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Encyclopedia > Ukrainian dance
A Ukrainian dance troupe at the BC Ukrainian Cultural Festival
A Ukrainian dance troupe at the BC Ukrainian Cultural Festival

Ukrainian Dance most often to refers to "Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance" (as it is known by ethnographers and dance historians), a stylized form of a Folk Dance based in part on the movements contained in, and the actual traditional dances of the peoples of Ukraine (both modern and pre-modern). This stylized artform has so permeated the culture of Ukraine that today traditional forms of dance in Ukraine which have not been affected by the stylized form are virtually non-existent. Image File history File linksMetadata UkrainianDance. ... Image File history File linksMetadata UkrainianDance. ... Folk dance is a term used to describe a large number of dances that tend to share the following attributes: They were originally danced in about the 19th century or earlier (or are, in any case, not currently copyrighted); Their performance is dominated by an inherited tradition rather than by... A contemporary dancer rehearsing in a dance studio Dance generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ... Ukraine is a country with a well-defined national identity, but also an assortment of strong culturally-identified ethnic groups. ...


Ukrainian Dance is very energetic, fast-paced, and entertaining, and along with Pysanky, it is a unique aspect of Ukrainian culture instantly recognized and highly appreciated throughout the world. Ukrainian pysanky Pysanka (plural: pysanky, pysankas) is a Ukrainian word for an egg decorated using a wax resist (batik) method. ...

Contents


Pre-Modern History

Judging by the figures depicted in motion on Trypillian clay vessels, dance has been performed in the lands of present-day Ukraine since the 3rd millenium b.c.e. (Considered a matriarchal society, the presumably female-centered Trypillian dances would have differed considerably from modern-day Ukrainian Folk Dance, which primarily focuses on the male dancer.) Up through the introduction of Christianity in Ukraine (becoming a state religion in 988 c.e.), dance served a very important ritual function. Pre-christian rituals combined dance with music, poetry, and song. A remnant of Ritual Dance (also known as Obryadovi dances, or Khorovody) which survives in limited form today are the Vesnianky ("Spring" dances), also referred to as Hahilky, Hayilky, Hayivky, Yahilky, and Rohulky. The pre-harvest festival of Kupalo had many ritual dances associated with it as well, and therefore remains a favorite theme of modern Ukrainian Folk-Stage choreographers. Ritual dances were so strongly ingrained into the culture of the people, that rather than being eliminated by Christianity, the accompanying songs and poetry were altered to incorporate christian themes, enabling millenia-old steps and choreographic forms to continue to be passed down from generation to generation. For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life, teachings, and actions of Jesus, the Christ, as recounted in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life, teachings, and actions of Jesus, the Christ, as recounted in the New Testament. ... As a noun, Christian is an appellation and moniker deriving from the appellation Christ, which many people associate exclusively with Jesus of Nazareth. ...


At about the time of Ukraine's Kozak Uprising, Social Dances gained in popularity. Ukrainian Social Dances (Pobutovi dances) can be distinguished from Ukrainian Ritual Dances by 2 charactersitics: the prevalence of musical accompaniment without song, and the increased presence of improvisation by performers. The early Hopak and Kozachok developed as Social Dances, as well as the Hutsulka and Kolomeyka in the West. Later, social dances of foreign extraction such as the Polka and Quadrille also gained popularity, but developed distinct regional variations with the prevalence of improvistional dancers and musicians.


The third major type of folk dance which developed prior to the modern era, was the Thematic or Story Dance (Siuzhetny dances). The Story Dances incorporated an artistically sophisticated level of pantomime and movement which entertained audiences. Thematic story dances told the story of a particular group of people through movements which mimicked their work; such dances included "the Shoemakers" (Shevchyky), "the Blacksmiths" (Kovali), and "the Reapers" (Kosari).


All of these traditional dances were began to be performed performed, or referenced to, by a blossoming theatrical trade beginning in the 18th century. While the Ukrainian people remained nationless and relegated to lower social classes in their own homelands, their foreign rulers lived lavishly in comparison, importing foreign entertainerment. It is within this context that the Thematic Dances, which depicted an agrarian society's ideals, gained even more popularity with the native population, further developing the theater into a thriving occupation.


