FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Umbar" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Umbar

In J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional world of Arda, a great haven to the far south of Gondor in Middle-earth. J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... A map of Arda before the end of the First Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the world in which all of the events occur, including the continents of Middle-earth and Aman. ... Gondor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ...


'Umbar' was a name - of unknown meaning - given to the area by its original inhabitants. The Númenóreans adopted the name, probably aware of the fact that 'Umbar' was the Quenya word for 'fate'. Text in Quenya, written in the Tengwar and Latin alphabets Quenya is one of the languages spoken by the Elves in J. R. R. Tolkiens work. ...


The great cape and land-locked firth of Umbar south of the Bay of Belfalas formed a natural harbour of enclosing rock, but the "great fortress of Númenor"(LR) that was located within it was not built until 2280 S.A. It was only by this time that Sauron had dared to threaten Númenor; In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Bay of Belfalas was a large southern bay in the Great Sea. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... The main part of this article relates to the last versions of Middle-earths history, and as such may controvert parts of The Silmarillion. ...

..the strength of his terror and mastery over men had grown exceedingly great, he began to assail the strong places of the Numenoreans upon the shores of the sea.
('Akallabeth' ~ "The Silmarillion")

Like the earlier New Haven in Enedwaith, and the later Pelargir on the Anduin, Umbar became a base from which Númenórean influence spread over Middle-earth. It was at Umbar that the last king of Númenor, Ar-Pharazôn the Golden, landed in 3261 S.A, to challenge Sauron: In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Lond Daer Enedh (also spelt Ened) was a great harbour in Eriador founded by the Númenóreans. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Enedwaith, also spelled Enedhwaith, originally referred to both a region of Middle-earth and the men that inhabited it, although the region Enedwaith retained that name even when the Enedwaith people were no more. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Pelargir was a great harbour city in southern Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, the Anduin or Great River of Wilderland is the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River), rising east of the Misty Mountains and flowing south through Wilderland and eastern Gondor. ... In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Ar-Pharazôn the Golden (3118 - 3319 S.A., r. ...

The fleet came at last to that place that was called Umbar, where was a mighty haven that no hand had wrought. Empty and silent under a sickle moon was the land when the King of the Sea set foot upon the shore. For seven days he journeyed with banner and trumpet. Then he sent forth heralds, and he commanded Sauron to come before him and swear to him fealty.
('Akallabêth' from "The Silmarillion")

After the Downfall of Númenor 58 years later, Umbar remained in the hands of the Númenóreans, in essence a Realm in Exile alongside Arnor and Gondor. But unlike these others, Umbar had been used by the 'King's Men', who had turned to the worship of Melkor in the last days of Númenor. These 'King's Men' were not friendly to the Elves or to their fellow Númenórean survivors who were allied to the elves, and became known as Black Númenóreans. Akallabêth is the fourth part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher R. Tolkien, with some minor assistance from fantasy fiction writer Guy Gavriel Kay. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... Gondor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Different people known as the Kings Men: Kings Men was William Shakespeares playing company, together with Richard Burbage et al. ... The Elves (always pluralized as such, never Elfs) are one of the races that appear in the work of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Arda, the Black Númenóreans were originally the loyalist survivors from the mightiest human kingdom that had yet been: Númenor, which was destroyed in the late Second Age. ...


Two Black Númenórean lords, Herumor and Fuinur, were probably from Umbar, as at the end of The Second Age they became very powerful amongst the Haradrim, a neighbouring people. Their fate is unknown, but they likely shared Sauron's defeat at the hands of the Last Alliance of Elves and Men. Herumor, which is Sindarin for Black Lord, was a Black Númenórean in the Middle-earth legendarium created by J.R.R Tolkien. ... The Haradrim or Southrons, are a race of Men in the Middle-earth, fantasy world created by J.R.R. Tolkien Spoiler warning: Lands of haradrim lie to the south of Gondor past the river Harnen, said to be of Swarthy skin, the Harad tribesmen as being skilled archers and... The Last Alliance of Elves and Men is an episode in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ...


The rulers of Umbar retained much influence over the Haradwaith well into The Third Age. When not part of Gondor, its system of government was no doubt tyrannical, but it may also have been a duumvirate: Black Númenórean and Corsair Lords are paired when mentioned; Herumor/Fuinur for example, and later Angamaite/Sangahyando. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, Haradwaith is a region south of Gondor and Mordor. ... A duumvirate is an alliance between two equally powerful political or military leaders. ...


Gondors power, however, eclipsed that of Umbar as the Third Age progressed, and in 933 T.A. Gondor's King Eärnil I captured Umbar in a surprise attack, although this was "at great cost." Eärnil I is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and the thirteenth King of Gondor and the second Ship-king. ...


For the following 500 years, Umbar was an important Gondorian city: not only a major sea-port, but as the site of the submission of Sauron to Ar-Pharazôn, and so served as a proud reminder of the might of the Dúnedain of old:

on the highest hill of the headland above the Haven they (…) set a great white pillar as a monument. It was crowned with a globe of crystal that took the rays of the Sun and of the Moon and shone like a bright star that could be seen in clear weather even on the coasts of Gondor or far out upon the western sea.
('The Heirs of Elendil' from "The Peoples of Middle-earth")

Many Black Númenóreans had fled Umbar from the assault of 933 T.A., to their subjects in Near Harad, but 82 years later, in a vain attempt to recapture it, The Peoples of Middle-earth is the 12th and final volume of The History of Middle-earth, edited by Christopher Tolkien from the unpublished manuscripts of his father J. R. R. Tolkien. ...

