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Encyclopedia > USDemocrat
Democratic Party
Democratic Party logo
Party Chairman Howard Dean
Senate Leader Harry Reid
House Leader Nancy Pelosi
Founded 1792
Headquarters 430 South Capitol Street SE
Washington, D.C.
20003
Political ideology Liberalism, Progressivism
International affiliation Alliance of American and European Democrats1,
Color(s) Blue2
Website www.democrats.org
1The National Democratic Institute, an organization with ties to the party, is registered as a cooperating organization with the Liberal International.
2Blue was assigned as the party's color in the presidential elections of 2000 and 2004, and will likely be used again in the 2008 election.


The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other one being the Republican Party. The party traces its beginnings to Thomas Jefferson in the early 1790s, and is one of the oldest, if not the oldest, political party in the world. Currently, the Democratic Party is the minority party in the United States Senate and the House of Representatives. Democrats control 20 state legislatures. In 2005, the Democrats regained a plurality of legislative seats nationwide; however, the seat count is still much lower than it was ten years ago.

This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party, for which he serves as Senate Minority Leader. ... Representative Nancy Pelosi Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is the Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: the District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Official website: http://www. ... American liberalism (also called modern liberalism) is a political current that claims descent from classical liberalism in terms of devotion to individual liberty, but rejects the laissez faire economics of classical liberalism in favor of institutions that promote social and economic equity. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Alliance of American and European Democrats is a loose bilateral partnership between the United States Democratic Party and the European Democratic Party. ... Blue is any of a number of similar colors. ... The Liberal International is an international organization for international liberal parties. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ... A political party is an organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... The Republican Party was established in 1854 by a coalition of former Whigs, Northern Democrats, and Free-Soilers who opposed the expansion of slavery and held a Hamiltonian vision for modernizing the United States. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential founders of the United States. ... Events and Trends French Revolution ( 1789 - 1799). ... The Minority Party (Minoritetspartiet) is a political party in Denmark without parliamentary representation. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... State legislatures are the lawmaking bodies of the 50 states in the United States of America. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


Basic Values

The Democratic Party bases its values and ideologies on modern liberalism. This means they are typically in support of civil liberties, social freedoms, equality and a free enterprise system with government intervention such as minimum wage and taxes for the sake of avoiding poverty and social injustice. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with American Liberalism. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Free Enterprise is am economic system characterized by private or corporate ownership of capital goods; investments that are determined by private decision rather than by state control; and determined in a free market. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... -1... World map showing Life expectancy. ... Headline text Social injustice is a concept relating to the perceived unfairness of a society in its divisions of rewards and burdens. ...


It should be said, however, that the principles and values of any political party are difficult to define and generally apply to all members of the party. Some members may disagree with one or more plank of their party's political platform. The national platform issued in presidential elections is the personal statement of the nominee. A political platform is a list of the principles which a political party supports in order to appeal to the general public for the purpose of having said partys candidates voted into office. ...


Budget


On the budget, John Kerry in the 2004 platform promised to halve the yearly federal budget deficit by 2009. Democrats argue that large deficits impede economic growth, lead to market instabilities, and present the hard choice of cutting services or generating new revenues, sometimes through tax increases.


Patriot Act


On a major issue affecting civil liberties, the USA PATRIOT Act, the Democrats claim success in changing portions of the Patriot Act that threaten individual rights, such as the library provisions, which was dropped in 2006. Kerry's platform said, "Our government should never round up innocent people only because of their religion or ethnicity, and we should never stifle free expression." Generally, the party is against racial profiling. This article is in need of attention. ... President George W. Bush signing the USA PATRIOT Act in the White Houses East Room on October 26, 2001. ...


Same-Sex Marriage


The party is divided on same-sex marriage, with one faction supporting civil unions for same-sex couples, while others have endorsed full same-sex marriage rights. Same-sex marriage is marriage between two people who are of the same characteristic sex. ... A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing homosexual couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married heterosexuals (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by couples of differing sexes who do not... Same-sex marriage is marriage between two people who are of the same characteristic sex. ...


Abortion


Democrats believe that right to privacy is a constitutional right. Thus as a matter of privacy and gender equality, they maintain, women should be allowed access to abortion, legalized under Roe v. Wade. Often supporters refer to a "right to choose" without a direct reference to the more politically charged term "abortion". Many Democratic politicians include in this right practical access to abortion through government subsidies. Some Democrats explicitly oppose abortion. The party has been shifting to the center on the issue, dropping the calls in the 1980s for unlimited abortion rights and funding, and talking instead about making abortions less common while still legal and available. Thus the national platform (in 2000 and 2004) called for abortion to be "safe, legal and rare"—namely, keeping it legal by rejecting laws that include governmental interference in any individual matter, and reducing the number performed by promoting both knowledge of reproduction and contraception and incentives for adoption. Senator Clinton said in early 2005 that the opposing sides should find "common ground" to prevent unwanted pregnancies and ultimately reduce abortions, which she called a "sad, even tragic choice to many, many women."[1] The right to privacy is a purported human right and an element of various legal traditions which may restrain both government and private party action. ... A constitutional right is a right granted by a countrys constitution (usually on the federal level), and cannot be legally denied by lower (local/municipal) governments. ... Feminism is a diverse, competing, and often opposing collection of social theories, political movements, and moral philosophies, largely motivated by or concerning the experiences of women, especially in terms of their social, political, and economic inequalities. ... Holding Texas laws criminalizing abortion violated womens Fourteenth Amendment right to choose whether to continue a pregnancy. ...


Drugs


Since Democrats base their ideologies on civil liberties and favoring the basic rights of the people, Many Democrats have favored the legalization of Marijuana. However, as far as more hard core drugs such as LSD and Cocaine, few Democrats have expressed support in legalizing them. This article is in need of attention. ... Species Cannabis indica Cannabis ruderalis Cannabis sativa Cannabis is a genus of flowering plant that includes one or more species. ... For other uses, see LSD (disambiguation). ... This article is about the drug Cocaine. ...


Crime and gun control


Democrats often focus on methods of prevention of crime, believing that preventative measures save taxpayers money as prevention is cheaper than incarceration. They emphasize improved community policing and more on-duty police officers in order to help accomplish this goal. Their platforms for 2000 and 2004 also cite crackdowns on gangs and drug trafficking as preventive methods. Their platforms have also particularly addressed the issue of domestic violence, calling for strict penalties for offenders and protections for victims. The Democratic Party has introduced various measures of gun control over the last 100 years. Most notable of these is the National Firearms Act of 1934 (signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt), the 1939 Gun Control Act (also signed into law by FDR), the 1968 Gun Control Act (introduced by Sen. Dodd and endorsed by Sen. Edward Kennedy), the Brady law of 1993 (signed by President Bill Clinton), and the Crime Control Act of 1994 (also signed by Clinton). However, many Democrats, including rural, Southern and Western Democrats, favor fewer restrictions on firearm possession. In the national platform for 2004, the only statement explicitly favoring gun control was a plank calling for renewal of the 1994 Assault Weapons Ban. On May 10, 2002 the Christian Science Monitor reported Democrats were shifting away from the issue, explaining "The shift in tone can be traced to the aftermath of the 2000 election, and the pervasive belief that the issue cost Al Gore the presidency. Exit polls from 2000 showed that among gun owners, George W. Bush beat Mr. Gore by 61 to 39 percent. More significant, while 59 percent of union households went for Mr. Gore overall, those homes were just as likely to choose Bush if they contained guns." [2] A gang is a group of individuals who share a common identity and, in current usage, engage in illegal activities. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Federal Assault Weapons Ban, or AWB, is a provision of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, a federal law of the United States that includes a prohibition on the sale of semiautomatic assault weapons manufactured after the date of the bans enactment. ...