Modern History

Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance began its path to international acclaim first and foremost with the work of Vasyl' Mykolayovych Verkhovynets' (b. 1880, original surname Kostiv), an actor, choir conductor and amateur musicologist, and his landmark book "Theory of Ukrainian Folk Dance." Verkhovynets' had acquired a professional level of training in the arts as part of Mykola Sadovs'kyy's theatrical troupe, which had itself incorporated a distinguished level of folk dance in its productions of dramas based on Ukrainian folk themes. While touring the central area of present-day Ukraine, Vasyl' Verkhovynets' visited many villages surrounding the cites he performed in, in order to acquire as much information about the dance traditions of his people as possible. "Theory of Ukrainian Folk Dance" (first published in 1919) brought together for the first time the various steps and terminology now recognized by all students of Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance. It also fundamentally altered the nature of Ukrainian Folk Dance by setting dances on a stage (with a rear, 2 wings, and the audience seated at the front), as well as laid out a method of transcribing folk dances on paper. It has since been reprinted 5 times and remains one of the basic texts of study of the Folk Dances of Ukraine.


The history of Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance diverges at this stage of Vasyl' Verkhovynets' career: in Ukraine, Verkhovynets' remained involved in the training of the next generation of Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance artists, and Vasyl Avramenko, building on Verkhovynets' work, developed the artform in the Ukrainian diaspora.


Development in North America

Vasyl Avramenko (1895-1981), whose name is synonymous with Ukrainian Dance in the Ukrainian diaspora, began his career as a dance instructor at an internment camp in Poland in 1921, having previously studied the theartical arts in Kyiv, and later with Mykola Sadovs'kyy's troupe, where he met and received training from Vasyl' Verkhovynets'. After the war, Avramenko toured the western area of present-day Ukraine, instructing where he could, but eventually setting out to spread Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance thoughout the world. After travelling through Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Germany, Avramenko came to Canada in 1925. Ukrainian immigrants had brought their native traditions to the lands that they settled, largely in Canada, Australia, USA, and South America. Even prior to Avramenko's arrival, many village dances had survived the trip abroad and retained their traditional place at community gatherings. (As documented in Andriy Nahachevskyy's book "Social Dances of Ukrainian-Canadians.") Because of this, upon landing in Canada, Avramenko was able to create a dance troupe out of local immigrants almost immediately. His missionary zeal soon spread a series of dance schools throughout Canada, including the cities of Toronto, Oshawa, Hamilton, Fort William, Port Arthur, Kenora, Winnipeg, Edmonton, Yorkton, Regina, Vegreville, Canora, Dauphin, Windsor, and many others. Eventually, Avramenko would begin schools in the United States, including New York, Philadelphia, Detroit, Cleveland, Uttica, Yonkers, Buffalo, Boston, and others. Avramenko visited Australia and experienced a similar success in developing schools on yet another continent. When he left each town, Avramenko would appoint a leader to continue teaching the dances. Many of these appointed leaders later created Ukrainian dance groups in their areas. Avramenko created many Ukrainian dance groups in his lifetime. He is credited with spreading this art form across the world, and for this reason he is known in the diaspora as the "Father of Ukrainian Dance." Avramenko's students would tour North America, performing to tremendous acclaim even at important venues such as World's Fairs, and the White House. For one performance, at New York's Metropolitan Opera House in 1931, over 500 dancers appeared on stage. Vasyl' Avramenko eventually moved into film production in the United States, putting out film versions of the Ukrainian operas Natalka Poltavka and Cossacks in Exile, as well as other Ukrainian dramas, filmed in the U.S., starring Ukrainian immigrants, and always featuring Ukrainian dancing. Students of Avramenko, as well as other immigrant dancers, continued Avramenko's legacy, opening new schools and teaching generations of students to come. 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term Ukrainian diaspora refers to the global community of ethnic Ukrainians, usually more specifically those who maintain some kind of connection, even if ephemeral, to the land of their ancestors and maintain their feeling of Ukrainian national identity within local community. ... Kiev (Київ, Kyiv, in Ukrainian; Киев, Kiev, in Russian) is the capital and largest city of Ukraine, located in the north central part of the country on the Dnieper river. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


