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Encyclopedia > Ultimates
The Ultimates


The Ultimates 2 #1. Art by Bryan Hitch. Image File history File links Acap. ... Image File history File links The_Ultimates2_issue1. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover to Ultimates (v2) #12. ...

Publisher Marvel Comics
(Ultimate imprint)
First appearance The Ultimates #1
Created by Mark Millar
Bryan Hitch
Base(s) of operations Triskelion
Roster
Captain America
Nick Fury
Hawkeye
The Hulk
Iron Man
Quicksilver
Scarlet Witch
Thor
Wasp

"The Ultimates" is a set of superhero comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics. "The Ultimates" is also the name of the team of heroes that make up the cast of the series. This team is a modernized re-imagining of Marvel's long-running super hero team, the Avengers, and they "exist" not in the mainstream Marvel Universe (as the Avengers do), but in the Ultimate Marvel Universe alongside other re-imagined heroes such as Ultimate Spider-Man, the Ultimate X-Men, and the Ultimate Fantastic Four. This article is about the comic book company. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Mark Millar (born December 24, 1969) is a Scottish comic book writer born in Coatbridge. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover to Ultimates (v2) #12. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Captain America has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... General Nicholas Joseph Nick Fury is a fictional military officer, Gulf War veteran and spy, featured in Marvel Comics. ... Hawkeye (Clint Barton) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a longtime member of the Avengers. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Hulk has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Iron Man has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ... The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... Ultimate Thor is a fictional character, a superhero in the Ultimate Marvel Universe based on the mythological Thor and the Marvel Universe Thor. ... The Wasp (Janet van Dyne) is a comic book superheroine in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... This article is about the comic book company. ... The Avengers are a fictional superhero team appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the shared universe setting used by many Marvel Comics titles. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ... For the video game of the same title, see Ultimate Spider-Man (video game). ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Ultimate Fantastic Four is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, part of the Ultimate Marvel line featuring classic Marvel Universe characters re-imagined for a modern audience. ...


While The Ultimates are clearly recognizable as a version of the Avengers, they are also very different from the originals. The tone of the stories in these books is widely considered to be darker, more cynical, and more cinematic than most traditional comic books.[1][2] Also, up until recently, The Ultimates were a government-sponsored branch of the United States military rather than a traditional super hero team.


Unlike the other Ultimate marvel titles, The Ultimates has been published in limited series rather than as an ongoing monthly title. The first series, written by Mark Millar and illustrated by Bryan Hitch, ended in April 2004. The second series, The Ultimates 2, also by Millar and Hitch, began in December 2004 and was completed in May 2007. A third series will be written by Jeph Loeb and illustrated by Joe Madureira, starting around December 2007. Mark Millar (born December 24, 1969) is a Scottish comic book writer born in Coatbridge. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover to Ultimates (v2) #12. ... Joseph Jeph Siegbert Loeb III is an American motion picture and television producer/writer and award-winning comic book writer. ... Jose Madureira (born December 3, 1974, in Philadelphia. ...

Contents

Publication history

Conception

The Ultimates debuted in March 2002, the fourth comic series to appear in the Ultimate Marvel line, preceded by Ultimate Spider-Man, Ultimate X-Men and Ultimate Marvel Team-Up. The series was conceived by writer Mark Millar and artist Bryan Hitch who, when asked about the impetus for the collaboration in an interview with Silver Bullet Comics, remembers that "Joe Quesada called and said, 'Hey, the lunatics are running the asylum over here, want to join the party?' The project came from Millar, and it was perfect. Joe put us together, and after three hours on the phone, we had started the journey that was to develop into The Ultimates."[2] The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ... For the video game of the same title, see Ultimate Spider-Man (video game). ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Ultimate Marvel Team-Up was a Marvel Comics title which ran for 16 issues (plus a concluding Ultimate Spider-Man Super Special), set in the Ultimate Marvel Universe. ... Joseph Joe Quesada (born December 1, 1962), colloquially known as Joe Q, is the editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics and a comic book writer and artist. ...


As was stated above, one of many notable differences between The Ultimates and many other comics is the edgier and darker elements that Millar has written in to them. This can be especially seen in the characters, which are quite different than their mainstream counterparts. Captain America is more violent and pragmatic, Nick Fury is notably fiercer and scorns oversight of S.H.I.E.L.D., Hank and Janet Pym share an abusive relationship and Tony Stark is a womanizing drunk with a flamboyantly gay butler. Bruce Banner is written as a far more self-conscious, socially-inept individual and Betty Ross as careerist, manipulative and self-indulgent, a source of their frequent relationship woes. The Hulk is frequently depicted as a murderous sociopath whose rage leaves little concern for civilian casualties. Nick Fury and Janet Pym, both previously depicted as Caucasian in mainstream Marvel comics, have their ethnicities adjusted to give the team a more multi-cultural tone (with Fury now an African-American and Janet is Asian-American). In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Captain America has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... General Nicholas Joseph Nick Fury is a fictional military officer, Gulf War veteran and spy, featured in Marvel Comics. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Iron Man has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ...


Hitch commented: "We just set out with the basic idea: What would we do if we had to make The Avengers as a movie?... You have to approach it as though nothing has happened before and tell the story fresh from the start, find the current day relevance and the best actors. We had to get to the core of who these people were and build outwards, so Cap was a soldier, Thor is either a nut case or a messiah (maybe both, today we would treat them same way: a cult following and a spell in the loony house), Banner an insecure genius, and Fury the king of cool.[2]" Ultimate Thor is a fictional character, a superhero in the Ultimate Marvel Universe based on the mythological Thor and the Marvel Universe Thor. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Hulk has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ...


Although the Ultimates consistently sold well and received favorable notice from critics (see "Awards" section), the series soon became notorious for its delayed release dates. Originally planned as a monthly comic, the publication dates were constantly shifted further back, so that the twelfth issue of The Ultimates didn't come out until April 2004, almost three years after issue #1. Similarly, the thirteenth issue of The Ultimates 2 was delayed for over 6 months from its originally scheduled release date; it was finally released in May 2007.


