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Encyclopedia > Union for French Democracy
Union pour la démocratie française
Leader François Bayrou
Founded 1978
Headquarters UDF 133 bis, rue de l'Université

75007 Paris-1... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ...

Political Ideology Centrism, Social liberalism, Christian Democracy
European Affiliation European Democratic Party
International Affiliation Alliance of American and European Democrats
Colours Orange
The 2007 Presidential Election Candidate François Bayrou
Website www.udf.org
See also Constitution of France

France Politics
French Parliament
French Government
French President
Political parties
Elections In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... Social liberalism is either a synonym for new liberalism or a label used by progressive liberal parties in order to differentiate themselves from the more conservative liberal parties, especially when there are two or more liberal parties in a country. ... Christian Democracy is a heterogeneous political ideology and movement. ... For the eurosceptic informal grouping, see European Democrats. ... The Alliance of American and European Democrats is a loose bilateral partnership between the United States Democratic Party and the European Democratic Party. ... The colour orange occurs between red and yellow in the visible spectrum at a wavelength of about 585–620 nanometres. ... -1... The current Constitution of France was adopted on October 4, 1958, and has been amended 17 times, most recently on March 28, 2003. ... Politics of France takes place in a framework of a semi-presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of France is head of state and the Prime Minister of France head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... The Parlement of France is bicameral, and consists of the National Assembly (Assemblée Nationale) and the Senate (Sénat). ... It has been suggested that Human rights in France be merged into this article or section. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... Political parties in France lists political parties in France. ... France is a representative democracy. ...

The Union for French Democracy, also known by its French acronym UDF (Union pour la Démocratie Française), is a French centrist political party. It was founded in 1978 as an electoral entity to support President Valéry Giscard d'Estaing in order to couterbalance the RPR preponderance over the right. This name was chosen due to the title of Giscard d'Estaing's 1976 book, French Democracy. A political party is an organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Valéry Marie René Giscard dEstaing [IPA: vÉ‘leÊ€i mÉ‘Ê€i ʀəne Ê’iskÉ‘Ê€ dÉ›stɛ̃] (born 2 February 1926 in Koblenz, Germany) is a French center-right politician who was President of the French Republic from 1974 until 1981. ... In France the Gaullist Party is usually used to refer to the largest party professing to be Gaullist. ...


The founder parties were the christian-democratic Democratic and Social Centre, the liberal Republican Party, the Radical Party and the Social-Democratic Party. But now, the UDF is a single entity, due to the defection of the Republicans and the Radicals to President Chirac's UMP and the merger of the centrist components. The Republican Party was a French right-wing political party founded in 1977. ... The Radical Party (Parti Radical or Républicains Radicaux et Radicaux-Socialistes, Radical Republicans and Radical Socialists), was a major French political party of the early to mid 20th century, originally considered radical due to its anti-clericalism. ... The Social Democratic Party was a French political party founded at the begining of the 1970s, by a split from the Socialist Party. ... Jacques René Chirac (born November 29, 1932 in Paris) is a French politician and the current President of the French Republic. ... The Union for a Popular Movement (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire), initially named the Union for the Presidential Majority (Union pour la Majorité Présidentielle), and more usually known from its French acronym as simply the UMP, is the main French conservative political party of the right-wing. ...


Its current leader, as of 2006, is François Bayrou. The UDF has been a junior partner in the coalitions behind Prime Ministers Jean-Pierre Raffarin and Dominique de Villepin, though it has not participated in the cabinets of either, except Gilles de Robien's controversial participation as Education minister. 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... -1... The Prime Minister of France (Premier ministre de la France) is the functional head of the Cabinet of France. ... Jean-Pierre Raffarin Jean-Pierre Raffarin   listen? (born August 3, 1948) is a French conservative politician. ... Dominique Marie François René Galouzeau de Villepin (born 14 November 1953 in Rabat, Morocco) simply known as Dominique de Villepin ( — , is a French diplomat and politician. ... Gilles de Robien (April 10, 1941) is a notable French politician. ...


