FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Uhlan" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Uhlan
Polish uhlans from Duchy of Warsaw army
Polish uhlans from Duchy of Warsaw army

Uhlans (in Polish: Ułan also spelled "Ulan", German, from Turkish oğlan [1]) were originally Polish light cavalry soldiers armed with lances, sabres, pistols, rifles; later they also served in the Prussian and Austrian armies. Similar troops also existed in other European armies, where they were rather known as "lancers". Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (616x800, 156 KB) Polish Uhlans from Duchy of Warsaw 1807-1815 by January Suchodolski (1797-1875) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Uhlan ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (616x800, 156 KB) Polish Uhlans from Duchy of Warsaw 1807-1815 by January Suchodolski (1797-1875) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Uhlan ... Coat of arms Map of the Duchy of Warsaw after 1809. ... French Republican Guard - May 8, 2005 celebrations Cavalry (from French cavalerie) were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat. ... This article is about a military rank. ... The term lance (Greek: λόγχη, Latin: lancea, German: Lanze, French: lance, Spanish: lanza, Italian: lancia) has become a catchall for a variety of different pole weapons based on the spear. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Szabla. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ... A rifle is a firearm with a barrel that has a helical groove or pattern of grooves (rifling) cut into the barrel walls. ... Motto: Suum cuique Latin: To each his own Prussia at its peak, as leading state of the German Empire Capital Königsberg, later Berlin Political structure Duchy, Kingdom, Republic Duke1  - 1525–68 Albert I  - 1688–1701 Frederick III King1  - 1701–13 Frederick I  - 1888–1918 William II Prime Minister1,2... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Volunteer Representative Squadron of the City of PoznaÅ„ in the uniform of the 15th Uhlan Regiment of PoznaÅ„ from 1939 A lancer (uhlan) was a cavalry soldier who fought with a lance. ...


Uhlans typically wore a double-breasted jacket (kurta) with a coloured panel (plastron) at the front, a coloured sash, and a square-topped Polish lancer cap (czapka) also spelt chapka, chapska and schapska. This cap or cavalry helmet was derived from a traditional design of Polish cap, made more formal and stylised for military use. Czapka is a Polish generic word for a cap. ...


Their lances usually had small swallow-tailed flags (known as the lance pennon) just below the spearhead. ...

Uhlans wearing the Czapka cavalry helmet
Uhlans wearing the Czapka cavalry helmet
Uhlan wearing the Czako or Shako headgear
Uhlan wearing the Czako or Shako headgear

Contents

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 511 pixelsFull resolution (2400 × 1532 pixel, file size: 168 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Montage of three Uhlans wearing the czapka cavalry helmet of the 19th century File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 511 pixelsFull resolution (2400 × 1532 pixel, file size: 168 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Montage of three Uhlans wearing the czapka cavalry helmet of the 19th century File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old... Czapka is a Polish generic word for a cap. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A Shako of a French Navy uniform of the 19th century. ...

History

Origins

Volunteer Representative Squadron of City of Poznań in uniforms of 15th Uhlan's Regiment of Poznań from 1939
Volunteer Representative Squadron of City of Poznań in uniforms of 15th Uhlan's Regiment of Poznań from 1939

The name itself comes from Mongolian or Tartar words oglan or uhuan meaning brave warrior Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x968, 425 KB) Uniforms of 15th Poznań Reg. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x968, 425 KB) Uniforms of 15th Poznań Reg. ... Poznań ( ; full official name: The Capital City of Poznań, Polish: Stołeczne Miasto Poznań (Latin: , German: , Yiddish: פּױזן Poyzn) is a city in west-central Poland with over 578,900 inhabitants (2002). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... Tartar may refer to: Look up Tartar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Other plausible etymologies for 'Uhlan' include "Hulan" from Halani warrior, who overan the Pontic and the great steppe, or 'hulati' or 'galtai', connotated as free or disobedient, or "young man admired by women," but also as 'without money, pure or drinking'. In Historiae Liber XXXI by Ammianus Marcellinus 4th century Roman historian we can find 12 occurrences of string 'Halan*' eg 'Halanos' , 'parte alia prope Amazonum sedes Halani', 'Halanorum regionibus', 'Hunorum et Halanorum'. Underhalani are know to live in northern Sarmatia at least from 6th century. Cavalli-Sforza first found correlation between genetic haplotyes and language, this correlation suggest searching for etymology in languages of genetic markers domination, the other languages helpfully may reflect alive or fossilized form of the words. A steppe in Western Kazakhstan in early spring In physical geography, a steppe (Russian: - , Ukrainian: - , Kazakh: - ), pronounced in English as , is a plain without trees (apart from those near rivers and lakes); it is similar to a prairie, although a prairie is generally considered as being dominated by tall grasses... Ammianus Marcellinus (325/330-after 391) was a Roman historian who wrote during Late Antiquity. ... Sarmatian horseman Sarmatians, Sarmatae or Sauromatae (the second form is mostly used by the earlier Greek writers, the other by the later Greeks and the Romans) were a people whom Herodotus (4. ... Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza (born January 25, 1922) is an Italian population geneticist born in Genoa, who has been a professor at Stanford University since 1970 (now emeritus). ... In human genetics, Haplogroup R1a1 (M17) is a Y-chromosome haplogroup, that is spread across Eurasia. ...


