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Encyclopedia > Union Square (New York City)
Union Square
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
Union Square
Location: New York, NY
Coordinates: 40°44′10.25″N, 73°59′25.42″W
Built/Founded: 1882
Architect: Bartholdi, Frederic Auguste; et.al.
Added to NRHP: December 09, 1997
NRHP Reference #: 97001678 [1]
Governing body: New York City Department of Parks and Recreation and Metropolitan Transportation Authority

Union Square Park (also known as Union Square) is an important and historic intersection in New York City, located where Broadway and the Bowery came together in the early 19th century. Today it is bounded by 14th Street, Union Square East, 17th Street, and Union Square West. It is run and operated jointly by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation as well as the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 777 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (3173 × 2448 pixel, file size: 7. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is the branch of government of the City of New York responsible for maintaining the citys parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the citys natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for citys residents. ... The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is a public benefit corporation responsible for public transportation in the State of New York. ... “New York, NY” redirects here. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... The Bowery is a well-known street in Manhattan that more or less marks the boundary between Chinatown and Little Italy on one side and the Lower East Side on the other—running from Chatham Square in the south to Astor Place in the north. ... 14th Street looking west from Fifth Avenue 14th Street is an important east-west thoroughfare in Manhattan in New York City. ... 17th Street is an east-west running street between First Avenue and Eleventh Avenue in Manhattan in New York City. ... The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is the branch of government of the City of New York responsible for maintaining the citys parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the citys natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for citys residents. ... The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is a public benefit corporation responsible for public transportation in the State of New York. ...


Important thoroughfares which lead away from the park are Broadway, leading both north and south; Fourth Avenue, leading southeast to the Bowery; and Park Avenue South, leading north to Grand Central Terminal. Union Square lies over 14th Street–Union Square, a New York City Subway complex served by the 4, 5, 6, L, N, Q, R, and W trains. Neighborhoods around the park are the Flatiron District to the north, Chelsea to the west, Greenwich Village and New York University to the south, and Gramercy to the east. The eastern side of the square is dominated by the Zeckendorf Towers. The main concourse Grand Central Terminal (GCT, often unofficially called Grand Central Station) is a terminal rail station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue (42nd Street and Park Avenue) in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... 14th Street–Union Square is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the IRT Lexington Avenue Line, the BMT Broadway Line, and the BMT Canarsie Line. ... The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority as MTA New York City Transit. ... The 4 Lexington Avenue Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The 5 Lexington Avenue Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The 6 Lexington Avenue Local is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The L 14th Street-Canarsie Local is a service of the New York City Subway, running local along the full length of the BMT Canarsie Line, 24 hours a day. ... The N Broadway Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The Q Broadway Express is a service of the New York City Subway. ... Current and former R services The R Broadway Local is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The W Broadway Local is a service of the New York City Subway. ... The famous Flatiron building from which the district is named. ... Elegant building along 23rd street. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational institution in New York City. ... Gramercy, also called Gramercy Park, is a neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City, focused around Gramercy Park, a private park between East 20th and 21st Streets. ...


Union Square is noted for its impressive equestrian statue of George Washington, created by Henry Kirke Brown and unveiled in 1856. Other statues in the park include the Marquis de Lafayette, created by Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, Abraham Lincoln, created by Henry Kirke Browne and James Fountain, donated by Daniel Willis James and sculpted by Adolf Donndorf. A newer addition, added in 1986, is a statue of Mahatma Gandhi in the southwest corner of the park. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Henry Kirke Brown (born February 24, 1814 in Leyden, Massachusetts; died July 10, 1886 at Newburgh, New York) was an American sculptor. ... Marie-Joseph-Paul-Roch-Yves-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (September 6, 1757 – May 20, 1834), was a French aristocrat most famous for his participation in the American Revolutionary War and early French Revolution. ... One of his works Bartholdi Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi (August 2, 1834 - October 4, 1904) was a French sculptor. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Gujarati: , Hindi: , IAST: mohandās karamcand gāndhÄ«, IPA: ) (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948), was a major political and spiritual leader of India and the Indian independence movement. ...


In April 1861, soon after the fall of Fort Sumter, Union Square was the site of a patriotic rally that is thought to have been the largest public gathering in North America up to that time. Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ...

