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Encyclopedia > United Church of Christ

Disambiguation: This article is about the United States denomination known as "United Church of Christ." For other merged denominations see United and uniting churches. For other churches that have the words "Church" and "Christ" in their name, see Church of Christ (disambiguation). United and uniting churches are churches that bring together (or unite) different (predominantly) Protestant denominations in one organisation. ... The Church of Christ is a term in Christian theology denoting the entire body of Christians throughout the world, no matter the denomination. ...

The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination principally in the United States, generally considered within the Reformed tradition, and formed in 1957 by the union of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches. Image File history File links United_Church_of_Christ_logo. ... In the United States, the Mainline churches are those Protestant denominations with moderate theologies which attempt to be open to new ideas and societal changes without abandoning what they consider to be the historical basis of the Christian faith. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A denomination, in the... -1... The Evangelical and Reformed Church was an American Protestant denomination formed by the merger (1934) of the Reformed Church in the United States and the Evangelical Synod of North America. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ...


According to the 2006 yearbook, the United Church of Christ has approximately 1.2 million members and is composed of approximately 5,633 local congregations.


Although similar in name, the UCC denomination is theologically, historically, and culturally distinct from the Churches of Christ, a loose affiliation of conservative congregations [1] that arose primarily from the Restoration Movement taking place in the Southeastern U.S. in the 19th century. The Churches of Christ discussed in this article are not part of the United Church of Christ; the Disciples of Christ; the International Churches of Christ; the Church of Christ, Scientist (Christian Science); the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints or any other denomination within the Latter Day... For information related to dispensational Christian views regarding the end times, see restorationism. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ...

Contents

Origin of the United Church of Christ

In 1957, the United Church of Christ formed through the union of the Evangelical and Reformed Church with the General Council of Congregational Christian Churches. Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ...

Hidden Histories in the United Church of Christ (two volumes; 1987, ISBN 0-8298-0753-5) edited by Barbara Brown Zikmund chronicles the many different church backgrounds that are a part of the UCC. Volume one is available online[2]. The Evangelical and Reformed Church was an American Protestant denomination formed by the merger (1934) of the Reformed Church in the United States and the Evangelical Synod of North America. ... The Evangelical Synod of North America (originally known as the German Evangelical Synod of North America) was a denominational body of Protestant churches in the United States existing from the mid-1800s until its 1934 merger with the Reformed Church in the United States to form the Evangelical and Reformed... -1... In an unadorned church, the 17th century congregation stands to hear the sermon. ... The British Isles in relation to mainland Europe The British Isles (French: , Irish: [1] or Oileáin Iarthair Eorpa,[2] Manx: Ellanyn Goaldagh, Scottish Gaelic: , Welsh: ), is a group of islands off the northwest coast of continental Europe comprising Great Britain, Ireland and a number of smaller islands. ... The Heidelberg Catechism is a document taking the form of a series of questions and answers, for use in teaching Reformed Christian doctrine. ... The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland Length 1. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37°53N to 39°43N  - Longitude 75°4W to 79°33... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... The Evangelical Synod of North America (originally known as the German Evangelical Synod of North America) was a denominational body of Protestant churches in the United States existing from the mid-1800s until its 1934 merger with the Reformed Church in the United States to form the Evangelical and Reformed... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis Metro[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... -1... Motto Suum cuique Latin: To each his own Prussia at its peak, as leading state of the German Empire Capital Königsberg, later Berlin Government Duke1  - 1525–68 Albert I (first)  - 1688–1701 Frederick III (last) King1  - 1701–13 Frederick I (first)  - 1888–1918 William II (last) Prime Minister1,2... The Heidelberg Catechism is a document taking the form of a series of questions and answers, for use in teaching Reformed Christian doctrine. ... Luthers Small Catechism was written by Martin Luther and published in 1529 for the training of children. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Image File history File links HennikerChurch. ... Image File history File links HennikerChurch. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... Political separatism is a movement to obtain sovereignty and split a territory or group of people (usually a people with a distinctive national consciousness) from one another (or one nation from another; a colony from the metropolis). ... Pilgrims is the name commonly applied to early settlers of the Plymouth Colony in present-day Massachusetts. ... Plymouth Colony was an English colonial venture in North America from 1620 until 1691. ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... National Association of Congregational Christian Churches (NACCC) is an association of about 400 churches that is organized according to Congregational church governance. ... The Conservative Congregational Christian Conference, known as the CCCC or 4Cs, is an evangelical Christian denomination organized in 1948 by churches of the old Congregational Christian Conference who wanted to preserve the historic Christian faith. ... Fundamentalism is a movement to maintain strict adherence to founding principles. ... For information related to dispensational Christian views regarding the end times, see restorationism. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Anglo-Saxons refers collectively to the groups of Germanic tribes who achieved dominance in southern Britain from the mid-5th century, forming the basis for the modern English nation. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is a term describing individuals belonging... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Churches of Christ discussed in this article are not part of the United Church of Christ; the Disciples of Christ; the International Churches of Christ; the Church of Christ, Scientist (Christian Science); the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints or any other denomination within the Latter Day...


Doctrine and beliefs

Statements of doctrine and beliefs

The UCC uses four words to describe itself: "Christian, Reformed, Congregational and Evangelical." The church's diversity and adherence to covenantal polity (rather than government by regional elders or bishops) give individual congregations a great deal of freedom in the areas of worship, congregational life, and doctrine. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A Christian () is a... -1... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Look up Evangelical in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The motto of the United Church of Christ comes from John 17:21: "That they may all be one." The denomination's official literature uses broad doctrinal parameters, honoring creeds and confessions as "testimonies of faith" rather than "tests of faith," and emphasizes freedom of individual conscience and local church autonomy. Indeed, the relationship between local congregations and the denomination's national headquarters is covenantal rather than hierarchical: local churches have complete control of their finances, hiring and firing of clergy and other staff, and theological and political stands.


In the United Church of Christ, creeds, confessions, and affirmations of faith function as "testimonies to faith" around which the church gathers rather than as "tests of faith" rigidly proscribing required doctrinal consent. As expressed on the United Church of Christ constitution, "The United Church of Christ acknowledges as its sole Head, Jesus Christ, Son of God and Savior. It acknowledges as kindred in Christ all who share in this confession. It looks to the Word of God in the Scriptures, and to the presence and power of the Holy Spirit, to prosper its creative and redemptive work in the world. It claims as its own the faith of the historic Church expressed in the ancient creeds and reclaimed in the basic insights of the Protestant Reformers. It affirms the responsibility of the Church in each generation to make this faith its own in reality of worship, in honesty of thought and expression, and in purity of heart before God. In accordance with the teaching of our Lord and the practice prevailing among evangelical Christians, it recognizes two sacraments: Baptism and the Lord's Supper or Holy Communion" from the UCC constitution[3].


The denomination, therefore, looks to a number of historic confessions as expressing the common faith around which the church gathers, including:

While not functioning as creedal tests of faith, together these confessions and testimonies of faith situate the United Church of Christ solidly within the family of Reformation churches. The Apostles Creed (Latin: Symbolum Apostolorum), sometimes titled Symbol of the Apostles, is an early statement of Christian belief, a creed or symbol. ... Icon depicting the Holy Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea holding the Nicene Creed. ... The Heidelberg Catechism is a document taking the form of a series of questions and answers, for use in teaching Reformed Christian doctrine. ... Luthers Small Catechism was written by Martin Luther and published in 1529 for the training of children. ... The Statement of Faith of the United Church of Christ is a Christian confession of faith written in 1959 to express the common faith of the newly founded United Church of Christ, formed in 1957 by the union of the Evangelical and Reformed Church with the Congregational Christian Churches. ...


Studies and surveys of beliefs

In 2001, Hartford Institute for Religion Research did a "Faith Communities Today (FACT)" study [4] that included a survey of United Church of Christ beliefs. Among the results of this were findings that in the UCC, 5.6 percent of the churches responding to the survey described their members as "very liberal or progressive," 3.4 percent as "very conservative," 22.4 percent as "somewhat liberal or progressive," and 23.6 percent as "somewhat conservative" Those results suggested a nearly equal balance between liberal and conservative congregations. The self-described "moderate" group, however, was the largest at 45 percent. Another statistics based on the Hartford Institute report found that for opinion of the highest source of authority, 53.2% said "the Bible," 16.1% said "Holy Spirit" 9.2% said "Reason", 6.3% said "Experience" and 6.1% said "Creeds."


David Roozen, director of the Hartford Institute for Religion Research who has studied the United Church of Christ, said surveys show the national church's pronouncements are often more liberal than the views in the pews but that its governing structure is set up to allow such disagreements[5].


Starting in 2003, a task force commisisoned by General Synod 24 studied the diverse Worship habits of UCC churches. The study can be found online [6] and reflects statistics on attitudes towards Worship, Baptism, and Communion, such as "Laity (70%) and clergy (90%) alike overwhelmingly describe worship “as an encounter with God that leads to doing God’s work in the world.” "95 percent of our congregations use the Revised Common Lectionary in some way in planning or actual worship and preaching" and "96 percent always or almost always have a sermon, 86 percent have a time with children, 95 percent have a time of sharing joys and concerns, and 98 percent include the Prayer of Our Savior/Lord’s Prayer." Clergy and laity were invited to select two meanings of baptism that they emphasize. They were also to suggest the meaning that they thought their entire church emphasized. Baptism as an “entry into the Church Universal” was the most frequent response. Clergy and laity were also invited to identify two meanings of Holy Communion that they emphasize. While clergy emphasized Holy Communion as “a meal in which we encounter God’s living presence,” laity emphasized “a remembrance of Jesus’ last supper, death, and resurrection.” The Revised Common Lectionary is a lectionary of the liturgical year put together in 1983. ... A sermon is an oration by a prophet or member of the clergy. ... A childrens message or childrens sermon is a part of a church service dedicated to communicating an abbreviated Christian message that is palatable to small children. ... Representation of the Sermon on the Mount The Lords Prayer in Swahili. ...