Once the Tatar (sometimes also spelled "Tartar") military men had settled in Poland and Lithuania in the late 14th century, the Poles started incorporating much of their military vocabulary and many of their traditions along with their strategy and tactics. This included the formation of light cavalry units. Initially composed mostly of Tartars and Lithuanians, the uhlan units first served as skirmishers during various battles of late Middle Ages. Their tasks were to conduct reconnaissance in advance of the heavier cavalry (knights, later Hussars and Pancerni), and to probe enemy defences. Historically, the term Tatar (or Tartar) has been ambiguously used by Europeans to refer to many different peoples of Inner Asia and Northern Asia. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... An army unit consisting of mounted soldiers are commonly known as cavalry. ... Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... Polish Hussar Hussar (original Hungarian spelling: huszár, plural huszárok) refers to a number of types of cavalry used throughout Europe since the 15th century. ... Towarzysz pancerny - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


In Polish language are words ulan a man and ulijanka a woman:

The best example is traditional folk song
Panno Ulijanko usiadź na kolanko  : Lady Ulan seat on knee
Podepszyj se boczki  : put your arms on your waist
chyć sie za warkoczki  : put your hands on your briades

The root for word ulani is deeply symbolically conotated as energy of water - vis vitalis.

other examples:
Idzie dysc idzie dysc,  :Coming rain, coming rain
Idzie sikawica /błyskawica  :Coming thunder storm
Uleje, usiece, uleje usiece  :it will beat/wet, it will cut, beat/wet cut
Uleje usiece, Janickowe lica  :it will beat/weat it will cut, the face/eyes of Jon, but it may allegorically understand that water (a woman) will conquest the man eyes. or the thunder turmoil (a war) cause his face to not dray , as he will miss her away.

This above song usualy sign by women is from region of PodHalani/Halani/

Ułani ulani malowane dzieci
niejedna panienka za wami poleci

This above song, is sign by Ulani in formation.


Also "jak ulany" it mean the son like a father. kropla w krople as to drops of water are the same like waters - woda or vodini.


