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Encyclopedia > Ukrainian presidential election, 2004
Ukraine


This article is part of the series:
Politics of Ukraine,
Subseries of the Politics series Large flag of Ukraine Image originally derived from the public domain flags of the CIA World Factbook. ... Shortly after becoming independent in 1991, Ukraine named a parliamentary commission to prepare a new constitution, adopted a multi-party system, and adopted legislative guarantees of civil and political rights for national minorities. ... Look up Politics on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Politics (disambiguation) Democracy History of democracy List of democracy and elections-related topics List of years in politics List of politics by country articles Political corruption Political economy Political movement Political parties of the world Political party Political psychology Political sociology Political...

Political parties in Ukraine
Elections in Ukraine:
President: 2004
Parliament: 2006 Political parties in Ukraine lists political parties in Ukraine. ... Politics of Ukraine Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Ukraine ... The next Ukrainian parliamentary election will be held in March of 2006. ...

Politics Portal

The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. The election was held in a highly charged atmosphere, with allegations of media bias, intimidation and even a poisoning of Yushchenko that was later confirmed to be the result of the poison dioxin. Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... This is the main article on Media bias. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ...


According to official results, announced on November 23, the election was won by Yanukovych, but Yushchenko and his supporters, as well as many international observers, denounced the election as rigged. This led to a serious political crisis, widespread acts of civil disobedience, dubbed the "Orange Revolution", which eventually led to the Ukrainian Supreme Court annulling the results and ordering a repeat of the second round. November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... An anti-war activist is arrested for civil disobedience on the steps of the Supreme Court on February 9, 2005. ... Orange-clad supporters of Viktor Yushchenko gather in Independence Square in Kiev. ...


The second vote was re-run on December 26. Observers reported a much fairer vote, and Viktor Yushchenko won with about 52% of the vote, to Yanukovych's 44%. Yushchenko was eventually declared the winner on January 10, 2005 after the failure of a legal action brought by Yanukovych. December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


For a timeline of events that followed the runoff, see Post-election developments in Ukraine, 2004. Below is the timeline of events that followed the runoff presidential election held in Ukraine on November 21, 2004 that sparked off the Orange Revolution. Orange-clad supporters of Viktor Yushchenko gather in Independence Square in Kiev. ...

Contents


Candidates

The two major contenders were Viktor Yanukovych and Viktor Yushchenko. Yanukovych, Ukrainian prime minister since 2002, was supported by the out-going President Leonid Kuchma, as well as the Russian Federation and its president, Vladimir Putin. Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Leonid Kuchma Leonid Danylovych Kuchma (Леонід Кучма) (born August 9, 1938) was the second President of Ukraine from July 19, 1994 to January 23, 2005. ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Путин, pronunciation â–¶(?), Pútin; born 7 October 1952) is a Russian politician and the current President of the Russian Federation. ...


Yushchenko on the other hand, was considered more pro-Western, and enjoyed the support of the European Union and the United States.


In total, there were 26 candidates to the presidency, with other candidates receiving much fewer votes than the two leaders.


Preliminary vote

The initial vote of the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election was held on October 31, 2004. The results announced were a near-draw: official figures gave Yanukovych 39.32% and Yushchenko 39.87% of the votes cast. As no candidate reached the 50% margin required for outright victory, a runoff election was to be held on November 21. Although a 75% turnout was recorded in the initial vote, observers reported many irregularities, particularly in the regions where Yushchenko's support was seen to be strongest. It was unclear how much of an impact this had on the result. October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Runoff voting is a voting system used in single-seat elections. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