Other theological publications and colloquiums.

Theological seminars, journals, and publications of the UCC [7] may be helpful to understand the theologies of the UCC, but while they disseminate various theological opinions and news, none is used to speak authoritatively about church beliefs.


In 1977 the Office for Church Life and Leadership (OCLL) began sponsoring an annual a "Craigville Colloquy" with the first topic: "Toward Sound Teaching in the United Church of Christ." According to a 2004 speech by current president John Thomas, "a group of prominent United Church of Christ theologians set forth an agenda as urgent today as it was then: Convinced as we are that our church, along with the American churches generally, is excessively accommodated to cultural values and perceptions, our thinking revolved around the conviction that the ministry of the church must become more intentional and disciplined in teaching the faith of the church, in valuing its theological tradition and in responding to the present place of the church in culture." [33]


Concurrent with these sentiments, the late 1970s/early 1980s brought the launch of several theological publications to include Prism and New Conversations.


New Conversations, an "annual" magazine of the United Church of Christ's Board for Homeland Ministries (BHM)[8] that is actually published less often than annually. The last known edition was 2002's "Medical Technology and Christian Decision Making" "[34] dealing with bioethics. The BHM has produced several issues of “New Conversations” dealing with Asian Americans, Micronesians, and Native Hawaiian Issues[9]. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

  • Volume 1: (Spring/Summer, 1975),
  • Volume 4: no 2 (Fall 1979) -- Topic:"Order and Identity in the United Church of Christ"
  • Volume 5: No. 2, (Fall 1980) -- Topic:“The Design of Faith”
  • Volume 6: (Spring 1982)
  • Volume 11: (Fall 1988) -- Topic: "National Service" New Conversations.
  • (Winter/Spring 1989) -- Topic: American Missionary Association and Amistad
  • Spring 1995 -- Topic: "Don't Ask Questions"
  • Volume 15, Number 3 (1993) -- Topic: "New Conversations: Confronting and Combatting Christian Anti-Judaism" ed. by Nanette M. Roberts
  • Volume 17, no. 2 (Summer 1995) -- Topic: "The Church and the Public School"
  • Fall 2002 -- Topic: "Medical Technology and Christian Decision Making"

Prism is a theological journal of the United Church of Christ (ISSN 0887-5049) published jointly by the seven seminaries of the United Church of Christ, and produced twice a year. A journal for the whole church, Prism offers "serious theological reflection from a diversity of viewpoints on issues of faith, mission, and ministry." Prism was founded in 1985, and is edited by Clyde Steckel, United Seminary's emeritus professor of theology, and Elizabeth Nordbeck of Andover Newton Theological School[10]. La Amistad, a 19th century Spanish schooner The Amistad, a 1841 United States court case concerning a slave rebellion on that ship. ...


The Living Theological Heritage of the United Church of Christ, (ISBN 0-8298-1113-3), an 835-page, 7-volume set edited by Rev. Barbara Brown Zikmund and a team of 13 editors, four associate editors and an editorial board of seven. The materials, which span the first century through the 20th century, were included in the volumes because, according to editors, they had impacted the shaping the UCC's theological identity[11].


UCC beliefs expressed to the World Council of Churches

In 1982, the Faith and Order Commission of the World Council of Churches unanimously adopted a statement in Lima, Peru regarding "Baptism, Eucharist, and Ministry." The 1982 UCC General Synod adopted an official tentative response in 11-pages that reflects a UCC theological response to this document[12]. The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ... Baptism in early Christian art. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... The term ministry can refer to the following: A ministry is a department of a government. ...


Polity/organizational structure

System and ethos of polity

Quoting the United Church of Christ Constitution, "The basic unit of the life and organization of the United Church of Christ is the local church." [35] An interplay of wider interdependence with local autonomy characterizes the organization of the UCC. Each "setting" of the United Church of Christ relates covenantally with other settings, their actions speaking "to but not for" each other. The term local churches (地方教會) was originally used by Watchman Nee (倪柝聲) to describe Christian churches that form based upon the teaching of the ground of locality; however, its use to refer to any collection of independent Christian congregations in a city has become more...


The ethos of United Church of Christ organization is considered "covenantal." The structure of UCC organization is a mixture of the congregational and presbyterian polities of its predecessor denominations. With ultimate authority on most matters given to the local church, many see United Church of Christ polity as closer to congregationalism; however, with ordination and pastoral oversight conducted by Associations, and General Synod representation given to Conferences instead of congregational delegates, certain presbyterian similarities are also visible. A covenant, in its most general sense, is a solemn promise to do or not do something specified. ... Congregationalist church governance, often known as congregationalism, is a system of church governance in which every local congregation is independent. ... Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders. ... Ecclesiastical polity is the operational and governance structure of a church or Christian denomination. ...


Local churches

The basic unit of the United Church of Christ is the local church (also often called the congregation). Local churches have the freedom to govern themselves, establishing their own internal organizational structures and theological positions. Thus, local church governance varies widely throughout the denomination; some congregations, mainly of Congregational origin, have numerous relatively-independent "boards" that oversee different aspects of church life, while others have one central "church council" or "consistory" (especially in former Evangelical and Reformed parishes) that handles most or all affairs, while still others have structures incorporating aspects of both, or other alternative organizational structures entirely.


Local churches also have the freedom to hire and dismiss their own pastors and other leadership. However, unlike purely congregational polities, the association has the main authority to ordain clergy and grant standing to clergy coming to a church from another association or another denomination (this authority is exercised "in cooperation with" the person being ordained/called and the Local Church that is calling them). Local churches are aided in searching for and calling ordained clergy through a denominationally-coordinated "search-and-call" system, usually facilitated by staff at the conference level. Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ...


Associations

See also: Associations of the United Church of Christ

Local churches are typically gathered together in regional bodies called Associations. Local churches often give financial support to the association to support its activities. The official delegates of an association are comprised of all ordained clergy within the bounds of the association together with lay delegates sent from each local church. The association provides primary oversight and authorization of ordained and other authorized ministers. The association ordains new ministers, holds ministers' standing in covenant with local churches, and is responsible for disciplinary action. [In a few instances where there is only one association within a conference, or where the associations within a conference have agreed to dissolve, the Conference (below) assumes the association's functions.] Most of the thirty-nine conferences of the United Church of Christ are subdivided into associations, which are themselves made of local churches. ...


Conferences

See also: Conferences of the United Church of Christ

Local churches also are members of larger Conferences, of which there are 38 in the United Church of Christ. A conference typically contains multiple associations; if no associations exist within its boundaries, the conference exercises the functions of the association as well. Conferences are supported financially through local churches' contribution to "Our Church's Wider Mission", the United Church of Christ's denominational support system. Conferences provide the primary support for the search-and-call process by which churches select ordained leadership and often provide significant programming resources for their constituent churches. Conferences, like associations, are congregationally representative bodies, with each local church sending ordained and lay delegates. As of Fall 2005 there are 39 Conferences in the United Church of Christ, listed below alongside the conference minister of each. ... As of Fall 2005 there are 39 Conferences in the United Church of Christ, listed below alongside the conference minister of each. ...


General Synod

The denomination's churchwide deliberative body is the General Synod, which meets every two years. The General Synod is comprised of delegates elected from the Conferences (distributed proportionally by conference size) together with the boards of directors of each of the four covenanted ministries (see below, under National Offices). The General Synod is the title of the governing body of some church organizations. ...


While General Synod provides the most visible voice of the "stance of the denomination" on any particular issue, the covenantal polity of the denomination means that General Synod speaks to local churches, associations, and conferences, but not for them. Thus, the other settings of the church are allowed to hold differing views and practices on all non-constitutional matters.


General Synod considers three kinds of resolutions:

  • Pronouncements: A Pronouncement is a statement of Christian conviction on a matter of moral or social principle and has been adopted by a two-thirds vote of a General Synod.
  • Proposals for Action: A Proposal for Action is a recommendation for specific directional statements and goals implementing a Pronouncement. A Proposal for Action normally accompanies a Pronouncement. (See link above regarding Pronouncements.)
  • Resolutions and Other Formal Motions Which may consist of the following three types:
    • Resolutions of Witness: A Resolution of Witness is an expression of the General Synod concerning a moral, ethical, or religious matter confronting the church, the nation, or the world, adopted for the guidance of the officers, Associated, or Affiliated Ministries, or other bodies as defined in Article VI of the Bylaws of the United Church of Christ; the consideration of local churches, Associations, Conferences, and other bodies related to the United Church of Christ; and for a Christian witness to the world. It represents agreement by at least two-thirds of the delegates voting that the view expressed is based on Christian conviction and is a part of their witness to Jesus Christ.
    • Prudential Resolutions: A Prudential Resolution establishes policy, institutes or revises structure or procedures, authorizes programs, approves directions, or requests actions by a majority vote.
    • Other Formal Motions
See also: Resolutions of the United Church of Christ

The United Church of Christ is a Christian denomination. ...

National offices: covenanted, associated, and affiliated ministries

As agents of the General Synod, the denomination maintains national offices comprising four "covenanted ministries", one "associated ministry", and one "affiliated ministry". The current system of national governance was adopted in 1999 as a restructure of the national setting, consolidating numerous agencies, boards, and "instrumentalities" that the UCC, in the main, had inherited from the Congregational Christian Churches at the time of merger, along with several created during the denomination's earlier years.


