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Encyclopedia > Ulaid

The Ulaid, also known as the Ulaidh and the Ulad, are a people of Early Ireland who gave their name to the Irish Province of Ulster. Their capital was at Emain Macha.


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Ulaid at AllExperts (672 words)
The Ulaid or Ulaidh (singular Ulad or Uladh) were a people of Early Ireland who gave their name to the Irish Province of Ulster.
Their territory at its height extended as far south as the River Boyne and as far west as County Leitrim, but by early Christian times they were pressed by the northern Uí Néill and they were reduced to eastern County Down, where they became known as the Dál Fiatach and the Dál nAraide.
According to the Annals of the Four Masters, the reduction of the Ulaid began in AD 331, when the Three Collas defeated their king Fergus Foga in the Battle of Achadh Leithdheirg in County Monaghan.
Ulaid Cycle (10072 words)
The main part of the Ulaid Cycle was set during the reigns of Conchobar in Ulaid (Ulster) and Queen Medb in Connacht (Connaught).
She reappeared in the Ulaid Cycle as wife of Crunnchu and was associated with the curse placed upon the men of Ulster (see Curse of Macha, in the article below).
Cathbad was the Ari-Druid of Ulaid and an adviser for King Conchobar of Ulster.
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