Contents

Site of social and political activism

Union Square protest
Union Square protest

The park has historically been the start or the end point for many political demonstrations. It is — and was in the past — a frequent gathering point for radicals of all stripes, whom one will often find speaking or demonstrating. On September 5, 1882, in the first Labor Day celebration, a crowd of at least 10,000 workers paraded up Broadway and filed past the reviewing stand at Union Square. Although the park was known for its union rallies and for the large 1861 gathering in support of Union troops, it was actually named for its location at the union of major streets (decades before any of these gatherings occurred). [2] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (820x615, 108 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Union Square (New York City) International reactions to the 2006 Qana airstrike Metadata This file contains additional information... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (820x615, 108 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Union Square (New York City) International reactions to the 2006 Qana airstrike Metadata This file contains additional information... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Labor Day is a United States federal holiday that takes place on the first Monday of September. ...

Candle Lit Vigil for Hrant Dink

In the days and weeks following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, Union Square became a primary public gathering point for mourners. People created spontaneous candle and photograph memorials in the park and vigils were held to honor the victims. This was a natural role for the Square as Lower Manhattan below 14th Street, which forms Union Square's southern border, briefly became a "frozen zone," with no non-emergency vehicles allowed and pedestrians sometimes stopped and asked why they were venturing south by police and national guardsmen. The Square's tradition as a meeting place in times of upheaval was also a factor. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Hrant Dink (Armenian: , IPA: [][1]) (September 15, 1954 – January 19, 2007) was a Turkish-Armenian editor, journalist and column writer. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... A vigil (from the Latin vigilia, wakefulness) is a period of sleeplessness, an occasion for devotional watching or observance. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway Lower Manhattan, from the Brooklyn Bridge, 2005 Rigid airship the USS Akron over Lower Manhattan Lower Manhattan is the southernmost part of the island of Manhattan, the main island and center of business and government of the City of New York. ...


Greenmarket

The outdoor Greenmarket Farmers Market, held four days each week

In 1976, the Council on the Environment of New York City established the Greenmarket program, which provided regional small family farmers with opportunities to sell their fruits, vegetables and other farm products at open-air markets in the city. The most famous is the Union Square Greenmarket, held Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays between 8 AM and 6 PM year round. 250,000 customers a week purchase 1,000 varieties of fruits and vegetables at the market.[citation needed] The variety of produce available is broader by perhaps a factor of ten than what is found in a conventional supermarket.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1332x999, 278 KB) Summary The farmers market at Union Square, New York City. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1332x999, 278 KB) Summary The farmers market at Union Square, New York City. ...

Grocery at the Greenmarket

Union Square is also known for the Union Square Holiday Market, which is held November 23 through December 24. Temporary kiosks are filled by over 100 artisans, who sell items ranging from candles and perfume to knitted scarves and high-end jewelry. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ...


Union Square is a popular meeting place, given its central location in Manhattan and due to the fact that many subway lines stop at Union Square Station. There are many bars and restaurants on the periphery of the square, and the surrounding streets have some of the city's most renowned (and expensive) restaurants.


Union Square Partnership

The Union Square Partnership (USP), a Business Improvement District (BID) and a Local Development Corporation (LDC), was formed in 1984 and later became a model for all other Business Improvement Districts in New York City. It had, as of 2006, a US$1.4 million budget. Jennifer E. Falk became its executive director in January 2007. [1] A business improvement district (BID) (also known as a special improvement district or a business improvement area) is a public/private sector partnership in which property and business owners of a defined area elect to make a collective contribution to the maintenance, development and marketing/promotion of their commercial district. ...


References

  1. ^ National Register Information System. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service (2007-01-23).
  2. ^ Union Square: New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, accessed December 12, 2006

December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Gallery

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Union Square (New York City) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (579 words)
Union Square (also known as Union Square Park) is an important and historic intersection in New York City, located where Broadway and the Bowery came together in the early 19th century.
Neighborhoods around the park are the Flatiron District to the north, Chelsea to the west, Greenwich Village and New York University to the south, and Gramercy to the east.
Union Square is noted for its impressive equestrian statue of George Washington, created by Henry Kirke Brown and unveiled in 1856.
New York City - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8427 words)
New York emerged from World War II as the unquestioned leading city of the world, with Wall Street leading America's emergence as the world's dominant economic power, the United Nations headquarters (built in Manhattan in 1952) emphasizing its political influence, and the rise of Abstract Expressionism displacing Paris as center of the art world.
New York City is located at the center of the BosWash megalopolis, 218 miles (350 km) driving distance from Boston and 220 miles (353 km) from Washington, D.C. The city's total area is 468.9 square miles (1,214.4 km²), of which 35.31% is water.
The Washington Square Arch in Greenwich Village is the unofficial symbol of New York University.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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