Covenanted ministries

These structures carry out the work of the General Synod and support the local churches, associations, and conferences. The head executives of these ministries comprise the five member Collegium of Officers, which are the non-hierarchical official officers of the denomination. (The Office of General Ministries is represented by both the General Minister, who serves as President of the denomination, and the Associate General minister). According the UCC office of communication press release at the time of restructure, "In the new executive arrangement, the five will work together in a Collegium of Officers, meeting as peers. This setting is designed to provide an opportunity for mutual responsibility and reporting, as well as ongoing assessment of UCC programs." The main offices of the Covenanted ministries are at the "Church House", the United Church of Christ national headquarters at 700 Prospect Avenue in Cleveland, Ohio. This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...

  • The Office of General Ministries (OGM) is responsible for administration, common services (technology, physical plant, etc), covenantal relations (ecumenical relations, formal relations to other settings of the church), financial development, and "proclamation, identity and communication". The current General Minister and President is the Rev. John Thomas and the current Associate General Minister is Ms. Edith Guffey.
  • Local Church Ministries (LCM) is responsible for evangelism, stewardship and church finance, worship and education, Pilgrim Press and United Church Resources (the publishing house of the United Church of Christ), and parish life and leadership (authorization, clergy development, seminary relations, parish leadership, etc.). The current Executive Minister of Local Church Ministries is the Rev. José Malayang.
  • Wider Church Ministries (WCM) is responsible for partner relations* (relations with churches around the world, missionary work, etc.), local church relations* (as relates to world ministries and missions), global sharing of resources, health and wholeness ministry, and global education and advocacy*. The starred '*' ministries are carried out through the Common Global Ministries Board, a joint instrumentality of the United Church of Christ and the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), based in Indianapolis, Indiana. The current Executive Minister for Wider Church Ministries is the Rev. Cally Rogers-Witte.
  • Justice and Witness Ministries (JWM) is responsible for ministries related to economic justice, human rights, justice for women and transformation, public life and social policy, and racial justice. In addition to its offices in Cleveland, JWM also maintains an office on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. The current Executive Minister for Justice and Witness Ministries is Ms. M. Linda Jaramillo. JWM also maintains an office called "Minister for Children, Families and Human Sexuality Advocacy" that promotes the Our Whole Lives sex education curriculum.

Nickname: Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Marion Founded 1821 Government  - Mayor Bart Peterson (D) Area  - City  372 sq mi (963. ... Justice and Witness Ministries (JWM) is one of five covenanted ministries of the United Church of Christ. ... Capitol Hill is the name of a district in the following cities: Capitol Hill, Denver, Colorado Capitol Hill, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Capitol Hill, Seattle, Washington Capitol Hill, Washington, DC It is also a common nickname for the United States Congress and the politicians who serve it (e. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... Our Whole Lives, or OWL, is a set of sexuality curricula for teenagers and adults prepared by the Unitarian Universalist Association and the United Church of Christ. ... Sex education is a broad term used to describe education about human sexual anatomy, sexual reproduction, sexual intercourse, and other aspects of human sexual behavior. ...

Associated ministry

The Pension Boards of the United Church of Christ (PB) operates the employee benefits systems for all settings of the United Church of Christ, including health, dental, and optical insurance, retirement/pension systems, disability and life insurance, and ministerial assistance programs. The Pension Boards offices are located in New York City, where the headquarters of all UCC national bodies had been located prior to their move to Ohio in the early 1990s. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Affiliated ministry

The United Church Foundation (UCF) operates a collective financial management and investment system available to any setting of the United Church of Christ that wishes to place its assets with UCF. The United Church Foundation offices are also located in New York City. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


The United Church of Christ Insurance Board is a nonprofit corporation collectively "owned" by 38 of the 39 Conferences of the United Church of Christ. It is run by a president/CEO and a 15-member Board, of with the full corporate board consisting of participating Conference ministers. The UCCIB administers a property insurance and liability insurance program serving the United Church of Christ and Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) churches and related entities. [36]. [37] As of Fall 2005 there are 39 Conferences in the United Church of Christ, listed below alongside the conference minister of each. ... Property insurance provides protection against most risks to property, such as fire, theft and some weather damage. ... Liability insurance is a part of the general insurance system of risk transference. ...


United Church News

The denomination's official publication, United Church News, was begun in 1985 by the Rev. W. Evan Golder, founding editor. [38] The current editor, the Rev. J. Bennett Guess, succeeded Golder in 2003 after serving as "minister for communication and mission education" for the UCC's Justice and Witness Ministries[39] Justice and Witness Ministries (JWM) is one of five covenanted ministries of the United Church of Christ. ...


United Church News is published by the Office of Communication, United Church of Christ, which is related to the Proclamation, Identity and Communication Ministry of the United Church of Christ, led by the Rev. Robert Chase of Lakewood, Ohio. Chase began work at the UCC’s national offices in Cleveland in April 1999. [40]


Several regional editions are published by conferences as inserts to the nationally distributed edition. At its inception, the newspaper charged a subscription fee, but in the early 2000s this was discontinued in favor of free distribution. Recently, to save money, UCN reduced frequency of publication.{cite}


Current issues in the United Church of Christ

Controversial "God Is Still Speaking" identity campaign

Main article: God is Still Speaking
Example from UCC media branding campaign

At the 2003 General Synod, the United Church of Christ began a campaign with "emphasis on expanding the UCC's name-brand identity through modern advertising and marketing."[13] that was formally launched Advent 2004. The campaign included coordinated program of evangelism and hospitality training for congregations paired with national and local television "brand" advertising, known as the "God is Still Speaking" campaign or "The Stillspeaking Initiative." The initiative was themed around the quote "Never place a period where God has placed a comma," and campaign materials, including print and broadcast advertising as well as merchandise, featured the quote and a large "comma," with a visual theme in red and black. United Church of Christ congregations were asked to "opt in" to the campaign, signifying their support as well as their willingness to receive training on hospitality and evangelism. An evangelism event was held in Atlanta in August 2005 to promote the campaign[14]. With a partial intent of distinguishing itself from similar sounding denominations, the campaign urged UCCers to pronounce the denominational name with a pause in the middle, a la "United Church, of Christ". Several renewal groups panned the ad campaign for its efforts to create an ONA/progressive perception of the UCC identity despite its actual majority in centrist/moderate viewpoints.[15][16][17][18] According to John Evans, associate professor of sociology at University of California, San Diego, "The UCC is clearly going after a certain niche in American society who are very liberal and have a particular religious vision that includes inclusiveness… They are becoming the religious brand that is known for this."[19] Example from UCC media branding campaign God is Still Speaking, also known as The Stillspeaking Initiative, is the name of the identity, branding, and advertising campaign of the United Church of Christ that was launched in 2004. ... Image File history File links UCC_branding_logo. ... The Confessing Movement is a neo-Evangelical movement within several American mainline Protestant denominations to return those churches to what the members of the movement see as theological orthodoxy. ... ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... In politics and religion, a moderate is an individual who holds an intermediate position between two extreme or radical viewpoints. ...


The first television advertisement in the campaign, the "Bouncers" advertisement, showed bouncers allowing a white, well-dressed family comprising a straight couple and two children into a church building while rejecting a number of others, including an African American female, a Latino male, and a person using a wheelchair. The text displayed on the screen says "Jesus didn't turn people away. Neither do we." In the initial December 2004 run, the NBC and CBS television networks refused to air an advertisement by the UCC, deeming it too controversial. The winter 2005 issue of The Witness (a renewal group publication) noted, ‘Some controversy continues about the controversy itself. Some reports indicate that NBC and CBS notified the UCC about its decision not to run the “bouncer” ads several months before the campaign launch date, while approving a second “little girl” ad which UCC officials chose not to use until three weeks into the month. All the press releases about this controversy have come from the UCC to coordinate with the release of the Ad. NBC and CBS have not commented, leading some to speculate that the creation of the controversy was an intentional effort to draw attention to the campaign. Ironically, the one major network to accept the Ad is FOX, which is generally considered to be less liberal than the three other networks.’[20] A bouncer at the door of a strip club in San Francisco, USA. A bouncer or doorman is an informal term for security guards employed at venues such as bars, nightclubs or concerts to provide security, check legal age, and refuse entry to a venue based on criteria such as... NBC (a former acronym for National Broadcasting Company) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ...


During Lent 2006, the UCC launched several sites prior to the release of the commercial, including iUCC.org, UCCVitality.org, RejectionHurts.com, AccessibleAirwaves.org. Also, at Buford’s request, the commercial was previewed by an estimated 800 people March 17-19 at the UCC’s New England Women’s Gathering. In January 2006, Sojourners Magazine published an inverview of Buford describing the commercial[21]. This Sojourners' information was subsequently published on several forums and blogs, (namely, UCC forums, Philosophy over Coffee, UCCTruths). In reaction, the United Church news stated that "details of UCC's new TV ad [had] emerge[d] earlier than planned" and therefore issued a complete description of the ad a full week before its planned press conference.[22] It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... Sojourners Magazine, a bimonthly publication of Sojourners Fellowship, was first published in 1971 under the original title of The Post-American. ...


In the second major commercial, known as the "Ejector Seat" commercial, church pews "eject" people in a fashion similar to aircraft ejector seats; among the persons "ejected" from the church are an African American mother holding a crying infant, two men holding hands, an Arab-American man, and a person with a walker. The commercial again concluded with the line "Jesus didn't turn people away. Neither do we", and cut to a scene of a diverse church gathering and a voice-over stating "The United Church of Christ: No matter who you are, or where you are on life's journey, you're welcome here." The "Ejector Seat" commercial was originally announced to air during Advent 2005, but due to inadequate funding available at the time, the Executive Council delayed this until Lent 2006. Pews in rows in a church. ... US Air Force F-15 Eagle ejection seat test using a mannequin. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In December 2006, UCC launched a blog-centered ad campaign. "UCC ads will be placed on various internet sites and blogs, with the hope of reaching general audiences in addition to targeted groups, such as youth, young families with children, gays and lesbians, social justice advocates, and the Spanish-speaking community."[23] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The United Church of Christ Executive Council announced at its April 2006 meeting that the denomination would integrate the campaign into the overall program of the national setting. Ron Buford, the campaign manager, subsequently resigned.


