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Encyclopedia > Union Flag
 Flag Ratio: 1:2
Flag Ratio: 1:2

The term Union Flag refers to the de facto national flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland also known as the Union Jack. Historically, the flag has been used throughout the former British Empire. It still retains an official or semi-official status in many Commonwealth Realms. The current design dates from the Union of Ireland and Great Britain in 1801. Union Jack often refers to the Union Flag or Flag of the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links FIAV_111000. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 Flag Ratio: 3:5 The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland uses as its national flag the Royal Banner commonly known as the Union Flag or, popularly, Union Jack (although officially this title should only be given to the flag when it is flown... For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Look up Semi in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An official is someone who holds an office (function or mandate, regardless whether it carries an actual working space with it) in an organisation or government and participates in the exercise of authority (either his own or that of his superior and/or employer, public or legally private). ... A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the 16 sovereign states that recognize Queen Elizabeth II as their Queen and head of state. ... All Saints Chapel in the Cathedral Basilica of St. ... The Act of Union 1800 merged the Kingdom of Ireland and the Kingdom of Great Britain (itself a merger of England and Wales and Scotland under the Act of Union 1707) to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on 1 January 1801. ...

Contents

Terminology: "Union Flag" or "Union Jack"?

The issue of whether to use the term "Union Flag" or "Union Jack" is a matter of some debate. One view is that "Union Jack" should only be used for the flag when it is flown as a jack (a small flag flown at the bow of a ship), but it is not universally accepted that the "Jack" of "Union Jack" is a reference to such a jack flag and is only an educated guess.[1] The Flag Institute, the vexillological organisation for the United Kingdom, stated that the term Union Flag is a "relatively recent idea". It also noted that "From early in its life the Admiralty itself frequently referred to the flag as the Union Jack, whatever its use, and in 1902 an Admiralty Circular announced that Their Lordships had decided that either name could be used officially. Such use was given Parliamentary approval in 1908 when it was stated that "the Union Jack should be regarded as the National flag".[2] A Maritime flag or Naval Jack is a national flag used exclusively on boats and other watercraft. ... Flag of the Flag Institute, adopted on creation of the Institute, 23 April 1971. ... Flag of the Fédération internationale des associations vexillologiques. ...


When the flag was initially introduced, in 1606, it was known simply as "the British flag" or "the flag of Britain". The first use of the name "Union" appeared in 1625. The word 'jack' was in use before 1600 to describe the maritime bow flag. By 1627 a small Union Jack was commonly flown in this position. One theory goes that for some years it would have been called just "the Jack", or "Jack flag", or "the King's Jack", but by 1674, while formally referred to as "His Majesty's Jack", it was commonly called the Union Jack, and this was officially acknowledged.[2]


The 'Jack' part of the name may also have come from the name of King James I / James VI of Scotland, who inherited the English crown, uniting the two kingdoms. Jac is from Jacobus, Latin for James. King James was fond of attaching his name to items of national importance. Other examples include the King James Bible, commissioned in 1603, and Jamestown - the first English speaking settlement made in North America under King James' rule (1607). James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ...


The size and power of the Royal Navy internationally at the time could also explain why the flag was nicknamed the "Union Jack"; considering the navy was so widely utilised and renowned by the United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries, it is possible that the term "Jack" did occur due to its regular use on all British ships using the "Jack Staff" (a flag pole attached to the bow of a ship). Even if the term "Union Jack" does derive from the jack flag (as perhaps seems most likely), after three centuries, it is now sanctioned by use, has appeared in official use, and remains the popular term. The BBC website disregards the term "union flag" because of its "great potential for confusion", preferring union jack (in lower case)[3] The term "Union Flag", on the other hand, is the term preferred in official documents by vexillologists.[citation needed] The Merchant Shipping Act 1995[4] refers to the national colours of the United Kingdom as "the Union flag (commonly known as the Union Jack) …". For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Flag of the Fédération internationale des associations vexillologiques. ... The Receiver of Wreck, a post defined under the Merchant Shipping Act 1995 is an official of the British government whose main task is to process incoming reports of wreck in order to: Give legitimate owners the opportunity to retrieve their property Ensure that law-abiding finders of wreck receive... National colours are frequently part of a countrys set of national symbols. ...


History

The Union Flag before 1801

1606 version
1606 version

When James VI King of Scots inherited the throne of England and was crowned as King James I of England in 1603, the crowns of the Kingdom of England (which since 1535 had included Wales) and the Kingdom of Scotland were united in a personal union through him. Despite this Union of the Crowns, each kingdom remained an independent state. Image File history File links Union_flag_1606_(Kings_Colors). ... Image File history File links Union_flag_1606_(Kings_Colors). ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... The Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542 were a series of parliamentary measures by which the legal system of Wales was annexed to England and the norms of English administration introduced in order to create a single state and a single legal jurisdiction, which is frequently referred to as England... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... It has been suggested that Dynastic union be merged into this article or section. ... The Union of the Crowns refers to the accession of James VI, King of Scots, to the thrones of England and Ireland, in March 1603. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ...