27,897,559 voters participated. Results of the preliminary vote were as follows:

candidate nominated by % votes
Viktor Yushchenko Self-nominated 39.87 11,125,395
Viktor Yanukovych Party of Regions 39.32 10,969,579
Oleksander Moroz Socialist Party of Ukraine 5.81 1,621,154
Petro Simonenko Communist Party of Ukraine 4.97 1,388,045
Nataliya Vitrenko Progressive Socialist Party of Ukraine 1.53 426,897
Anatoliy Kinah Party of Manufacturers and Entrepreneurs of Ukraine 0.93 260,890
Olaksander Yakovenko Communist Party of Workers and Peasants 0.78 218,214
Oleksander Omelchenko Unity Party 0.48 136,502
Leonid Chernovetsky self-nominated 0.45 128,037
Dmytro Korchinsky self-nominated 0.17 49,641
Andriy Chornovil self-nominated 0.12 36,086
Mykola Grabar self-nominated 0.07 19,550
Mykhailo Brodsky self-nominated 0.05 16,400
Yuriy Zbitnyev New Power Party 0.05 16,249
Sergiy Komisarenko self-nominated 0.04 13,692
Vasil Volga non-governmental organization "Public Control" 0.04 12,874
Bohdan Boyko Movement of Ukrainian Patriots 0.04 12,717
Oleksander Rzhavsky United Family Party 0.03 10,664
Mykola Rogozhynsky self-nominated 0.03 10,242
Vladislav Krivobokov People's Party of Depositors and Social Protection 0.03 9,280
Oleksander Bazilyuk Slavic Party of Ukraine 0.03 8,917
Igor Dushin Liberal Democratic Party of Ukraine 0.03 8,598
Roman Kozak Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists in Ukraine 0.02 8,360
Volodimir Nechiporuk self-nominated 0.02 6,141
Grigoriy Chernish Party of Rehabilitation of Infirm People withdrew
Vitaly Kononov Green Party of Ukraine withdrew
Other (Write-in) 2.98 834,425
None 1.98 556,963
Viktor Yanukovych, Prime Minister at the time
Viktor Yanukovych, Prime Minister at the time
Viktor Yushchenko, opposition leader.
Viktor Yushchenko, opposition leader.
First-round voters in Kamyaniets Podilskiy, October 31, 2004
First-round voters in Kamyaniets Podilskiy, October 31, 2004


Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... Party of the Regions(Ukraine)(Ukrainian: Партія регіонів) centrist Ukrainian political party created in March 2001 what originally supported president Leonid Kuchma and joined pro-government United Ukraine alliance during 2002 parliamentary election . ... Categories: Ukraine-related stubs | People stubs | Ukrainian politicians | Elections in Ukraine ... The Socialist Party of Ukraine (Ukrainian: Sotsialistychna Partiya Ukrainy) is a political party in Ukraine. ... Petro Symonenko is the first secretary of the Communist Party of Ukraine. ... Categories: Politics stubs | Communist parties | Ukrainian politics | Ukrainian political parties ... Election poster 2004 Nataliya Vitrenko was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the Progressive Socialist Party of Ukraine, which she has chaired since 1996. ... The Progressive Socialist Party of Ukraine (Ukrainian: Прогресивна соціалістична партія України) is a political party in Ukraine, created by Nataliya Vitrenko a flamboyant former member of Socialist Party of Ukraine in 1995. ... Categories: People stubs | Ukrainian politicians | Prime ministers of Ukraine ... Olaksander Yakovenko was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the Communist Party of Workers and Peasants, which he has chaired since 2001; this party won 0. ... Oleksander Omelchenko was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the Unity party, which he chairs. ... Leonid Chernovetsky was a self-nominated candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election. ... Dmytro Korchinsky was a self-nominated candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election. ... Andriy Chornovil was a self-nominated candidate in the Ukrainian dissident and a leader of National Movement of Ukraine, Vyacheslav Chornovil. ... Mykola Grabar was a self-nominated candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election. ... ... Yuriy Zbitnyev was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the New Power Party. ... Sergiy Komisarenko was a self-nominated candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election. ... Vasil Volga was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the non-governmental organization Public Control, of which he has been chair since 2000. ... Bohdan Boyko was a candidate in 2004 Ukrainian presidential election. ... Oleksander Rzhavsky was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the United Family Party, of which he is the head. ... Mykola Rogozhynsky was a self-nominated candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election. ... Vladislav Krivobokov was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the Peoples Party of Depositors and Social Protection, which he has chaired since its foundation in 2000. ... Oleksandr Bazylyuk was a candidate in Ukrainian presidential elections in 1999 and 2004. ... Igor Dushin was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the Liberal Democratic Party. ... Politics of Ukraine Politics of Ukraine Political parties in Ukraine Elections in Ukraine: President: 2004 The Liberal Democratic Party of Ukraine (Liberalno Demokratuyčna Partija Ukrajiny) is a political party in Ukraine. ... Roman Kozak was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists in Ukraine, which he has chaired since 2001. ... Volodimir Nechiporuk was a self-nominated candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election. ... Grigoriy Chernish was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the Party of Rehabilitation of Infirm People, which he has chaired since 1994. ... Vitaly Kononov was a candidate in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, nominated by the Green Party of Ukraine, which he chairs. ... Download high resolution version (683x1000, 151 KB)Viktor Yanukovitch, 2004 Election Poster. ... Download high resolution version (683x1000, 151 KB)Viktor Yanukovitch, 2004 Election Poster. ... Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... From http://www. ... From http://www. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... Download high resolution version (1136x848, 712 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1136x848, 712 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Kamenets Podolskiy (Ukrainian Камянець-Подільський Kamyanets Podilskyy, Polish Kamieniec Podolski, Yiddish קאַמענעץ Kamenets, Latin Camenecium) is a town in south-western Ukraine, the traditional capital of the historical region of Podolia. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Runoff