Controversial Resolutions from General Synod XXV (2005)

See also: Resolutions of United Church of Christ

Two resolutions from the United Church of Christ General Synod XXV, meeting in Atlanta, Georgia from July 1–5, 2005, generated significant controversy both in and outside the denomination, some of which continues presently. As noted in the Polity section above, the General Synod cannot enforce positions on local congregations, speaking "to, but not for" them. General Synod XXV of the United Church of Christ conviened July 1 - 5, 2005, in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The United Church of Christ is a Christian denomination. ... Hotlanta redirects here. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • The resolution "In support of equal marriage rights for all", supported by an estimated 80% of the 884 General Synod Delegates, made the United Church of Christ General Synod the first major Christian deliberative body in the U.S. to make a statement of support for "equal marriage rights for all people, regardless of gender," and is hitherto the largest Christian denominational entity in the U.S. supporting equal marriage rights (although other denominations have affirmed committed relationships for LGBT people in other forms). The resolution's primary focus is on calling for equal access to civil marriage rights regardless of gender; however, the resolution does call upon local congregations and other settings of the United Church of Christ to discussion and discernment around "marriage equality" and encourages congregations "to consider adopting Wedding Policies that do not discriminate against couples based on gender." Although eighty percent (80%) of the delegates at the United Church of Christ General Synod XV endorsed an "Equal Marriage Rights For All" resolution, national response to the resolution remains mixed. Some in the United Church of Christ have heralded the resolution as furthering the prophetic witness of the United Church of Christ to both church and society. Others in the United Church of Christ viewed this decision unfavorably, though, because the General Synod's highly publicized endorsement may or may not reflect the actual theological opinions held by individual members or their local congregations. The language used that asserts no distinction between same sex marriage and different sex marriage ("Therefore, theologically and biblically, there is neither justification for denying any couple, regardless of gender, the blessings of the church nor for denying equal protection under the law in the granting of a civil marriage license, recognized and respected by all civil entities.") has been considered by some to be an overstepping the Synod's role in asserting theological positions. Of particular note, on June 10, 2006, the Iglesia Evangelica Unida de Puerto Rico, since 1931 a conference of the Congregational Christian Churches/UCC, voted by a 3–1 margin to withdraw its affiliation with the UCC as a body, over the issue[24].
  • United Church of Christ General Synod XV also passed two resolutions concerning the conflict between Israel and Palestinians in the Middle East. One calls for the use of economic leverage to promote peace in the Middle East, which can include measures such as government lobbying, selective investment, shareholder lobbying, and selective divestment from companies which profit from the continuing Israel-Palestine conflict. The other resolution, named "Tear Down the Wall", calls upon Israel to remove the separation barrier between Israel and the West Bank. Opponents of the "Tear Down the Wall" resolution have noted that the wall's purpose is to prevent terrorist attacks, and that the resolution does not call for a stop to these attacks. The Simon Wiesenthal Center stated that the July 2005 UCC resolutions on divestment from Israel were "functionally anti-Semitic"[25]. The Anti-Defamation League stated that those same resolutions are "disappointing and disturbing" and "deeply troubling"[26]. In addition to the concerns raised about the merits of the "economic leverage" resolution, additional concerns were raised about the process in which the General Synod approved the resolution. Michael Downs of the United Church of Christ Pension Boards (who would be charged with implementing any divestment of the UCC's Pension Board investments) wrote a letter[27] to UCC President John Thomas expressing concern "with the precedent-setting implications of voted actions, integrity of process and trust."

LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence According to the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO), there are over a thousand federal laws that treat married people differently from single people. ... The initialism LGBT is used to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... In finance and economics, divestment or divestiture is the reduction of some kind of asset, for either financial or social goals. ... Separation barriers (separation walls, security fences) are constructed to limit the movement of people across a certain line or border or to separate two populations. ... The Simon Wiesenthal Center The Simon Wiesenthal Center is an international Jewish organization that declares itself to be a human rights group dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust by fostering tolerance and understanding through community involvement, educational outreach and social action. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Anti-Defamation League Logo The Anti-Defamation League (or ADL) is an advocacy group founded by Bnai Brith in the United States whose stated aim is to stop, by appeals to reason and conscience and, if necessary, by appeals to law, the defamation of the Jewish people. ...

Criticism of conservative critics

Leaders of the United Church of Christ have recently begun to issue criticism of the Institute for Religion and Democracy and groups associated with it. In a speech October 14, 2005, President John Thomas accused the IRD of becoming over-involved with conservatives within the UCC. He said, "In the midst of all of this we are increasingly aware of the challenge of groups within and beyond the United Church of Christ that claim to represent the call to honor theological diversity in the United Church of Christ, that encourage the voice of more conservative sisters and brothers among us, but which are in fact intent on disrupting and destroying our life together."[28] The Institute on Religion and Democracy (IRD) describes itself as an ecumenical alliance of U.S. Christians working to reform their churches social witness, in accord with biblical and historic Christian teachings, thereby contributing to the renewal of democratic society at home and abroad. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


At Gettysburg College on March 6, 2006, Thomas again warned against collusion with the IRD, calling called the IRD "a sophisticated 'inside the beltway' organization well funded by conservative foundations and closely aligned with a neo-conservative political agenda." Thomas criticized IRD's association with the Association of Church Renewal, with the Biblical Witness Fellowship, with "Welcoming and Faithful Movement" [sic], and the Simon Wiesenthal Center. Further, Thomas described IRD's modus operandi as follows: "The IRD pursues its political agenda in the churches through three strategies: campaigns of disinformation that seek to discredit church leadership, advocacy efforts at church assemblies seeking to influence church policy, and grass roots organizing which, in some cases, encourages schismatic movements encouraging members and congregations either to redirect mission funding or even to leave their denominations. Indeed, the Mainline churches are facing hardball tactics."[29] Following the speech, the Simon Wiesenthal Center denied any connection to the IRD and stated "John Thomas made some conspiratorial charges about the Wiesenthal Center at a recent speech at Gettysburg College. These charges are completely inaccurate and are not based on fact and the irresponsible nature of these comments should make reasonable people wonder if the leadership of the UCC is being equally irresponsible with the facts about the Middle-East."[30] Gettysburg College is a private national four-year liberal arts college founded in 1832, in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, adjacent to the famous battlefield. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Biblical Witness Fellowship is a conservative evangelical affinity group composed of members of the United Church of Christ. ... The Simon Wiesenthal Center The Simon Wiesenthal Center is an international Jewish organization that declares itself to be a human rights group dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust by fostering tolerance and understanding through community involvement, educational outreach and social action. ... Modus operandi (often used in the abbreviated form MO) is a Latin phrase, approximately translated as mode of operation. ... Disinformation, in the context of espionage, military intelligence, and propaganda, is the spreading of deliberately false information to mislead an enemy as to ones position or course of action. ... Grassroots democracy is the political processes which are driven by groups of ordinary citizens, as opposed to larger organisations or wealthy individuals with concentrated vested interests in particular policies. ... The word schism (IPA: or ), from the Greek σχίσμα, skhísma (from σχίζω, skhízō, to tear, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization or a movement. ... Hardball is a sports term used to distinguish baseball from its variant softball. ... The Simon Wiesenthal Center The Simon Wiesenthal Center is an international Jewish organization that declares itself to be a human rights group dedicated to preserving the memory of the Holocaust by fostering tolerance and understanding through community involvement, educational outreach and social action. ...


Faithful and Welcoming, one of these groups named by Thomas as being aligned with IRD, held their first annual gathering in August 2006 and invited the UCC leadership to dialogue on the future of conservatives and other non-liberals in the UCC. Shortly thereafter, the August–September issue of the United Church News was published during that included a pastoral letter by Thomas and point counterpoint articles by Bob Thompson[31] and Nancy Taylor[32] disagreeing over the goals of Faithful and Welcoming. Thomas' letter[33] does not take an explicit stand on FWC, but is clear that pastors within the UCC need to "distinguish loving critics from hurtful ones" and that not all conservative critics of UCC resolutions should be automatically associated with IRD. Taylor's ONA counterpoint explicitly stated "Thompson is not a loving critic." In music, counterpoint is a texture involving the simultaneous sounding of separate melodies or lines against each other. ...


However, Faithful and Welcoming is not and was not aligned with IRD. This controversy stemmed from a short-lived link to IRD inadvertently posted on the FWC website's links page. This link was not representative of an association or alignment with IRD.


Thomas' letter said:

It is clear that we face two kinds of critics today. There are many loving critics who care deeply for this church, seek ways to support it, and yearn for its growth and vitality. They find themselves in dissent from some of the positions of the General Synod and its leaders, finding in the Bible and the church's tradition differing understandings of how we are to view contemporary social and moral issues. We need to listen with care, humility and deep respect to these loving critics, assuring them of their honored place within the diverse life of this church, finding ways for them to support those aspects of our national and global ministries that they can fully embrace. We need to be open to the truth that they have spiritual insights to nurture, even challenge us toward greater faithfulness.


It's also the case that there are critics who do not love this church, who seek to disrupt, distract, diminish, even destroy our life. These critics, within and beyond, encourage local churches to withhold financial support of our wider ministries, offer advice and counsel on how to leave the denomination, establish parallel structures for the placement of clergy and the sending of mission personnel, and regularly disseminate deliberately misleading or false information about the denomination and its leaders. Those who love this church, and cherish its legacy, need to be clear in saying no to this form of critique which falls outside the bounds of acceptable Christian behavior.