In a December 2004 interview with PopCultureShock, Millar talked about his comic, stating The Ultimates were indeed different from the Avengers (its mainstream Marvel sister title): "The idea behind The Avengers is that the Marvel Universe's biggest players all get together and fight all the biggest supervillains they can't defeat individually, whereas Ultimates 2 is an exploration of what happens when a bunch of ordinary people are turned into super-soldiers and being groomed to fight the real-life war on terror." He also defended the concept of putting controversial "indie" topics into a big mainstream comic like Ultimates, denying he had "sold out". He said: "There's a funny snobbery from people as regards the worthiness of indie books... The nice thing about hitting your thirties is realizing it's often all pose and 90% of indie books are as shit as 90% of mainstream books. There's good and bad on both sides and no inner-dignity to not selling well."[3] This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11 2001. ...


The Ultimates

"Super Human" (The Ultimates #1-6)

S.H.I.E.L.D. general Nick Fury is entrusted with establishing a strike force of government-sponsored superheroes. Initial recruits include scientist couple Henry and Janet Pym (Giant-Man and Wasp) tasked with developing a super-soldier serum based on Hank's Giant-Man formula. Bruce Banner (The Hulk) is also recruited to focus on recreating a super-soldier serum responsible for the original Captain America. Billionaire playboy Tony Stark and his (Iron Man) project are also brought aboard. Attempts at courting anti-establishment icon and self-proclaimed Norse god Thor fall through due to his outspoken criticism of the United States' foreign policy. The team is almost complete when S.H.I.E.L.D. discovers the preserved body of Steve Rogers, the super-soldier missing in action since World War II. After a successful revival, he is given command of the strike force, now called the Ultimates. In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Captain America has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Following its establishment, criticism of the Ultimates gradually builds, due to the inflated billion-dollar budget of the Triskelion, the Ultimates' headquarters built off the coast of Manhattan. Bruce Banner, invited primarily because of his work on the super-soldier serum that defined Captain America's super powers, is unable to deliver workable results. He is further shamed by the progress of Hank Pym's research, the taunting by several of his teammates and discovering ex-girlfriend Betty Ross's affair with Hollywood actor Freddy Prinze, Jr. Following these events, Banner injects himself with serum that combines the Captain America and Hulk formulas, rationalizing to Betty that the Ultimates will now have something to fight. He transforms into the ultra-violent, sociopath Ultimate Hulk, whose subsequent rampage through Manhattan kills 852 people. After a brutal and devastating battle, the Hulk is finally subdued by Jan Pym who delivers an electrical pulse to the part of his brain that controlled his transformations, by shrinking down small enough to fit through his nasal cavities. Banner's involvement in Hulk's rampage is concealed by Betty Ross and S.H.I.E.L.D. to quash the public relations disaster.


"Homeland Security" (The Ultimates #7-13)

The Ultimates discover the existence of the shape-shifting Chitauri, an alien race that enslaves and colonizes entire solar systems. Following the development of the grave threat, S.H.I.E.L.D. black operative Black Widow (Natasha Romanova), former olympic archer Hawkeye (Clint Barton), and the mutant siblings Scarlet Witch(Wanda Maximoff) and Quicksilver (Pietro Maximoff) are integrated into the Ultimates. The Ultimates lead a S.H.I.E.L.D. invasion of the Chitauri's base of operations in Pollomach learning too late of the Chitauri trap, which wipes out the entire S.H.I.E.L.D. strike force.


In America, the Chitauri infiltrate the Triskelion to covertly conquer the world when thousands of ships of the Chitauri high command appear, ordering their ground forces to immediately evacuate Earth, and to activate a bomb large enough to wipe out the entire solar system. During their evacuation, the Chitauri discover that the Ultimates and a large contingent of the S.H.I.E.L.D. strike force survived the blast, courtesy of Iron Man's experimental force field generator. Thor teleports the survivors to the Chitauri's base in Phoenix, Arizona to engage the Chitauri ground forces.


The battle rages, but the situation is slowly disintegrating. The bomb cannot be defused, the skies are choked with Chitauri spaceships and Herr Kleiser, the Chitauri leader, proves too formidable for Captain America to defeat. Finally, Thor uses his mythical hammer Mjolnir to teleport the bomb to another dimension. American Air Force and Navy jets arrive and engage the Chitauri fleet. Captain America authorizes the weapon of last resort and thousands of feet above the battle, Banner is thrown out of a helicopter. The impact prompts an immediate Hulk transformation, and he proceeds to eat Herr Kleiser. Captain America redirects the Hulk against the Chitauri fleet, destroying it. The Hulk is sedated with an anti-Hulk serum, causing him to revert to an unconscious, exhausted Bruce Banner.


The world celebrates the Ultimates, who celebrate in turn at the White House. Nick Fury walks past the Oval Office to the balcony overlooking Washington and notes to the nearby honor guards that "It's not every day that you save the world."


The Ultimates 2

The second Millar/Hitch run, The Ultimates 2, began in December 2004 and finished in May 2007. Millar stated in Pop Culture Shock that this arc reflected contemporary issues, ranging from hyper-powered countries like the USA, preemptive strikes, the rising world-wide anti-American sentiment in the wake of the Neo-Conservative Bush Doctrine, and the "rogue nation" classification and the fear of backlash in form of nuclear Armageddon. Millar said: "In the name of oil, this administration is stirring up a hornet's nest (...). My own belief is that there'll be a couple of nuclear attacks in the States, the multinationals will move elsewhere, the American economy will completely collapse and make the 30s look like the 80s and the Middle East will be occupied by drafted teenagers from your home town. (...) I hope I'm completely and utterly wrong." [1] A hyperpower is a state that is militarily, economically, and technologically dominant on the world stage. ... Preemptive war (or preemptive attack) is waged in an attempt to repel or defeat a perceived imminent offensive or invasion, or to gain a strategic advantage in an impending (allegedly unavoidable) war. ... President Bush makes remarks in 2006 during a press conference in the Rose Garden about Irans nuclear ambitions and discusses North Koreas nuclear test. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


"Gods and Monsters" (The Ultimates 2 #1-6)

The Ultimates' involvement with the second Hulk rampage is revealed, causing a massive PR disaster and a death sentence for Bruce Banner, who is sedated and left aboard an aircraft carrier with a ticking nuclear bomb. Hank Pym, in charge of the execution, later receives a call from Banner, far across the world, thanking him.