Discrimination


The Democrats cite Affirmative Action as a way to redress past discrimination and ensure equitable employment regardless of ethnicity or gender, but oppose the use of quotas in hiring. Democrats wish to keep the Americans with Disabilities Act to prohibit discrimination against people on the basis of physical or mental disability. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 is the short title of United States Public Law 101-336, signed into law on July 26, 1990 by George H. W. Bush. ...


The Environment


The Democratic Party, being a liberal party is generally pro-environment more than pro-business, though the powerful Michigan delegation has long battled the rest of the part on issues of pollution caused by automobiles.


Health Care


Democrats typically call for "affordable and quality health care," and many advocate an expansion of government funding in this area. In his 2004 platform, Kerry affirmed the pursuit of federally funded stem-cell "research under the strictest ethical guidelines, but we will not walk away from the chance to save lives and reduce human suffering." Some Democratic governors support purchasing Canadian drugs, citing lower costs and budget restrictions as a primary incentive. Recognizing that unpaid insurance bills increase costs to the service provider, who passes the cost on to health-care consumers, many Democrats advocate rapid expansion of Health Insurance Coverage.


History

Beginnings

Andrew Jackson, the first Democratic President of the United States (1829-1837).
Andrew Jackson, the first Democratic President of the United States (1829-1837).

The Democratic Party traces its origins to the Democratic-Republican Party founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1792, although some scholars date the party's beginnings to the late 1820s, when Democratic-Republicans Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren built a new party along with ex-Federalists. The name "Democratic" appeared about 1834. The Democrats did resemble the old Democratic-Republican Party where geography was concerned (both were strong in New York City and Virginia, and weak in New England). Both shared the same Jeffersonian anti-elite opposition to "aristocracy" and faith in "the people." Andrew Jackson File links The following pages link to this file: Andrew Jackson ... Andrew Jackson File links The following pages link to this file: Andrew Jackson ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), was the first governor of Florida (1821), seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, the precursor of the modern-day Democratic Party, was one of two major American political parties in the First Party System that lasted from 1792 to 1824. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential founders of the United States. ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), was the first governor of Florida (1821), seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... Nickname: The Big Apple Official website: City of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area Total 468. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 320 km 690 km 7. ... The states of New England are Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. ...


The main opposition came from the new Whig party. Henry Clay was its main leader, but he lost repeatedly. The Democratic Party was a complex coalition with many elements, especially farmers in all parts of the country, together with workingmen's groups in the cities. The key issues in the 1830s were patronage, the tariff and the Bank of the United States. The economic issues of banking and tariffs would be central domestic policy issue from 1828 to 1850, together with questions of land distribution and national expansion. Whig Party banner from 1848 with candidates Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore. ... Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia, USA – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was a leading American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... On economics see tariff There are two sides to history of tariffs in the United States. ... There were two organizations known as the Bank of the United States First Bank of the United States (1791-1811) Second Bank of the United States (1816-1841) Categories: Defunct banks ...


Van Buren won the presidency in 1836 but was defeated for reelection in 1840. James K. Polk won in the 1844 election, directed the Mexican-American War, then retired. In the 1848 election, Van Buren's new Free Soil Party split from the Democrats, allowing the Whigs to defeat Lewis Cass. The Whigs fell apart after 1850, allowing the Democrats to dominate most states and elect a virtual unknown Franklin Pierce in 1852. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849) the eleventh President of the United States, served from March 4, 1845 to March 3, 1849. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Strength 60,000 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 (Mexican government estimate) The Mexican-American War was fought between the United States and... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. ... Lewis Cass Campaign poster for 12th United States Presidential campaign, 1848. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the 14th President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Post Civil War

Grover Cleveland, the only Democrat elected president between 1856 and 1912
Grover Cleveland, the only Democrat elected president between 1856 and 1912

The main leader in Congress, Sen. Stephen A. Douglas pushed through the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854 amidst strong protest. A major realignment took place among voters and politicians, with new issues, new parties, and new rules. Many Democrats (especially Free Soilers from 1848) joined the newly established Republican Party. James Buchanan was elected in 1856, but his policies in Kansas so angered Douglas that the party was on the verge of splitting. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1732x2572, 411 KB) U.S. President Grover Cleveland. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1732x2572, 411 KB) U.S. President Grover Cleveland. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813–June 3, 1861), American politician from Illinois, was one of the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860 (the other being John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky). ... The Kansas–Nebraska Act was a United States federal law passed on January 23, 1854, organizing a territorial government for the lands that later became the states of Kansas and Nebraska. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


In the 1850s the Party became increasingly divided, with its Southern wing staunchly advocating the expansion of slavery into new territories and distrusting the Northern wing led by Douglas. In 1860 the Party split and rival conventions were held. The Northern Democrats nominated Stephen A. Douglas and the Southern Democrats nominated John C. Breckenridge in the 1860 election. As a result, Republican Abraham Lincoln won, and eleven of the Southern United States --- Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia; --- seceded from the Union, Kentucky and Missouri were also claimed by the South, and formed the Confederate States of America. Douglas and most northern Democrats rejected secession and, at the beginning, supported Lincoln's efforts to restore the Union during the American Civil War. By 1862 Northern Democrats were divided into two factions, War Democrats, who supported the military policies of President Lincoln, and Peace Democrats (the so-called Copperheads), who strongly opposed them. The Democrats were shattered by the war but nevertheless benefited from white Southerners' resentment of Reconstruction and consequent hostility to the Republican Party. Once Redeemers ended Reconstruction, and the disenfranchisement of blacks took place in the 1890s, the South became the "Solid South" for nearly a century because it reliably voted Democratic. In most of the South there was effectively only one party, and victory in the Democratic primary was "tantamount to election." Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... Slavery is a condition in which one person, known as a slave, is under the control of another. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813–June 3, 1861), American politician from Illinois, was one of the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860 (the other being John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky). ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Southern United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 30th 135,775 km² 306 km 531 km 3. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 29th 137 732 km² 385 km 420 km 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 22nd 170 451 km² 260 km 800 km 17. ... Official language(s) English and French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans at last census; probably Baton Rogue since Hurricane Katrina Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 31st 134,382 km² 210 km 610 km 16 29°N to 33°N 89°W to 94°W Population... Official language(s) English Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 32nd 125,443 km² 275 km 545 km 3 30°13N to 35°N 88°7W to 91°41W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 31st 2,697,243 23. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 28th 139,509 km² 805 km 240 km 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 40th 82,965 km² 320 km 420 km 6 32°430N to 35°12N 78°030W to 83°20W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 26th 4,012... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 195 km 710 km 2. ... Official language(s) None. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 320 km 690 km 7. ... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 225 km 610 km 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 21st 69,709 mi²; 180,693 km² 240 mi; 385 km 300 mi; 480 km 1. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861–May 1... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln† Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 2,213,363 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 74,500 Total dead: 198,500 Wounded: 137,000+  The American... War Democrats were those who broke with the majority of the Democratic Party and supported the military policies of President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War of 1861-1865. ... The Copperheads were a group of Northern Democrats who opposed the American Civil War, wanting an immediate peace settlement with the Confederates. ... In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the breakaway Confederacy were reintegrated into the United States of America. ... We dont have an article called Redeemers Start this article Search for Redeemers in. ... Reconstruction-era military districts in the South For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Suffrage is the civil right to vote, or the exercise of that right. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... The phrase Solid South describes the reliable electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ...