On 12 April 1606, a new flag to represent this regal union between England and Scotland was specified in a royal decree, according to which the flag of England, also representing Wales by implication, (a red cross with a white background, known as St George's Cross) and the flag of Scotland (a white saltire with a blue background, known as the Saltire or Saint Andrew's Cross) would be "joyned together according to the forme made by our heralds, and sent by Us to our Admerall to be published to our Subjects." This royal flag was at first only for use at sea on civil and military ships of both Scotland and England. In 1634, its use was restricted to the monarch's ships. Land forces continued to use their respective national banners. After the Acts of Union 1707, the flag gained a regularised status, as "the ensign armorial of the Kingdom of Great Britain", the newly created state. It was then adopted by land forces as well, although the blue field used on land-based versions more closely resembled that of the blue of the flag of Scotland. is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... The Flag of England (5:3) The Flag of England is the St Georges Cross. ... St Georges cross The St Georges Cross is a red cross on a white background. ... The Saltire, the flag of Scotland, a white saltire with an official Pantone 300 coloured field. ... The arms of St Albans: Azure, a saltire Or (a gold saltire on a blue field) For The Saltire (proper noun) see Flag of Scotland. ... The Saltire (or St Andrews Cross) is the national flag of Scotland. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ...

Pre-1801 Union Flag at the historic Fort York, Toronto, Ontario
Pre-1801 Union Flag at the historic Fort York, Toronto, Ontario

Various shades of blue have been used in the Saltire over the years. The ground of the current Union Flag is a deep "navy" blue, (Pantone 280), which can be traced to the colour used for the Blue Ensign of the Royal Navy's historic "Blue Squadron". (Dark shades of colour were used on maritime flags on the basis of durability). The currently accepted flag of Scotland however uses a lighter "royal" blue, (Pantone 300), following the Scottish Parliament recommendation of 2003. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 559 pixels Full resolution (1524 × 1065 pixel, file size: 201 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Union Flag Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 559 pixels Full resolution (1524 × 1065 pixel, file size: 201 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Union Flag Metadata This file... Blockhouses at Fort York Fort York National Historic Site is a historic site of military fortifications and related buildings on the west side of downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Navy blue is an especially dark shade of the color blue. ... For the record label, see Pantone Music. ... RFA Brambleleaf flying the square Blue Jack based on the Blue Ensign The Blue Ensign is a flag, one of several British ensigns, used by certain organisations or territories associated with the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... A Maritime flag or Naval Jack is a national flag used exclusively on boats and other watercraft. ... Royal blue is a lighter shade of blue. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The blazon for the old flag, to be compared with the current flag, is Azure, the Cross Saltire of St Andrew Argent surmounted by the Cross of St George Gules, fimbriated of the second. This is an article about Heraldry. ... In heraldry and vexillology, fimbriation refers to small strips of colour placed around common charges or ordinaries in order for them to stand out from the background. ...


Wales had no explicit recognition in the Union Flag because Wales, having been annexed by Edward I of England in 1282 and following the Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542, was legally part of the Kingdom of England and was therefore represented by the flag of England. (The present-day Flag of Wales and St David's Cross emerged, or re-emerged, in the 20th century: the former based on the historical emblem of Wales, the Red Dragon, and the latter based on the arms of the Diocese of Saint David's.) However, on 27 November 2007, the culture minister, Margaret Hodge, said she will consider a redesign of the union flag to incorporate the Welsh dragon. [5] This article is about the country. ... Annexation is the legal merging of some territory into another body. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... The Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542 were a series of parliamentary measures by which the legal system of Wales was annexed to England and the norms of English administration introduced in order to create a single state and a single legal jurisdiction, which is frequently referred to as England... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Flag ratio: 2:3 The Welsh Dragon on the tailfin of an Air Wales ATR 42 aircraft. ... The Flag of St David The Flag of St David is normally a gold cross on a black field, although it appears in many forms including a black cross on a gold field, or with an engrailed cross. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... St Davids (Welsh: TÅ·ddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Rt. ...


The Kingdom of Ireland, which had existed as a personal union with England since 1541, was likewise unrepresented in the original versions of the Union Flag. This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... Events The first official translation of the entire Bible in Swedish February 12 - Pedro de Valdivia founds Santiago de Chile. ...

Commissioners' Flag of the Northern Lighthouse Board
Commissioners' Flag of the Northern Lighthouse Board

The flag does remain in use, however, appearing in the canton of the Commissioners' Ensign of the Northern Lighthouse Board. This remains the only contemporary official representation of the pre-1801 Union Flag.[6] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cape Wrath lighthouse The Northern Lighthouse Board (NLB), previously known as the Commissioners of Northern Light Houses, is the organisation responsible for marine navigation aids around the coastal areas of Scotland and the Isle of Man. ...


This version of the Union Flag is also shown in the canton of the Grand Union Flag (also known as the Congress flag, The First Navy Ensign, The Cambridge Flag, and The Continental Colours), the first widely used Flag of the United States. The canton of a flag is the top inner quarter of a flag. ... Grand Union flag North Carolina Currency, 1776 Painting of flag of East India Company, 1732 The Grand Union Flag, also known as the Congress flag, the First Navy Ensign, The Cambridge Flag, and The Continental Colors is the first true Flag of the United States. ... Union Jack. ...

The "Scottish variant" of the Union Flag, which may have seen limited use from 1606-1707
The "Scottish variant" of the Union Flag, which may have seen limited use from 1606-1707
Other proposed versions.
Other proposed versions.

Image File history File links Union_Jack_1606_Scotland. ... Image File history File links Union_Jack_1606_Scotland. ... Image File history File links Union_jack_proposed. ... Image File history File links Union_jack_proposed. ...