Meanwhile, the Ultimates are criticized both publicly and by S.H.I.E.L.D. for several international mishaps stemming from their involvement in U.S. foreign policy. One incident in particular, in which the Ultimates invade a Middle-Eastern nation to disarm its nuclear arsenal, brings international accusations that the United States is establishing an expansionist empire similar to Rome. The incident forces Thor's resignation from the team.


Days later, Thor is videotaped attacking Italian riot police at an anti-war protest. Following the incident, the Ultimates are notified by Gunnar Golmen of the Norwegian branch of the European Defense Initiative, who reveals that Thor is an escaped mental patient who stole experimental weapons from a government lab that bestows him incredible power. The Ultimates, faced with a rogue hero running free through the world, assemble a team to apprehend him. Throughout the massive battle, Thor blames his half-brother Loki, whom he accuses of manufacturing evidence to deceive the Ultimates. The team ignores Thor's pleas and after a grueling battle apprehends and imprisons him in a Triskellion cell. Gunnar Golmen soon visits him, taunting him from the other side of his cell and revealing his true existence as Loki.


"Grand Theft America" (The Ultimates 2 #7-13)

Thor remains imprisoned, despite a massive protest outside the Triskelion, proclaiming his innocence. Inside, Thor converses with Tony Stark, warning him that there is a traitor within the Ultimates. Bruce Banner is presumed dead following the successful detonation of the nuclear device. Hank Pym who, after attacking and severely injuring his wife Janet, is no longer a member of the Ultimates, moonlights as a member of the hapless vigilante group, the Defenders while developing prototype designs for his Ultron robots, which he attempts to market to Nick Fury, who is unwilling to associate with Pym. Fury's rebuff and Pym's disastrous career as a Defender prompt him to start seeking out alternate employment with the Ultimate traitor who shares his distaste for the Ultimates. The Defenders are a Marvel Comics superhero group — usually presented as a non-team of individualistic outsiders each known for following their own agendas — that usually battles mystic and supernatural threats. ... For other uses, see Ultron (disambiguation). ...


One night Clint Barton and his wife Laura, following a dinner party with Jan, Steve, Pietro and Wanda, are ambushed by armed men in their home, who kill Laura and the children and capture Hawkeye. Based on video surveillance, Captain America is arrested and imprisoned in the Triskelion. Days later, following Captain America's arrest, the Triskellion is attacked by a massive invasion force. New York City and Washington D.C. are likewise invaded. Despite the Ultimates' best efforts, their ranks have been depleted, and the Reserves are outclassed by the invading forces. The invading force is named the Liberators, a supervillain alliance composed of recruits and funding from rival countries of the United States: Syria, North Korea, China, Russia, and Iran, reinforced with human infantry in specially augmented suits. The Ultimates traitor is revealed as Black Widow, who captured Hawkeye and extracted enough information from his mind to override the various security systems of the Ultimates. Hank Pym, previously approached by the Liberators to betray the Ultimates, is tasked with maintaining order, in the form of his Ultron robots. Hawkeye (Clint Barton) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a longtime member of the Avengers. ... For the all-female team, see Lady Liberators (comics). ...


The Liberators round up members of the United States government, S.H.I.E.L.D., the Ultimates and assorted American superhero teams. Captain America escapes from the Triskelion with Wasp, Hawkeye escapes from his interrogators, and the three converge onto the White House, where they free the other Ultimates and instigate an immediate counter-offensive against the occupying invaders. The Liberators, many of whom are engineered doppelgangers of existing Ultimates, are gradually dispatched. A super soldier task force from the European Union appears on American soil and frees Spider-Man, the X-Men, and the Fantastic Four, all of whom resist the Liberator occupation in New York City. As the tide turns Hank Pym orders his Ultron robots to turn against the Liberators.


With the Ultimates and their allies on the verge of victory, Loki reveals his true self and threatens retaliation. The Scarlet Witch summons Thor, his injuries healed, and he attacks Loki. The two do battle across Washington D.C. before Loki summons a massive inter-dimensional army of trolls, giants and monsters from Norse mythology that forces the Ultimates into a retreat. Moments later, clenched together in battle, Thor reveals he brought backup as well. The skies light up with a rainbow bridge and an army of Asgardian warriors join the battle. With the combined might of the Ultimates and their Asgardian reinforcements, Loki's army is defeated and the Trickster himself is sent to Odin for judgment. Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... In Norse Mythology, Bifröst is the bridge leading from the realm of the mortals Midgard to the realm of the gods Asgard, which the gods travel daily to hold their councils under the shade of the tree Yggdrasill. ...


Following the battle, Captain America informs Nick Fury the Ultimates will thereafter act as an independent team to be financed by Tony Stark, thus severing ties to the United States government to dissuade further terrorist attacks. Hawkeye locates a recovering Black Widow in a hospital bed, where he kills her. Tony Stark finds a new love interest and on the Triskelion, Jan visits Hank Pym, now incarcerated in the same cell previously occupied with Bruce Banner and Thor.


In an epilogue, Steve Rogers and Gail are seen in 1942 taking a walk in Brooklyn, discussing a future together that will never be. This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


The Ultimates 3

Cover to Ultimates 3 #1. Art by Joe Madureira.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 417 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,656 × 864 pixels, file size: 270 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cover to Ultimates 3 #1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 417 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,656 × 864 pixels, file size: 270 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cover to Ultimates 3 #1. ... Jose Madureira (born December 3, 1974, in Philadelphia. ...