In 1978, the Ukrainian Dance Workshop was started in New York by several leading teachers of Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance in North America, including Roma Pryma-Bohachevsky. Trained in Lviv, Vienna, and later Winnipeg, Roma Pryma-Bohachevsky had toured the world before settling in the US, and becoming the most prolific teacher and choreographer of Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance in the United States. For over 25 years, her guidance of the Ukrainian Dance Workshop, and her Syzokryli Ukrainian Dance Ensemble, not only developed the some of the finest Ukrainian dancers to come out of North America, but also attracted already established dancers; this combined pool of talent allowed Roma Pryma to try ever innovative choreographies, evoking modern Ukrainian themes such as the murder of outspoken musician Volodymyr Ivasiuk and the Chornobyl tragedy. After developing the next generation of Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance instructors, establishing numerous schools and instructional intensives, choreographing hundreds of dances, and teaching thousands of students, Roma Pryma-Bohachevsky passed away in 1994. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Lviv (Ukrainian: Львів, L’viv ; Polish: Lwów; Russian: Львов, Lvov; German: Lemberg; Yiddish: לעמבערג; Latin: Leopolis; see also Cities alternative names) is a city in western Ukraine, the capital city of the Lviv Oblast (province) and one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]; Slovenian: Dunaj, Hungarian: Bécs, Czech: Vídeň, Slovak: Viedeň, Romany Vidnya; Croatian and Serbian: Beč) is the capital of Austria, and also one of the nine States of Austria. ... Motto: Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Area: 465. ... Chernobyl area. ...


Development in Ukraine

Classical choreographers in Ukraine began to turn to Vasyl' Verkhovynets' for his expertise when incorporating the increasingly popular folk motifs into their works. In addition to established names like V. Lytvynenko and Leonid Zhukov, younger choreographers like Pavlo Virsky, Mykola Bolotov, Halyna Beryozova were choreographing with folk steps and forms. During this period (in between World Wars), the "3-part" Hopak was developed by Verkhovynets'. Hopak is a Ukrainian folk dance and the corresponding musical style. ...


In 1937, Pavlo Virsky and Mykola Bolotov founded the State Folk Dance Ensemble of the Ukrainian SSR, with the goal of elevating Folk-Stage Dance to its highest artistic level and solidifying it as a viable stage artform. Although disbanded following the outbreak of World War II, Lydia Chereshnova (who had directed the Ukrainian Song & Dance Ensemble entertaining troops during the war) brought it back into existence in 1951. After Vakhtang Vronsky of the Odessa Opera Theatre directed for a few seasons, in 1955 Pavlo Virsky returned as artistic director of the State Folk Dance Ensemble of the Ukrainian SSR until his death in 1975. During this 20-year period, Pavlo Virsky demonstrated tremendous creativity in his choreography and propelled Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance to a world-renowned level. The geographical situation of Odessa city and province within Ukraine Odessa (Ukrainian: Одеса, Odesa; Russian: ) is a city in southwestern Ukraine, a major port on the Black Sea, and the administrative centre of the countrys Odessa Oblast. ... State motto: Пролетарі всіх країн, єднайтеся! Official language None. ...

Performance of Virsky group
Enlarge
Performance of Virsky group

Other Ukrainian choreographers and companies of note include:

  • The Ukrainian Folk Choir under the direction of Hryhoriy Veryovka was founded in Kharkiv in 1943, and included a contingent of dancers under the initial direction of Oleksander Dmytrenko, and soon thereafter Leonid Kalinin, and later O. Homyn.
  • The Dnipro Dance Ensemble was founded in Dnipropetrovsk prior to the war, and flourished under Kim Vasylenko beginning in 1947. Vasylenko has written numerous times on the topic of Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance, including the classic text "Lexicon of Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance."
  • The Yatran Dance Ensemble was founded in Kirovohrad in 1949, and gained great renown beginning in 1957 under director Anatoliy Krivokhyzha

Vintage view of Kharkov in the 1890s. ... Dnipropetrovsk (Ukrainian: Дніпропетровськ, Dnipropetrovs’k; Russian: Днепропетро́вск, Dnepropetrovsk, formerly Екатериносла́в, Yekaterinoslav) is Ukraines third largest city with 1. ... Kirovohrad emblem Kirovohrad flag Kirovohrad (Кіровоград) is a city in Ukraine, population 239,400 (2004). ...