The nation was very evenly balanced in the 1880s. Though Republicans continued to control the White House until 1885, the Democrats remained competitive. Dominated by conservative pro-business Bourbon Democrats like Samuel J. Tilden and Grover Cleveland, they had a solid base in the South and great strength in the rural lower Midwestern United States, and in ethnic German American and Irish American enclaves in large cities, mill towns and mining camps in the Northeastern United States. They controlled the House of Representatives for most of that period. In the election of 1884, Grover Cleveland, the reforming Democratic Governor of New York, won the Presidency. He was defeated in the election of 1888 but was re-elected in 1892. Cleveland was the leader of the conservative Bourbon Democrats who represented mercantile, banking and railroad interests, opposed imperialism and overseas expansion, fought for the gold standard, opposed Bimetallism, and crusaded against corruption and high taxes. The Bourbons were overthrown by Bryan in 1896. // Events and Trends Technology Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... Bourbon Democrats was a term used in the United States from 1876 to 1904 to refer to conservative or reactionary members of the Democratic Party, especially those who supported President Grover Cleveland in 1884-1896 and Alton B. Parker in 1904. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... German Americans are citizens of the United States of German ancestry. ... Irish Americans are residents or citizens of the United States who claim Irish ancestry. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Bourbon Democrats was a term used in the United States from 1876 to 1904 to refer to conservative or reactionary members of the Democratic Party, especially those who supported President Grover Cleveland in 1884-1896 and Alton B. Parker in 1904. ... In economics, bimetallism is a monetary standard in which the value of the monetary unit can be expressed either with a certain amount of gold or with a certain amount of silver: the ratio between the two metals is fixed by law. ...


Bryan and Progressivism, 1896-1932

Woodrow Wilson, the only Democrat elected president between 1892 and 1932
Woodrow Wilson, the only Democrat elected president between 1892 and 1932

In the presidential election of 1896, widely regarded as a political realignment, agrarian Democrats demanding Free Silver defeated the Bourbons and nominated William Jennings Bryan (as did the agrarian Populist Party). Bryan, perhaps best known for his "Cross of Gold" speech delivered at the 1896 convention, waged a vigorous campaign attacking Eastern monied interests, but he lost to Republican William McKinley in an election which was to prove decisive. Portrait of Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Realigning election or critical election or realignment are terms from political history and political science. ... Free Silver was an important political issue in the late 19th century United States. ... William Jennings Bryan, 1907 William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860–July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... The Populist Party was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ... The Cross of Gold speech was delivered by William Jennings Bryan at the 1896 Democratic National Convention on July 9, 1896 at the Chicago Coliseum in Chicago, Illinois. ... The 1896 Democratic National Convention, held at the Chicago Coliseum from July 7 to July 11, was the scene of William Jennings Bryans nomination as Democratic presidential candidate for the 1896 U.S. presidential election, the youngest ever nominee. ... The name Mckinley redirects here. ...


The Republicans controlled the presidency for 28 of the following 36 years, dominating most of the Northeastern United States and the Midwestern United States, and half the Western United States. Bryan, with a base in the Southern United States and the Great Plains, was strong enough to get the nomination in the elections of 1900 (losing to McKinley) and 1908 (losing to William Howard Taft). Bourbon conservatives controlled the convention in the election of 1904, but they faced a Theodore Roosevelt landslide. Bryan dropped his free silver and anti-imperialism rhetoric and supported mainstream progressive issues. He backed Woodrow Wilson in 1912, was rewarded by being made Secretary of State, but resigned to protest Wilson's war policies in 1915. Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The states shown striped may or may not be considered part of the informal western United States today. ... Southern United States. ... The Great Plains is the broad expanse of prairie which lies east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States of America and Canada, covering all or parts of the U.S. states of New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota and North Dakota and the... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, the 10th Chief Justice of the United States, and a leader of the conservative wing of the Republican party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Taking advantage of a growing split between conservatives and the insurgents and Progressives in the GOP, the Democrats took control of the House in 1910 and elected intellectual reformer Woodrow Wilson in 1912 and 1916. Wilson successfully led Congress to a series of Progressive laws, including the Underwood Tariff that reduced tariffs; the Clayton Anti-Trust Law that systematized the antitrust system, the Federal Reserve System that created a strong central bank, and pay benefits for railroad workers. A law to outlaw child labor was reversed by the Supreme Court. The Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution establishing Prohibition and the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution establishing Women's suffrage were passed in his second term, but they were bipartisan efforts. In effect, Wilson laid to rest the issues of tariffs, money and antitrust that had dominated politics for 40 years. The United States Progressive Party of 1912 was a political party created by a split in the Republican Party in the 1912 election. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... The Underwood Tariff, or the Tariff Act of 1913 reduced the basic United States tariff rates from 41% to 27%, well below the Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act of 1909. ... Antitrust or competition laws are laws which seek to promote economic and business competition by prohibiting anti-competitive behavior and unfair business practices. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central bank of the United States. ... Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ... Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ... Amendment XIX (the Nineteenth Amendment) to the United States Constitution (sometimes called the Susan B. Anthony Amendment) grants voting rights regardless of the voters sex: The amendment prohibits both the federal government and the states from using a persons sex as a qualification to vote; it was specifically... Suffrage parade, New York City, 1912 The movement for womens suffrage, led by suffragists (peaceful protestors) and suffragettes (violent protestors), was a social, economic and political reform movement aimed at extending the suffrage (the right to vote) to women, advocating equal suffrage (abolition of graded votes) rather than universal...


Wilson led the U.S. to victory in World War I and helped write the Versailles Treaty, which included the League of Nations. But in 1919 Wilson's political skills faltered, as did his health; suddenly everything turned sour. The Senate rejected Versailles and the League, and a nationwide wave of strikes and violence caused unrest. Prohibition opened deep splits between the northern wet ethnics and the southern dries. In the 1924 Democratic National Convention, a resolution denouncing the Ku Klux Klan by name failed by one vote. It was a test of strength posed by Al Smith and Oscar W. Underwood to challenge the William McAdoo candidacy. The deeply divided party was hit by Republican landslides in the presidential elections of 1920, 1924, and 1928. However Al Smith helped build a strong Catholic base in the big cities in 1928, and Franklin D. Roosevelt's election as governor of New York that year brought a new leader to center stage. Combatants Allies: • Serbia, • Russia, • France, • Romania, • Belgium, • British Empire and Dominions, • United States, • Italy, • ...and others Central Powers: • Germany, • Austria-Hungary, • Ottoman Empire, • Bulgaria Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total: 8 million Full list Military dead: 3 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total: 6 million Full... Woodrow Wilson with the American Peace Commissioners The Treaty of Versailles of 1919 is the peace treaty created as a result of six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 which put an official end to World War I between the Allies and Central Powers. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. ... The 1924 Democratic National Convention, also called the Klanbake was held at the Madison Square Garden in New York City from June 24 to July 9, took a record 103 ballots to nominate a presidential candidate. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, a leading Catholic, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... William Gibbs McAdoo (October 31, 1863–February 1, 1941) was a U.S. Senator and United States Secretary of the Treasury. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, a leading Catholic, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... FDR (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ...


The New Deal

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1933-1945)
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1933-1945)

The Great Depression set the stage for a more liberal government, and Franklin D. Roosevelt won a landslide victory in the presidential election of 1932, campaigning on a vague platform that promised repeal of Prohibition and criticizing Herbert Hoover's presidential failures. On taking office on March 4, 1933, Roosevelt came forth with a massive array of programs, soon known as the New Deal. These focused on "Relief, Recovery and Reform". That is, relief of unemployment and rural distress, recovery of the economy back to normal and long-term structural reforms to prevent any repetition. Image File history File linksMetadata FDR_in_1933. ... Image File history File linksMetadata FDR_in_1933. ... Dorothea Langes Migrant Mother depicts destitute pea pickers in California, centering on Florence Owens Thompson, a mother of seven children, age 32, in Nipomo, California, March 1936. ... FDR (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... In politics, a landslide victory (or just a landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming majority in an election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the 31st President of the United States (1929-1933), was a successful mining engineer, humanitarian, and administrator. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal The New Deal is the name given to the series of programs implemented between 1933-37 under President Franklin D. Roosevelt with the goal of relief, recovery and reform of the United States economy during the Great Depression. ...