"Sex, Lies, & DVD"

The third installment, The Ultimates 3, is set to be released December 2007 and will last 5 issues. The creative team of Jeph Loeb, Joe Madureira and Christian Lichtner was announced at Wizard World Chicago in August 2006. Full plot details have yet to be released, but it has been revealed that Ultimates 3 will relate to the Ultimate Origins miniseries and lead directly into the "Ultimatum" arc (by Loeb and Finch) that will take place in Ultimate Fantastic Four and Ultimate X-Men.[4] Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Joseph Jeph Siegbert Loeb III is an American motion picture and television producer/writer and award-winning comic book writer. ... Jose Madureira (born December 3, 1974, in Philadelphia. ... Ultimate Origins is a comic book miniseries by Marvel Comics, scheduled to be published in June 2008[1] It falls under Marvels Ultimate Marvel imprint. ... Ultimatum is an upcoming six-issue comic book story arc from Marvel Comics, scheduled to begin in May 2008. ... Ultimate Fantastic Four is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, part of the Ultimate Marvel line featuring classic Marvel Universe characters re-imagined for a modern audience. ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ...


Recent solicitations have stated that in issue #1 that Venom will launch a surprise attack on Stark Tower and one of the Ultimates will die in the resulting conflict.[5] Solicitations for issue #2 state that the Brotherhood of Mutants will attack. Spider-Man will also appear with the Ultimates, although he "is not welcome" by the team," according to Loeb. [6] Issue #1 will be released with two different gatefold covers; one with heroes and one with villains. Preview of these covers have shown that the titular group's lineup includes Captain America, Spider-Man, Wolverine, Giant Man, Black Panther, Wasp, Thor, Iron Man, Quicksilver, Scarlet Witch, Valkyrie, and Hawkeye will be appearing in the book.[7][6] Villains shown include Magneto, Mystique, Blob, Sabretooth, Multiple Man, Venom, and Storm. In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Magneto has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... Mystique (Raven Darkholme) is a Marvel Comics character associated with the X-Men franchise. ... For other uses, see Blob (disambiguation). ... Sabretooth is a Marvel Comics character, an arch-enemy of the X-Men’s Wolverine. ... For the rapper of Twiztid, see Jamie Spaniolo. ... Venom (Edward Eddie Charles Brock), is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics supervillain and anti-hero generally credited to David Michelinie and Todd McFarlane. ... In addition to her mainstream incarnation, Storm has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ...


Characters

The Ultimates

Members of the Ultimates include Black Widow, Captain America, General Nick Fury, Giant-Man, Hawkeye, the Hulk, Iron Man, Quicksilver, Scarlet Witch, Thor, and the Wasp. This article is about the Marvel Comics characters. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Captain America has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... General Nicholas Joseph Nick Fury is a fictional military officer, Gulf War veteran and spy, featured in Marvel Comics. ... Dr. Henry Hank Pym is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe, created by writer Stan Lee and artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby. ... Hawkeye (Clint Barton) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a longtime member of the Avengers. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Hulk has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Iron Man has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ... The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... Ultimate Thor is a fictional character, a superhero in the Ultimate Marvel Universe based on the mythological Thor and the Marvel Universe Thor. ... The Wasp (Janet van Dyne) is a comic book superheroine in the Marvel Comics universe. ...

  • The Black Widow and Hawkeye are Natasha Romanova, a former KGB spy and expert assassin and Clint Barton, a former Olympics archer with superhuman accuracy. Professional partners originally part of the Ultimates' covert operations "Black Ops" team. They were subsequently moved to public status after having their backgrounds falsified for public consumption following the emergence of the Chitauri threat. Hawkeye killed Black Widow, who was engaged to Stark, at the end of Ultimates 2.
  • Captain America, real name Steve Rogers, is the only test subject to survive the "super-soldier serum", which gives him enhanced strength and durability. After his last mission during World War II, he fell into the Arctic Ocean and was cryogenically frozen for over 50 years and only recently was found and revived. He is patriotic, jingoistic and deeply conservative (unlike his more liberal Earth-616 counterpart) stemming from his pre-World War II upbringing. A tactical genius, he is the Ultimates' field leader and maintains a stereotypical 1940s attitude in the modern post-2000 world.
  • General Nick Fury is the director of S.H.I.E.L.D., a fictional branch of the U.S. military devoted to meta-human threats. While primarily tasked with leading the Ultimates through a command center on the Triskellion or a Helicarrier, he occasionally joins the team on field missions, where he employs a dazzling array of classified weaponry and technology. He appears constantly in the Ultimate Marvel Universe and personally knows Charles Xavier and Peter Parker. In an interview for Fanboy Radio Bryan Hitch explains the origins of their version of the character: If a government-sanction superteam existed, it would be run by someone who had had both a military and political background and arrived at Colin Powell. Since the original Nick Fury had been based on the 1960s definition of cool, Dean Martin, the 21st century version would be based on the current definition of cool, Samuel L. Jackson.

    According to Bryan Hitch's Fanboy Radio interview, Samuel L. Jackson's wife purchased original artwork of Nick Fury and has it hanging in his home. This article is about the Marvel Comics characters. ... Hawkeye (Clint Barton) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a longtime member of the Avengers. ... This article is about the KGB of the Soviet Union. ... From The U.S. Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms - Joint Publication JP1-02 dated 05 January 2007: Covert Operation: An operation that is so planned and executed as to conceal the identity of or permit plausible denial by the sponsor. ... The Skrulls are a fictional race of extraterrestrial shapeshifters that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Captain America has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... In the fictional Marvel Universe, Earth-616 or Earth 616 is the name used to identify the primary continuity in which most Marvel Comics titles take place. ... General Nicholas Joseph Nick Fury is a fictional military officer, Gulf War veteran and spy, featured in Marvel Comics. ... S.H.I.E.L.D. (originally an acronym for Supreme Headquarters, International Espionage, Law-Enforcement Division, changed in 1991 to Strategic Hazard Intervention, Espionage and Logistics Directorate) is a fictional counterterrorism and intelligence agency in the Marvel Universe that often deals with superhuman threats. ... The Helicarrier, an aircraft carrier specifically designed to be itself capable of independent powered flight in addition to the conventional functions of aircraft carriers, is the signature capital ship of the fictional intelligence/defence agency S.H.I.E.L.D., usually shown in Marvel Comics-published comic book magazines. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Professor X has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... For the video game of the same title, see Ultimate Spider-Man (video game). ... Fanboy Radio is a comic book related radio show and podcast. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... For the French hip hop artist, see Nikkfurie. ... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti, June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an American singer, film actor, and comedian. ... “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover to Ultimates (v2) #12. ... Fanboy Radio is a comic book related radio show and podcast. ... “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... General Nicholas Joseph Nick Fury is a fictional military officer, Gulf War veteran and spy, featured in Marvel Comics. ...