UDF's most marked political trait is that it is in favor of European federalism, up to the point of turning the European Union into United States of Europe. In that respect, UDF was the likely target of Jacques Chirac's Call of Cochin (1978), in which he denounced pro-European policies of "the party of the foreigners". Federalism is a political philosophy in which a group or body of members are bound together (Latin: foedus, covenant) with a governing representative head. ... The United States of Europe is a name given to one version of the possible future unification of Europe, as a sovereign federation of states, similar to the United States of America. ... Jacques René Chirac (born November 29, 1932 in Paris) is a French politician and the current President of the French Republic. ... The Call of Cochin (Appel de Cochin) is a famous pamphlet published on December 6, 1978 by Jacques Chirac, former Prime Minister of France, president of the Rally for the Republic party, and mayor of Paris. ...


Since its foundation, UDF has been in an uneasy alliance with the bigger right-wing party RPR and its successor UMP. Indeed, the criticism of the RPR leader Jacques Chirac contributed towards the defeat of President Giscard d'Estaing at the 1981 presidential election. In France the Gaullist Party is usually used to refer to the largest party professing to be Gaullist. ... The Union for a Popular Movement (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire), initially named the Union for the Presidential Majority (Union pour la Majorité Présidentielle), and more usually known from its French acronym as simply the UMP, is the main French conservative political party of the right-wing. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


In the 1980s, RPR joined the liberal and pro-European positions of UDF. However, Jacques Chirac appeared like the leader of right, and UDF played the supporting role in the coalition. From 1986 to 1988, UDF participated to Chirac's cabinet of the first "cohabitation".


In 1988, the former centrist Prime minister Raymond Barre was candidate at the presidential election. Yet, he was not supported by all the UDF personalities and he was eliminated at the first round. After the re-election of François Mitterrand, some UDF members participated as ministers in the left-wing Michel Rocard's cabinets. Others created a new parliamentary group, the Union of Center, which voted occasionally with the Socialist Party or with the RPR. In the same time, the authority of the old right-wing leaders (Chirac, Giscard d'Estaing, Barre...) was contested by a new generation of politicians called the "renovation men". Raymond Barre was born on April 12, 1924 in Saint Denis, the capital of the French island of La Réunion in the Indian Ocean. ... (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) was a French politician. ... Michel Rocard, French politician Michel Rocard (born August 23, 1930) is a French Socialist politician, former French Prime minister, and currently a member of the European Parliament. ... The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste or PS), which replaced the SFIO in 1969, is the main opposition party in France. ...


In the 1990s, all the UDF came back in oppostion and created a new coalition with the RPR, the "Union for France". This one won largely the 1993 legislative election. However, the UDF was so divided for present a candidate at the 1995 presidential election. The UDF members chosen between the two RPR challengers, Jacques Chirac and Edouard Balladur. The majority supported the second, but this was the first who was elected. After the right-wing defeat of the 1997 legislative election, the UDF confederation knew a major crisis. French legislative election took place on March 21 and 28, 1993 to elect the 10th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ... Second Round First Round See also: President of France, France, Politics of France Categories: Elections in France | 1995 elections ... Categories: Stub | 1929 births | Prime ministers of France | Alumni of Sciences Po ... French legislative election took place in May 25 and June 1, 1997 to elect the 11th National Assembly of the Fifth Republic. ...


Until 2002, the UDF spanned a somewhat wide ideological spectrum on the center-right. An ironic characterization of UDF's membership is that it was the union of everybody on the right that was neither far-right nor a Chirac supporter. However, the UDF suffered to be not an unified party contrary to the RPR. The economic policies proposed by UDF's leaders used to range from left-wing-leaning, in favor of social justice, to strongly laissez-faire economics. Such divergences led the laissez-faire advocates of Démocratie Libérale, such as Alain Madelin, to split out of UDF on May 16, 1998. This departure followed the elections of UDF politicians for the presidence of 4 regional councils with the votes of FN elects. Indeed, the Liberals refused to condemn these alliances. A right is the power or privilege to which one is justly entitled or a thing to which one has a just claim. ... Far right, extreme right, ultra-right, radical right, or hard right are terms used to discuss the relative position a group or person occupies within a political spectrum. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Social justice refers to conceptions of justice applied to an entire society. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... Liberal Democracy (Démocratie Libérale, DL) was a French political party that advocated laissez-faire economics and whose leader was Alain Madelin. ... Alain Madelin in 2005 Alain Madelin (born March 26, 1946) is a French politician and a former minister of that country. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... The National Front (FN, French: ) is a far-right, nationalist political party in France, founded in 1972 by Jean-Marie Le Pen. ...