In the November 21 runoff, Ukraine's electoral commission declared Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych the winner. According to electoral commission data, Yanukovych had 49.42% and Yushchenko had 46.69% of the votes cast. Observers for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) said the run-off vote "did not meet international standards" and U.S. senior election observer, Senator Richard Lugar, called it a "concerted and forceful program of election day fraud." November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is an international organization for security. ... Richard Green Dick Lugar (born April 4, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Indiana. ... More than one country has a day called Election Day. ...

Official results for each region. Although the results have allegedly been manipulated, the map still shows a political divide between eastern and western Ukraine.

The geographic distribution of the votes showed a clear east-west division of Ukraine, which is rooted deeply in the country's history. The western, mostly agricultural, and central parts roughly correspond with the former territories of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in the 17th century. They are considered more pro-Western, with the population mostly Ukrainian-speaking and Ukrainian Greek Catholic (Uniate) in the west or Ukrainian Orthodox in the center, and have voted predominantly for Yushchenko. The industrial eastern part, including the Crimean Autonomous Republic, where the links with Russia and the Russian Orthodox Church are much stronger, and which contains many ethnic Russians and fewer Ukrainians, is a Yanukovych stronghold. Download high resolution version (1181x825, 34 KB)Based on GFDL image: Commons:Image:Map_of_Ukraine_political_simple_blank. ... Download high resolution version (1181x825, 34 KB)Based on GFDL image: Commons:Image:Map_of_Ukraine_political_simple_blank. ... After the Union of Lublin in 1569 and the formation of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth the gentry of Ukraine voted for membership in the Polish part of the Commonwealth. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church is a successor church to the acceptance of Christianity by Prince Volodymyr (also Vladimir) in Kyiv (Kiev), in 988. ... The Ukrainian Orthodox Church (UOC) is currently separated into three major jurisdictions: that body of Christians from Ukraine who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs of the Eastern Orthodox Church (the Ukrainian Orthodox Church - Moscow Patriarchate - UOC-MP). ... The Crimea (officially Autonomous Republic of Crimea, Russian transliteration: Avtonomnaya Respublika Krym, Russian: Автономная Республика Крым, Ukrainian: Автономна Республіка Крим, , pronounced cry-MEE-ah in English) is a peninsula and an autonomous republic of Ukraine on the northern coast of the Black Sea. ... Christ the Redeemer, a well-known Russian Orthodox icon from Zvenigorod. ...