Other proposed versions

Various other designs for a common flag were drawn up following the union of the two Crowns in 1603, but were rarely, if ever, used.[7] One version showed St George's cross with St Andrew's cross in the canton, and another version placed the two crosses side-by-side. Also, some Scots were upset that the Scottish flag was underneath the English flag in the version finally adopted, and preferred a version where the Scottish cross was on top (the English flag was placed between the cross of St Andrew and its background).[8]


Despite the flag representing a union of kingdoms, it has been suggested[9] that the Union Flag be modified to include either the Red Dragon or flag of Saint David in order to represent Wales, despite Wales never having been a kingdom itself. (This status also accounts for the absence of any Welsh symbol in the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom. The last symbol representing Wales, incorporated as part of the royal arms of Elizabeth I of England, ceased to be used following her death in 1603). Y Ddraig Goch on the Flag of Wales Y Ddraig Goch (IPA: ) (Welsh for the red dragon) appears on the national Flag of Wales (the flag itself is also called Y Ddraig Goch), and is the most famous dragon in Britain. ... The Flag of St David The Flag of St David is normally a gold cross on a black field, although it appears in many forms including a black cross on a gold field, or with an engrailed cross. ... This article is about the country. ... The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom The Royal Arms of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II are her arms of dominion in right of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Since 1801

Image File history File links Flags_of_the_Union_Jack. ...

St George's Flag (England)
St Andrew's Flag (Scotland)

The current Union Flag dates from 1 January 1801 with the Act of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Ireland and the Kingdom of Great Britain to form the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The new design added the red saltire cross of Saint Patrick's Flag for Ireland. This saltire is overlaid on the saltire of St Andrew, but still beneath the cross of St George. The Irish saltire is arranged counterchange with the saltire of St Andrew, so the white is always on the clockwise side of the red. The arrangement has introduced a requirement to display the flag "the right way up"; see specifications for flag use, below. The additional white stripe is added (as with the St George cross) to prevent "colour next to colour", a heraldic imperative. Not to be confused with the Cross of St. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... The flag of Scotland features a white saltire, a crux decussate (X-shaped cross) representing the cross of the Christian martyr Saint Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland, on a blue field. ... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... Saint Patricks Flag: a red saltire on a field of white Saint Patricks Flag is a flag of Ireland that features in the flag of the United Kingdom. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The Act of Union 1800 merged the Kingdom of Ireland and the Kingdom of Great Britain (itself a merger of England and Wales and Scotland under the Act of Union 1707) to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on 1 January 1801. ... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... The arms of St Albans: Azure, a saltire Or (a gold saltire on a blue field) For The Saltire (proper noun) see Flag of Scotland. ... Saint Patricks Flag: a red saltire on a field of white Saint Patricks Flag is a flag of Ireland that features in the flag of the United Kingdom. ... The flag of Scotland features a white saltire, a crux decussate (X-shaped cross) representing the cross of the Christian martyr Saint Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland, on a blue field. ... Not to be confused with the Cross of St. ... “Union Jack” redirects here. ...


This Saint Patrick's cross is problematic in several ways. Firstly, the symbol does not have much emotional resonance since its history is so thin and hard to find; some believe that it was essentially 'invented' for the purposes of inclusion in the Union Flag. One possible origin is from the arms of the Fitzgerald family (Dukes of Leinster) who were sent by Henry II of England to aid Anglo-Norman rule in Ireland and has rarely been used as an emblem of Ireland by the Irish: a harp, a Celtic cross, a shamrock, or (since 1922) an Irish tricolour have been more common. However, the exact origin of the flag is unknown, with evidence of saltires being present on ancient Irish coins and maps. The St Patrick's saltire flag has been used in more recent times for St Patrick's Day in Northern Ireland and by both state and civil organisations wishing to avoid the sectarianism that may be implied by the use of either the tricolour or symbols of Unionism, including the recently formed Police Service of Northern Ireland. The Duke of Leinster (referring to Leinster and, unlike the province, pronounced Linster) is Irelands premier peer. ... The Duke of Leinster (referring to Leinster and, unlike the province, pronounced Linster) is Irelands premier peer. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... For other uses, see Harp (disambiguation). ... For the band, see Celtic Cross (band). ... The Shamrock Oxalis acetosella as The Shamrock The shamrock, an unofficial symbol of Ireland and Boston, Massachusetts, is a three-leafed old white clover, sometimes (rarely nowadays) Trifolium repens (white clover, known in Irish as seamair bhán) but more usually today Trifolium dubium (lesser clover, Irish: seamair bhuí). However... The national flag of the Republic of Ireland (Irish: An Bhratach Náisiúnta), also known as the tricolour,[1] is a vertical tricolour of green (at the hoist), white, and orange. ... Statue of Saint Patrick Saint Patrick (died March 17, 462, 492, or 493), is the patron saint of Ireland. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The national flag of the Republic of Ireland (Irish: An Bhratach Náisiúnta), also known as the tricolour,[1] is a vertical tricolour of green (at the hoist), white, and orange. ... The Police Service of Northern Ireland (Irish: Seirbhís Póilíneachta Thuaisceart na hÉireann) is the police service that covers Northern Ireland. ...


The current flag is blazoned Azure, the Crosses Saltire of St Andrew and St Patrick, quarterly per saltire, counterchanged Argent and Gules, the latter fimbriated of the second, surmounted by the Cross of St George of the third, fimbriated as the saltire. This is an article about Heraldry. ...


Status

The Union Flag is used as a jack by commissioned Royal Navy warships, and by certain categories of Army and Royal Air Force vessels, though none are currently (June 2007) in commission. When at anchor or alongside, it is flown from the jackstaff at the prow of the ship. It can only be worn underway when the ship is dressed for a special occasion, or (when flown at masthead) to indicate the presence of an Admiral of the Fleet onboard; including the Lord High Admiral, the British Monarch.[10] It may theoretically be flown to indicate that a court-martial is in progress, though these are normally held in shore establishments. Flags are particularly important at sea, where they can mean the difference between life and death, and consequently where the rules and regulations for the flying of flags are strictly enforced. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... RAF redirects here. ... First Navy Jack being raised on a jackstaff A jackstaff is a small vertical spar (pole) in the bow of a ship, on which a particular type of flag, know as a jack, is flown. ... Prow, the fore part of a ship, the stem and its surrounding parts, hence used like keel, by metonymy, of the ship itself. ... Royal Navy Insignia Shoulder board The flag of an Admiral of the Fleet is the Union Flag, and is in 1:2 rather than the 2:3 of other admirals flags. ... For the international law of the sea, see Admiralty law. ... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ...