The 1932 election brought Democrats large majorities in both houses of Congress, and among state governors; the 1934 election increased those margins. The 1933 programs, called "the First New Deal" by many historians, represented a broad consensus; Roosevelt tried to reach out to business and labor, farmers and consumers, cities and countryside. By 1934, however, he was moving toward a more confrontational policy. Roosevelt sought to move the party away from laissez-faire capitalism and toward an ideology of economic regulation and insurance against hardship. Conservative Democrats were outraged; led by Al Smith they formed the American Liberty League in 1934 and counterattacked. Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... Capitalism is commonly understood to mean an economic or socioeconomic system in which the means of production are predominantly privately owned and operated for profit, often through the employment of labour. ... Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, a leading Catholic, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... The American Liberty League was a U.S. organization formed in 1934 by conservative Democrats such as Al Smith (the 1928 Democratic nominee), Jouett Shouse (former high party official and U.S. Representative), and John Jacob Raskob (former Democratic national chairman and the foremost opponent of prohibition), Dean Acheson (future...


After making gains in Congress in 1934 Roosevelt embarked on an ambitious legislative program that came to be called "The Second New Deal." It was characterized by building up labor unions, nationalizing welfare by the Works Progress Administration, setting up Social Security, imposing more regulations on business (especially transportation and communications), and raising taxes on business profits. His policies soon paid off by uniting a diverse coalition of Democratic voters called the New Deal Coalition, which included labor unions, minorities (most significantly, Catholics and Jews), and liberals. This united voter base allowed Democrats to be elected to Congress and the presidency for much of the next 30 years. WPA Graphic The Works Progress Administration (later Works Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created in May 1935 by Presidential order (Congress did not set it up). ... For specific national programs, see Social Security (United States), National insurance (UK), Social Security (Sweden) Social security primarily refers to a field of social welfare concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment, families with children and others. ... The New Deal coalition was the poop alignment of interest groups and voting blocs who supported the New Deal and voted for United States Democratic Party presidential candidates from 1932 until approximately 1966, and which made the Democratic Party the majority party during that time. ... Liberalism is a political current embracing several historical and present-day ideologies that claim defense of individual liberty as the purpose of government. ...


After a triumphant re-election in 1936, Roosevelt announced plans to enlarge the Supreme Court. A firestorm of opposition erupted, led by his own vice president John Nance Garner. Roosevelt was defeated by an alliance of Republicans and conservative Democrats, who formed a conservative coalition that managed to block nearly all liberal legislation. Threatened by the conservative wing of his party, Roosevelt made an attempt to purge it; in 1938, he actively campaigned against five incumbent conservative Democratic senators. They denounced national interference in state affairs, and all five senators won re-election. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Nance Cactus Jack Garner (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ...


Under FDR, the Democratic Party became characterized as "liberal" (an old word with a new meaning). Liberalism meant the promotion of social welfare, labor unions, civil rights, and regulation of business. The opponents, who stressed long-term growth, support for entrepreneurship and low taxes, now started calling themselves "conservatives." ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ...


Truman to Kennedy, 1945-1963

President Harry S Truman (1945-1953)
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President Harry S Truman (1945-1953)

Harry S Truman took over in 1945, when Roosevelt died, The rifts inside the party that Roosevelt had papered over began to emerge. Former Vice President Henry A. Wallace denounced Truman as a war-monger for his anti-Soviet programs, the Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan and NATO. However the Wallace supporters and fellow travelers of the far left were pushed out of the party and the CIO in 1946-48 by young anti-Communists like Hubert H. Humphrey, Walter Reuther and Arthur Schlesinger Jr.. On the right the Republicans blasted Truman’s domestic policies. “Had Enough?” and "To err is Truman" were winning slogans for Republicans, who recaptured Congress in 1946. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (512x641, 94 KB) This image is a work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the persons official duties. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (512x641, 94 KB) This image is a work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the persons official duties. ... For the victim of Mt. ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941-45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933-40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945-46). ... The Truman Doctrine was part of the United States political response to perceived aggression by the Soviet Union in Europe and the Middle East, illustrated through the communist movements in Iran, Turkey and Greece. ... Map of Europe showing the countries that received Marshall Plan aid. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for collective security established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on 4 April 1949. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... Walter Philip Reuther (b. ... Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. ...


Many party leaders were ready to dump Truman, but they lacked an alternative. Truman counterattacked, pushing out Strom Thurmond and his Dixiecrats and taking advantage of the splits inside the Republican Party. Truman won re-election over Thomas Dewey in 1948; a stunning surprise. Truman’s Fair Deal proposals, such as universal health care were defeated by the Conservative Coalition in Congress. James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... In United States history, the Fair Deal was the policy of social improvement of U.S. President Harry S. Truman, outlined in his 1949 State of the Union Address to Congress on January 5, 1949. ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ...


The Democrats nominated Adlai Stevenson in both 1952 and 1956, only to see him overwhelmed by two Dwight D. Eisenhower landslides. In Congress the powerful duo of House Speaker Sam Rayburn and Senate Majority leader Lyndon B. Johnson held the party together, often by compromising with Eisenhower. In 1958 the party made dramatic gains in the off-year election. Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969, popularly known as Ike) was an American soldier and politician. ... ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969). ...

President John F. Kennedy (1961-1963)
President John F. Kennedy (1961-1963)

Sen. John F. Kennedy won the presidential election of 1960, defeating then-Vice President of the United States Richard Nixon. Though Kennedy's term in office lasted just 1000 days, he tried to hold back Communist gains after the failed Bay of Pigs Invasion and the construction of the Berlin Wall, and sent 16,000 soldiers to Vietnam to advise the hard pressed South Vietnamese army. He challenged America in the Space Race to land a man on the moon by 1969. After the Cuban Missile Crisis he moved to de-escalate tensions with the Soviet Union. A growing issue was racial integration and the Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963, and replaced by Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. Johnson, heir to the New Deal broke the Conservative Coalition and passed a remarkable number of liberal laws, known as the Great Society. At the same time Johnson escalated the Vietnam War, leading to a "guns versus butter" conflict that shattered the party in 1968. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Combatants Cuban Government Forces Cuban exiles trained by the US Commanders Fidel Castro Grayston Lynch Pepe San Roman Erneido Oliva Strength 51,000 1,500 Casualties 2,200; estimated 114 dead 1,189 captured Cuban poster warning before invasion showing a soldier armed with an RPD machine gun. ... Remnant of the Berlin Wall near Potsdamer Platz, June 2003. ... For other uses, see Space Race (disambiguation). ... U.S.A.F. spy photo of one of the suspected launch sites The Cuban Missile Crisis refers to the tense confrontation between the Soviet Union and the United States regarding the Soviet deployment of nuclear missiles in Cuba. ... Racial integration, or simply integration includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969). ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal The New Deal is the name given to the series of programs implemented between 1933-37 under President Franklin D. Roosevelt with the goal of relief, recovery and reform of the United States economy during the Great Depression. ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ... The Great Society was a set of domestic programs enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson (1963-1969). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) United States of America South Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand the Philippines Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) National Liberation Front (Viet Cong) Strength ~1,200,000 (1968) ~420,000 (1968) Casualties South Vietnamese dead: 1,250,000+ US dead: 58,226 US wounded...