  • Giant-Man and the Wasp are husband and wife Henry and Janet Pym. Henry is a brilliant but unstable scientist working on the "Super Soldier Project" for S.H.I.E.L.D., assisted by Janet, a molecular biologist. Henry has the ability to proportionately expand himself to 60 feet in height, while Janet can transform into a wasp-sized version of herself, with wings and the ability to project glittering blasts of bio-electric energy. Their strained marriage includes emotional, verbal, and physical abuse by both of them, leading Janet to begin a relationship with Captain America after divorcing Henry. The relationship with Captain America also faces strain, largely from the inherent generational differences and Janet's attempts to re-establish a friendship with Henry.
  • The Hulk, Dr. Robert Bruce Banner. A scientific genius and expert on genetics and radiation, Banner's initial transformation into the Hulk was shielded from the public by S.H.I.E.L.D., who hired him to replicate the super-soldier serum responsible for Captain America. Later, ashamed at his inability to recreate the serum and resentful of his treatment at the hands of his teammates and ex-girlfriend Betty Ross, Banner injects himself with an improved Hulk serum, transforming into the grayish, sociopathic, psychopathic Hulk. The Hulk's subsequent rampage killed 852 people, and Banner was ultimately sentenced to death by nuclear explosion, only to transform into the Hulk prior to detonation and survive the blast. Following a soul-searching journey to Tibet, Banner returns to America during the Liberators invasion to aid the Ultimates.
  • Iron Man, real name Antonio Stark, son of inventor and defense contractor Howard Stark and geneticist and educator Maria Stark. A billionaire industrialist, unrepentant playboy, shameless womanizer and inventive genius, Stark has been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor and decides to do something of worth before he dies, utilizing the Iron Man powered armor for his personal crusade instead of selling it on the open market. Tony is particularly susceptible to alcohol due to the proliferation of brain tissue throughout much his body, an uncommon phenomenon responsible for his hyper-intelligence. The condition is also responsible for his constant physical pain, which he sedates with his nearly endless drinking. In the second series, Stark becomes engaged to Natasha Romanova.
  • Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch are Pietro and Wanda Maximoff, a pair of mutant siblings and the children of noted mutant terrorist Magneto. Pietro can run, think, and react at super speed while Wanda can consciously manipulate probabilities in her favor. Despite working for the Ultimates, neither Pietro nor Wanda has abandoned their loyalty to Magneto's Brotherhood of Mutant Supremacy or their belief in mutant supremacy. Their mutant status and their father's vengeful wrath following Pietro's betrayal have forced them to remain a part of the Black Ops section. They are very close and intimate with one another with physical behavior bordering on incestuous.
  • Thor Thor's real name was originally said to be Thorlief Golmen, allegedly the exiled Son of Odin. He maintains a cult of personality with his preachings of political conspiracies orchestrated by the New World Order. An ex-nurse who suffered a nervous breakdown and spent 18 months in a mental institution, he possesses the super-powers of flight, weather manipulation, super-strength and clairvoyance. He also wields Mjolnir, which can teleport objects into other dimensions. Thor's true identity as the Norse God of Thunder are frequently questioned by his teammates and the world alike, although the later appearance of Loki in the series gives credence to Thor's claims, following Thor's summoning of Asgardian reinforcements that magically arrive in the real world. He refuses to be an official member of the team, which he considers pawns of the military-industrial complex, but offers his assistance for any "genuine emergency" that requires his help. Thor's claims are verified at the end of Ultimates 2, laying to rest the question of whether or not he is indeed the mythical Thunder God.

Dr. Henry Hank Pym is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe, created by writer Stan Lee and artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby. ... The Wasp (Janet van Dyne) is a comic book superheroine in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Hulk has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... For other uses, see Radiation (disambiguation). ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Captain America has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... Betty Ross (later Betty Talbot and then Betty Banner) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For the all-female team, see Lady Liberators (comics). ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Iron Man has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... A geneticist is a scientist who studies genetics, the science of heredity and variation of organisms. ... A brain tumor is any intracranial tumor created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division, normally either in the brain itself (neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin-producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or... U.S. Army conceptual mock-up of an exoskeleton-equipped soldier. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... This article is about the Marvel Comics characters. ... For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ... The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... This article is about magneto, the engine component. ... In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Magneto has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... The Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, also known as The Brotherhood and Brotherhood of Mutants, is a Marvel Comics supervillain team devoted to mutant superiority over normal humans. ... Ultimate Thor is a fictional character, a superhero in the Ultimate Marvel Universe based on the mythological Thor and the Marvel Universe Thor. ... Odin is a fictional character and that appears in the Marvel Universe and is based on the being of the same name from Norse mythology. ... A cult of personality or personality cult arises when a countrys leader uses mass media to create a larger-than-life public image through unquestioning flattery and praise. ... Clairvoyance, from 17th century French Clair meaning clear and voyant meaning seeing, is a term used to describe the transference of information about an object, location or physical event through means other than the 5 traditional senses (See Psi). ... For other uses, see Mjolnir (disambiguation). ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Loki (Loki Laufeyson) is a fictional comic book character, a Marvel Comics supervillain, based upon the Loki of Norse mythology. ... President Dwight Eisenhower famously referred to the military-industrial complex in his farewell address. ...