No law has ever been passed making the Union Flag the national flag of the United Kingdom; rather it has become one through usage. Its first recorded recognition as a national flag came in 1908, when it was stated in Parliament that "the Union Jack should be regarded as the National flag". A more categorical statement was made by the Home Secretary in 1933, when he stated that "the Union Jack is the National Flag". The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ...


Civilian use is permitted on land, but non-naval/military use at sea is prohibited. Unauthorised use of the flag in the 17th Century to avoid paying harbour duties - a privilege restricted to naval ships - caused James' successor, Charles I, to order that use of the flag on naval vessels be restricted to His Majesty's ships "upon pain of Our high displeasure". It remains a criminal offence under the Merchant Shipping (Registration, etc.) Act 1993 to display the Union Flag (other than the "Pilot Jack" - see below) from a British ship. Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ...


The Court of the Lord Lyon, which has criminal jurisdiction in heraldic matters in Scotland, confirms that the Union Flag "is the correct flag for all citizens and corporate bodies of the United Kingdom to fly to demonstrate their loyalty and their nationality." Arms of the Office of the Lord Lyon The Lord Lyon King of Arms, the head of Lyon Court, is the Scottish official with responsibility for regulating heraldry in that kingdom, issuing new grants of arms, and serving as the judge of the oldest Heraldic court in the world that...


The Union Flag has been in use in Canada dating back to the British settlement in Nova Scotia in 1621. At the close of the Great Flag Debate of 1964, which resulted in the adoption of the Maple Leaf Flag as the Canadian national flag in 1965, the Parliament of Canada voted to make the Union Flag the symbol of Canada's membership of the Commonwealth and its allegiance to the crown. The move was a concession given to conservatives who preferred to keep the old flag, with its Union flag in the canton. The Union flag is sometimes flown alongside the Maple-Leaf Flag on Commonwealth Day and other royal occasions and anniversaries. 1957 version of the Canadian Red Ensign that had evolved as the de facto national flag until 1965. ... The National Flag of Canada, popularly known as the Maple Leaf and lUnifolié (French for the one-leafed), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre featuring a stylized, 11-pointed, red maple leaf. ... Commonwealth Day is the annual celebration of the Commonwealth of Nations held on the second Monday in March, and which is marked by a multi-faith service in Westminster Abbey normally attended by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Head of the Commonwealth, the Commonwealth Secretary-General and the Commonwealth High...


Use in other flags

Other nations and regions

The Union Flag was found in the canton (top left-hand corner) of the flags of many colonies of the UK, while the field (background) of their flags was the colour of the naval ensign flown by the particular Royal Navy squadron that patrolled that region of the world. Nations and colonies which have used the Union Flag at some stage have included Aden, America, Borneo, Ceylon, Cyprus, East Africa (Kenya), Gambia, Gold Coast (Ghana), India, Jamaica, Lagos, Malta, Mauritius, Nigeria, Palestine, Penang (Malaysia), Rhodesia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Somaliland, Tanganyika and Trinidad. As former British Empire nations were granted independence, these and other versions of the Union Flag were decommissioned. The most recent decommissioning of the Union Flag came on 1 July 1997, when the former Crown Colony of Hong Kong was returned to China. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... National flag and state ensign. ... The design and description of flags typically uses specialised flag terminology with precise and technical meanings, and is hence a form of jargon. ... In heraldry the background of the shield is called the field . ... The White Ensign. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Port of Aden (around 1910). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Borneo is the third largest island in the world and is located at the centre of Maritime Southeast Asia. ...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  geographic, including above East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... Flag of Gold Coast Map from 1896 of the British Gold Coast Colony. ... For other uses, see Lagos (disambiguation). ... A 2003 satellite image of the region. ... State motto: Bersatu dan Setia (United and Loyal) (formerly Let Penang Lead) State anthem: Untuk Negeri Kita (For Our State) Capital George Town Ruling party Barisan Nasional  - Yang Di-Pertua Negeri Tuan Yang Terutama Abdul Rahman bin Haji Abbas  - Ketua Menteri Tan Sri Dr. Koh Tsu Koon History    - Ceded by... This article is about the former British colony of Southern Rhodesia, todays Zimbabwe. ... For other territories formerly called Somaliland, see Somaliland (disambiguation). ... Flag of Deutsch-Ostafrika (1885-1919) Flag of Tanganyika (1919-1961) Flag of the Republic of Tanganyika 1962–64 Tanganyika is the name of an East African territory lying between the largest of the African great lakes: Lake Victoria, Lake Malawi and Lake Tanganyika, after which it was named. ... For other uses, see Trinidad (disambiguation). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


All administrative regions and territories of the United Kingdom fly the Union Flag in some form, with the exception of Gibraltar (other than the government ensign) and the Crown dependencies. Outside the UK itself, it is usually part of a special ensign in which the Union Flag is placed in the upper left hand corner of a blue field, with a signifying crest in the bottom right. Crown dependencies are possessions of the British Crown, as opposed to overseas territories or colonies. ... Ensign of the Imperial Japanese Navy. ...


Four countries currently incorporate the Union Flag as part of their own national flags: Australia, New Zealand, Tuvalu, and Fiji.