Development in Australia

Regional styles of dance

Ukrainian Folk Dance was fundamentally altered when it began to be performed onstage as an individual artform - Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance. Once masters such as Verkhovynets' and Avramenko began gathering a repertoire of dances and touring with their performance troupes, the inherent regional variations existing in Ukrainian pre-modern folk dances began to slowly fade into a more homogenous group. Also the scholarship of Verkhovynets' (and Vasyl' Avramenko, whose work is indebted to Verkhovynets' earlier scholarship) was mostly limited to the villages of central Ukraine. Gradually, others began filling in the gaps of the earlier research, by researching the dance forms of the various ethnicities of western Ukraine, publishing this scholarship, and founding regional dance ensembles. Most of this research, however, occurred after Verkhovynets' and Avramenko had already toured Ukraine, limiting the available sources of knowledge to isolated villages and immigrants who left their native territories before the touring began. Because of this, most of the "regional" dancing performed by Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance ensembles still rely on the basic triple-steps of Bihunets and Tynok, although with more and more advanced instruction becoming prevalent, greater variation has returned (regardless of its authenticity).


Ukraine has many cultural regions, which are based mostly on the various ethnicities which inhabit its lands. From region to region, one can hear different music, speak different dialects, see different forms of dress, and dance with a differing set of basic steps. The costume styles adopted by modern Ukrainian dance groups are based on traditional Ukrainian clothing, though changes have been made (such as shortening girls' skirts or alteration of materials) to meet the demand of the dance moves. In addition to Story (Character) Dances such as pantomimed fables or staged ritual dances which are not necessarily linked to particular regions, listed below are descriptions of a few Ukrainian cultural regions which are represented in Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance:

  • Poltava Region (Poltavshchyna): This central region is the one most commonly associated with Ukrainian dance. The culture of the central and eastern lands of Ukraine did not develop in isolation due to the many traders around Kyiv and those carried from the rivers running towards the Black Sea, as well as the area's propensity to be overrun by foregn invaders. The greatest remaining cultural influence in the central and eastern lands were the Kozaks, many of which were based out of central Ukraine, and whose love of social dances spawned the Hopak and the Kozachok. The costumes for the dances of this region include a blouse, a vinok (a flower and ribbon headpiece for girls), a plakhta (girls' skirt), a poyas (belt), sharyvary (loose mens' trousers), and red boots. Most commonly, the blouses are white with black and red embroidery. The Ukrainians believed that life should include both red (the colour of joy) and black (the colour of sorrow).[1] The dance style is crisp and acrobatic for men, and feminine and technical for girls.
  • Hutsul Region (Hutsulshchyna): The dances of the Hutsuls are well-known for being lively and energetic. The mountainous Hutsul region is adjacent to Bukovyna in south-western Ukraine, and the two clearly have shared similar influences. Hutsulshchyna is located in the highest parts of the remote Carpathian Mountains. Like Bukovynian dances, Hutsul dances are characterized by quick stamping and intricate footwork, combined with quick vertical movements. Hutsul costumes have orange, brown, green, and yellow embroidery. The common footwear is called postoly.[2]. A well-known Hutsul dance is the Arkan ('lasso'), in which men dance around a fire.
  • Transcarpathia (Zakarpattia): Dances from this region are known for their large sweeping movements and colourful costumes, with the general movement being "bouncy".[3]. A signature dance from this region is Bereznianka.
  • Bukovina (Bukovyna): a transitional land between Ukraine and Rumania, which has at times been also occupied by Hungary, Austria, Turkey, and the Tatars. Sustained by their woodworking in the Great Būk (beechtree) Forests of the Ukrainian Southwest, the native Ukrainians have developed a unique culture enriched in part through various immigrant influences on their secluded mountain lifestyle. Bukovynian music and dance is peppered with dichotomies and contrapuntal themes, reflecting both the personal and political histories of a stalwart people. In their dances, both men and women perform a variety of foot stamps. Usually, the girls' headpieces are very distinctive, consisting of tall wheat stalks, ostrich feathers, or other unique protuberances. The embroidery displayed on the blouses and shirts are typically stitched with darker and heavier threads, and women's skirts are sometimes open at the front, revealing an embroidered slip.[4]
  • Volhynia (Volyn’): This region is in north-western Ukraine. The costumes are bright and vibrant, while the dance steps are characterized by energetic jumping, high-carried legs, and lively arms. This region has been influenced heavily by Poland, due to both its close geographical position, as well as being previously held by that nation.[5]
  • Polesie (Polissia): The steps of Polissian dance are characteristically very bouncy and with emphasis on high knee movement. Costumes are white, red, and beige, and girls often wear aprons. A popular Polissian dance is called Mazurochky.
  • Lemko Region (Lemkivshchyna): The ethnic region of the Lemkos lays mainly in Poland, with a small part of the region falling within current Ukrainian borders. Separated from ethnic Ukrainians perhaps more than average among the ethnic groups, the Lemko people have a unique dialect and lifestyle that has been influenced by their neighbours in Poland, Ukraine, and Slovakia. Costumes typically depict the men and women with short vests, with the style of dance being light-hearted and lively.
  • Boiko Region (Boikivshchyna):
  • Gypsy dance of the Roma people, or Tsyhany: Many Ukrainian stage folk dance ensembles incorporate Gypsy dances into their repertoire. Gypsies have lived in Ukraine for centuries and those inhabiting the Carpathian Mountains have even developed their own dialect of the Rom language, as well as customs and traditional dances limited to their own villages.