Discerning between these two types of critics is one of the great challenges of leadership today. It requires a deep humility to embrace the loving critics, no matter how uncomfortable their critique may be, never saying, "I have no need of you." But it also requires the courage to name those whose actions are out of bounds, saying to those who would disrupt, distract, even destroy, "I will not let you damage what is precious or diminish a vocation that is a critical dimension of the Gospel witness." Such discernment is not easy. May God grant us the wisdom required for it, and the discipline to do it.

Thompson voices his contention that the UCC is attempting a realignment along the lines of "Tony Campolo's 1995 book, "Can Mainline Denominations Make a Comeback?" [that] advocated the "realignment" of denominations based on ideological lines." He says, "numerous individuals — along with entire congregations — have expressed interest in joining the UCC because of its bold pronouncements and extravagant welcome. More important than the numbers lost and gained, whatever they turn out to be, is this dual reality: those leaving the UCC more than likely consider themselves evangelical, conservative, orthodox, or traditional (ECOT) and those finding the UCC are likely liberal or progressive."… "We [FWC] do not seek to divide or disrupt. We are not a cover for an exit strategy. We are simply asking that our presence be recognized and valued." Tony Campolo Dr. Anthony Tony Campolo (born 1935) is a well-known American pastor, author, public speaker known for challenging Christians by illustrating how their faith can offer solutions in a world of complexity. ...


In response, Taylor writes, "while Thompson writes that his Faithful and Welcoming Churches "are not a cover for an exit strategy" from the UCC, his activities tell a different story" she lists several including that "Thompson's own church, Corinth Reformed Church (http://www.corinthtoday.org) in Hickory, N.C., has dropped UCC from its name and the FWC website encourages other UCC congregations to drop UCC from their names. Moreover, his church has scheduled a congregational vote for September 9, 2007 regarding its continued UCC affiliation." She further criticizes Thompson for his church's withholding of OCWM funds, and concludes, "Thompson is not a loving critic."


General Synod 26

In 2007, the UCC will hold its General Synod 26., and will also celebrate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the denomination. The General Synod 26 is currently slated to occur in Hartford, Connecticut, but labor disputes at its convention center prompted moving the venue to the older Hartford Civic Center with cooperation from the State of Connecticut. According to Edith Guffey, Associate General Minister, "They told me that the governor (Jodi Rell) wants very much to make this work, and that they will be taking care of the $100,000 fee for the Civic Center."[34]. This deal raised enough controversy to prompt Americans United for Separation of Church and State (led by the Rev. Barry Lynn, himself a UCC minister) to investigate the arrangements. In October 2006, Rev. Lynn expressed his "concern" over the arrangement, [41] but AU apparently opted to take no action. Nickname: Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , Country United States State Connecticut NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Named 1637 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1896 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Eddie Perez Area  - City  18. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Categories: Stub | 1946 births | Governors of Connecticut ...


Current issues for GS 26 will also include another significant restructure of the national offices due to "financial woes."[35] The United Church News termed these "sweeping changes that, if enacted, could substantially alter the way the national church is governed. The Collegium is suggesting an examination of the 'size, number and role' of the Covenanted Ministry boards and the Executive Council, the size and design of the Collegium of Officers, the assignment of national work and staffing settings, and the role of the general minister and president."[36] As of November 15, 2006, two of the four Covenanted Ministries (WCM and OGM) have expressed support for the proposal, while the LCM and JWM voiced significant reservations, if not outright opposition, at recent board meetings. is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


It should be noted that the UCC is not the only church body experiencing such problems; other mainline denominations, such as the Presbyterian Church (USA), have in recent years experienced sharp downturns in receipts from lower bodies, due to increased designated giving and membership losses, combined with increased distrust of national and regional judicatories from laypeople of all theological viewpoints. Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ...


The 2007 General Synod is advertising "Synod in the City," an outdoor bazaar that features speakers, street musicians, and circus acts. Several notable speakers have been advertised as follow:Synod Handbook Synod in the City Guide The Grand Timcheh of Qoms Bazaar. ...

  • Marian Wright Edelman -- president and founder of the Children's Defense Fund
  • Lynn Redgrave -- two-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning English actress born into the famous Redgrave acting family
  • The Most Rev. Peter Rosazza, Auxiliary Bishop of the Diocese of Hartford
  • Dr. Mary Mikhael, President, Near East School of Theology, Beirut, Lebanon
  • Bill Moyers -- an American journalist and public commentator.
  • Rabbi Naamah Kelman of Jerusalem
  • Ingrid Mattson, Professor of Islamic Studies at Hartford University
  • Chung Hyun Kyung
  • Walter Brueggemann -- "Prominent, engaging and insightful Old Testament scholar and prolific author."
  • He Qi - artist
  • Marilynne Robinson Author
  • Ricardo Esquivia -- "founder of Justapaz, Sembrandopaz and more than 150 peace groups"
  • Renita Weems -- "Acclaimed author on women’s spirituality and wholeness"
  • John Hockenberry Peabody and Emmy award-winning journalist, current Dateline NBC correspondent.
  • Leonard Pitts Jr. -- Syndicated Columnist
  • Kevin Phillips -- "One of America’s foremost political historians, author of American Theocracy."
  • Rachel Barton Pine -- violinist
  • Maria Otero -- "an expert on reaching the poor through global microfinance."
  • Charles McCullough -- Poet, sculptor and minister
  • Dave Anderson -- the namesake of Famous Dave's BBQ tells his story
  • Senator Barack Obama -- "The Illinois senator, 2008 presidential candidate and UCC member addresses his church."
  • Ray Kurzweil Scientist and futurist
  • Harry Knox -- "Human rights advocate who helped create a 22 state network of progressive clergy."
  • Billy Mills -- "The first and only American to win an Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 m. race (1964),"
  • Pauline Chen -- "Surgeon and author, winner of George Longstreth Humanness Award."
  • Susan Thistlethwaite -- Chicago Theological Seminary president and author.
  • The Rev. Peter Gomes -- Scholar, author, theologian and Harvard University’s Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Award winner in 2001
  • Danah Boyd -- technologist
  • Elaine Meryl Brown -- An Emmy award-winning writer and a Vice President at HBO
  • Joy Harjo -- an American poet, musician, and author of Native American ancestry
  • DJ Davey D a Hip Hop historian, journalist, deejay, and community activist.

Marian Wright Edelman (born June 6, 1939) is the president and founder of the Childrens Defense Fund. ... The Childrens Defense Fund is a child advocacy group. ... Lynn Rachel Redgrave OBE (born 8 March 1943 in London) is an English actress born into the famous acting Redgrave family. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... This article is about the Redgrave family of actors and actresses. ... The Near East School of Theology (NEST) is an interdenominational Protestant theological seminary serving the Evangelical churches of the Middle East and African churches, and is once again able to accommodate international students who have a special interest in Biblical and Islamic studies in a Middle Eastern context or those... There is also a drinking game alternately refered to as Beirut or Beer Pong. ... Bill Moyers Bill D. Moyers (born June 5, 1934 as Billy Don Moyers) is an American journalist and socialist public commentator. ... Ingrid Mattson, Ph. ... The University of Hartford, often called UHA or UHart, was founded in 1877, and is a private, independent, and nonsectarian coeducational university located in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... Chung Hyun Kyung is a Korean theologian In 1990, she introduced Asian womens theology with her book Struggle to be the Sun Again. ... Walter Brueggemann (b. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and to make a clear distinction between fact and fiction, this article may require cleanup. ... Marilynne Robinson (born 1947) is an American author. ... John Hockenberry (b. ... Leonard Pitts is a nationally-syndicated columnist based in Miami. ... Kevin Phillips (born November 30, 1940) is an American writer and commentator, largely on politics, economics, and history. ... American Theocracy: The Peril and Politics of Radical Religion, Oil, and Borrowed Money in the 21st Century (ISBN 0-670-03486-X) is the latest work of political commentary by American political writer Kevin Phillips. ... Rachel Barton Pine Rachel Barton Pine (born October 11, 1974) is a violinist from Chicago. ... Microfinance is a term for the practice of providing financial services, such as microcredit, microsavings or microinsurance to poor people. ... Famous Daves Legendary Pit Bar-B-Que, formerly Famous Daves Bar-B-Que Shack, is a chain of southern-style barbecue restaurants serving pork ribs, chicken, and beef brisket. ... Famous Daves Legendary Pit Bar-B-Que, formerly Famous Daves Bar-B-Que Shack, is a chain of southern-style barbecue restaurants serving pork ribs, chicken, and beef brisket. ... “Obama” redirects here. ... Dr. Raymond Kurzweil (born February 12, 1948) is a pioneer in the fields of optical character recognition (OCR), text-to-speech synthesis, speech recognition technology, and electronic musical keyboards. ... For the Irish poet, see Billy Mills (poet) William Billy Mills (born June 30, 1938) is the only American ever to win an Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 m run which he did at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. ... Peter John Gomes is a prominent African American preacher and theologian at Harvard Universitys Divinity School. ... Danah Boyd at the Web 2. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is a premium cable television network with headquarters in New York City. ... Joy Harjo (b. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ...

Obama's membership at Trinity UCC Chicago

According to the UCC.org website [42]:

U.S. Sen. Barack Obama says he has been deeply influenced by his church, Trinity UCC on Chicago's South Side, and its senior pastor, Jeremiah Wright. But that connection is now generating political controversy for Obama's presidential campaign. Conservative bloggers and pundits have raised concerns about Wright's Afrocentric theology and his liberal -- some say radical -- politics. “Obama” redirects here. ... Reverend Dr. Jeremiah A. Wright, Jr. ...