Similarly, the social policies ranged from the conservatism of the likes of Christine Boutin, famously opposed to civil unions for homosexuals, to more liberal policies she was excluded from the UDF because of her strongly social conservatism and based in March 2001 the FRS ("Forum des républicans sociaux"), now affiliated to the UMP. This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Christine Boutin (born in Levroux, Indre, France on February 6, 1944) is a French politician. ... A civil union is a legal partnership agreement between two persons. ... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Social conservatism is a belief in traditional or natural law-based morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. ...


Many leaders of UDF left it to join the Union for a Presidential Majority (Union pour la Majorité Présidentielle), supporting Jacques Chirac, after it was founded in 2002, leaving the UDF leader François Bayrou somewhat isolated. While a partner in the Raffarin cabinet, the UDF sometimes criticized the policies of the French government, yet did not wish to quit the majority coalition and enter the opposition, which is mostly left-wing. The Union for a Popular Movement, initially named the Union for a Presidential Majority, and in both cases also known by its French acronym UMP (Union pour un Mouvement Populaire and Union pour la Majorité Présidentielle, respectively) is a French right-wing, conservative political party. ... Jacques René Chirac (born November 29, 1932 in Paris) is a French politician and the current President of the French Republic. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... -1... Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition...


As a result, UDF, save for Gilles de Robien, quit the cabinet in the March 31, 2004 cabinet reshuffling, while still remaining in the parliamentary majority. Gilles de Robien (April 10, 1941) is a notable French politician. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2004, the party, along with Italy's Margherita, was one of the founding members of the European Democratic Party. Daisy-Democracy is Freedom (full name in Italian: Democrazia è Libertà – La Margherita: Democracy is Freedom – The Daisy) is a centrist political Party in Italy. ... For the eurosceptic informal grouping, see European Democrats. ...


Today, there is a split inside UDF elected officials, between those such as Robien and Pierre-Christophe Baguet, who favor closer ties with UMP, and those such as Bayrou that advocate independent centrist policies, with some such as Jean Dionis du Séjour trying a middle ground. [1] [2] One reason may be that UDF's elected positions are often obtained through alliances with UMP. However, the party base overwhelmingly favor independence. At the congress of Lyon January 28-29th 2006, 91% of the members voted to retain the independence of the UDF from the UMP and transform it into an independent centrist party. This new orientation means the UDF will be a social-liberal party aiming for a balance between socialist and conservative policies. Jean Dionis du Séjour Jean Dionis du Séjour, born on September 21, 1956, in Agen (Lot-et-Garonne), is a French politician from the centrist UDF party. ...


On May 16, 2006, François Bayrou and 10 other UDF deputies voted the motion of censure brought in by the Socialist deputies for the resignation of Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin's government, following the Clearstream affair. [3] (This motion had no chance to be accepted, given that UMP has an absolute majority in the Assembly.) Following this event, France's television authority then classified Bayrou and the other UDF deputies who voted the motion in the opposition for timing purposes; however, after Bayrou protested, he was classified as neither majority nor opposition. The emblem of the French Socialist Party The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste or PS), founded in 1969, is the main opposition party in France. ... The Prime Minister of France (Premier ministre de la France) is the functional head of the Cabinet of France. ... Dominique Marie François René Galouzeau de Villepin (born 14 November 1953 in Rabat, Morocco) simply known as Dominique de Villepin ( — , is a French diplomat and politician. ... Clearstream Banking S.A. (CB) is the clearing division of Deutsche Börse, based in Luxembourg. ...


See also

Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ...

Leaders

Jean Adrien François Lecanuet, born on March 4, 1920 in Rouen, died February 21, 1993 Born in a family of very modest conditions, he oriented towards studies of literature. ... Valéry Marie René Giscard dEstaing [IPA: vɑleʀi mɑʀi ʀəne ʒiskɑʀ dɛstɛ̃] (born 2 February 1926 in Koblenz, Germany) is a French center-right politician who was President of the French Republic from 1974 until 1981. ... -1...

External link

  • Official web site

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