In former British colonies, the Union Flag was used semi-interchangeably with territorial flags for significant parts of their early history. This was also the case in Canada until the introduction of the Maple Leaf Flag in 1965, but it is still used in the flags of a number of Canadian provinces like British Columbia, Manitoba and Ontario. Newfoundland and Labrador uses a modified version of the Union Flag, once the flag of the province. Canadian practice still allows the Union Flag, known in Canada as the Royal Union Flag, to be flown by private individuals and government agencies to show support for the Monarch and the Commonwealth. The National Flag of Canada, popularly known as the Maple Leaf and lUnifolié (French for the one-leafed), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre featuring a stylized, 11-pointed, red maple leaf. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ...


In addition to Australia's National Flag many other Australian flags retain the use of the Union Flag, including the Royal Australian Navy Ensign (also known as the Australian White Ensign), the Royal Australian Air Force Ensign, the Australian Red Ensign (for use by merchant and private vessels) and the Australian Civil Aviation Ensign. In addition, the flags of the six Australian States all retain the use of Union Flag in the canton. Finally, the Vice-Regal flags of the State Governors also retain the use of the Union Flag. See List of Australian flags for more information. Flag ratio: 1:2 The Royal Australian Navy Ensign is the flag used by the Royal Australian Navy. ... The Royal Australian Air Force Ensign is used by the Royal Australian Air Force in Australia and overseas. ... Flag ratio: 1:2 The Australian Red Ensign resulted from the Commonwealth Government Federal Design Competition, which required an official flag and a merchant or shipping version of the same design. ... Australian Civil Aviation Ensign The Australian Civil Aviation Ensign is an Australian flag that was used by the Australian Civil Aviation Authority. ... The design and description of flags typically uses specialised flag terminology with precise and technical meanings, and is hence a form of jargon. ... This is a list of flags used in Australia: // Categories: | ...


The Basque Country's flag, the Ikurriña is also loosely based on the Union Flag, reflecting the significant commercial ties between Bilbao and the UK at the time the Ikurriña was designed (1894). The Miskito people sometimes use a similar flag that also incorporates the Union Flag in its canton, due to long periods of contact in the Mosquito Coast. Location of the Basque Country The Basque Country divided in seven provinces Capital Pamplona Official languages Basque, French, Spanish Demonym Basque Currency Euro The Basque-speaking areas This article is about the overall Basque domain. ... Ikurriña The Ikurriña flag is a Basque symbol and the official flag of the Basque Country, an Autonomous Community (Comunidad Autónomas) of contemporary Spain. ... La Muy Noble y Muy Leal e Invicta (The most noble and most loyal and undefeated) Location Location of Bilbao in Spain and Biscay Coordinates : , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Bilbao (Basque) Spanish name Bilbao Nickname El Botxo (the hole) Founded 15... Ikurriña The Ikurriña flag is a Basque symbol and the official flag of the Basque Country, an Autonomous Community (Comunidad Autónomas) of contemporary Spain. ... For other uses, see Mosquito (disambiguation). ... The design and description of flags typically uses specialised flag terminology with precise and technical meanings, and is hence a form of jargon. ... The article is about the Central American area. ...


The jack of the Russian Navy is a common equivalent to the British one with the Saint George and Saint Andrew crosses reversed in order and colours but unmistakably based on the same design. The Russian Navy or VMF (Russian: Военно-Морской Флот (ВМФ) - Voyenno- Morskoy Flot (VMF) or Military Maritime Fleet) is the naval arm of the Russian armed forces. ... Saint-George is a municipality with 695 inhabitants (as of 2003) in the district of Aubonne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ... Saint Andrew (Greek: Ανδρέας, Andreas), called in the Orthodox tradition Protocletos, or the First-called, is a Christian Apostle and the elder brother of Saint Peter. ...


The Union Flag was also used by the United States in their first flag, the Grand Union Flag. This flag was the same design as the one used by the British East India Company. It also appeared on the South Africa flag as part of a central motif, long after the country had gained independence from Great Britain. Grand Union flag North Carolina Currency, 1776 Painting of flag of East India Company, 1732 The Grand Union Flag, also known as the Congress flag, the First Navy Ensign, The Cambridge Flag, and The Continental Colors is the first true Flag of the United States. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ...


One state of the United States, Hawaii, incorporates the Union Flag in its state flag. The canton of the Flag of Hawaii reveals the British influence over those islands in the late 19th century. This article is about the U.S. State. ... Ka Hae Hawaii, or the Flag of Hawaii Ka Hae Hawaii, or the Flag of Hawaii, is the official standard symbolizing Hawaii as a kingdom (under a short British annexation), protectorate, republic, territory and state. ...

National and regional flags incorporating the Union Flag
Anguilla | Australia | Bermuda | British Antarctic Territory | British Columbia | British Indian Ocean Territory | British Virgin Islands | Canadian Red Ensign | Cayman Islands | Cook Islands | Falkland Islands | Fiji | Hawaii | Manitoba | Montserrat | New South Wales | New Zealand | Niue | Ontario | Pitcairn Islands | Queensland | Saint Helena | South Australia | South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands | Tasmania | Tristan da Cunha | Turks and Caicos Islands | Tuvalu | Victoria | Western Australia