Dr. Wright's self-described "self-determination" views, "from the principles of Kawaida, the second principle being Kuji Salawi" are seen by some as Black separatism. This is a source of controversy for Obama as he has publicized his membership in this Christian church in response to debunked claims that he is a Muslim.[43] Although some have pointed to the Clinton campaign as the source of these questions [44], it has never been confirmed and has been denied by her campaign[45]. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Black separatism is a separatist political movement that seeks a separate homeland for black people, particularly African-Americans. ...


Barack Obama was invited to speak at the Iowa Conference meeting and also at the General Synod 26 a week later in Hartford Connecicut. In the final days before the General Synod 26, The American Spectator published a piece by conservative UCC member Jeffrey Lord called "Sharing a Church With Barack" where Lord challenged Senator Obama to address the liberal dominance National Offices and use his speaking opportunity within the Synod to "'turn the page on the kind of politics' UCC members have had to endure not for six years but almost fifty. The old politics of the UCC has lost members, entire churches, and millions of dollars in contributions that could easily have been targeted to help seriously suffering human beings but were used instead to fund church bureaucrats lusting for the earthly pleasure of wielding political power. The dissenters do indeed "want a new kind of politics and a new kind of governance" in the United Church of Christ." Lord challenged Senator Obama "to say anything approaching this to the liberal hierarchy of the United Church of Christ would instantly give him credibility as a politician of creativity and courage, unafraid to "speak truth to power" about the revolution stirring in the midst of his own church, to seriously walk the talk of his campaign rhetoric. But will he have that courage? Will my fellow UCC member actually stand up in a Hartford convention arena filled with a dwindling band of elitist mainline Protestant liberals and have the nerve to apply what he's saying in his presidential campaign to his own church?" [46] The American Spectator magazine. ...


Ecumenical relations

The United Church of Christ is in a relationship of full communion with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the Presbyterian Church (USA), and the Reformed Church in America through a formal declaration known as the Formula of Agreement, with the Union Evangelischer Kirchen (Union of Evangelical Churches) in Germany, and with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) through an ecumenical partnership. The church is a founding member of Churches Uniting in Christ and is in dialogue about deeper relations with the Alliance of Baptists. It is a member of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA (NCC), the World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC), and the World Council of Churches. The UCC also allies with other denominations in support of Church World Service efforts in domestic and foreign development and relief efforts. Full communion is completeness of that relationship between Christian individuals and groups which is known as communion. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... The Reformed Church in America (RCA) is a mainline Reformed Protestant denomination that was formerly known as the Dutch Reformed Church. ... Union Evangelischer Kirchen (UEK) is an organisation of 13 united and reformed evangelical churches in Germany, which are all member churches of the German EKD. // Evangelical Church of Anhalt: Evangelische Landeskirche Anhalts Evangelical Church in Baden: Evangelische Landeskirche in Baden Evangelical Church of Berlin-Brandenburg-Silesian Upper Lusatia: Evangelische Kirche... The insignia of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). ... Churches Uniting in Christ (CUIC) brings together nine mainline American denominations (including both predominantly white and predominantly black churches), and was inaugurated on January 20, 2002. ... The Alliance of Baptists is a fellowship of Baptist churches and individuals. ... The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (usually identified as National Council of Churches, or NCC) is an association of 35 Christian faith groups in the United States with 100,000 local congregations and more than 45,000,000 adherents. ... The World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC) is a fellowship of more than 200 churches with roots in the 16th-century Reformation. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ... Church World Service is the relief, development, and refugee assistance ministry of 36 Protestant, Orthodox, and Anglican denominations in the United States. ...


United Church of Christ institutions

Officially related educational institutions

Seminaries

Andover Newton Theological School, the oldest graduate school of theology in the United States, traces its roots to the early 1800s and the desire for a well-educated clergy among both Congregationalists and Baptists. ... Newton Centre is a village of Newton, Massachusetts. ... Bangor Theological Seminary is an ecumenical seminary, founded in 1814, in the Congregational tradition of the United Church of Christ. ... This article is about the Maine, USA city of Bangor. ... Chicago Theological Seminary is an ecumenical seminary of the United Church of Christ. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Eden Theological Seminary is a seminary of the United Church of Christ. ... Webster Groves is a city in St. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... Lancaster Theological Seminary is a seminary of the United Church of Christ. ... Nickname: Location of Lancaster County in Pennsylvania Location of Lancaster in Lancaster County Country United States State Pennsylvania County Lancaster Founded 1730 Incorporated March 10, 1818 Government  - Mayor Rick Gray (D) Area  - City  7. ... The Pacific School of Religion is an ecumenical seminary, affiliated with the United Church of Christ and the United Methodist Church, training clergy from twenty-four religious traditions, located in Berkeley, CA. External links PSR home page Categories: School stubs ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern California, in the United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Colleges and universities

These 19 schools have affirmed the purposes of the United Church of Christ Council for Higher Education by official action and are full members of the Council.

Catawba College official seal Catawba College, founded in 1851, is a private, coeducational liberal arts college in Salisbury, North Carolina, USA. It is the sixth oldest college in North Carolina, and is affiliated with the United Church of Christ. ... Image:Dtsalisbury1. ... Deaconess College of Nursing is a for profit nursing school in St. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Defiance College is a independent co-educational 4-year liberal-arts college located on a 150 acre campus in a beautiful residential area of small town Defiance, Ohio, United States. ... Defiance is a city located in northwestern Ohio, in Defiance County, about 55 miles southwest of Toledo. ... Dillard University is a private, faith based liberal arts college in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Nickname: Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718 Government  - Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area  - City  350. ... Doane College is a private liberal arts college in Crete, Nebraska, with satellite learning centers in Lincoln and Grand Island. ... Crete is a city in Saline County, Nebraska, United States. ... Drury University is a private liberal arts college in Springfield, Missouri. ... Springfield is the third largest city in Missouri. ... Elmhurst College was founded in 1871. ... Incorporated Village in 1982. ... Elon University is a private, liberal arts university located in Elon, North Carolina. ... Elon (also known as Elon College) is a town located in Alamance County, North Carolina. ... Heidelberg College is a small liberal arts college in Tiffin, Ohio. ... Tiffin is a city in Seneca County, Ohio, United States. ... Huston-Tillotson University is a historically black university in Austin, Texas. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: , Country United States State Texas Counties Travis County Government  - Mayor Will Wynn Area  - City  296. ... Illinois College is a private liberal arts college affiliated with the United Church of Christ and the Presbyterian Church (USA); it is located in Jacksonville, Illinois. ... Jacksonville is a city in Morgan County, Illinois, United States. ... Lakeland College Seal Lakeland College is a liberal arts college located in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin west of Howards Grove. ... Sheboygan is the county seat of Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, United States. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Northland College is a small, coeducational, liberal arts college in Ashland, Wisconsin, USA. Initially founded as the North Wisconsin Academy in 1892, the college was established in 1906. ... Location of Ashland, Wisconsin Coordinates: Country United States State Wisconsin Counties Ashland / Bayfield Government  - Mayor Ed Monroe Area  - City 13. ... Olivet College is a liberal arts college located in the city of Olivet in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Olivet is a city in Eaton County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Pacific University is a private university located in Forest Grove, Oregon, United States about 40 minutes west of Portland. ... Forest Grove is a city located in Washington County 25 miles west of Portland, Oregon. ... Piedmont College is a private, church-affiliated liberal arts institution in the historic northeast Georgia town of Demorest. ... Demorest is a city located in Habersham County, Georgia. ... Rocky Mountain College, Montanas oldest and first institution of higher learning, founded in 1878 eleven years prior to statehood, is a private comprehensive college offering over 25 liberal arts and professionally oriented majors. ... Motto: Star of the Big Sky Country Location in Montana Coordinates: County Yellowstone County Founded 1877 Incorporated 1882 Government  - Mayor Ronald Tussing Area  - City 106 km²  (41 sq mi)  - Water 0. ... Talladega College is Alabamas oldest private, historically black, liberal arts college. ... Talladega is a city located in Talladega County, Alabama. ... Tougaloo College is a private, co-educational, liberal arts institution of higher education founded in 1869, in Madison County, on the northern edge of Jackson, Mississippi. ...

Secondary academies

Woodstock is a town located in Shenandoah County, Virginia. ... Mercersburg Academy is an independent, coeducational boarding school for grades 9-12 located in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Mercersburg is a borough located in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, 73 miles (117 km) southwest of Harrisburg. ...

Historically related educational institutions

Historically related seminaries

Hartford Seminary is a theological college in Hartford, Connecticut, USA. Hartford Seminarys origins date from 1833, when the Pastoral Union of Connecticut was formed by a group of Congregational ministers for pastoral training. ... Nickname: Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , Country United States State Connecticut NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Named 1637 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1896 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Eddie Perez Area  - City  18. ... Harvard Divinity School is one of the constituent schools of Harvard University, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Howard University is a Carnegie Doctoral/Research extensive historically black university in [[Washington, D.C.] Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named after Oliver O. Howard. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... The Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) is a Christian, an independent, non-profit, coeducational ecumenical, graduate professional school of theology. ... Hotlanta redirects here. ... Nickname: Location of San Juan within the island of Puerto Rico Coordinates: Country United States Territory Puerto Rico Founded 1508/1521 Area  - City 76. ... The tower at Union Theological Seminary Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York is a preeminent independent graduate school of theology, located in the citys burrough of Manhattan. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA New Haven Region South Central Region Settled 1638 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1895 Government  - Type Mayor-board of aldermen  - Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ...

