician. ... In the United Kingdom, the Chairman of the Conservative Party is responsible for running the party machine, overseeing Conservative Central Office. ... The Right Honourable Sir Rhodes Boyson (11 May 1925- ) is an author and politician in the United Kingdom, and former Conservative Member of Parliament for Brent North. ... A backbencher is a Member of Parliament or a legislator who does not hold governmental office and is not a Front Bench spokesperson in the Opposition. ... John Crocket Bowis (born August 2, 1945 in Brighton, East Sussex) is a Conservative Member of the European Parliament for London. ... Iain MacDonald Sproat (born 8 November 1938) is a British Conservative politician who was elected as Member of Parliament for Harwich in the 1992 general election. ... The Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR) is a United Kingdom government department. ... Robin Clifford Squire (b. ... Andrew John Bower Mitchell (born 23 March 1956) is a British Conservative politician and Member of Parliament for Sutton Coldfield. ... The Department for Work and Pensions is a department of the Government of the United Kingdom, created on June 8, 2001 from the merger of the Employment part of the Department for Education and Employment and the Department of Social Security. ... Thomas George Sackville (born 26 October 1950) is a British Conservative politician. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... Sir Nicholas Cosmo Bonsor, 4th Baronet DL (born 9 December 1942) is a British Conservative politician. ... The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Whitehall, seen from St. ... This page is about Neil Hamilton, former MP and media personality. ... The Conservative Monday Club (widely known as the Monday Club) is a British pressure-group with its origins in the Conservative Party. ... Gyles Daubeney Brandreth (born March 8, 1948 in Germany) is a celebrity, author and politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Chief Whip is a political office in some legislatures assigned to an elected member whose task is to administer the whipping system that ensures that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... Sebastian Newbold Coe, Baron Coe (born September 29, 1956) is a British athlete, and Conservative Party politician. ... Phillip Oppenheim (born March 20, 1956) was the Conservative Member of Parliament for the Amber Valley constituency from 1983 until electoral defeat in 1997. ... The Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury is one of the most junior ministerial posts in the UK Treasury, after the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, the Paymaster-General and the Financial Secretary to the Treasury, and alongside the Economic Secretary to the Treasury. ... Anthony Harold Newton, Baron Newton of Braintree, OBE PC, known as Tony Newton, (born August 29, 1937), is a British Conservative politician and former Cabinet member. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... Roger Norman Freeman, Baron Freeman, PC (born May 27, 1942), a British Conservative politician, was Member of Parliament for Kettering from 1983 to 1997. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... Sir John Marcus Fox (June 11, 1927-March 16, 2002) was a British politician. ... In British politics, the 1922 Committee consists of all backbench Conservative Members of Parliament, though when the party is in opposition, frontbench MPs other than the party leader may also attend its meetings. ... Norman Stewart Hughson Lamont, Baron Lamont of Lerwick, PC (born 8 May 1942) was Conservative Member of Parliament for Kingston-upon-Thames, England from 1972 until 1997. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... The Right Honourable David Mellor (born 12 March 1949) is a British Conservative politician and barrister. ... The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport is a UK cabinet position with responsibility for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. ... One Nation, One Nation Conservatism, or Tory Democracy is a term used in political debate in the United Kingdom and sometimes Canada to refer to the moderate wing of the Conservative Party, and the Red Tory wing of the original Progressive Conservative Party in Canada who like to describe themselves... The Tory Reform Group (TRG) is a group within the United Kingdoms Conservative Party, that uphold the One Nation Tory vision, which they describe[citation needed] as being the promotion of: Social justice Political progress Prosperity for all // Europe The TRG is commonly seen as being pro-European. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... The Maastricht Rebels were British Members of Parliament (MPs) belonging to the then governing Conservative Party who refused to support the government of John Major in a series of votes in the House of Commons on the issue of the implementation of the Maastricht Treaty (Treaty on European Union) in... Brian Stanley Mawhinney, Baron Mawhinney PC (born 26 July 1940) was a member of the Cabinet until 1997 and a Member of Parliament until 2005. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ...