The Reserves

In phase two of the super-soldier program, these soldiers are slated to join the Ultimates. This would decidedly add a much more straightforward military aspect to the team, as these characters are all military personnel.

The Reserves.
  • Giant-Men, seven men injected with a modified version of Hank Pym's "Giant Man" Formula, allowing them to grow to just under 200 feet in height. In issue #9 of Ultimates 2, all the giant-men were seemingly killed by the Liberators' foot soldiers.
  • Rocketmen, wearing customized armor suits based on early Iron Man designs. Four are members of the Ultimate Reserves, while the others serve actively as general super-soldiers.

In recent issues of Ultimates 2, certain foot soldiers have been equipped with light blue enhancement suits that bestow flight and super-strength upon the wearer. Based on panel illustrations, it can be inferred there are at least 100 troops with these suits. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (504x756, 209 KB) Summary The cover of The Ultimates Annual #1, drawn by Brian Hitch. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (504x756, 209 KB) Summary The cover of The Ultimates Annual #1, drawn by Brian Hitch. ...


The following characters have yet to assist the Ultimates.

  • The Four Seasons, four Marines who derive their powers from their uniforms. Their costume designs and abilities follow the season motif (though precisely what their powers are is yet to be revealed).
  • The Human Sentinels, Sixty of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s top agents in Sentinel battle armor that has enough hardware to take on a fleet of the old Sentinel models. Special polychrome coatings prevent magnetic fields from harming them in any way. They also have helmets to deter telepathy.
  • Lieberman (deceased), the only Reserve member (besides the Giant Men) whose powers were not costume-based. He was injected with the Super-Soldier serum and, as a result, exhibited enhanced speed and strength, as well as nearly indestructible skin. He also possessed an innate connection to the S.H.I.E.L.D. supercomputer. He was intended to replace Captain America in case he was killed or went rogue. However, his central nervous system collapsed after he saved 57 people from a fire in New York City; the strain of the super-soldier serum killed him. It is suggested that there have been several other soldiers like him who died the same way.

Other reserves are mentioned, Intangi-girl and Thunderbolt, but they were not yet operational in their original appearance, and have not yet reappeared. British Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft Marines (from the English adjective marine, meaning of the sea, from Latin language mare, meaning sea, via French adjective marin(e), of the sea) are, in principle, seaborne land soldiers that are part of a navy. ... The Sentinels are fictional robots in the Marvel Comics Universe. ...


Allies

All the other Ultimate Universe title characters (Spider-Man, the X-Men, and the Fantastic Four) have interacted with the Ultimates at various times; however, characters who have thus far only appeared in conjunction with the Ultimates are:

  • Captains Britain, France, Spain, and Italy (along with several unnamed European state Captains), of the European Defense Initiative, are the European Union's super-soldiers. Their suits allow them to exhibit superhuman strength, endurance, flight, and are immune to drowning. They assisted in the capture of Thor and rebuilding of America following the Liberators' attack. [8] In addition, Captain Britain is a bioengineer, sharing his father's aptitude for science.
  • Carol Danvers, a United States Air Force Captain, former director of security at S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Aerospace Development Station 9, transferred to personal aide to General Fury. First appearing in Ultimate Secret, it is she that incarcerates Mahr Vehl and is then assigned to watch him at all times. Because of this, Sue Storm teases her about having an alien boyfriend. Captain Danvers makes her reappearance in Ultimate Power.
  • Falcon, Samuel Wilson, an explorer, adventurer, and scientist who uses a backpack with high-tech folding wings to fly. Wilson first appeared in Ultimate Nightmare and then worked on the Vision, demonstrating a high level of technological understanding. He is an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. rather than an official member of the Ultimates or Reserves.
  • Mahr Vehl, Pluskommander Geheneris Halason Mahr Vehl, human name Dr. Phillip Lawson, first appeared in Ultimate Secret, as the head scientist of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s space program. He is a Kree alien who underwent surgery to appear human. When necessary, Lawson can activate a cybernetic battlesuit from his wrist watch to gain superhuman strength, flight, endurance, shielding, invisibility, and an arm-mounted cannon. He has yet to reappear.
  • Spider-Man Nick is interested in Spider-Man joining the team when he is older. The Spider-Man/Fury relationship is rather changeable. Peter apparently told MJ that he wants to be Fury when he grows up, but the two had a serious falling out after the Hobgoblin incident when Peter attacked Nick, leading the latter to believe that Peter might be on the verge of crossing the line from ally to criminal. Fury then built a series of devices to take Peter down which were used in the clone saga before Fury finally came to understand that Peter was actually "Something truly special"; the two have apparently reconciled with Peter even going so far as telling Kingpin that he can sic Nick Fury on him. It is unclear how true this is, though given Peter's remark, "You know I can", it's possible that his relationship with S.H.I.E.L.D. is public knowledge. Fury has also manipulated the media into being nice to Spider-Man.
  • Vision, discovered in a Siberian military base during Ultimate Nightmare, the Vision was held for research at the Triskelion. After the defeat of Gah Lak Tus, the Vision is dispatched to herald its arrival on other worlds, along with the warning that "humans can kick the Hell out of anyone." Dr. Pym created a robot based on the Vision midway through Ultimates 2, dubbed Vision II.

Biological engineering (also biosystems engineering and bioengineering) deals with engineering biological processes in general. ... For the other Marvel Comics character called Ms. ... Ultimate Galactus Trilogy is a collection of three miniseries in Marvel Comics Ultimate Universe written by Warren Ellis. ... Ultimate Power is a nine-issue comic book limited series published by Marvel Comics. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ultimate Galactus Trilogy is a collection of three miniseries in Marvel Comics Ultimate Universe written by Warren Ellis. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Mar-Vell. ... Ultimate Galactus Trilogy is a collection of three miniseries in Marvel Comics Ultimate Universe written by Warren Ellis. ... For the video game of the same title, see Ultimate Spider-Man (video game). ... This article is about Marvel Comics modern-day characters. ... Ultimate Galactus Trilogy is a collection of three miniseries in Marvel Comics Ultimate Universe written by Warren Ellis. ... Galactus is a fictional character, a cosmic entity in the Marvel Universe. ...