Poltavs’ka oblast’ (Полтавська область in Ukrainian) is an oblast (province) of central Ukraine. ... Kiev (Київ, Kyiv, in Ukrainian; Киев, Kiev, in Russian) is the capital and largest city of Ukraine, located in the north central part of the country on the Dnieper river. ... Map of the Black Sea. ... Gold Embroidery Embroidery is the art or handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with designs stitched in strands of thread or yarn using a needle. ... Hutsuls or Huculs (Ukrainian: Гуцули, singular Гуцул) are a group of Ruthenians (Ukrainian) highlanders. ... Zakarpattya or Transcarpathia (Закарпатська область, Zakarpats’ka oblast’ in Ukrainian) is an oblast (region) of Ukraine. ... Bukovina (Romanian: Bucovina; Ukrainian: Буковина, Bukovyna; German and Polish: Bukowina; see also other languages) is a historical region on the northern slopes of the northeastern Carpathian Mountains and the adjoining plains. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Polesie is one of the largest European swampy areas, located in the South-Western part of the Eastern-European Lowland, mainly within the territories of Belarus, Ukraine and partly also within Poland and Russia. ... Historical arms of Podolia The region of Podolia (Ukrainian: Podillya, Polish: Podole) lies in the west-central and south-west portions of present-day Ukraine that correspond to Khmelnytskyi Oblast and Vinnytsia Oblast. ... Tzigane redirects here; for the composition by Maurice Ravel, see Tzigane (Ravel). ... ROM, Rom, or rom may refer to: Roma (people), whose members are called Rom (or Gypsy) Romany language (ISO 639 alpha-2, rom) Royal Ontario Museum Rom (Star Trek), the name of a Ferengi from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ...

Ukrainian performing dance companies

In Ukraine:

In Russia: Kiev (Київ, Kyiv, in Ukrainian; Киев, Kiev, in Russian) is the capital and largest city of Ukraine, located in the north central part of the country on the Dnieper river. ... Kiev (Київ, Kyiv, in Ukrainian; Киев, Kiev, in Russian) is the capital and largest city of Ukraine, located in the north central part of the country on the Dnieper river. ... Lviv (Ukrainian: Львів, L’viv ; Polish: Lwów; Russian: Львов, Lvov; German: Lemberg; Yiddish: לעמבערג; Latin: Leopolis; see also Cities alternative names) is a city in western Ukraine, the capital city of the Lviv Oblast (province) and one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. ... Lviv (Ukrainian: Львів, L’viv ; Polish: Lwów; Russian: Львов, Lvov; German: Lemberg; Yiddish: לעמבערג; Latin: Leopolis; see also Cities alternative names) is a city in western Ukraine, the capital city of the Lviv Oblast (province) and one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. ... Lviv (Ukrainian: Львів, L’viv ; Polish: Lwów; Russian: Львов, Lvov; German: Lemberg; Yiddish: לעמבערג; Latin: Leopolis; see also Cities alternative names) is a city in western Ukraine, the capital city of the Lviv Oblast (province) and one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine. ... Donetsk heavy industry Donetsk (Ukrainian: , Donetsk; Russian: ) is a city in eastern Ukraine on the Kalmius river. ...

In Canada: 19th century photo depicting Kuban Cossacks obelisk in Krasnodar 13 May 1967. ...