18th Century

The first Uhlan regiments were created in the early 18th century. As the development of firearms made heavy armor obsolete, lighter units became the core of the army. During the period preceding the Partitions of Poland, Uhlan formations consisting of Poles or Polish Tartars were created in most surrounding states simply because the Polish Crown had not the resources or political possibilities to afford a numerous army. Their speed and mobility was the major factor behind their popularity. However the Uhlan regiment formed by the Kingdom of Prussia in 1740, the so called Natzmer-uhlans was used ineptly, employing heavy-cavalry tactics against fortified positions. It failed to distinguish itself in the first of the Silesian Wars, and was disbanded shortly afterwards. In 1745 Saxony , engaged in a personal union with the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, created a Polish Uhlan regiment called "Saxon Volunteers". The same year the Kingdom of Prussia created yet another Uhlan regiment of Poles : The Bosniak-regiment. Shortly after Mauritz of Saxony created a Polish Ulan regiment on account of the French king Louis XV. King Stanisław August of Poland formed a royal guards regiment equipped with lances, szablas and pistols and dressed in kurtas and czapkas. This unit became the prototype for many other units of the Polish cavalry, who started to arm themselves with equipment modelled after Uhlan regiment - and the mediaeval Tartars. In the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth the Ulans officially had the status and traditions of the winged Polish hussars passed on to them in 1776, thus becoming National cavalry. The Austrian empire also formed a "Uhlan Regiment" in 1784, composed primarily of Poles. Ordinary Uhlan regiments of Austrian cavalrymen were raised in 1791. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Partitions of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (Polish: Rozbiór Polski or Rozbiory Polski; Lithuanian: Lietuvos-Lenkijos padalijimai, Belarusian: Падзелы Рэчы Паспалітай) took place in the 18th century and ended the existence of the sovereign Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... Flag of Prussia (1894 - 1918) The Kingdom of Prussia existed from 1701 until 1918, and from 1871 was the leading kingdom of the German Empire, comprising in its last form almost two-thirds of the area of the Empire. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... The Silesian Wars were a series of wars between Prussia and Austria (and their changing allies) for control of Silesia. ... The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stat Sakska) is the easternmost federal state of Germany. ... A personal union is a relationship of two or more entities that are considered separate, sovereign states, which, through established law, share the same person as their respective head of state. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Flag of Prussia (1894 - 1918) The Kingdom of Prussia existed from 1701 until 1918, and from 1871 was the leading kingdom of the German Empire, comprising in its last form almost two-thirds of the area of the Empire. ... Louis XV (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), called the Well-Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was King of France from 1715 to 1774. ... For other persons named StanisÅ‚aw Poniatowski, see StanisÅ‚aw Poniatowski. ... Szabla in general is the Polish generic term for a sabre. ... Czapka is a Polish generic word for a cap. ... Volunteer Representative Squadron of City of PoznaÅ„ in uniforms of 15th PoznaÅ„ Uhlans Regiment Polish Cavalry (Polish: ) can trace its origins back to the days of Medieval mounted knights. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Polish Hussar Hussar (original Hungarian spelling: huszár, plural huszárok) refers to a number of types of cavalry used throughout Europe since the 15th century. ... The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


19th Century

After the start of the Napoleonic Wars, uhlan formations were raised by the Duchy of Warsaw. Polish lancers serving with the French Army included the Vistula Legion and the Chevau-légers de la Garde Impériale. The lancers of the Polish expeditionary corps fighting alongside the French in Spain and Germany, spread the popularity of the Polish model of light cavalry. After the Battle of Somosierra, Napoleon Bonaparte said that one Polish cavalryman was worth ten French soldiers. The chevau-légers, French light cavalry units from the 16th century till 1815, were (re?)modelled after the Uhlans. Following the Treaty of Tilsit in 1807 lancer regiments designated as Uhlans were reintroduced in the Prussian service. Combatants Allies: Austrian Empire[1] Kingdom of Portugal Kingdom of Prussia[1] Russian Empire[2] Kingdom of Spain[3] Kingdom of Sweden United Kingdom[4] Ottoman Empire[5] French Empire Kingdom of Holland Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Kingdom of Bavaria[6] Kingdom of Saxony[7... Coat of arms Map of the Duchy of Warsaw after 1809. ... The Chevau-légers (from French cheval - horse and léger - light) was a generic French name for several units of light cavalry, roughly similar to lancers in the armies of other states during the Napoleonic Wars. ... Combatants France Spain Commanders Napoleon I of France Benito de San Juan Strength 45,000 20,000 infantry 16 guns Casualties Unknown 250 dead or wounded The Battle of Somosierra was a battle of the Peninsular War that took place on November 30, 1808 at the Somosierra pass in the... Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des... The Chevau-légers (from French cheval - horse and léger - light) was a generic French name for several units of light cavalry, roughly similar to lancers in the armies of other states during the Napoleonic Wars. ... The Treaties of Tilsit were two agreements signed by Napoleon I of France in the town of Tilsit in July, 1807. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ...


During and after the Napoleonic Wars cavalry regiments armed with lances were formed in many states throughout Europe, including the armies of United Kingdom, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Russia and Sweden.