Labour's victory was largely credited to the charisma of Tony Blair and a slick Labour public relations machine managed by Alastair Campbell. Between the 1992 election and the 1997 election there had also been major steps to modernise the party, including scrapping Clause IV that had committed the party to extending public ownership of Industry. Famously, in the early hours of 2 May 1997 a party was held at the Royal Festival Hall, in which Blair stated triumphantly "A new dawn has broken, has it not?". For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1 May 1997 UK general election brought the first change in UK Government for 18 years. ... Clause IV of the United Kingdom Labour Party constitution sets out the aims and values of the party, and has been the object of political fights over its direction. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Royal Festival Hall reopening celebrations The Royal Festival Hall is a concert, dance and talks venue within Southbank Centre in London, England. ...


The Referendum Party, which sought a referendum on Britain's relationship with the European Union, came fourth in terms of votes with 800,000 votes mainly from former Conservative voters, but won no seats in parliament. The six parties with the next highest votes stood only in either Scotland, Northern Ireland or Wales; in order, they were the Scottish National Party, the Ulster Unionist Party, the Social Democratic and Labour Party, Plaid Cymru, Sinn Féin, and the Democratic Unionist Party. The Referendum Party were a single-issue party in the United Kingdom formed to contest the 1997 General Election. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural referendums or referenda), ballot question, or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... This article is about the country. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the country. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... Plaid Cymru (IPA:; English: ; often referred to simply as Plaid) is a political party in Wales. ... For pre-Arthur Griffith use of the political name, see Sinn Féin (19th century). ... This article is about the political party in Northern Ireland. ...


In the previously safe seat of Tatton, where incumbent Conservative MP Neil Hamilton was facing charges of having taken cash for questions, the Labour and Liberal Democrat Parties decided not to field candidates in order that an Independent candidate, Martin Bell would have a better chance of winning the seat, which he duly did with a comfortable margin. Tatton is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Mostyn Neil Hamilton (born March 9, 1949) is a former barrister, teacher and Conservative Member of Parliament in the United Kingdom. ... The cash-for-questions affair was a controversial political scandal in 1990s Britain. ... For the British skier of the same name, please see Martin Bell (skier). ...


The result declared for the constituency of Winchester showed a margin of victory of just 2 votes for the Liberal Democrats. The defeated Conservative candidate mounted a successful legal challenge to the result on the grounds that errors by election officials (failures to stamp certain votes) had changed the result, the court ruled the result invalid and ordered a by-election on 20 November which was won by the Liberal Democrats with a much larger majority, causing much recrimination in the Conservative Party about the decision to challenge the original result in the first place. Winchester is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Member of Parliament for Winchester, Mark Oaten, (Liberal Democrat) was unseated on an electoral petition on October 6, 1997. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Results

The election was fought under new boundaries, with a net increase of eight seats compared to the 1992 election. Changes listed here are from the notional 1992, result had it been fought on the boundaries established in 1997. These notional results were used by all media organisations at the time.

UK General Election 1997
Party Seats Gains Losses Net Gain/Loss Seats % Votes % Votes +/-
  Labour 418 147 0 + 147 63.4 43.2 13,518,167 + 8.8
  Conservative 165 0 178 - 178 25.0 30.7 9,600,943 - 11.2
  Liberal Democrat 46 30 2 + 28 7.0 16.8 5,242,947 - 1.0
  Referendum Party 0 0 0 0 0.0 2.6 811,849 N/A
  Scottish National Party 6 3 0 + 3 0.9 2.0 621,550 + 0.1
  Ulster Unionist 10 1 0 +1 1.5 0.8 258,349 0.0
  Social Democratic and Labour 3 0 1 - 1 0.5 0.6 190,814 + 0.1
  Plaid Cymru 4 0 0 0 0.6 0.5 161,030 0.0
  Sinn Féin 2 2 0 + 2 0.3 0.4 126,921 0.0
  Democratic Unionist 2 0 1 - 1 0.3 0.3 107,348 0.0
  UK Independence 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.3 105,722 N/A
  Independent 1 1 0 + 1 0.2 0.1 64,482 0.0
  Green 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.3 63,991 - 0.2
  Alliance 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.2 62,972 0.0
  Socialist Labour 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.2 52,109 N/A
  Liberal 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.1 45,166 - 0.1
  British National Party 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.1 35,832 0.0
  Natural Law 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.1 30,604 - 0.1
  Speaker 1 1 0 0 0.0 0.1 23,969
  ProLife Alliance 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.1 19,332 N/A
  UK Unionist 1 1 0 + 1 0.2 0.0 12,817 N/A
  Progressive Unionist 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 10,928 N/A
  National Democrats 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 10,829 N/A
  Socialist Alternative 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 9,906 N/A
  Scottish Socialist 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 9,740 N/A
  Independent Labour 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 9,233 - 0.1
  Independent Conservative 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 8,608 - 0.1
  Monster Raving Loony 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 7,906 - 0.1
  Rainbow Dream Ticket 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 3,745 N/A
  NI Women's Coalition 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 3,024 N/A
  Workers' Party 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 2,766 - 0.1
  National Front 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 2,716 N/A
  Legalise Cannabis 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 2,085 N/A
  People's Labour 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,995 N/A
  Mebyon Kernow 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,906 N/A
  Conservative Anti-Euro 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,434 N/A
  Socialist Party (GB) 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,359 N/A
  Community Representative 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,290 N/A
  Residents Association 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,263 N/A
  Social Democrat 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,246 - 0.1
  Workers' Revolutionary 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,178 N/A
  Real Labour 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 1,117 N/A
  Independent Democratic 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 982
  Independent Liberal Democrat 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 890
  Communist 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 639
  Independent Green 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 593
  Green Party 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 539
  Socialist Equality 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 505