Headquarters

The Triskelion is the main headquarters of the Ultimates. It first appeared in The Ultimates #3. The Triskelion is a massive compound built by S.H.I.E.L.D. on an artificial island in the Upper New York Bay. It contains docking facilities for ships up to the size of aircraft carriers, airstrips, and several buildings, primarily a large three-winged tower from which the name Triskelion is presumably derived. Upper New York Bay, sometimes called Upper New York Harbor or the Upper Bay, is the northern area of New York Harbor inside the Narrows. ...


The Triskelion was planned by Norman Foster and houses a hospital facility, laboratories, barracks for S.H.I.E.L.D. troops, at least one squadron of fighter jets, and specialized holding facilities for superhuman prisoners. The restored Reichstag in Berlin, housing the German parliament. ...


Since the Ultimates have left the employ of the US Government, they have moved their headquarters to Stark Tower. However, the facility is still under construction.


Enemies

Aside from the Hulk, the Ultimates have fought and encountered several super powered foes, including Magneto and his Brotherhood of Mutant Supremacy, the Ultimate Six, and the products of an abandoned Russian supersoldier program. They have also fought the Ultimate X-Men twice, though it was not until recently that Fury declared the X-Men enemies of the state. They also tangled with the villain Deathlok, whom they defeated with the assistance of Spider-Man. In addition to his mainstream incarnation, Magneto has had been depicted in other fictional universes. ... The Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, also known as The Brotherhood and Brotherhood of Mutants, is a Marvel Comics supervillain team devoted to mutant superiority over normal humans. ... Ultimate Six is a seven-issue comic book limited series and crossover between Spider-Man and the Ultimates (2003), featuring the Ultimate Marvel version of the Sinister Six. ... For the Amalgam Comics character, see Super-Soldier. ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... For the protagonists of the Adult Swim animated series Metalocalypse see Dethklok Deathlok (sometimes also referred to as Deathlok the Demolisher) is a Marvel Comics anti-hero, a cyborg, created by Rich Buckler and Doug Moench. ...


The Chitauri and their leader, Captain America's wartime nemesis, Herr Kleiser, have proven to be formidable enemies of The Ultimates, a reptilian alien race based on the mainstream Marvel Skrulls. The Skrulls are a fictional race of extraterrestrial shapeshifters that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... The Skrulls are a fictional race of extraterrestrial shapeshifters that appear in the Marvel Universe. ...


The Ultimates have over the years defeated or killed a number of super-villains; most are detained in the Triskelion. A list of imprisoned supercriminals includes:

  • Doctor Octopus (Shown working for the government in USM #103)
  • Electro (Escaped)
  • Green Goblin (Kept in cryogenic suspension) (Escaped)
  • Kraven (Escaped)
  • Sandman (Scattered into several isolated jars)
  • Elijah Stern (Created Vulture's suit, now forced to work for Fury)

The latest enemies of the Ultimates are the Liberators, the superhuman strike force of an international coalition that invades the United States out of retaliation for the incursion of The Ultimates on foreign soil. They seemed to have been influencing most of the events which transpired during the majority of The Ultimates 2 series. During the final battle in New York, the entire team was killed by their Ultimates counterparts with the exception of Perun, Ant-Man and the Liberators' Asgardian ally, Loki. Carnage is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe, a supervillain and adversary of Spider-Man and Venom. ... Gwendolyn Gwen Stacy[1] is a supporting character in Marvel Comics’ Spider-Man series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the protagonists of the Adult Swim animated series Metalocalypse see Dethklok Deathlok (sometimes also referred to as Deathlok the Demolisher) is a Marvel Comics anti-hero, a cyborg, created by Rich Buckler and Doug Moench. ... Lady Deathstrike (real name Yuriko Oyama) is a Marvel Comics supervillain, a foe of the X-Men, especially Wolverine. ... Harry Osborn is a Marvel Comics character, both one-time friend and foe to Spider-Man. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Longshot is a fictional character a Marvel Comics superhero best known as a member of the X-Men. ... For other uses, see Mastermind. ... Mystique (Raven Darkholme) is a Marvel Comics character associated with the X-Men franchise. ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Omega Red (Arkady Rossovich) is a comic book supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe and a foe of the X-Men. ... MacDonald Mac Gargan is a fictional character, a comic book supervillain in the Marvel Comics Universe created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko. ... For the video game of the same title, see Ultimate Spider-Man (video game). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mister Sinister (Nathaniel Essex) is a fictional character appearing in the comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Ultimate Six is a seven-issue comic book limited series and crossover between Spider-Man and the Ultimates (2003), featuring the Ultimate Marvel version of the Sinister Six. ... For the video game of the same title, see Ultimate Spider-Man (video game). ... Electro is the name of several fictional comic book characters in the Marvel Comics universe, including two from Marvels predecessors, Timely Comics and Atlas Comics. ... The Green Goblin is a Marvel Comics supervillain and an archenemy of Spider-Man. ... For the character from the Underworld films, see Kraven (Underworld). ... Sandman (a. ... The Vulture is the name of three fictional characters that are comic book supervillains in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For the all-female team, see Lady Liberators (comics). ...


Awards and recognition

The "Super-Human" storyline running through the first six issues of the first series won the Comics Buyer's Guide Fan Award for Favorite Story for 2003. Comics Buyers Guide (CBG) is the longest-running periodical reporting on the comic book industry. ...