The traditions of the Polish uhlans were preserved during the Kingdom of Poland. They fought both in the November Uprising of 1830 and in the January Uprising of 1863. The term Congress Poland is an unofficial name of the Kingdom of Poland, a political entity that was created out of the Duchy of Warsaw at the Congress of Vienna in 1815, when European powers reorganised Europe following the Napoleonic wars. ... Coat-of-arms of the November Uprising. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Polonia (Poland), 1863, by Jan Matejko, 1864, oil on canvas, 156 × 232 cm, National Museum, Kraków. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


World War I

German Uhlans


In 1914 the Imperial German Army included twenty-six Uhlan regiments, three of which were Guard regiments, twenty-one line (sixteen Prussian, two Württemberg and three Saxon ) and two from the autonomous Royal Bavarian Army. The senior of these was Ulanen-Regiment Kaiser Alexander III. von Rußland which was first raised in 1745. All German Uhlan regiments wore Polish style czapkas and tunics with plastron fronts, both in coloured parade uniforms and the field grey service dress introduced in 1910. Because German hussar, dragoon and cuirassier regiments also carried lances in 1914 there was a tendency among their French and British opponents to describe all German cavalry as "uhlans". Arms of the Kingdom of Württemberg The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Wuerttemberg. ...


The lance carried by the uhlans (and after 1889 the entire German cavalry branch) consisted of a ten foot and five inch long tube made of rolled steel-plate, weighing three pound and nine ounces. The lance carried below its head a small pennant in differing colours according to the province or state from which the regiment was recruited. The four edged spear-like point of the shaft was 12.9 inches in length and made of tempered steel. The butt end of the shaft was also pointed so that (in theory) the lance could be welded as a double ended weapon.


After seeing mounted action during the early weeks of World War I the Uhlan regiments were either dismounted to serve as "cavalry rifles" in the trenches of the Western Front, or transferred to the Eastern Front where more primitive conditions made it possible for horse cavalry to still play a useful role. All twenty-six German Uhlan regiments were disbanded in 1918 – 1919.


Austrian Uhlans


There were eleven regiments of uhlans in the Austro-Hungarian cavalry, largely recruited in the Polish speaking parts of the Empire. They wore czapkas in regimental colours but otherwise were dressed in the light blue tunics and red breeches of the Austro-Hungarian dragoons, without Polish features. Their lances were similar in design to those of the German cavalry but had wooden shafts (of ash).


As with other armies, the Austro-Hungarian Uhlans were forced into a largely dismounted role by the realities of trench warfare by the end of 1914. The blue and red peacetime uniforms were replaced by field grey during 1915. There was however one last opportunity for traditional glory when on 21 August 1914 the uhlans and dragoons of the 4.Kavalleriedivision clashed with their counterparts of the Imperial Russian 10th Cavalry Division in classic cavalry style at the Battle of Jaroslavice.


Russian Uhlans


The Imperial Russian Army had converted its seventeen line Uhlan regiments to dragoons in 1881, but in 1910 they had their traditional lances, titles and uniforms returned to them. During this period only the two Uhlan regiments of the Imperial Guard retained their original distinctions.


Polish Uhlans


Józef Piłsudski's Polish Legions (an independent formation serving with the Austro Hungarian Army) had a small Uhlan detachment. Commanded by Władysław Belina-Prażmowski, they were modelled after the Uhlans of the Napoleonic period. This unit was the first element of the Central Powers to enter Polish lands during World War I. After the rebirth of Poland in 1918, Uhlan formations were raised in all parts of the country. They fought with distinction in the Greater Poland Uprising, the Polish-Ukrainian War and the Polish-Bolshevik War. Although equipped with modern horse-drawn artillery and trained in infantry tactics, the Uhlan formations kept their sabres, their lances and their ability to charge the enemy. Among other battles, the Uhlan units took part in the Battle of Komarów of 1920 against the invading Soviet Konarmia, the last pure cavalry battle in history. Office Chief of State, Marshal of Poland Term of office from November 14, 1918 until December 9, 1922 Profession Statesman Political party none (see Sanacja for details), formerly PPS Spouse Maria PiÅ‚sudska Aleksandra PiÅ‚sudska Date of birth December 5, 1867 Place of birth Zułów, in todays... Polish Legions (Polish Legiony Polskie) was the name of Polish armed forces created in August of 1914 in Galicia. ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Belina-Prażmowski WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Zygmunt Belina-Prażmowski (1888-1938) was a Polish cavalryman, colonel and politician. ... European military alliances in 1914. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Combatants Poland West Ukrainian Peoples Republic The Polish-Ukrainian War of 1918 and 1919 was a conflict between the forces of Poland and West Ukrainian Peoples Republic for the control over Eastern Galicia after the dissolution of Austria-Hungary. ... Polish-Bolshevik War Conflict Polish-Bolshevik War Date 1919–1921 Place Central and Eastern Europe Result Polish victory The Polish-Soviet War (also known as the Polish-Bolshevik War or the Polish-Russian War) was the war (February 1919 – March 1921) that determined the borders between the Russian... Battle of WoÅ‚odarka Polish infantry charging enemy positions during the Polish Defensive War A charge is a maneuver in battle in which soldiers advance towards their enemy at their best speed to engage in close combat. ... Combatants Poland Bolshevik Russia Commanders Juliusz Rómmel Semyon Budyonny Strength 6 regiments 17 500 men, 20 regiments Casualties 500 KIA, 700 horses Unknown. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...