Between the two rounds of the election, dramatic increases in turnout were recorded in Yanukovych-supporting regions, while Yushchenko-supporting regions recorded the same turnout or lower than recorded in the first round. This effect was most marked in eastern Ukraine and especially in Yanukovych's stronghold of Donetsk, where a turnout of 98.5% was reportedly claimed—more than 40% up from the first round. In some districts, turnout was claimed to be more than 100%, with one district reported by observers to have claimed a 127% turnout. According to election observers and opposition figures, pro-Yanukovych activists traveled around the region and voted many times as absentees. Some groups dependent on government assistance, such as students, hospital patients and prisoners, were reportedly told to vote for the government candidate. Many other irregularities were reported, including ballot-stuffing, intimidation at voting booths and huge numbers of new voters appearing on the electoral rolls—in Donetsk alone, half a million more voters were registered for the runoff election. Yanukovych won all but one of the regions where significant increases in turnout were claimed. It was later determined by the Ukrainian Supreme Court that this was in fact due to widespread falsification of the results.

Change in claimed turnout between the 1st and 2nd rounds of the election according to the Central Election Commission

Download high resolution version (1181x825, 21 KB)Ukrainian Presedential Elections of 2004, showing voter turnout increase between 1st and run-off rounds File links The following pages link to this file: Ukrainian presidential election, 2004 Talk:Ukrainian presidential election, 2004 User:Berkut Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (1181x825, 21 KB)Ukrainian Presedential Elections of 2004, showing voter turnout increase between 1st and run-off rounds File links The following pages link to this file: Ukrainian presidential election, 2004 Talk:Ukrainian presidential election, 2004 User:Berkut Categories: GFDL images ...

International influence and reaction

Many commentators saw the elections as being influenced by outside powers, notably the United States, the European Union and Russia, with the US backing Yushchenko (sending former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, former National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski and Senator John McCain to visit with Yushchenko), and Russian president Vladimir Putin publicly backing Yanukovych. In the media the two candidates were contrasted, with Yushchenko representing both the pro-Western Kiev residents as well as the rural Ukrainians, whereas Yanukovych represents the Eastern, pro-Russian industrial laborers. The Seal of the United States Department of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Henry Kissinger Dr. Henry Alfred Kissinger (born May 27, 1923 as Heinz Alfred Kissinger) is a German-born American diplomat and statesman. ... -1... Zbigniew Brzezinski Zbigniew Kazimierz Brzezinski (born March 28, 1928) is a Polish-American political scientist, geostrategist, statesman. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... John Sidney McCain III (born August 29, 1936) is an American politician. ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Путин, pronunciation ▶(?), Pútin; born 7 October 1952) is a Russian politician and the current President of the Russian Federation. ... A monument to St. ...


More specifically it was believed that a Yushchenko victory would represent a halt of Ukraine's integration with the rest of the Commonwealth of Independent States, and possibly a cancellation of the Common Economic Space between Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan that had already been agreed to by the Ukrainian parliament; he would instead be likely to increase attempts at further integration with Europe and a possible membership in the EU and NATO. On the other hand Yanukovych had already promised to make Russian an official language for Ukraine, as is already the case in fellow CIS member states Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. The Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) (in Russian: Содружество Независимых Государств (СНГ) - Sodruzhestvo Nezavisimykh Gosudarstv) is a confederation, or alliance, consisting of 11 former Soviet Republics: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. ...


Russia and the CIS

President Vladimir Putin had twice visited Ukraine before the election to show his support for Yanukovych and congratulated him on his victory before official election results. CIS election observers praised the second round of the elections as "legitimate and of a nature that reflected democratic standards", a view in direct contradiction to other monitoring organizations such as the ENEMO, the Civic Voters Committee in Ukraine and the IEOM. [1] Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Путин, pronunciation ▶(?), Pútin; born 7 October 1952) is a Russian politician and the current President of the Russian Federation. ... On October 2002, the Commonwealth of Independent States adopted at a heads of states meeting, the Convention on the Standards of Democratic Elections, Electoral Rights, and Freedoms in the Member States of the Commonwealth of Independent States. ...