Civil Rights movement

President Lyndon Johnson foresaw the end of the Solid South when he signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
President Lyndon Johnson foresaw the end of the Solid South when he signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

African Americans, who had traditionally given strong support to the Republican Party since the American Civil War, shifted to the Democratic Party in the 1930s, probably because of New Deal relief programs and patronage offers. In many cities, such as Chicago, entire ward-based Republican apparatus in Black neighborhoods switched parties overnight. However, the New Deal Coalition began to fracture, as more Democratic leaders voiced support for civil rights, upsetting the party's traditional base of conservative Southern Democrats and ethnic Catholics in Northern United States cities. After Harry Truman's platform showed support for civil rights and anti-segregation laws during the 1948 Democratic National Convention, some Southern Democrats, called "Dixiecrats" temporarily abandoned the national party and voted for South Carolina governor Strom Thurmond. They voted for his electors on the regular state Democratic ticket. Although Republican Dwight D. Eisenhower carried half the South in 1952 and 1956, Barry Goldwater also carried many Southern states in 1964, but there was no permanent realignment until Ronald Regan's sweeping victories in the South in the 1980s. Download high resolution version (407x619, 70 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (407x619, 70 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... The phrase Solid South describes the reliable electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ... President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln† Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 2,213,363 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 74,500 Total dead: 198,500 Wounded: 137,000+  The American... The New Deal coalition was the poop alignment of interest groups and voting blocs who supported the New Deal and voted for United States Democratic Party presidential candidates from 1932 until approximately 1966, and which made the Democratic Party the majority party during that time. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... The Northern United States or simply The North, is a region in the United States of America. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People, Leland, Mississippi, June 1937 Racial segregation is characterized by forced separation of people of different races in daily life when both are doing equal tasks, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to... The 1948 Democratic National Convention was held in Philadelphia from July 12 to July 14, and resulted in the nomination of President Harry Truman for President and of Alben Barkley for Vice President. ... The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969, popularly known as Ike) was an American soldier and politician. ... Barry Goldwater Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a United States politician and a founding figure in the modern conservative movement in the USA and a major inspiration for many of his youthful followers to join the libertarian movement. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... Order: 40th President Term of Office: January 20, 1981–January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles, California First Lady: Nancy Reagan Political... The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive. ...


The national party's dramatic reversal on civil rights issues culminated when Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964. On doing so he famously commented: "We have lost the South for a generation." Meanwhile, the Republicans were beginning their Southern strategy, which aimed to resist federal encroachment on the states, while appealing to residual racist feelings among conservative and moderate white Southerners in the rapidly growing cities and suburbs of the south. Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969). ... President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states. ...


In 1968 everything went wrong for the party, and the wounds would last for decades. The Vietnam War turned sour with the stunning Tet Offensive early in the year. Senator Eugene McCarthy rallied antiwar forces on campus in the New Hampshire primary, proving Johnson's support among Democrats was slipping fast. In a stunning move, Johnson withdrew from the election. Senator Robert Kennedy then entered the race, facing McCarthy in a bitter series of primaries that showed a deep split between the students and professors supporting McCarthy and the ethnics and African Americans supporting Kennedy. Martin Luther King was assassinated in April, sparking a nationwide round of riots and violent protests. Johnson had to send federal troops to Detroit, and had to post machine-gun squads to guard the Capitol building. The Secret Service told him he could not attend the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, because they could not guarantee his safety. Just before the convention Kennedy was assassinated. At the convention left wing forces confronted the police in a series of violent encounters. Meanwhile Hubert H. Humphrey, a stalwart New Dealer had entered the race, but it was too late for him to enter the primaries. He relied on support from the labor unions and from old-line city bosses like Chicago's Richard J. Daley, and won the nomination. Meanwhile Alabama's Democratic governor George C. Wallace launched a third party crusade against the integrationists and intellectuals, and at one point was running second to the Republican candidate Richard M. Nixon. A blistering union campaign stopped Wallace from making major inroads into the northern white working class vote, but he swept the white working class vote in the South. Humphrey defied his reputation as a supporter of the Vietnam war, but it was too late. Nixon won, as the Democrats retained control of Congress. Eugene Joseph Gene McCarthy (March 29, 1916 – December 10, 2005) was an American politician and a longtime member of the U.S. Congress. ... The New Hampshire primary is the opening gun of the quadrennial U.S. presidential election. ... Robert Kennedy Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925–June 6, 1968) was the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ... The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr, Ph. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... Richard J. Daley was Chicagos longest-serving mayor and held office from 1955 to his death in 1976 Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was the longest-serving mayor of Chicago. ... George Corley Wallace (August 25, 1919–September 13, 1998) was an American politician who was elected Governor of Alabama (as a Democrat) four times (1962, 1970, 1974 and 1982) and ran for U.S. President (in 1964, 1968, 1972 and 1976). ... Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew (1969–1973), Gerald R. Ford (1973–1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald R. Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of death: April 22...


The degree to which white and black southerners had reversed their historic parties became evident in the 1968 presidential election, when every southern state except Texas deserted Humphrey and voted for either Republican Nixon or independent Wallace. The party's main electoral base thus shifted to the Northeastern United States, marking a dramatic reversal from tradition. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ...


1970s

President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981)
President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981)

In the presidential election of 1972, the Democrats nominated South Dakota Senator George McGovern with his isolationist, anti-Vietnam War slogan "Come Home, America!" McGovern's platform advocated immediate withdrawal from Vietnam and a guaranteed minimum income for all Americans. McGovern tried to crusade against the policies of Nixon, but disclosures about his running-mate Thomas Eagleton (who had undergone secret electric shock therapy) proved disastrous to McGovern's public image. Sargent Shriver, ally of Chicago mayor Richard J. Daley finally accepted the Vice Presidential candidacy. The general election was a landslide for Nixon, as McGovern carried only Massachusetts. However, Democrats retained their large majorities in Congress and most state houses. This is the color version of image:Jimmycarter. ... This is the color version of image:Jimmycarter. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George McGovern Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential candidate, losing the 1972 presidential election to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) United States of America South Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand the Philippines Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) National Liberation Front (Viet Cong) Strength ~1,200,000 (1968) ~420,000 (1968) Casualties South Vietnamese dead: 1,250,000+ US dead: 58,226 US wounded... Thomas Eagleton Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former U.S. Senator from Missouri. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... Richard J. Daley was Chicagos longest-serving mayor and held office from 1955 to his death in 1976 Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was the longest-serving mayor of Chicago. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 44th 10,555 mi²; 27,360 km² 183 mi; 295 km 113 mi; 182 km 13. ...


Gerald Ford pardoned Richard M. Nixon soon after his resignation in 1974, giving the Democrats a "corruption" issue they used to make major gains in the off-year elections. In the 1976 the surprise winner was a little-known outsider who promised honesty in Washington, Jimmy Carter, a former Governor of Georgia. Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew (1969–1973), Gerald R. Ford (1973–1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald R. Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of death: April 22... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For the submarine, see USS Jimmy Carter (SSN-23). ...