Interwar

In the period between the world wars, the Polish cavalry was reformed, with some units retaining their Uhlan traditions. However in contrast with its traditional role, the cavalry was no longer seen as a unit capable of breaking through enemy lines. Instead it was used as a mobile reserve and employed infantry tactics: the soldiers dismounted before the battle and fought as infantry (dragoon), yet retained the high mobility of cavalry. Technically speaking, in 1939 Poland had 11 brigades of mounted infantry and no units of cavalry as such. Volunteer Representative Squadron of City of Poznań in uniforms of 15th Poznań Uhlans Regiment Polish Cavalry (Polish: ) can trace its origins back to the days of Medieval mounted knights. ... French dragoon, 1745. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ...


As noted above, the uhlans of the Imperial German Army were disbanded at the end of World War I. However lances continued to be carried by certain cavalry regiments of the new German Army (Reichsheer) permitted by the Treaty of Versailles. As late as 1925 Major General von Seecckt, Commander of the Reichsheer, rejected a General Staff proposal that lances be abandoned as unsuited for a modern army


World War II

Although the Polish cavalrymen retained their sabres, after 1937 the lance was no longer standard issue, but was issued to cavalrymen as an optional weapon of choice. Instead the cavalry units were equipped with 75mm field guns, light tanks, 37mm anti-tank guns, 40mm anti-aircraft guns, as well as anti-tank rifles and other modern weapons. Although there were cavalry charges during World War II and many were successful, they were an exception rather than a rule. A field gun is an artillery piece. ... The US M1A1 Abrams tank is a typical modern main battle tank. ... Anti-tank, or simply AT, refers to any method of combating military armored fighting vehicles, notably tanks. ... American troops man an anti-aircraft gun near the Algerian coastline in 1943 Anti-aircraft, or air defense, is any method of combating military aircraft from the ground. ... An anti-tank rifle is a rifle designed to penetrate the armour of vehicles, particularly tanks. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


See also

Volunteer Representative Squadron of City of Poznań in uniforms of 15th Poznań Uhlans Regiment Polish Cavalry (Polish: ) can trace its origins back to the days of Medieval mounted knights. ... Volunteer Representative Squadron of the City of Poznań in the uniform of the 15th Uhlan Regiment of Poznań from 1939 A lancer (uhlan) was a cavalry soldier who fought with a lance. ... Polish (Winged) Hussar Hussar (original Hungarian spelling: huszár, plural huszárok, Polish: Husaria) refers to a number of types of cavalry used throughout Europe since the 15th century. ...

References

  1. ^ Merriam-Webster Online - Uhlan article

Sources and external links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
The State Hermitage Museum: Virtual Tour (246 words)
The first uhlan regiment in Russia, formed in 1803 following the example of the Polish national light cavalry, was Tsesarevich Konstantin Pavlovich's Uhlan Regiment.
In the Patriotic War of 1812 the four active squadrons of the Guards Uhlans formed part of the 1st Western Army in the cavalry corps commanded by Lieutenant General F.P. Uvarov, while the reserve squadron formed part of the combined guards regiment in Lieutenant General P.Ch.
In April 1813 the regiment was awarded St George standards with the inscription "For the capture of an enemy standard near Krasnoye and for distinction in the defeat and driving out of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m