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Motto: Fortis et Liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19,531 km² (2. ... Regina may refer to: Latin word for Queen Regina, Saskatchewan, the capital of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: From many peoples, strength) Official languages English Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Lynda M. Haverstock Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 7th 651,036 km² 9. ... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19,531 km² (2. ... More than one place has the name Edmonton. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19,531 km² (2. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19,531 km² (2. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Area: East to West: 43 km North to South: 21 km629. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English, French (in some areas) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 4th... Motto: Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Area: 465. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Official languages English Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 8th 647,797 km² 14. ... Saskatoon nickname: The Bridge City, The Hub City Broadway Bridge in Saskatoon Area  - Total Metro. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: From many peoples, strength) Official languages English Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Lynda M. Haverstock Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 7th 651,036 km² 9. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English, French (in some areas) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 4th... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... Motto: Fortis et Liber (Latin: Strong and free) Official languages English Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 28 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 6th 661,848 km² 642,317 km² 19,531 km² (2. ... Windsor (IPA: usually , but also ) is the name of many places: // England Windsor, Berkshire, on the south-western outskirts of London; the oldest place with the name, famous as the location of Windsor Castle. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English, French (in some areas) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 4th... . ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Official languages English Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 36 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 5th 944,735 km² 925,186 km² 19,549 km... Surrey is a county in southern England, part of the South East England region and one of the Home Counties. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Official languages English Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 36 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 5th 944,735 km² 925,186 km² 19,549 km...

In Australia: Nickname: The Big Apple Motto: Official website: City of New York Location [[Image:|250px|250px|Location of City of New York, New York]] Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 33rd 119,283 km² 255 km 455 km 2. ... Nickname: The Big Apple Motto: Official website: City of New York Location [[Image:|250px|250px|Location of City of New York, New York]] Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 25th 149,998 km² 340 km 629 km 4. ... In English literary history, the name Rochester refers to John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ...

  • Veselka Ukrainian Dance Ensemble of Sydney, Sydney
  • Roztiazhka Ukrainian Cossack Dancers, Perth
  • Cossack Brothers Ukrainian Cabaret Entertainment
  • Verkhovyna Ukrainian Youth Association Dance Ensemble, Melbourne
  • Vohon Ukrainian Cossack Dance Group, Perth
  • Zahrava Ukrainian Youth Association Dance Ensemble, Sydney

In Argentina: Sydney is the state capital of New South Wales and with a population of over four million people is the most populous city in Australia. ... Perth is the name of several towns and cities: In Australia: Perth, Western Australia is the state capital city of Western Australia and fourth-largest city in Australia. ... Melbourne is the state capital and largest city in the Australian state of Victoria, and the second-largest city in Australia (after Sydney), with a population of approximately 3. ... Perth is the name of several towns and cities: In Australia: Perth, Western Australia is the state capital city of Western Australia and fourth-largest city in Australia. ... Sydney is the state capital of New South Wales and with a population of over four million people is the most populous city in Australia. ...

  • Ukrainian Dance Ensemble Prosvita

References

Texts In Ukrainian

  • Vesnyanochka - by Vasyl' Verkhovynets'
  • Theory of Ukrainian Folk Dance - by Vasyl' Verkhovynets'
  • Ukrainian Folk Dance - by Andriy Humeniuk
  • Folk Choreographic Art of Ukraine - by Andriy Humeniuk
  • Lexicon of Ukrainian Folk-Stage Dance - by Kim Vasylenko
  • Fundamentals of Folk-Stage Dance (Books 1 & 2)- by Evhen Zaitsev
  • Ukrainian Folk Dances, Music, and Dress - by Vasyl' Avramenko
  • Hutsul Dances - by Roman Harasymchuk
  • Social Dances of Ukrainian-Canadians - Andriy Nahachevskyy
  • Choreographic Arts of Ivano-Frankivs'k - Bohdan Stas'ko
  • Folk Dances of Volyn' and Volyn'-Polissia - by Mykola Poliatykin

Texts In English

  • The Ukrainian Folk Dance - by Myron Shatulsky
  • Ukrainian Dance Resource Booklets, Series I-IV - By Bohdan Zerebecky
  • European Folk Dance - by Joan Lawson

Online references

  • Bukovyna Costumes
  • Hutsul Costumes
  • Volyn Costumes
  • Zakarpattia Costumes
  • A Costumes Website
  • Examples of Zakarpattian and Polissian Costumes
  • Examples of Boiko Costumes

External links

  • Alberta's Ukrainian Dance Association
  • A Popular Ukrainian Dance Forum
  • Ukrainian Dance on LiveJournal
  • Folk!, the first feature length documentary about Ukrainian Folk Dancing in North America

 
 

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