the Men of the Harad, led by the lords that had been driven from Umbar, came up with great power against that stronghold..
('Annals of the Kings and Rulers' from Appendix A to "The Lord of the Rings")

This 'great power' availed the Men Of Harad little, however, for despite investing and besieging the fortress of Umbar for 35 years, they failed to take it, as its supply was easily maintained, "because of the sea-power of Gondor".In 1050 T.A., the late King Earnil's son Ciryandil, In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth Ciryandil is the fourteenth King of Gondor and the third Ship-king. ...

came down from the north by sea and by land, and crossing the River Harnen his armies utterly defeated the Men of the Harad..
('Annals of the Kings and Rulers' from Appendix A to "The Lord of the Rings")

Gondorian possession of Umbar came to an abrupt end In 1448 T.A., but not at the hands of an external foe. Following the disastrous Kin-strife, the sons of Castamir the Usurper arrived there with many men and most of the fleet of Gondor. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Kin-strife was a disastrous civil war in Gondor. ... Castamir the Ursurper is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...

There they made a refuge for all the enemies of the king, and a lordship independent of his crown. Umbar remained at war with Gondor for many lives of men..
('Appendix A' ~ "The Lord of the Rings")

These men became known as the 'Corsairs of Umbar', and within two centuries became a major threat to Gondor. In 1634 T.A. Castamir's great-grandsons Angamaitë and Sangahyando raided Pelargir, from Umbar, killing King Minardil, but Gondor could not retaliate as it was ravaged by the Great Plague. Vengeance, if not swift, was certainly devastating: 78 years after Minardils death, his great-grand nephew succeeded in briefly recapturing Umbar, and even renamed himself Umbardacil. However, In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Pelargir was a great harbour city in southern Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth Minardil is the twenty-fifth King of Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Great Plague was a disastrous pestilence. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth Telumehtar was the twenty-eighth King of Gondor. ...

..in the new evils that soon befell Gondor Umbar was again lost, and fell into the hands of the Men Of Harad.
('Annals of the Kings and Rulers' from Appendix A to "The Lord of the Rings")

Throughout the rest of The Third Age, Umbar was home a new generation of 'Corsairs of Umbar', who must have been closely related to the Haradrim, if not even merely Haradrim themselves. These new Corsairs were cruel slavers who often raided the coasts of Belfalas and Anfalas in Gondor: in T.A 2746 for example, Amrothos, the 15th Prince of Dol Amroth fell defending Dol-en-Ernil against them. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Belfalas was a region of southern Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anfalas is a region of Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dol Amroth was a princedom which formed part of the kingdom of Gondor. ...


In 2758 T.A. Umbar joined a massive co-ordinated attack with Men of the Harad and even of Dunland, against Gondor and the new realm of Rohan: Dunland is a fictional land from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth: the land of the Dunlendings. ... Rohan, originally Rochand, is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ...

Three great fleets, long prepared, came up from Umbar and the Harad, and assailed the coasts of Gondor in great force; and the enemy made many landings, even as far north as the mouth of the Isen.
('Annals of the Kings and Rulers' from Appendix A to "The Lord of the Rings")

In 2885 T.A, Umbar supported the Haradrim who claimed Harondor, although this had long "been a debatable land between the Corsairs and the Kings(LR)", and when Sauron declared himself openly in 2951, Umbar declared its alliegance to him, and the great monument commemorating Ar-Pharazôn's triumph at Umbar was thrown down.


Umbar's fleet was largely destroyed 29 years later, when Thorongil (Aragorn Elessar, as it later turned out) in the service of the Steward of Gondor Ecthelion II led a taskforce south and burned them, killing the Captain of the Haven in the process. Promotional poster featuring Viggo Mortensen as Aragorn in New Line Cinemas motion pictures directed by Peter Jackson. ... Aragorn II, later crowned King Elessar, (T.A. 2931 - F.A. 120) is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ... The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium of Middle-earth. ... Ecthelion II is, in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the twenty-fifth Ruling Steward of Gondor. ...


During the War of the Ring, Umbar had not fully recovered from this, but could still send 50 'great ships' and smaller vessels "beyond count", to raid the coastlands of Gondor and draw off major forces from the defence of Minas Tirith. They were once again defeated by Aragorn, and the Army of the Dead. With the Fall of Barad-dûr, Umbar, weakened and defeated, finally lost its sovereignty and submitted to the crown of King Elessar. Spoiler warning: In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the War of the Ring ended the Third Age. ... In the fictional works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Army of the Dead were the shades of Men of the White Mountains, who were cursed to remain in Middle-earth by Isildur after they abandoned their oath of aid to him in the War of the Last Alliance. ... Barad-dûr and Mount Doom in Peter Jacksons film The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King Barad-dûr (Sindarin Dark Tower, sometimes given as The Barad-dûr) (Lugburz in Black Speech) is the fortress of Sauron in the fantasy world of J. R...


Umbar appeared on the bottom edge of the maps found in earlier editions of Lord of the Rings, but it is absent from modern editions, which regrettably map a slightly smaller area of Middle-earth.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Umbar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1290 words)
Umbar's fleet was largely destroyed 29 years later, when Thorongil (Aragorn Elessar, as it later turned out) in the service of the Steward of Gondor Ecthelion II led a taskforce south and burned them, killing the Captain of the Haven in the process.
With the Fall of Barad-dûr, Umbar, weakened and defeated, finally lost its sovereignty and submitted to the crown of King Elessar.
Umbar appeared on the bottom edge of the maps found in earlier editions of Lord of the Rings, but it is absent from modern editions, which regrettably map a slightly smaller area of Middle-earth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m