Flag of the British Antarctic Territory Flag of the Commissioner of the British Antarctic Territory The Flag of the British Antarctic Territory was granted in 1963, when the British Antarctic Territory was created. ... Flag of British Columbia Flag ratio: 3:5 The Flag of British Columbia, Canada is based upon the shield of the provincial arms of British Columbia. ... The Canadian Red Ensign. ... Ka Hae Hawaii, or the Flag of Hawaii Ka Hae Hawaii, or the Flag of Hawaii, is the official standard symbolizing Hawaii as a kingdom (under a short British annexation), protectorate, republic, territory and state. ... Manitobas official flag since 1965 The Flag of Manitoba is a variation of the Red Ensign which bears the shield of the provincial coat of arms. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The current state flag of New South Wales was officially adopted in 1876. ... Ontarios official flag since 1965 The current Flag of Ontario was proclaimed the official flag of the Canadian province of Ontario by the Flag Act on May 21, 1965. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The state flag of Queensland is a British Blue Ensign defaced with the state badge on a white disc in the fly. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The current state flag of South Australia, a state of Australia, was officially adopted in 1904. ... Flag of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Flag of the Civil Commissioner of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands The Flag of the South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands was granted in 1985, when the Territory was created. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The current state flag of Tasmania was officially adopted by the government of Tasmania in 1875. ... The Flag of Tristan da Cunha The Flag of Tristan da Cunha was adopted on October 20, in a proclamation made by the Governor of Saint Helena under a Royal Warrant granted by Queen Elizabeth II. Prior to this, as a dependancy of Saint Helena, Tristan du Cunha used the... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The current state flag of Victoria in Australia is a British Blue Ensign defaced by the state badge of Victoria in the fly. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The current state flag of Western Australia was officially adopted by the government of Western Australia in 1953. ...

Ensigns

Main article: British ensigns.

The Union Flag can be found in the canton of several of the ensigns flown by vessels and aircraft of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories. Image File history File links Naval_Ensign_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Naval_Ensign_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The White Ensign. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The White Ensign. ... Ensign of the Imperial Japanese Navy. ...


Pilot Jack

The flag in a white border occasionally seen on merchant ships was sometimes referred to as the Pilot Jack. It can be traced back to 1823 when it was created as a signal flag, never intended as a civil jack. A book issued to British consuls in 1855 states that the white bordered Union Flag is to be hoisted for a pilot. Although there was some ambiguity regarding the legality of it being flown for any other purpose on civilian vessels, its use as an ensign or jack was established well in advance of the 1864 Act that designated the Red Ensign for merchant shipping. In 1970 the white-bordered Union Flag ceased to be the signal for a pilot, but references to it as national colours were not removed from the current Merchant Shipping Act and it was legally interpreted as a flag that could be flown on a merchant ship, as a jack if desired. This status was confirmed by the Merchant Shipping (Registration, etc.) Act 1993 and the consolidating Merchant Shipping Act 1995 which prohibits the use of any distinctive national colours or those used or resembling flags or pendants on Her Majesty's Ships, except the Red Ensign, the Union Flag with a white border, and some other exceptions permitted elsewhere in the Acts. This article is about the Roman rank. ... The Red Ensign, as currently used by the United Kingdoms Merchant Navy The Red Ensign of the United Kingdom in use in London The Red Ensign or Red Duster is a flag that originated in the early 17th century as an ensign flown by the Royal Navy. ... The Red Ensign, as currently used by the United Kingdoms Merchant Navy The Red Ensign of the United Kingdom in use in London The Red Ensign or Red Duster is a flag that originated in the early 17th century as an ensign flown by the Royal Navy. ...


Flag days

Canada

In Canada, the Royal Union Flag is flown on specified days from federal buildings, airports, military bases and other government buildings on the following days:

The flag is only flown where physical arrangements allow (e.g., when there is more than one flag pole). The flag of Canada is never moved to make room for the Royal Union Flag. Commonwealth Day is the annual celebration of the Commonwealth of Nations held on the second Monday in March, and which is marked by a multi-faith service in Westminster Abbey normally attended by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Head of the Commonwealth, the Commonwealth Secretary-General and the Commonwealth High... Queen Elizabeth II in Canada for her official birthday, Victoria Day 2005, Edmonton, Alberta Victoria Day (French: Fête de la Reine) is a Canadian statutory holiday celebrated on the last Monday before or on May 24 in honour of both Queen Victorias birthday and the current reigning Canadian... Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, wearing the Sovereigns insignia of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit The style of the Canadian Sovereign has varied over the years. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Statute of Westminster relating to the British Empire and its dominions. ... The National Flag of Canada, popularly known as the Maple Leaf and lUnifolié (French for the one-leafed), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre featuring a stylized, 11-pointed, red maple leaf. ...


United Kingdom

In July 2007, British prime minister Gordon Brown unveiled plans to have the Union Flag flown more often from government buildings.[1] While consultation on new guidelines is underway, the decision to fly the flag may be made by each government department. For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ...


Previously the flag was generally only flown on public buildings on days marking the birthdays of members of the Royal Family, the wedding anniversary of the monarch, Commonwealth Day, Accession Day, Coronation Day, the Queen's Official Birthday, Remembrance Sunday and on the days of the State Opening and prorogation of Parliament. The Union Flag is flown at half mast from the announcement of the death of the Sovereign (save for Proclamation Day), or upon command of the Sovereign.[11] Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... A wedding anniversary is an anniversary which falls on the month and day a particular wedding took place, and which recurs every subsequent year, except for those who were married on February 29th. ... Commonwealth Day is the annual celebration of the Commonwealth of Nations held on the second Monday in March, and which is marked by a multi-faith service in Westminster Abbey normally attended by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Head of the Commonwealth, the Commonwealth Secretary-General and the Commonwealth High... Accession Day is the anniversary of the day a monarch succeeds to the throne upon the death of the previous monarch. ... Coronation Day is the anniversary of the coronation of a monarch, the day a king or queen is formally crowned and invested with the regalia. ... In Jersey the Lieutenant-Governor hosts a reception for the public at Government House to mark the Queens Official Birthday at which he announces recipients of Birthday Honours The Queens Birthday or Queens Official Birthday is celebrated as a public holiday in several Commonwealth countries (usually Commonwealth... In the United Kingdom, Remembrance Sunday is the second Sunday of November, the Sunday nearest to 11 November (Remembrance Day), which is the anniversary of the end of the hostilities of the First World War at 11 a. ... Flag Flying Half-Staff over the White House Half-mast, or half-staff, describes the act of flying a flag approximately halfway up a flagpole (though anywhere from one-third to two-thirds of the way up the flagpole is acceptable). ...