Prominent hardliners in Russia cast the election as opposition to renewed Western imperialism. Russian Communist Party leader Gennady Zyuganov, for example, blames the West for interfering in the situation in Ukraine in the run-up to the October 31 presidential election: Communist Party supporters attend a May Day rally in Moscow The Communist Party of the Russian Federation (Коммунисти́ческая Па́ртия Росси́йской Федера́ции = КПРФ) is a Russian political party. ... Gennady Zyuganov Gennady Andreyevich Zyuganov (Генна́дий Андре́евич Зюга́нов) (born June 26, 1944) is a Russian politician, and head of the Communist Party of the Russian Federation (since 1993). ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ...

"I have been in Kiev for a third day and I see for myself that the numerous actions of local opposition bear the earmarks of those groups that at different times tried to destabilize Prague, Budapest and Bucharest - the earmarks of U.S. special services." [2]

On November 28, Yuri Luzhkov, the Mayor of Moscow, gave a speech denouncing the Ukrainian opposition, calling its members a "sabbath of witches" pretending to "represent the whole of the nation" [3]. Russian newspapers have printed increasingly shrill warnings, with the Communist party paper Pravda claiming: "Nato troops in Hungary and Poland are preparing to move, and Romanian and Slovakian military units have been put on alert. Ukrainian towns are in their sights." November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yuri Mikhailovich Luzhkov (Ю́рий Миха́йлович Лужко́в) (born September 21, 1936 in Moscow, Russia, USSR) is a Russian political figure. ... This article treats the Soviet/Russian newspaper. ...


Several other CIS countries lined up with Russia in supporting Yanukovych. Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko phoned Yanukovych to offer his own congratulations before the results had been officially declared. Kazakhstan's President Nursultan Nazarbayev wrote to Yanukovych that "Your victory shows that the Ukrainian people have made a choice in favour of the unity of the nation, of democratic development and economic progress." The presidents of Kyrgyzstan (Askar Akayev) and of Uzbekistan (Islam Karimov) likewise sent their congratulations. However, later Karimov criticized Russia's involvement in the Ukrainian election, saying that "Russia’s excessive demonstration of its willingness to see a certain outcome in the vote has done more harm than good." [4] The Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) (in Russian: Содружество Независимых Государств (СНГ) - Sodruzhestvo Nezavisimykh Gosudarstv) is a confederation, or alliance, consisting of 11 former Soviet Republics: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. ... Alexander Grigoryevich Lukashenko (Lukashenka) (Russian: Александр Григорьевич Лукашенко, Belarusian: Алякса́ндр Рыго́равіч Лукашэ́нка, Alaksandar Ryhoravič ŁukaÅ¡enka) (born August 30, 1954) is the current President of Belarus. ... Nursultan Nazarbayev Nursultan Abishuly Nazarbayev (Нұрсұлтан Әбішұлы Назарбаев) (born July 6, 1940 in Chemolgan, Kazakhstan) is the current leader of Kazakhstan. ... Askar Akayev Askar Akayevich Akayev (Аскар Акаевич Акаев) (born November 10, 1944 in Kyzyl-Bairak, Kirghiz SSR) served as President of Kyrgyzstan from 1990 to March 2005, when he was deposed by a popular uprising dubbed the Tulip Revolution. ... Islam Karimov Islam Abduganievich Karimov (in modern Uzbek: Islom Karimov) (born January 30, 1938) has been the President of Uzbekistan since 1991. ...


In contrast, the Georgian president Mikhail Saakashvili indicated his support for the supporters of Yushchenko, saying that "What is happening in Ukraine today clearly attests to the importance of Georgia's example for the rest of the world" [5]. This was a reference to the Rose Revolution of late 2003. Indeed, Georgians have been highly visible in the demonstrations in Kiev and the flag of Georgia has been among those on display in the city's Independence Square, while Yushchenko himself held up a rose in a seeming reference to the Rose Revolution. Mikhail Saakashvili briefing the press at UN headquarters Mikhail Saakashvili (Georgian: მიხეილ სააკაშვილი) (born December 21, 1967) is a Georgian jurist and politician and the current President of Georgia. ... Mikhail Saakashvili and his supporters marched on the parliament carrying roses as a symbol of nonviolence Rose Revolution refers to a peaceful 2003 revolution in the country of Georgia that displaced president Eduard Shevardnadze. ... 2003 (MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag ratio: 100:147 The official flag of Georgia is the five-cross flag, restored to official use on January 14, 2004 after a break of some 500 years. ...