Some of President Carter's major accomplishments consisted of the creation of a national energy policy and the consolidation of governmental agencies, resulting in two new cabinet departments, the United States Department of Energy and the United States Department of Education. Carter led the bipartisan effort to deregulate the trucking, airline, rail, finance, communications, and oil industries, thus eliminating the New Deal approach to regulation of the economy. He bolstered the social security system, and appointed record numbers of women and minorities to significant government and judicial posts. He helped enact strong legislation on environmental protection, through the expansion of the National Park Service in Alaska, creating 103 million new acres of land. In foreign affairs, Carter's accomplishments consisted of the Camp David Accords, the Panama Canal Treaties, the creation of full diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China, and the negotiation of the SALT II Treaty. In addition, he championed human rights throughout the world and used human rights as the center of his administration's foreign policy. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... The United States Department of Education was created in 1979 (by PL 96-88) as a Cabinet-level department of the United States government, and began operating in 1980. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal The New Deal is the name given to the series of programs implemented between 1933-37 under President Franklin D. Roosevelt with the goal of relief, recovery and reform of the United States economy during the Great Depression. ... For specific national programs, see Social Security (United States), National insurance (UK), Social Security (Sweden) Social security primarily refers to a field of social welfare concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment, families with children and others. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 1st 1,717,854 km² 1,300 km 2,380 km 13. ... Anwar Sadat (left), Jimmy Carter (center), and Menachem Begin (right) shake hands in celebration of the success of the Camp David Accords The Camp David Accords were signed by Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin on September 17, 1978, following twelve days of secret negotiations at... Map of Panama, with Panama canal The Torrijos-Carter Treaties (sometimes referred to in the singular as the Torrijos-Carter Treaty), are a pair of treaties signed by the United States and Panama in Washington, D. C. on September 7, 1977, abrogating the Hay-Bunau Varilla Treaty signed in 1903. ... nSALT II was a second round of the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks from 1972-1979 between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, which sought to curtail the manufacture of strategic nuclear weapons. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...


Even with all of these successes, Carter failed to implement a national health plan or to reform the tax system, as he had promised in his campaign. Inflation was also on the rise. Abroad, the Iran hostage crisis (November 4, 1979 - January 20, 1981) involved 52 Americans held hostage for 444 days, and Carter's diplomatic and military rescue attempts failed. The Soviet war in Afghanistan starting in December, 1979 helped weaken the perception Americans had of Carter. In the presidential election of 1980, Carter defeated Ted Kennedy to gain renomination, but lost to Ronald Reagan in November. The Democrats lost 12 Senate seats, and for the first time since 1954, the Republicans controlled the Senate. The House, however, remained in Democratic hands. Even though he had already been defeated for re-election, Carter negotiated the release of every American hostage from Iran in the last hours of his term in office. The former US embassy, Tehran, Iran, as it appears today The Iran hostage crisis was a 444-day (about 14 months) period during which student proxies of the new Iranian regime held hostage 52 diplomats and citizens of the United States, which lasted from November 4, 1979 until January 20... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants USSR Democratic Republic of Afghanistan Mujahideen Rebels supported by nations such as the United States, Pakistan, and China Commanders General Boris Gromov Gulbuddin Hekmatyar Sibghatullah Mojadeddi Ahmed Shah Massoud Abdul Ali Mazari Indirect and Minor roles Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq Osama Bin Laden Casualties Over 15,000 Soviet military... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Edward Moore Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, having served since 1962. ...


1980s

Thomas "Tip" O'Neill was Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1977-1987

Instrumental in the election of Republican President Ronald Reagan in the 1980 election were Democrats who supported many conservative policies. The "Reagan Democrats" were Democrats before and after the Reagan years. They were mostly white ethnics in the Northeastern United States who were attracted to Reagan's social conservatism and his hawkish foreign policy. Reagan carried 49 states against former Vice President Walter Mondale, a New Deal stalwart, in the United States presidential election, 1984. Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis, running not as a New Dealer but as an efficiency expert in public administration, lost by a landslide in the 1988 election to Vice President George H. W. Bush. Image File history File links This is the official government photo of Tip ONeill. ... Image File history File links This is the official government photo of Tip ONeill. ... Thomas Philip ONeill, Jr. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... President Ronald Reagan. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 44th 10,555 mi²; 27,360 km² 183 mi; 295 km 113 mi; 182 km 13. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and former presidential candidate, born in Brookline, Massachusetts, to Greek-immigrant parents. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Herbert Walker Bush, GCB, (born June 12, 1924 in Milton, MA) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ...


The Democrats remained in control of Congress, although conservative "Blue Dog Democrats" often voted with Reagan. The Senate was in Republican hands from 1980-86, but later returned to Democratic control. The Democrats clashed frequently with Reagan on numerous issues. In foreign policy, they disagreed with the president on the nuclear freeze and the Boland Amendment, which tried to restrict funding of the Contras who were challenging the left-wing government of Nicaragua. Democrats failed to block Reagan's tax cuts and his increases in military spending, but they did keep alive numerous social programs that he tried to cut or eliminate. Congress voted for most of the spending increases and tax cuts that Reagan proposed, but not his spending cuts. Annual federal budget deficits, and the national debt, rose to record heights under Reagan. Blue Dog Democrats are social and economic conservatives and moderates in the United States Democratic Party. ... The nuclear freeze was a proposed agreement between the worlds nuclear powers, primarily the United States and the then-Soviet Union, to freeze all production of new nuclear arms and to leave levels of nuclear armanent where they currently were. ... The Boland Amendment was an amendment to the House Appropriations Bill of 1982, which was attached as something known as a Barnacle Bill, or provision that would not be expected to pass on its own merit, to the Defense Appropriations Act of 1983. ... The Contras (from the Spanish term La Contra, short for movement of the contrarrevolucionarios, meaning counter-revolutionaries) were the armed opponents of Nicaraguas Sandinista Junta of National Reconstruction following the July 1979 overthrow of Anastasio Somoza Debayle and the ending of the Somoza familys 43-year rule. ...


In response to three landslide defeats in a row (1980-84-88), the Democratic Leadership Council was created to move the Party rightwards to the ideological center. With the Party retaining left-of-center supporters as well as supporters holding moderate or conservative views on some issues, the Democrats, more so than ever, became a catch all party with widespread appeal to most opponents of the Republicans. The Democratic Leadership Council is an influential non-profit corporation that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from the its traditionally liberal positions. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catch-all party. ...


1990s

During Bill Clinton's presidency (1993-2001) the Democratic Party's campaigning moved ideologically towards the center.
During Bill Clinton's presidency (1993-2001) the Democratic Party's campaigning moved ideologically towards the center.

In 1992, for the first time in 12 years, the United States elected a Democrat to the White House. President Bill Clinton balanced the federal budget for the first time since the Kennedy presidency and presided over a robust American economy that saw incomes grow across the board. In 1994, the economy had the lowest combination of unemployment and inflation in 25 years. President Clinton signed into law the Brady Bill, which imposed a five-day waiting period on handgun purchases and banned many types of assault weapons. His Family and Medical Leave Act, covering some 40 million Americans, offered workers up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-guaranteed leave for childbirth or a personal or family illness. He helped restore democracy to Haiti, took a strong hand in Palestinian-Israeli peace negotiations, brokered a historic cease-fire in Northern Ireland, and negotiated the Dayton accords, which helped bring an end to nearly four years of terror and killing in the former Yugoslavia. Clinton was re-elected in 1996, the first time since Franklin Roosevelt in 1936 that a Democratic president had been elected to consecutive terms. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Budget generally refers to a list of all planned expenses and revenues. ... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993. ... The Dayton Agreement or Dayton Accords is the name given to the agreement at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio to end the war in the former Yugoslavia that had gone on for the previous three years, in particular the future of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...