The current flag days where the Union Flag should be flown from government buildings all over the UK are:

In addition, the Union Flag should be flown in the following areas on specified days: is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Countess of Wessex (Sophie Helen; neé Rhys-Jones, born 20 January 1965), is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Prince Andrew, The Duke of York (Andrew Albert Christian Edward; born 19 February 1960) is a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Duke of York since 1986. ... Commonwealth Day is the annual celebration of the Commonwealth of Nations held on the second Monday in March, and which is marked by a multi-faith service in Westminster Abbey normally attended by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Head of the Commonwealth, the Commonwealth Secretary-General and the Commonwealth High... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, KG, KCVO, SOM (Edward Antony Richard Louis Mountbatten-Windsor; born 10 March 1964) is a member of the British Royal Family, the youngest child and third son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Earl of Wessex since 1999. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Council of Europe (COE) has developed a series of European symbols for the continent of Europe, and these have since been shared with the European Union (EU). ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Prince Philip redirects here. ... In Jersey the Lieutenant-Governor hosts a reception for the public at Government House to mark the Queens Official Birthday at which he announces recipients of Birthday Honours The Queens Birthday or Queens Official Birthday is celebrated as a public holiday in several Commonwealth countries (usually Commonwealth... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary; formerly Parker Bowles; née Shand, born 17 July 1947) is the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other 15 Commonwealth Realms. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Princess Anne, Princess Royal (Anne Elizabeth Alice Louise; born 15 August 1950), is a member of the British Royal Family and the only daughter of Elizabeth II. She is the seventh holder of the title Princess Royal, and is currently ninth in the line of succession to the British... In the United Kingdom, Remembrance Sunday is the second Sunday of November, the Sunday nearest to 11 November (Remembrance Day), which is the anniversary of the end of the hostilities of the First World War at 11 a. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

However, on 30 November, (Saint Andrew's Day), the Union Flag can only be flown in Scotland where a building has more than one flagpole—on this day the Saltire will not be lowered to make way for the Union Flag if there is only one flagpole.[12] This difference arose after Members of the Scottish Parliament complained that Scotland was the only country in the world that could not fly its national flag on its national day.[13] is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the country. ... Saint Davids Day (Welsh: Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant) is the feast day of Saint David, the patron saint of Wales, and falls on March 1 each year. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Saint George oil painting by Raphael St Georges Day is celebrated in several nations of whom Saint George is the patron saint, including England, Georgia, Bulgaria, Portugal, and Catalonia. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the country. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint Andrew (Greek: Andreas, manly), the Christian Apostle, brother of Saint Peter, was born at Bethsaida on the Lake of Galilee. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ...


There is no specified flag flown on 17 March, (Saint Patrick's Day), in Northern Ireland. However, the St Patrick's saltire flag has been used in more recent times for St Patrick's Day in Northern Ireland, by various organisations wishing to avoid the sectarianism that may be implied by the use of either the tricolour of the Republic of Ireland or symbols of Unionism such as either the Union Flag of the United Kingdom or former flag of Northern Ireland. is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... St. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...


Non-government organisations may fly the Union Flag whenever they choose.


Specifications for flag use

Correct way to fly the flag, assuming flagpole to the left.
Correct way to fly the flag, assuming flagpole to the left.
Incorrect way to fly the flag, unless flagpole is to the right.
Incorrect way to fly the flag, unless flagpole is to the right.

The flag does not have reflectional symmetry, due to the slight pinwheeling of St. Patrick's cross, which is technically called the counterchange of saltires. Thus, it has a right side and a wrong side up. To fly the flag the correct way up, the broad portion of the white cross of St Andrew should be above the red band of St Patrick (and the thin white portion below) in the upper hoist canton (the corner at the top nearest to the flag-pole), giving the Scottish symbol precedence over the Irish symbol. This is expressed by the phrases wide white top and broad side up. Traditionally, flying a flag upside down is understood as a distress signal. In the case of the Union Flag, the difference is so subtle as to be easily missed by many. In the past this has been taken advantage of by the British Army. On one occasion, a British stronghold had been captured. The captured Britons were ordered to keep flying the flag so that it was not obvious that the stronghold had fallen. However, they flew it upside-down, thus alerting some sharp-eyed British reinforcements.[citation needed] Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom_reversed. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom_reversed. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... The arms of St Albans: Azure, a saltire Or (a gold saltire on a blue field) For The Saltire (proper noun) see Flag of Scotland. ...


The normal dimensions of the flag are 1:2, except in the British Army where a 3:5 version is used. The British Army's flag is the Union Flag, but in 1938 a "British Army Non-Ceremonial Flag" was devised, featuring a Lion on crossed blades with the St Edward's Crown on a red background. This is not the equivalent of the ensigns of the other armed services, but is used at recruiting and military or sporting events, when the Army needs to be identified but the reverence and ceremony due to the regimental flags and the Union Flag would be inappropriate. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Coronation Chair and Regalia of England St Edwards Crown is one of the British Crown Jewels used primarily in the coronation of a new monarch. ... British regiment A regiment is a military unit, consisting of a variable number of battalions - commanded by a colonel. ...


The colour specifications for the colours Union Flag (Royal) Blue, Union Flag Red and White are:[14]

Scheme Blue Red White General Note: The colour schemes are not all congruent. This is due to different specifications for different types of media (for example: screen, print, and so forth)

Not official; these are Wikimedia Commons' own conversions of the Pantone.

Pantone 280 C 186 C Safe
Web-Safe Hex #003399 #CC0000 #FFFFFF
MoD 8711D 8711H 8711J
NATO 8305.99.130.4580 8305.99.130.4584 8305.99.130.4585
CMYK 100.72.0.18.5 0.91.76.6 0.0.0.0
RGB (Hex) 0, 36, 125 (#00247D) 207, 20, 43 (#CF142B) 255, 255, 255 (#FFFFFF)

For the record label, see Pantone Music. ... Web colors are colors used in designing web pages, and the methods for describing and specifying those colors. ... The Ministry of Defence (MOD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and is the headquarters of the British Armed Forces. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... Cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black). ... RGB redirects here. ... Web colors are colors used in designing web pages, and the methods for describing and specifying those colors. ...

Other names

  • In Canada the flag is officially called the Royal Union Flag.
  • In China the flag has the nickname Rice-Character Flag (米字旗 pinyin: mǐzìqí) since the pattern looks like the Chinese character for "rice" (米).[15]
  • In some countries, including Ireland and Scotland, the Union flag is occasionally referred to as the Butcher's Apron, because of its perceived association with the killing of civilian populations by English, and later British, forces.[16] In 2006, Sandra White, a Scottish National Party Member of the Scottish Parliament, caused some controversy when she referred to the flag in a press release as the "Butcher's Apron".[17][18]

Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... This article is about the country. ... Sandra White is a Scottish politician. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ...

See also

This is a list of flags used by and in the United Kingdom and related territories. ... This is a gallery of flags arranged by design. ... Also known as the Latin cross or crux ordinaria. ... The Union Jack Club is a residential London club for members (and families) of the British Armed Services, including serving members of the Volunteer Reserve Forces, below commissioned rank. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... ... The flag of the Kalmar Union The flag of the Kalmar Union was derived from the Dannebrog, bearing a Christian cross. ... Grand Union flag North Carolina Currency, 1776 Painting of flag of East India Company, 1732 The Grand Union Flag, also known as the Congress flag, the First Navy Ensign, The Cambridge Flag, and The Continental Colors is the first true Flag of the United States. ... The Flag of Europe consists of a circle of twelve golden (yellow) stars on a blue background. ... Flag of the African Union, formerly used by the Organisation of African Unity. ... The Union Badge as seen in the Norwegian flag Norway and Sweden were in a personal union from 1814 to 1905. ...

Further reading

  • Nick Groom (2007). The Union Jack: The Story of the British Flag. Atlantic Books. ISBN 9781843543374. 

Notes

  1. ^ Union Flag. Official web site of the British Monarchy.
  2. ^ a b Flag Institute Accessed 2nd May 2007
  3. ^ "Union recognition" BBC News online article.
  4. ^ Merchant Shipping Act 1995 (c. 21) section 4(1)(a)(ii)
  5. ^ www.guardian.co.uk/britain/article/0,,2218159,00.html#clnc
  6. ^ www.fotw.net/flags/gb-lthse.html#cnlc Flags of the World, Northern Lighthouse Commissioner's Flag
  7. ^ The Kings and Queens of England and Scotland by Plantagenet Somerset Fry (Grove Press, 1990). Includes several proposed versions of the original Union Flag.
  8. ^ Flags Of The World United Kingdom - History Of The Flag: Scottish Variant
  9. ^ Proposal to include a Welsh symbol in the Union Flag
  10. ^ Flags of the World Use of the Union Flag at Sea
  11. ^ Department of Culture, Media and Sport's rules, issued on behalf of The Queen
  12. ^ Scotland.gov.uk- "Royal and ceremonial"/
  13. ^ BBC News- "Ministers agree flag day review"
  14. ^ The Flag Institute
  15. ^ A Google Images search for '米字旗' turns up several United Kingdom flags
  16. ^ http://archives.tcm.ie/businesspost/2006/06/25/story15150.asp The Sunday Business Post, June 25, 2006 "Irish republicans have long called it the butcher’s apron, an imaginative and pointed interpretation of its lurid colours and bloody history."
  17. ^ http://news.scotsman.com/latest_scotland.cfm?id=82122006
  18. ^ http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/news/tm_objectid=16609593&method=full&siteid=66633-name_page.html

Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Sunday Business Post is an Irish national Sunday newspaper published by Thomas Crosbie Holdings Limited. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Union Flag - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2777 words)
The pre-1801 Union Flag is also shown in the canton of the Grand Union Flag (also known as the Congress flag, The First Navy Ensign, The Cambridge Flag, and The Continental Colors), the first widely-used Flag of the United States.
The current flag is blazoned Azure, the Crosses Saltire of St Andrew and St Patrick, quarterly per saltire, counterchanged Argent and Gules, the latter fimbriated of the second, surmounted by the Cross of St George of the third, fimbriated as the saltire.
The Union Flag was found in the canton (top left-hand corner) of the flags of many colonies of the UK, while the field (background) of their flags was the colour of the naval ensign flown by the particular Royal Navy squadron that patrolled that region of the World.
Flag of the United Kingdom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (597 words)
Currently the flag is flown on days marking the birthdays of members of the Royal family, the wedding anniversary of the monarch, Commonwealth Day, Accession Day, Coronation Day, The Queen's official birthday, Remembrance Sunday and on the days of the State Opening and prorogation of Parliament.
The flag is only flown on public buildings as decided by Department for Culture, Media and Sport or on the command of the British monarch.
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