Armenia and Azerbaijan kept more neutral positions, supporting neither side but both stressing the need for Ukrainian unity.


On December 2, one day before the Supreme Court decided in favour of repeating the runoff election, President Kuchma visited Moscow to discuss the crisis with Vladimir Putin. Putin supported Kuchma's position of desiring wholly new elections, rather than just a repeat of the second round. December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


European Union

The EU has made it clear that they would not recognize the results of the election. All 25 member countries of the EU have summoned their ambassadors from Ukraine in order to register a sharp protest against what is seen as election fraud.


The European Union has disputed the election process in Ukraine, with European Commission President José Manuel Durão Barroso warning of consequences if there is no review of the election. During a meeting between Putin and EU officials in the Hague, the Russian president opposed the EU reaction by saying that he was "deeply convinced that we have no moral right to push a big European state to any kind of massive disorder." The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... The President of the European Commission is notionally the highest ranking unelected official within the European Union. ... José Manuel Durão Barroso (pronunced: IPA, listen â–¶(?)) (born in Lisbon, March 23, 1956) is a Portuguese politician and is the 11th President of the European Commission. ... Arms of The Hague The Hague (with capital T; Dutch: Den Haag, or officially s-Gravenhage) is the administrative capital of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country, in the province South Holland of which it is also the capital. ...


Among EU member states, Ukraine's western neighbours were most concerned. In Poland, Ukraine's largest western neighbour, politicians, the media and ordinary citizens enthusiastically supported Yushchenko and opposed the election fraud. Polish deputies to the European Parliament have called for giving Ukraine the prospect of future EU membership provided the country obeyed democratic standards. Western EU members are however more reluctant with the idea of Ukrainian membership in the EU, which results in Polish media accusing them of being more interested in the integration process with Turkey and maintaining good relations with Russia. The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ...


On November 25, former Ukrainian foreign minister and a close collaborator of Yushchenko, Borys Tarasyuk delivered a speech before the Polish Sejm, urging Poland not to recognize the election result and help solve the political crisis. On the same day former Polish President Lech Wałęsa went to Kiev to publicly express his support for a democratic Ukraine. He was later followed by a number of Polish MPs from different parties. November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Boris Tarasyuk with Condoleezza Rice Borys Tarasyuk (born 1949) is the foreign minister of Ukraine. ... This article is about the lower chamber of Polish parliament. ... Office President of Poland Term of office from December 22, 1990 until December 23, 1995 Profession Electrician and shipyard worker Political party none, see Solidarity for details Spouse Danuta WaÅ‚Ä™sa Date of birth September 29, 1943 Place of birth Popowo, Poland Date of death Place of death Lech Wa...


United States

The United States government has also decided not to recognize the election, and has expressed dissatisfaction with the current situation—the outgoing US Secretary of State, Colin Powell, quite unequivocally stated that the result announced could not be accepted as legitimate by the United States. President George W. Bush and various members of Congress have also made statements disclosing their concern over the legitimacy of the polling. Prominent former Cold War hawk Zbigniew Brzezinski casts the election as an opposition to renewed Russian imperialism: The government of the United States, established by the United States Constitution, is a federal republic of 50 states, a few territories and some protectorates. ... The Seal of the United States Department of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Colin Luther Powell, (pronounced koh-lihn, born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 26, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... For the generic term for a high-tension struggle between countries, see cold war (war). ... Zbigniew Brzezinski Zbigniew Kazimierz Brzezinski (born March 28, 1928) is a Polish-American political scientist, geostrategist, statesman. ... Big Coat of Arms of the Russian Empire, adopted in 1882 Flag of Russian Empire Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic to the Pacific Ocean...