However, starting in 1994, the Democrats lost their majority in the House of Representatives. Clinton, vetoed two Republican-backed reform bills before signing the third, a welfare reform bill. Labor unions, which had been steadily losing membership since the 1960s, found they had also lost political clout inside the Democratic Party: Clinton enacted the NAFTA free trade agreement with Canada and Mexico over the strong objection of these labor unions, much to the disappointment of those on the left of the Party. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... Nafta or NAFTA may refer to: an acronym for the North American Free Trade Agreement an acronym for the New Zealand Australia Free Trade Agreement the town/Tokyo of Nafta, Tunisia This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


When the DLC attempted to move the Democratic agenda in favor of more centrist positions, prominent Democrats from both the centrist and conservative factions (such as Terry McAuliffe) assumed leadership of the party and its direction. Some liberals and progressives felt alienated by the Democratic Party, which they felt had become unconcerned with the interests of the common people and left-wing issues in general. Some Democrats challenged the validity of such critiques, citing the Democratic role in pushing for liberal reforms. DLC is a TLA that may stand for: Democratic Leadership Council Dalian Zhoushuizi International Airport (China) Data Language Corporation Data Length Code for example on CANbus and LINbus Data link connector Data Link Control (networking) delay line canceller Democratic Leadership Council Department of Liquor Control (Vermont) Desktop Linux Consortium Development... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... Terry McAuliffe opening the 2004 Democratic National Convention Terrence Richard Terry McAuliffe (born 1957) is an American political leader from the Democratic Party; he served as Chairman of the Democratic National Committee from February 2001 to February 2005. ...


21st century

During the presidential election of 2000, the Democrats chose Vice President Al Gore to be the Party's candidate for the presidency. Gore and George W. Bush, the Republican candidate, clearly disagreed on a number of issues, including abortion, gun politics, environmentalism, gay marriage, tax cuts, foreign policy, public education, global warming, judicial appointments, and affirmative action. Nevertheless, Gore's affiliation with Clinton and the Democratic Leadership Council caused some critics — Green Party presidential candidate Ralph Nader in particular — to assert that Bush and Gore were too similar, especially on free trade and reductions in social welfare. This outraged the far left, as it saw the Democratic party becoming a junior GOP. As Nader's closest advisor explained the reason for his running, "Because we want to punish the Democrats, we want to hurt them, wound them."[3] The 21st century is the century that began on 1 January 2001 and will last to 31 December 2100. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The term gun politics refers to the various public policy debates surrounding the freedom or restriction (gun rights versus gun control) of private ownership and usage of firearms, and to what extent such policy influences crime and the balance of power between the individual and the state. ... Environmentalism is the support of or involvement with the environmental movement by environmentalists. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1856 to 2005 Mean temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is a term used to describe the trend of increases in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans that... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) ran three times for President of the United States. ...


Gore won the popular vote by just over 500,000 votes, but lost in the electoral college by four votes. Many Democrats blamed Nader's third-party spoiler role for Gore's defeat. They pointed to the states of New Hampshire (4 electoral votes) and Florida (25 electoral votes), where Nader's total votes exceeded Governor Bush's margin of victory. In Florida, Nader received 97,000 votes; Bush defeated Gore by a mere 538. Winning either Florida or New Hampshire would have given Gore enough electoral votes to win the presidency. The spoiler effect is a term to describe the effect a candidate can have on a close election, in which their candidacy results in the election being won by a candidate dissimilar to them, rather than a candidate similar to them. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 46th 24,239 km² 110 km 305 km 3. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 22nd 170 451 km² 260 km 800 km 17. ...

Vice President Al Gore did not win his 2000 Presidential bid, although he won the national popular vote by 543,816 votes.
Vice President Al Gore did not win his 2000 Presidential bid, although he won the national popular vote by 543,816 votes.

Republican Senators went from the majority in the 106th Congress to a split minority in the 107th Congress (with a Republican Vice President breaking a tie). However, when liberal Republican Senator Jim Jeffords (Vermont) changed his party affiliation to unaffiliated and chose to vote with the Democrats, the majority status switched back to the Democrats, including control of the floor (by the Majority Leader) and control of all committee chairmanships. The Republicans regained their majority in 2002 and strengthened it in 2004, leaving the Democrats with only 44 seats, the fewest since the 1920s. Al Gore government photo. ... Al Gore government photo. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934 in Rutland, Vermont) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 43rd 24,923 km² 130 km 260 km 3. ... The 1920s were a decade sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ...


In the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks, the nation's focus was changed to issues of national security. All but one Democrat (Senator Russell Feingold) voted with their Republican counterparts to authorize President Bush's 2001 invasion of Afghanistan. House leader Dick Gephardt and Senate leader Tom Daschle pushed Democrats to vote for the USA PATRIOT Act and the invasion of Iraq. The Democrats were split over entering Iraq in 2003 and increasingly expressed concerns about both the justification and progress of the War on Terrorism and the domestic effects including threats to civil rights and civil liberties from the USA PATRIOT Act. A huge plume of smoke and fire can be seen emerging from the North Tower. ... Security measures taken to protect the Houses of Parliament in London, England. ... Combatants al-Qaeda, Taliban Northern Alliance, United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, France, New Zealand, Italy, Germany Commanders Mohammed Omar Osama bin Laden Tommy Franks Mohammed Fahim Strength Casualties {{{notes}}} The United States invasion of Afghanistan occurred in October 2001, in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks on... Rep. ... President George W. Bush signing the USA PATRIOT Act in the White Houses East Room on October 26, 2001. ... Combatants Coalition Forces (United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Poland) Iraq Commanders Tommy Franks Saddam Hussein Strength 263,000 375,000 The 2003 Invasion of Iraq began on March 20 and consisted mainly of United States and United Kingdom forces. ... The War on Terrorism or War on Terror (in U.S. foreign policy circles, Global War on Terrorism or GWOT; recently also Long War) is a campaign by the United States government and some of its allies with the stated goal of ending international terrorism by stopping terrorist groups and... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... This article is in need of attention. ... President George W. Bush signing the USA PATRIOT Act in the White Houses East Room on October 26, 2001. ...


In the wake of the financial fraud scandal of the Enron Corporation and other corporations, Congressional Democrats were pushed for a legal overhaul of business accounting with the intention of preventing further accounting fraud. This led to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act in 2002. With job losses and bankruptcies across regions and industries increasing in 2001 and 2002, the Democrats generally campaigned on the issue of economic recovery. Enron Corporation is an energy company based in Houston, Texas. ... Before the signing ceremony of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, President George W. Bush meets with Senator Paul Sarbanes, Secretary of Labor Elaine Chao and other dignitaries in the Blue Room at the White House July 30, 2002. ...


The 2004 campaign started as early as December 2002, when Gore announced he would not run again in the 2004 election. Ex-Governor Howard Dean of Vermont, an opponent of the war and a critic of the Democratic establishment, was the front-runner leading into the Democratic primaries. Dean had immense grassroots support, especially from the left wing of the Party. John Kerry, a more centrist figure, was nominated because he was seen as more "electable" than Dean. Presidential election results map. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... A primary election is an election in which registered voters in a jurisdiction select a political partys candidate for a later election (nominating primary). ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Anybody but Bush was an informal political movement during the 2004 US Presidential election. ...


As layoffs of American workers occurred in various industries due to outsourcing, some Democrats (including Howard Dean and Senatorial candidate Erskine Bowles of North Carolina) began to refine their positions on free trade and some even questioned their past support for it. By 2004, the failure of George W. Bush's administration to find weapons of mass destruction, mounting combat casualties and fatalities in Iraq, and the lack of any end point for the War on Terror were frequently debated issues in the election. That year, Democrats generally campaigned on surmounting the jobless recovery, solving the Iraq crisis, and fighting terrorism more efficiently. Paper shredding can be contracted out Outsourcing (or contracting out) is often defined as the delegation of non-core operations or jobs from internal production within a business to an external entity (such as a subcontractor) that specializes in that operation. ... Erskine Bowles Erskine Boyce Bowles (born 8 August 1945) is an American businessman and political figure from the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 28th 139,509 km² 805 km 240 km 9. ... Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) generally include nuclear, biological, chemical and, increasingly, radiological weapons. ... A jobless recovery is a phrase used by economists to describe the recovery from a recession which does not produce strong growth in employment. ...