Historically related colleges and universities (Council for Higher Education)

"These colleges continue to relate to the United Church of Christ through the Council for Higher Education, but chose not to affirm the purposes of the Council. Though in many respects similar to the colleges and universities that have full membership in the Council, these institutions tend to be less intentional about their relationships with the United Church of Christ." (from the United Church of Christ website)

Beloit College is a liberal arts college in Beloit, Wisconsin and a member of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest. ... Nickname: Location of Beloit in Wisconsin Coordinates: , Country United States State Wisconsin County Rock Founded 1836 Incorporated February 24, 1846 (village) March 31, 1856 (city) Government  - Manager Larry Arft  - City Attorney Tom Casper  - City Council Martin Densch (President) Kevin Leavy (V. President) Terrence T. Monahan Joel Patch Douglas Eddy Chad... Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ... Northfield is a city in Rice County, Minnesota. ... Cedar Crest College is a private liberal arts college for women located in Allentown, Pennsylvania, in the United States. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Semper Tyrannis Pennsylvanias location in the United States Allentowns location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Lehigh Founded 1762 Government  - Mayor Ed Pawlowski Area  - City  18. ... Fisk University is a historically black university in Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. It was established by John Ogden, Reverend Erastus Milo Cravath and Reverend Edward P. Smith and named in honor of General Clinton B. Fisk of the Tennessee Freedmens Bureau. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ... Franklin and Marshall College is a four-year private co-educational liberal arts college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. ... Nickname: Location of Lancaster County in Pennsylvania Location of Lancaster in Lancaster County Country United States State Pennsylvania County Lancaster Founded 1730 Incorporated March 10, 1818 Government  - Mayor Rick Gray (D) Area  - City  7. ... Grinnell College is a small liberal arts college in Grinnell, Iowa. ... Grinnell is a city located in Poweshiek County, Iowa. ... Hood College is a co-educational liberal arts college located in Frederick, Maryland. ... Location in Maryland Coordinates: , Country United States State Maryland County Frederick Founded 1745 Government  - Mayor William J. Holtzinger (R)  - Board of Alderman Marcia Hall (D) Alan E. Imhoff (R) David P. Koontz (D) Donna K. Ramsburg (D) C. Paul Smith (R) Area  - City  20. ... // Ripon College is a liberal arts college in Ripon, Wisconsin, USA. It was founded in 1851, but its first class of students did not enroll until 1853. ... Ripon is a city located in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. ... Ursinus College is a small, coeducational, liberal arts college in Collegeville, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. ... Collegeville is a borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 25 miles (40 km) northwest of Philadelphia on the Perkiomen Creek. ... Westminster College, Salt Lake City, or simply Westminster College is a four year accredited liberal arts college located in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. It also offers four graduate programs. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ...

Other historical colleges and universities (unrelated)

These colleges and universities no longer maintain any relationship to the United Church of Christ, but were founded by or otherwise related historically to the denomination or its predecessors.

Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA New Haven Region South Central Region Settled 1638 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1895 Government  - Type Mayor-board of aldermen  - Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ... Rollins College is an institution of higher learning located in Winter Park, Florida. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... New College of Florida is a highly selective public liberal arts college located in Sarasota, Florida. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Oberlin College is a small, selective liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ... Oberlin is a city in Lorain County, Ohio, to the south and west of Cleveland. ... The Smith Campus Center Fountain at Pomona College during the inauguration of College President David Oxtoby Pomona College is a private residential liberal arts college located 33 miles (53 km) east of downtown Los Angeles in Claremont, California. ... Claremont is a city in eastern Los Angeles County, California, USA, about 30 miles (45 km) east of downtown Los Angeles at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains in the Pomona Valley. ...

List of famous UCC members or attendees

This section lists notable people known to have been raised in or current members of the United Church of Christ or its predecessor denominations.

[53] Abigail Smith Adams she was (November 11, 1744 – October 28, 1818) was the wife of John Adams, the second President of the United States, and is seen as the second First Lady of the United States though that term was not coined until after her death. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) served as Americas first Vice President (1789–1797) and as its second President (1797–1801). ... Events April 16 - The London premiere of Alcina by George Frideric Handel, his first the first Italian opera for the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Daniel Kahikina Dan Akaka (Chinese: 阿卡卡 李碩, Hanyu pinyin: akaka lishuo) (born September 11, 1924) is a U.S. Senator from HawaiÊ»i and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Max Sieben Baucus (b. ... Julian Bond (2004) Horace Julian Bond (born January 14, 1940 in Nashville, Tennessee) is an American leader of the American Civil Rights Movement. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... Walter Brueggemann (b. ... Columbia Theological Seminary is one of the ten official Presbyterian Church (USA) seminaries. ... Rev. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Lonnie Rashid Lynn, Jr. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is the Governor of New Jersey. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Donald Hall (born September 20, 1928) is an American poet and the U.S. Poet Laureate. ... The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress is appointed by the United States Librarian of Congress and earns a stipend of $35,000 a year. ... Mills Edwin Godwin, Jr. ... Daniel Robert Graham (born November 9, 1936) is an American politician. ... Judd Gregg (born February 1947) is a former Governor of New Hampshire and current United States Senator were he serves as ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee. ... James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934 in Rutland, Vermont) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ... Dean Ray Koontz (born July 9, 1945 in Everett, Pennsylvania), also known under a number of pseudonyms, including Leigh Nichols, is an American writer. ... John Williamson Nevin (February 20, 1803 - June 6, 1886), American theologian and educationalist, was born on Herrons Branch, near Shippensburg, Franklin county, Pennsylvania. ... “Obama” redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Robert Orr may refer to one of several people: Robert F. Orr, an American judge. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Helmut Richard Niebuhr (1894-1962) was an American Christian ethicist best known for his 1951 book Christ and Culture and his 1960 book Radical Monotheism and Western Culture. ... Karl Paul Reinhold Niebuhr (June 21, 1892 – June 1, 1971) was a Protestant theologian best known for his study of the task of relating the Christian faith to the reality of modern politics and diplomacy. ... Sally Pederson is the current Lieutenant Governor of the state of Iowa. ... Leonard Pitts is a nationally-syndicated columnist based in Miami. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Marilynne Robinson (born 1947) is an American author. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Gilead is a novel written by Marilynne Robinson and published in 2004. ... Philip Schaff (January 1, 1819-1893), was a Swiss-born, German-educated theologian and a historian of the Christian church, who, after his education, lived and taught in the United States. ... George Smathers George Armistead Smathers (born November 14, 1913) is an American lawyer and politician who represented Florida in the United States Senate for eighteen years, from 1951 until 1969, as a member of the Democratic Party. ... Max L. Stackhouse is a notable professor at Princeton Theological Seminary. ... The steeple of Alexander Hall Princeton Theological Seminary is a theological seminary located in the Borough of Princeton, New Jersey in the United States. ... Bill McKinney is the current President and Professor of American Religion of the Pacific School of Religion (PSR) in Berkeley, California, the oldest theological seminary in the American West. ... Paul Johannes Tillich (August 20, 1886 – October 22, 1965) was a German-American theologian and Christian existentialist philosopher. ... Andrew Jackson Young, Jr. ...


List of UCC people notable only within the denomination

This section lists theologians and other UCC clergy and laypeople that are notable within the denomination but that may have little name recognition outside the denomination[37].

Presidents (year order)
  • James E. Wagner & Fred Hoskins — UCC co-presidents (1957–1961)[38]
  • Ben M. Herbster — UCC president (1961–1969)
  • Robert Moss, Jr. — UCC president (1969–1976) and author of the Moss Adaptation of the UCC statement of Faith[39].
  • Joseph H. Evans — UCC president (1976–1977)
  • Avery Post — UCC President (1977–1989)
  • Paul Sherry — UCC President (1989–1999)
  • John H. Thomas — UCC president (1999–present)
Others (alphabetical order)
  • Ron Buford — coordinator of The Stillspeaking Initiative and former advertising manager for United Church News[40].
  • Gabriel Fackre — Theologian; president, Confessing Christ; Abbot Professor of Christian Theology Emeritus, Andover Newton Theological School
  • J. Bennett Guess — Editor of United Church News, the denominational newspaper
  • Edith Guffey — Associate General Minister
  • Louis Gunnemann — UCC polity theologian and former dean of United Theological Seminary (Twin Cities)
  • Douglas Horton — Ecumenist, Minister and General Secretary of the General Council of Congregational Christian Churches, translator of Karl Barth into English, and early force in the formation of the UCC[41].
  • Rev. William Hulteen — 25-year veteran of the former national "Office for Church Life and Leadership" (OCLL) and spokesman for issues of "ordained and lay leadership, theological reflection and education, clergy placement, worship and spirituality, and congregational life" [42].
  • M. Linda Jaramillo — Executive Minister for Justice and Witness Ministries (JWM)
  • José Malayang — Executive Minister for Local Church Ministries (LCM)
  • Rev. Otis Moss III — Pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago
  • Elizabeth Nordbeck — Professor of Ecclesiastical History and 11-year dean at Andover Newton Theological School. co-editor of Prism, a UCC denominational journal[43][44].
  • Charles Shelby Rooks — influential UCC pastor and scholar who, as president of Chicago Theological Seminary from 1974 to 1984, was the first African American to lead a predominantly Euro-American theological school[45].
  • David Runnion-Bareford — Executive Director of Biblical Witness Fellowship since 1994; pastor, Congregational Church, Candia, New Hampshire
  • Rev. Mr. Reuben Sheares
  • Nancy S. Taylor — frequent denominational commentator, former Massachusets Conference minister, and presently pastor of the historic Old South Church in Boston[46][47]
  • Susan Thistlethwaite — President and Professor of Theology, Chicago Theological Seminary [48]
  • Rev. Bob Thompson, president of Faithful and Welcoming Churches [49]; pastor, Corinth Reformed Church, Hickory, North Carolina
  • Frederick R. Trost — founding convenor of Confessing Christ; former Conference Minister, Wisconsin Conference [50]
  • Cally Rogers-Witte — Executive Minister for Wider Church Ministries (WCM)
  • Rev. Jeremiah Wright — Senior Pastor of the 10000-plus-member Trinity United Church of Christ, a predominantly African American Chicago congregation.
  • Barbara Brown Zikmund — church historian (Hidden Histories) and President of Hartford Seminary; unsuccessful candidate for General Minister position in 1999.