"Russia is more likely to make a break with its imperial past if the newly independent post-Soviet states are vital and stable. Their vitality will temper any residual Russian imperial temptations. Political and economic support for the new states must be an integral part of a broader strategy for integrating Russia into a cooperative transcontinental system. A sovereign Ukraine is a critically important component of such a policy, as is support for such strategically pivotal states as Azerbaijan and Uzbekistan."'

U.S. Senators John McCain and Hillary Clinton jointly wrote a letter to nominate him along with Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili for the Nobel Peace Prize. Sovereignty is the exclusive right to exercise supreme authority over a geographic region, group of people or oneself. ... John Sidney McCain III (born August 29, 1936) is an American politician. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... Mikhail Saakashvili briefing the press at UN headquarters Mikhail Saakashvili (Georgian: მიხეილ სააკაშვილი) (born December 21, 1967) is a Georgian jurist and politician and the current President of Georgia. ... The Nobel Institute in Oslo, Norway. ...


Rerun

Repeated voting, 26 December 2004

On December 3 the Supreme Court declared the results of the runoff election to be invalid. A rerun of the runoff vote was held December 26. Exit polls suggested that opposition leader Yushchenko had won the poll with a majority of the votes, and Yushchenko publicly declared victory when around half of the votes had been counted. Download high resolution version (1417x990, 64 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1417x990, 64 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ...


The vote counting has now been completed, and Viktor Yushchenko received 51.99% of the votes, while Viktor Yanukovych got 44.19%; Yanukovych finally conceded defeat on December 31, 2004, resigning as Ukraine's Prime Minister the same day. Despite Yushchenko's victory in the second round of voting, the regional voting patterns were largely unchanged from the first one, with many southern and eastern provinces going largely for Yanukovych, with the west and central regions again favoring Yushchenko. December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ukraine's supreme court rejected Yanukovych's appeal against the electoral commission's handling of the results on January 6. January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


On January 10 the Ukrainian Electoral Commission officially declared Yushchenko as the winner and on January 11 published the final election results, clearing the way for Yushchenko to be inaugurated as President. The official ceremonies took place on Sunday, January 23 at about noon, when Yushchenko was sworn in as President.
January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


External links

Commons
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Ukrainian presidential election, 2004
  • Central Election Commission (official results, in English)
  • Russian Information Agency (russian POV)
  • Elections in Ukraine (Pro-Yanukovych biased)
  • European Parliament resolution
  • Christian Science Monitor: One election, two Viktors
  • International Support for Ukrainian Democracy
  • Ukrainian Presidential Elections - 2nd Round Preliminary Report
  • PINR - Ukrainian Presidential Elections: To East or West?
  • Ukrainian Election Observer Blogs
  • A description of the procedure by an international observer
  • Complete 2004 Election Results



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  Results from FactBites:
 
2004 U.S. presidential election controversy and irregularities - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5507 words)
After the 2004 U.S. Presidential election, there were many allegations of fraud including, but not limited to, forging of vote totals, miscounting of votes for one candidate as votes for another, widespread voter intimidation, and irregularities with the distribution of voting machines.
The election was certified by the U.S. Congress on January 6, 2005, despite a challenge to Ohio's electoral votes concerning alleged irregularities in that state's election process.
Among the issues raised in 2004 were allegations or complaints regarding obstacles to voter registration, improper purges of voter lists, voter suppression, accuracy and reliability of voting machines (especially electronic voting), problems with absentee ballots and provisional ballots, impossible voter turnout, and possible partisan interference by voting machine company and election officials.
Ukrainian presidential election, 2004: Information From Answers.com (2144 words)
The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko.
The election was held in a highly charged atmosphere, with allegations of media bias, intimidation and even a poisoning of Yushchenko that was later confirmed to be the result of the poison dioxin.
The initial vote of the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election was held on October 31, 2004.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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