Senator John Kerry was the Democratic Party's 2004 candidate for President.
Senator John Kerry was the Democratic Party's 2004 candidate for President.

In the end, Kerry lost both the popular vote by 3 million and electoral vote. Republicans gained four seats in the Senate and three seats in the House of Representatives. Also, for the first time since 1952, the Democratic leader of the Senate lost re-election. In the end there were 3,660 Democratic state legislators across the nation to the Republicans' 3,557. Democrats gained governorships in Louisiana, New Hampshire and Montana. However, they lost the governorship of Missouri and a legislative majority in Georgia - which had long been a Democratic stronghold. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2065x3000, 312 KB) http://kerry. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2065x3000, 312 KB) http://kerry. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... State legislatures are the lawmaking bodies of the 50 states in the United States of America. ...


There were many reasons for the defeat. Kerry was a poor campaigner who thought his heroic war record in the Vietnam War would make him more attractive to voters, but a group of Vietnam veterans opposed to Kerry called the Swift Boat Veterans undercut this campaign strategy. Kerry was unable to reconcile his initial support of the Iraq War with his opposition to the war in 2004, or manage the deep split in the Democratic Party between those who favored and opposed the war. Republicans ran thousands of television commercials to argue that Kerry had flip-flopped on Iraq. When Kerry's home state of Massachusetts legalized same-sex marriage, the issue split liberal and conservative Democrats and independents (Kerry publicly stated throughout his campaign that he opposed same sex marriage, but favored civil unions). Republicans exploited the same-sex marriage issue by promoting ballot initiatives in 11 states that brought conservatives to the polls in large numbers; all 11 initiatives passed. [4] Kerry may also have lost the election due to the Democrats being unable to clearly articulate their values, goals, and issue positions.[5] Flaws in vote-counting systems may also have played a role in Kerry's defeat (see 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy and irregularities). With 150,000 more votes in Ohio, Kerry would have overcome Bush's 3 million vote popular majority and won the electoral college. Sen. Barbara Boxer of California and several Democratic U.S. Representatives (including John Conyers of Michigan) raised the issue of voting irregularities in Ohio when the 109th Congress first convened, but they were defeated 267-31 by the House and 74-1 by the Senate. Combatants Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) United States of America South Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand the Philippines Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) National Liberation Front (Viet Cong) Strength ~1,200,000 (1968) ~420,000 (1968) Casualties South Vietnamese dead: 1,250,000+ US dead: 58,226 US wounded... Swift Vets and POWs for Truth, formerly known as the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth (SBVT), is an organization of American Swift boat veterans and former prisoners of war of the Vietnam War, formed during the 2004 presidential election campaign for the purpose of discrediting John Kerrys military service... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The Iraq War (2003-present) is an ongoing conflict in the Middle Eastern country of Iraq, which began with the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and continues to the present in the form of an insurgent rebellion, which the US claims is assisted by... Same-sex marriage is marriage between two people who are of the same characteristic sex. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... John Conyers John Conyers, Jr. ...

 Many Democratic Party supporters want Senator Barack Obama to become the front-runner for the nation's first African American president, despite his hesitance.
Many Democratic Party supporters want Senator Barack Obama to become the front-runner for the nation's first African American president, despite his hesitance.

After two unexpected defeats, many Democrats have voiced serious concerns about the future of their party. Prominent Democrats began to rethink the party's direction, and a variety of strategies for moving forward were voiced. Some have suggested moving towards the right to regain seats in the House and Senate and possibly win the presidency in the election of 2008; others suggested that the party move more to the left and become a stronger opposition party. Image File history File linksMetadata Barack_Obama. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Barack_Obama. ... Barack Hussein Obama, Jr. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ...


These debates were reflected in the 2005 campaign for Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, which Howard Dean won over the objections of many party insiders. Dean sought to move the Democratic strategy away from the establishment, and bolster support for the party's state and local chapters.[6] Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ...


When the 109th Congress convened, Democratic Senators chose Harry Reid of Nevada as their Minority Leader and Richard Durbin of Illinois to replace Reid as their Assistant Minority Leader. Reid tried to convince the Democratic Senators to vote more as a bloc on important issues; he did force the Republicans to abandon their push for privatization of Social Security. The 109th United States Congress meets from January 4, 2005, to January 1, 2007. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party, for which he serves as Senate Minority Leader. ... The Senate Minority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin (born November 21, 1944) is a Democratic American politician. ... Traditionally the second ranking position in the minority party in the United States Senate. ...


By the close of 2005, many Democrats across the country were optimistic about their party's chances in regaining control of the House or Senate. The federal government's slow response to disasters like Hurricane Katrina highlighted a degree of incompetence in the administration. Democratic politicians argued that the party that had maintained control due to its emphasis on national security was infact unable to effectively manage a disaster that had been predicted for days. Additionally, the Democratic Party managed to maintain its governorships in Virginia and New Jersey, electing Tim Kaine and Jon Corzine, respectively. These victories were seen by many as a rejection of the Republican party and a beacon of hope for the Democrats in 2006 and 2008. Hurricane Katrina was the costliest and one of the deadliest hurricanes in American history. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 320 km 690 km 7. ... Official language(s) None defined, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 47th 22,608 km² 110 km 240 km 14. ... Timothy Michael Kaine (born February 26, 1958 in St. ... Jon Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is the current Democratic Governor of the state of New Jersey. ...


The USA PATRIOT Act was renewed by Congress in March 2006; it passed in the Senate by 89-10 (34 Democrats voted yes and 9 voted no), and in the House by 280-138 (66 Democrats voted for the renewal, and 124 voted against it.)[7] However the act was largely rewritten to remove some of its more controversial provisions. President George W. Bush signing the USA PATRIOT Act in the White Houses East Room on October 26, 2001. ...


2008 Outlook

U.S. Senator and former First Lady Hillary Clinton has been mentioned as the most likely nominee for the Democratic in 2008.
U.S. Senator and former First Lady Hillary Clinton has been mentioned as the most likely nominee for the Democratic in 2008.

Pollsters and pundits all put Senator Hillary Clinton in the lead for the 2008 nomination, but other possible candidates have been active. They include former national nominees John Edwards, Al Gore, and John Kerry, as well as former Virginia Governor Mark Warner, retired General Wesley Clark, Indiana Senator Evan Bayh, New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson (who could become the first Hispanic on a major party ticket), Illinois Senator Barack Obama (who could be the first African-American on a major party ticket), and from the left wing of the party, Wisconsin Senator Russell Feingold. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x915, 86 KB)Official White House First Lady Portrait of Hillary Rodham Clinton File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x915, 86 KB)Official White House First Lady Portrait of Hillary Rodham Clinton File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Martha Washington, 1st First Lady of the United States Laura Bush, current First Lady of the United States (2001-present) First Lady of the United States is the unofficial title of the hostess of the White House. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... This article is about the American attorney and politican. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Wesley Clark Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general in the U.S. Army. ... Birch Evans Evan Bayh III (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as a U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... William Blaine Bill Richardson (born November 15, 1947) is an American politician and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Barack Hussein Obama, Jr. ... Russell Dana Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician and has been a U.S. senator from Wisconsin since 1993. ...


Presidential tickets

Election year Result Nominees
President Vice President
1828 won Andrew Jackson John Caldwell Calhoun[1]
1832 won Martin Van Buren
1836 won Martin Van Buren Richard Mentor Johnson
1840 lost
1844 won James Knox Polk George Mifflin Dallas
1848 lost Lewis Cass William Orlando Butler
1852 won Franklin Pierce William Rufus de Vane King[2]
1856 won James Buchanan John Cabell Breckinridge
1860 lost Stephen Arnold Douglas (Northern) Herschel Vespasian Johnson
lost John Cabell Breckinridge (Southern) