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Encyclopedia > Uniform Resource Locator

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Uniform Resource Locator (URL) formerly known as Universal Resource Locator, is a technical, Web-related term used in two distinct meanings: WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ...

  • In popular usage and many technical documents, it is a synonym for Uniform Resource Identifier (URI);
  • Strictly, the idea of a uniform syntax for global identifiers of network-retrievable documents was the core idea of the World Wide Web. In the early times, these identifiers were variously called "document names", "Web addresses" and "Uniform Resource Locators". These names were misleading, however, because not all identifiers were locators, and even for those that were, this was not their defining characteristic. Nevertheless, by the time the RFC 1630 formally defined the term "URI" as a generic term best suited to the concept, the term "URL" had gained widespread popularity, which has continued to this day.

Synonyms (in ancient Greek, συν (syn) = plus and όνομα (onoma) = name) are different words with similar or identical meanings. ... A Uniform Resource Identifier (URI), is a compact string of characters used to identify or name a resource. ...

URI/URL syntax in brief

Every URI (and therefore, every URL) begins with the scheme name that defines its namespace, purpose, and the syntax of the remaining part of the URI. Most Web-enabled programs will try to dereference a URI according to the semantics of its scheme and a context-vbn For example, a Web browser will usually dereference a http://example.org/ by performing an HTTP request to the host example.org, at the default HTTP port (see Port 80). Dereferencing the URI mailto:bob@example.com will usually open a "Compose e-mail" window with the address bob@example.com in the "To" field. A URI scheme is the top level of the URI (Uniform Resource Identifier) naming structure. ... A URI scheme is the top level of the URI (Uniform Resource Identifier) naming structure. ... A namespace is a context in which a group of one or more identifiers might exist. ... A Uniform Resource Identifier (URI), is a compact string of characters used to identify or name a resource. ... An example of a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox) A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with text, images, videos, music and other information typically located on a Web page at a website on the World Wide Web or a local area network. ... HTTP (for HyperText Transfer Protocol) is the primary method used to convey information on the World Wide Web. ... HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is the primary method used to transfer or convey information on the World Wide Web. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... An e-mail address identifies a location to which e-mail messages can be delivered. ...


"example.com" is a domain name; an IP address or other network address might be used instead. The term domain name has multiple related meanings: A name that identifies a computer or computers on the internet. ... An IP address (Internet Protocol address) is a unique address that certain electronic devices use in order to identify and communicate with each other on a computer network utilizing the Internet Protocol standard (IP)—in simpler terms, a computer address. ... In computer networking, the term network address may refer to one of the following: A network layer address, i. ...


URLs as locators

In its current strict technical meaning, a URL is a URI that, “in addition to identifying a resource, [provides] a means of locating the resource by describing its primary access mechanism (e.g., its network ‘location’).”[1] The term resource is a foundational term in World Wide Web architecture because it is the root of Uniform Resource Identifiers, also known as URIs and URLs. ...


Address bar

Main article: URL bar
Address Bar in Mozilla Firefox.

URLs are typically entered into the address or location bar of a web browser. To the right is a standard Mozilla Firefox address bar. Address bars may of course vary in appearance depending on which web browser it is displayed in, and which skin is in use. A URL bar, or location bar/address bar, is a widget in a web browser which indicates the URL of the webpage currently viewed. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 483 × 26 pixelsFull resolution (483 × 26 pixel, file size: 2 KB, MIME type: image/png) Address Bar in Microsoft Internet Explorer File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 483 × 26 pixelsFull resolution (483 × 26 pixel, file size: 2 KB, MIME type: image/png) Address Bar in Microsoft Internet Explorer File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A URL bar, or location bar/address bar, is a widget in a web browser which indicates the URL of the webpage currently viewed. ... An example of a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox) A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with text, images, videos, music and other information typically located on a Web page at a website on the World Wide Web or a local area network. ... Firefox redirects here. ... In computing, skins and themes are custom graphical appearances (GUIs) that can be applied to certain software and websites in order to suit the different tastes of different users. ...

Clean URLs

"Clean" and "cruft-free" describe URLs which are:

  • Not tied to technical details, such as the software used or whether the resource comes from a file or a database - so that a change in the technology will not break existing links to the resource. e.g. /cars/audi/ is preferable to /cars/audi/index.php or /myprog.jsp?page=cars/audi/.
  • Not tied to internal organisational structure, such as the current editor or department that created the document - so an internal reorganisation will not cause existing links to the document to break. e.g. /recommendations/2007/xyz/ is better than /~users/jane/current-work/xyz/ or /xyz-team/recommendations/.
  • Consistent with other URLs in the same site in terms of hierarchy. This is desirable so a user can see where they are in the structure of the site, and can predict where to find what they are looking for. e.g. /cars/audi/ and /cars/ford/, instead of /cars/audi/ but /ford-cars/.
  • Consistent with other URLs in the same site in terms of action. This is desirable so a user can predict other, similar URLs on that site, e.g. if /blogs/andrea/feed/ shows a feed of Andrea's blog, then appending /feed/ to any another blog on the same site should show a feed for that blog.
  • A single location for a single resource. The same resource should not be available from multiple URLs, as this results in both confusion (Are they the same resource, or is one a copy of the other? Which is the 'right' one? Is one new and the other due to be removed?) and technical difficulties, e.g. counting links to a particular resource, or caching content to speed up access but not being able to show the cached content when the resource is accessed using a different URL.

An example of the difference between "clean" and "standard" URLs could be seen as: For other meanings of RSS, see RSS (disambiguation). ...


Standard: http://example.com/index.php?section=articles&subsection=recent


Clean: http://example.com/articles/recent/ or http://example.com/articles/2007/


See also

The curie (symbol Ci) is a former unit of radioactivity, defined as 3. ... eXtensible Resource Identifier (abbreviated XRI) is a scheme and resolution protocol for abstract identifiers compatible with Uniform Resource Identifiers and Internationalized Resource Identifiers, developed by the XRI Technical Committee at OASIS. The goal of XRI is to provide a universal format for abstract, structured identifiers that are domain-, location-, application... In the 1950s and early 1960s, prior to the widespread inter-networking that led to the Internet, most communication networks were limited by their nature to only allow communications between the stations on the network. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... Percent-encoding, also known as URL encoding, is a mechanism for encoding information in a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) under certain circumstances. ... A rewrite engine is a piece of web server software used to modify URLs before fetching the requested item, for a variety of purposes. ... A Uniform Resource Identifier (URI), is a compact string of characters used to identify or name a resource. ... URL normalization is the process by which URLs are modified and standardized in a consistent manner. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... URL redirection, also called URL forwarding, domain redirection and domain forwarding, is a technique on the World Wide Web for making a web page available under many URLs. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Tim Berners-Lee, Roy T. Fielding, Larry Masinter. (January 2005). “Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): Generic Syntax”. Internet Society. RFC 3986; STD 66.

  Results from FactBites:
 
URL: Uniform Resource Locator(RFC 1738) (211 words)
Uniform Resource Location (URL) is the syntax and semantics for a compact string representation for a resource available via the Internet.
URLs are used to `locate" resources, by providing an abstract identification of the resource location.
Having located a resource, a system may perform a variety of operations on the resource, as might be characterized by such words as `access", `update", `replace", `find attributes".
Uniform Resource Locator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (184 words)
A URL is the complete colection of parameters that locates an individual Resource (document, image, web page) on the World Wide Web.
A fraction of a URI or URL is known as the Domain Name.
URL's uniformity in syntax creates a simple and organized structure upon which Communication Protocols can be created.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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