Total votes cast: 31,286,284. All parties with more than 500 votes shown. Labour total includes New Labour and "Labour Time for Change" candidates; Conservative total includes candidates in Northern Ireland (excluded in some lists) and "Loyal Conservative" candidate. Image File history File linksMetadata Tony_Blair. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Tony_Blair. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom is the politician who leads Her Majestys Most Loyal Opposition. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 449 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (470 × 628 pixel, file size: 34 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 449 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (470 × 628 pixel, file size: 34 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Image File history File links Paddy_Ashdown_1. ... Image File history File links Paddy_Ashdown_1. ... Jeremy John Durham Ashdown, Baron Ashdown of Norton-sub-Hamdon, GCMG, KBE, PC, (born 27 February 1941), commonly known as Paddy Ashdown, is a British politician. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The Referendum Party were a single-issue party in the United Kingdom formed to contest the 1997 General Election. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland. ... West Tyrone is a British Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... Creation 1922 MP Gerry Adams Party Sinn Féin Type House of Commons Districts Belfast, Lisburn EP constituency Northern Ireland Belfast West is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Plaid Cymru (IPA:; English: ; often referred to simply as Plaid) is a political party in Wales. ... For pre-Arthur Griffith use of the political name, see Sinn Féin (19th century). ... This article is about the political party in Northern Ireland. ... Mid Ulster is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced //) is a British political party. ... Tatton is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Tatton is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The Socialist Labour Party (SLP) is a small left-wing political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Party is a minor United Kingdom political party. ... The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Natural Law Party was founded in 1992 in the United States by a group of educators, business leaders, and lawyers in Fairfield, Iowa who practiced Transcendental Meditation. ... In the United Kingdom, the Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, and is seen historically as the First Commoner of the Land. ... West Bromwich West is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... ProLife, otherwise The ProLife Party and formerly The ProLife Alliance is a minor political party in the United Kingdom. ... The UK Unionist Party (UKUP) is a small political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... North Down is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... North Down is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... The Progressive Unionist Party (PUP) are a small political party from Northern Ireland. ... The National Democrats is the name of a right wing nationalist party in the United Kingdom that has campaigned vigorously against immigration and asylum. ... The Socialist Party is a Trotskyist political party active in England and Wales and part of the Committee for a Workers International. ... The Scottish Socialist Alliance (SSA) was a coalition of left-wing bodies in Scotland which existed from 1996 to 1998, and was the forerunner of the Scottish Socialist Party. ... In politics, an independent is a politician who is not affiliated with any political party. ... In politics, an independent is a politician who is not affiliated with any political party. ... The Official Monster Raving Loony Party (OMRLP) is a registered political party established in the United Kingdom in 1983 by musician and anti-politician David Sutch, also known as Screaming Lord Sutch (1940-1999). ... Vote For Yourself Rainbow Dream Ticket is a United Kingdom Political party which advocates the abolition of parliament in favour of devolution to city states and decision-making by referendum. ... The Northern Ireland Womens Coalition is a non-sectarian political party in Northern Ireland. ... The Workers Party (in Irish Páirtí na nOibrithe) is an Irish left wing political party that evolved from Official Sinn Féin. ... In the United Kingdom, the British National Front (most commonly called the National Front or NF) is a far right-wing political party that had its heyday during the 1970s and 80s. ... Cannabis leaves The Legalise Cannabis Alliance (LCA) is a political party registered in the United Kingdom with the cannabis leaf image as its emblem. ... The Peoples Party or Socialist Peoples Party is a minor political party in the Furness region of England. ... Mebyon Kernow (Cornish for Sons of Cornwall, often abbrieviated MK) is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Arguing against capitalism, Speakers Corner, October 31, 2004 The Socialist Party of Great Britain, also known as the SPGB, is a small Marxist party, which is emphatically not Leninist. ... Residents Associations are formed by groups of people from a specific locality who come together to address issues within their local area and act as a voice for their local community and make the experience of living in or around their neighbourhood a more pleasant one. ... The Social Democratic Party is a small political party in the United Kingdom. ... Logo of the current Workers Revolutionary Party The Workers Revolutionary Party is a small Trotskyist political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Communist Party of Britain, which claimed to have 1026 members in 2007, is the largest Communist party in the United Kingdom. ... The Green Party in Northern Ireland is a minor political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The Socialist Equality Party is a minor Trotskyist political party in England. ... New Labour is an alternative name of the British political Labour Party. ...


Turnout: 71.2%


The Popular Unionist MP elected in 1992 died in 1995 and the party folded shortly afterwards. The Ulster Popular Unionist Party was a unionist political party in Northern Ireland. ...


There was no incumbent Speaker in the 1992 election.


See also

This is a list of Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the House of Commons at the 1997 General Election, arranged by constituency. ...

Manifestos

  • Labour (new Labour because Britain deserves better)
  • Conservative (You can only be sure with the Conservatives)
  • Liberal Democrats (Make the Difference)

External links

  • BBC Election Website
  • Video of the iconic moment at which Conservative Michael Portillo lost his seat to Labour's Stephen Twigg
  • 1997 election manifestos - Link to 1997 election manifestos of various parties.
  • Catalogue of 1997 general election ephemera at the Archives Division of the London School of Economics.
Mascot: Beaver Affiliations: University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Website: http://www. ... This is a list of United Kingdom general elections since 1802. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom general election, 1801 was not an election as such, but the co-option of members to serve in the first Parliament to be held after the formation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on 1 January 1801. ... The election to the 2nd Parliament of the United Kingdom was the first to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland (as the 1801-1802 Parliament was composed of members elected to the former Parliaments of Great Britain and Ireland). ... The election to the 3rd Parliament of the United Kingdom was the second general election to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The election to the 4th Parliament of the United Kingdom was the third general election to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The election to the 5th Parliament of the United Kingdom was the fourth general election to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The 1818 UK general election saw the Whigs gain a few seats, but the Tories under the Earl of Liverpool retained a majority of around 90 seats. ... The 1820 UK general election, held shortly after the Radical War in Scotland and the Cato Street Conspiracy. ... The 1826 UK general election saw the Tories under the Earl of Liverpool win a substantial an increased majority over the Whigs. ... The 1830 UK general election, fought in the aftermath of the Swing Riots, saw electoral reform as a major election issue. ... The 1831 UK general election, the last before the Reform Act of 1832, saw electoral reform as the major election issue. ... The 1832 UK general election, the first after the Reform Act, saw the Whigs win a large majority, with the Tories winning less than 30% of the vote. ... The 1835 UK general election saw Robert Peels Conservatives make large gains from their low of the 1832 election, but the Whigs maintained a large majority. ... The 1837 UK general election saw Robert Peels Conservatives close further on the position of the Whigs, who won their third election of the decade. ... The 1841 UK general election saw a big swing as Robert Peels Conservatives took control of the House of Commons. ... The 1847 UK general election saw candidates calling themselves Conservatives win the most seats, in part because they won a number of uncontested seats. ... The 1852 UK general election was very close, Lord John Russells Whigs again winning the popular vote, but once again Conservative candidates won a very slight majority. ... The 1857 UK general election saw the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, finally win a majority in the House of Commons as the Conservative vote fell significantly. ... The 1859 UK general election saw the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, hold their majority in a much enlarged House of Commons over the Earl of Derbys Conservatives. ... The 1865 UK general election saw the Liberals, led by Lord Palmerston, increase their large majority over the Earl of Derbys Conservatives. ... The 1868 UK general election was the first after passage of the Reform Act 1867, which enfranchised all male householders, thus greatly increasing the number of men who could vote in elections in the United Kingdom. ... The 1874 UK general election ended with the Liberals, led by William Gladstone, winning a majority of the votes cast, but Benjamin Disraelis Conservatives winning the majority of seats in the House of Commons, largely because they won a number of uncontested seats. ... The UK general election of 1880 was a general election in the United Kingdom held on the 18 April 1880. ... The 1885 UK general election was from the 24th November - 18th December 1885. ... The 1886 UK general election took place from July 1-27, 1886. ... The 1892 UK general election was held from 4th - 26th July 1892. ... The UK general election of 1895 was held from 13th July - 7th August 1895. ... Lord Salisbury Henry Campbell-Bannerman Keir Hardie The campaign for United Kingdom general election of 1900 was held from 25 September to 24 October 1900. ... The UK general election of 1906 was from 12th January – 8th February 1906. ... The UK general election of January 1910 was held from 15th January – 10th February 1910. ... The UK general election of December 1910 was the last held over several days, from 3rd – 19th December 1910. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1918 held on 14th December 1918, after the Representation of the People Act 1918. ... The UK general election of 1922 was held on 15th November 1922. ... The UK general election of 1923 was held on 5th December 1923. ... The 1924 UK general election was held on 29th October 1924. ... The 1929 UK general election was held on 30th May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament. ... The UK general election on Tuesday 27 October 1931 was the last in the United Kingdom not held on a Thursday. ... Stanley Baldwin Clement Attlee The UK general election held on 14th November 1935 resulted in a large, though reduced, majority for the National Government now led by Stanley Baldwin. ... Clement Attlee Winston Churchill The United Kingdom General Election of 1945 held on 5 July 1945 but not counted and declared until 26 July 1945 (due to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas) was one of the most significant general elections of the 20th... The United Kingdom general election in 1950 was the first general election ever after a full term of a Labour government. ... The 1951 election was held soon after the UK general election, 1950, which Labour won, but with an unworkable majority. ... The 1955 United Kingdom general election was held on May 26, 1955, four years after the previous general election. ... This United Kingdom general election was held on October 8, 1959, and marked a third successive victory for the ruling Conservative party, led by Harold MacMillan. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1964 result was a very slim majority for the Labour Party, of 4, and led to their first government since 1951. ... The UK general election in 1966 was called by Harold Wilson because his government, elected in the 1964 election, had an unworkably small majority. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1970 was held on June 18, 1970, and resulted in a surprise loss of power for Labour under Harold Wilson, who was replaced as Prime Minister by the Conservative leader, Edward Heath. ... The UK general election of February 1974 was held on February 28, 1974. ... Harold Wilson Edward Heath The United Kingdom general election of October 1974 took place on 10 October 1974. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1979 was held on 3 May 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ... The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... Margaret Thatcher David Steel Election 1987 Titles The United Kingdom general election of 1987 was held on 11 June 1987 and was the third consecutive victory for the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992, and was the fourth consecutive victory for the Conservative Party. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... Under the provisions of the Parliament Acts of 1911 and 1949, the next United Kingdom general election must be held on or before 3 June 2010, barring exceptional circumstances. ... Referendums (or referenda) are only occasionally held by the government of the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom referendum of 1975 was a post-legislative referendum held on 5 June 1975 in the whole of the United Kingdom over whether there was support for it to stay in the European Economic Community, which it had entered in 1973, under the Conservative government of Edward Heath. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
United Kingdom general election, 2005 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3205 words)
The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair.
In Northern Ireland, the election was dominated in the unionist community by a battle between the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) to be the region's largest unionist party in Parliament.
Other elections in the province have shown both a shift in votes towards the DUP but also a collapse of support for the cross-community Alliance Party which is likely to be more marked in a first past the post election and thus which may work in the UUP's favour.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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