James Elvin Wagner (1873–1962?) was a U.S. clergyman. ... Polity is a general term that refers to political organization of a group. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Ecumenism (also oecumenism, Å“cumenism... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Karl Barth. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Candia is a town located in Rockingham County, New Hampshire. ... Interior of the Old South Church. ... Nickname: HKY, 828, Hicktown, Furniture Capitol of the World Location in the U.S. state of North Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State North Carolina County Catawba County, North Carolina  - Mayor G. Rudy Wright, Jr. ... Reverend Dr. Jeremiah A. Wright, Jr. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ...

Acronyms

Many acronyms are used within the UCC in place of common phrases: It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Backronym and Apronym (Discuss) Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations, such as NATO, laser, and ABC, written as the initial letter or letters of words, and pronounced on the basis of this abbreviated written form. ...

  • ANTS - Andover Newton Theological School
  • AUCE - Association of United Church Educators
  • BWF - Biblical Witness Fellowship
  • CAIM - Council for American Indian Ministry
  • CC - Congregational Christian
  • CCHS - Congregational Christian Historical Society
  • CCM - Council of Conference Ministers
  • CE - Council for Ecumenism
  • CHE - Council for Higher Education
  • CHHSM - Council for Health and Human Service Ministries
  • CHM - Council for Hispanic Ministries
  • CR - Collegium Relationship Committee
  • CJA - Christians for Justice Action
  • COCU - Consultation on Church Union
  • COREM - Council for Racial and Ethnic Ministries
  • CUCCIAB - Conferences of the United Church of Christ Insurance Advisory Board
  • CUE - Mid-America Seminaries, Chicago, United, and Eden
  • CYYAM - Council on Youth and Young Adult Ministry
  • E&R - Evangelical and Reformed
  • EC - Executive Council
  • ECOT - evangelical, conservative, orthodox, traditional -- an acronym claimed to be invented by FWC to define contradistinction to "progressive" and "fundamentalist" wings of the UCC
  • EMR/EMRFA - Equal Marriage Rights resolution of GS25
  • EP&P - Evaluation, Planning, and Policy Committee
  • ERHS - Evangelical and Reformed Historical Society
  • FWC - Faithful And Welcoming Churches
  • GISS - God is still speaking, (theme for UCC ad campaign)
  • GS - General Synod
  • GS25 - General Synod 25 held in 2005, approved the EMR
  • JWM - Justice and Witness Ministries
  • HC - Historical Council
  • LCM - Local Church Ministries
  • MRSEJ - Ministers for Racial, Social, and Economic Justice (often referred to verbally as "Missus [MRS.] E.J.")
  • NCCC - National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA
  • OCCL - Office for Church Life and Leadership (defunct office under pre-2000 reorganization
  • OGM - Office of General Ministries
  • OL - Organizational Life Committee
  • ONA - Open And Affirming
  • PAAM - Pacific Islander and Asian American Ministries
  • PB - Pension Boards
  • PPC-25 - Program and Planning Committee of the Twenty-fifth General Synod
  • TSI - The Still Speaking Initiative (UCC ad campaign)
  • UBC - United Black Christians
  • UCC - United Church of Christ
  • UCCDM - UCC Disabilities Ministries
  • UCCLGBTC - United Church Coalition for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Concerns
  • UCF - United Church Foundation
  • WCM - Wider Church Ministries
  • WARC - World Alliance of Reformed Churches
  • WCC - World Council of Churches

Biblical Witness Fellowship is a conservative evangelical affinity group composed of members of the United Church of Christ. ... Example from UCC media branding campaign God is still speaking, also known as The Stillspeaking Initiative, is the name of the identity, branding, and advertising campaign of the United Church of Christ that was launched in 2004. ... Justice and Witness Ministries (JWM) is one of five covenanted ministries of the United Church of Christ. ... The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (usually identified as National Council of Churches, or NCC) is a religious organization currently (2006) consisting of 35 Protestant, Anglican, Orthodox, African-American and historic Christian denominations in the United States, and is widely regarded as a leading force... ... The World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC) is a fellowship of more than 200 churches with roots in the 16th-century Reformation. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ...

See also

Religion Portal

Image File history File links P_religion_world. ... Churches Uniting in Christ (CUIC) brings together nine mainline American denominations (including both predominantly white and predominantly black churches), and was inaugurated on January 20, 2002. ... As of Fall 2005 there are 39 Conferences in the United Church of Christ, listed below alongside the conference minister of each. ... Most of the thirty-nine conferences of the United Church of Christ are subdivided into associations, which are themselves made of local churches. ... Formed in 1853 with the gift of 56 books from its owners personal collections, the Congregational Library now holds 225,000 items documenting the history of one of the nations oldest and most influential religious traditions. ...

References

  1. ^ Famous members of the Christian Churches and Churches of Christ. Adherents.com (2005-10-17). Retrieved on 2006-12-24.
  2. ^ Hidden Histories in the United Church of Christ. ucc.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-24.
  3. ^ Constitution and Bylaws of the United Church of Christ. ucc.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-24.
  4. ^ Lang, Andy (April 2001). Denominational identity still important. ucc.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-24.
  5. ^ Smith, Peter (2006-11-05). United Church of Christ Divided. courier-journal.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-24.
  6. ^ Fowler, Sidney D.; Marjorie H. Royle (2005-06-27). Worshiping into God's Future: Summaries and Strategies 2005 (.pdf). ucc.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ [2]
  9. ^ [3]
  10. ^ [4]
  11. ^ [5]
  12. ^ A United Church OF Christ Response to Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry. ucc.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-26.
  13. ^ Winslow, William (July-August 2003). UCC leader asks for $1 billion in annual giving by 2007. ucc.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  14. ^ Thomas, John. National Evangelism Event. ucc.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  15. ^ [6]
  16. ^ [7]
  17. ^ [8]
  18. ^ [9]
  19. ^ [10]
  20. ^ [11], pp. 1, 7.
  21. ^ [12]
  22. ^ Guess, J. Bennett (2006-03-21). Details of UCC's new TV ad emerge earlier than planned. ucc.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  23. ^ [13]
  24. ^ [14]
  25. ^ Simon WIESENTHAL Center.
  26. ^ Anti-Defamation League.
  27. ^ [15].
  28. ^ [16]
  29. ^ [17]
  30. ^ [18]
  31. ^ THOMPSON, Bob.
  32. ^ TAYLOR, Nancy.
  33. ^ Thomas’ letter, 2006 Sept.
  34. ^ Cohen, Jeffrey. "Church Picks City After All", Courant.com, 2006-06-03. Retrieved on 2006-12-26. 
  35. ^ [19]
  36. ^ [20]
  37. ^ [21]
  38. ^ A list of world religious organizations. worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  39. ^ Moss, Robert (1976). An Adaptation of the Statement of Faith Of the United Church of Christ. plymouthchurch.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  40. ^ [22]
  41. ^ [23]
  42. ^ [24]
  43. ^ [25]
  44. ^ [26]
  45. ^ [27]
  46. ^ [28]
  47. ^ [29]
  48. ^ [30]
  49. ^ [31]
  50. ^ [32]
  • Dewan, Shalia. "United Church of Christ Backs Same-Sex Marriage". New York Times. 5 July 2005.
  1. ^  J. Bennett Guess, "Since newsworthy General Synod, UCC reports both positive, negative fallout", United Church News, online edition, accessed 28 January 2006 at <http://news.ucc.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=440&Itemid=1>.

Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 6 days remaining in the year. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Denominational Websites:

Websites of groups/caucuses with Executive Council Seats:

  • United Church of Christ Coalition for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Concerns (The Coalition)
  • United Black Christians (UBC)
  • Council for American Indian Ministry (CAIM)
  • Ministers for Racial, Social, and Economic Justice (MRSEJ)
  • UCC Disabilities Ministries
  • Council for Youth and Young Adult Ministries (CYYAM)

Websites of UCC-related groups (including professional associations and other caucuses):

  • Association of United Church Educators
  • Council for Health and Human Services Ministries
  • UCC Musicians Association
  • UCC Musicians Network

Websites of unofficial but notable UCC groups (including dissent groups, renewal groups, and prophetic groups):

  • Biblical Witness Fellowship
  • Confessing Christ
  • Faithful and Welcoming Churches
  • Order of Corpus Christi
  • Outdoor Ministry Association
  • UCC Truths
  • UCC Unity

  Results from FactBites:
 
Churches Uniting in Christ - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (315 words)
Churches Uniting in Christ (CUIC) brings together nine mainline American denominations (including both predominantly white and predominantly fl churches), and was inaugurated on January 20, 2002.
However, the Presbyterian Church USA was unwilling to implement some of the changes to its internal rules that this model would require, and the Episcopal Church did not feel able to participate at the time.
CUIC is not a merger, but rather an intercommunion agreement whereby each member recognizes the others as part of the true church, and recognizes its rites (baptism, communion) as valid.
United Church of Christ - definition of United Church of Christ in Encyclopedia (502 words)
The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States, formed in 1957 by the merger of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches.
The United Church of Christ is in partnership with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and in a continuing dialogue with the Alliance of Baptists.
The Church is in a relationship of full communion with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the Reformed Church in America, and the Presbyterian Church (USA) through a formal declaration known as the Formula of Agreement.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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