Allusions

  • In the DC comic Superman/Batman (issues #20-25), the title characters find themselves involved in a dispute with a group of alternate universe superheroes known as The Maximums, who are analogues of The Ultimates much the way Marvel's Squadron Supreme served as substitutes for DC's Justice League. The Maximums, unlike The Ultimates, are based out of San Francisco.
  • While Pym tries to sell Nick Fury on the Ultron and Vision robots, Quicksilver accuses his sister, the Scarlet Witch, of flirting with one of the VISION robots. This is an obvious reference to the Scarlet Witch of the Earth-616 universe, who married the android Vision.
  • In issue 6 of The Ultimates, an issue of the Daily Planet is shown with an article titled "Ultimates Success", written by Lois Lane; the words "Daily" and "Lois" are partially covered by an issue of the Daily Bugle and Fury's laptop.
  • In issue 3 of The Ultimates, while at the Triskelion opening gala event, Tony Stark is approached by three reporters who each bear striking resemblances to Clark Kent, Lois Lane and Jimmy Olsen.
  • In issue 6 of The Ultimates, while in his house with Captain America and Thor, Tony Stark asks his butler, Jarvis, if he is going to go to the club with 'Alfred and all those other old degenerates'. Alfred is also the name of Bruce Wayne's butler in the comic series Batman.
  • In the first half of Ultimates 2, Loki can be seen in the background when Thor appears delusional. In the restaurant when Volstagg disappears, Loki can be seen in his green suit smirking. Later on, when the protest in Italy turns violent, Loki can be seen walking among the crowd.
  • Ultimate Nick Fury is closely based on Samuel L. Jackson with his approval.[citation needed] In a scene in The Ultimates, the characters discuss the actors they would like to play themselves if they ever made an Ultimates movie. Nick Fury suggests Samuel Jackson. In real life, Jackson will play Fury in the 2008 Iron Man film.

Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ... A DC Comics superteam parody of Marvels Ultimates created by The Joker and Mr. ... The Squadron Supreme is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe, a thinly disguised version of DC Comics Justice League of America. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... In the fictional Marvel Universe, Earth-616 or Earth 616 is the name used to identify the primary continuity in which most Marvel Comics titles take place. ... This article is about the fictional newspaper. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... Layout of the Bugle The Daily Bugle is a fictional New York City newspaper that is a regular fixture in the Marvel Universe, most prominently in Spider-Man and its derivative media. ... “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... This article is about the upcoming live action film. ...

Ultimate Avengers animated films

Main article: Ultimate Avengers

The Ultimates has been adapted into Ultimate Avengers, a series of animated films released on DVD. Initially, the announcement came on July 20, 2004 that Marvel Entertainment and Lions Gate Family Home Entertainment would be producing Ultimate Avengers, which was then released on February 21, 2006. Later the same year, the second film, Ultimate Avengers 2, was released on August 8. Ultimate Avengers (also known as Ultimate Avengers: The Movie) is a direct-to-video animated film based on the Marvel comic book The Ultimates. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marvel Entertainment, Inc. ... Lions Gate redirects here, for other meanings see Lions Gate (disambiguation)‎. Lions Gate Entertainment Corporation, (usually renderred as Lionsgate), (NYSE: LGF) is an American entertainment company which originated in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Ultimate Avengers (also known as Ultimate Avengers: The Movie) is a direct-to-video animated film based on the Marvel comic book The Ultimates. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ultimate Avengers 2 (also known as Ultimate Avengers 2: Rise of the Panther) is the sequel to Ultimate Avengers. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Collected editions

Trade paperbacks

The Ultimates Vol. 1: Super-Human (ISBN 0-7851-0960-9) collects The Ultimates #1-6
The Ultimates Vol. 2: Homeland Security (ISBN 0-7851-1078-X) collects The Ultimates #7-13
The Ultimates 2 Vol. 1: Gods And Monsters (ISBN 0-7851-1093-3) collects The Ultimates 2 #1-6
The Ultimates 2 Vol. 2: Grand Theft America (ISBN 0-7851-1790-3) collects The Ultimates 2 #7-13
Ultimate Annuals Vol. 1 (ISBN 0-7851-2035-1) includes The Ultimates 2 Annual #1

Hardcover

The Ultimates (ISBN 0-7851-1082-8) collects The Ultimates #1-13
The Ultimates 2 (ISBN 9780785121381 ) collects The Ultimates 2 #1-13 and The Ultimates Annual #1

Mass Market Paperbacks

Tomorrow Men (The Ultimates) (ISBN 1-4165-1065-6) Michael Jan Friedman

A mass-market paperback, authored by Michael Jan Friedman, and set between Volumes 1 & 2 of the Ultimates comic book series. ... Michael Jan Friedman Michael Jan Friedman is a New York Times bestselling author, Michael Jan Friedman is the author of nearly sixty books of fiction and nonfiction, more than half of which bear are in the Star Trek universe. ...

References

  1. ^ Writer and columnist Peter David touched upon this in his But I Digress column in The Comics Buyers Guide #1609 (October 2005).
  2. ^ a b c www.silverbulletcomicbooks.com - Bryan Hitch: The Ultimates Visionary
  3. ^ www.popcultureshock.com
  4. ^ http://www.comicbooks.org/news/newsitem.cgi?id=11387 "CCI: ULTIMATE CHANGES: LOEB TALKS "ULTIMATUM" AND ULTIMATES 3" by Dave Richards, Staff Writer
  5. ^ http://comics.ign.com/articles/833/833811p1.html
  6. ^ a b Powell, Matt; "First Look: Ultimates 3 #2: Is Spidey joining? Jeph Loeb dishes on what’s new with the Ultimate Avengers"; wizarduniverse.com; November 9, 2007
  7. ^ Ultimates 3 #2 at marvel.com
  8. ^  Ultimates 2,  #3 August 2005  Marvel Comics

Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... CBG #1600 Comics Buyers Guide (ISSN 0745-4570) (CBG) is the longest-running periodical reporting on the comic book industry. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the comic book company. ...

External links

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The Ultimate Adventure Race Series - Race Updates! (1903 words)
Ultimate Sports Association hears the call of these racers and will include a 2 person division in all their races for the 2006 season.
Ultimate Sports Association would like to remind racers to try and make a 3 or 4 person team as Adventure Racing is very much a team effort and racing as a 2 person team takes away from the full experience of a traditional Adventure Race.
So if you are part of the Ultimate Adventure Race Series and have the most points after the first two events you will win a free entrance into this August 17-20th race in Canada.
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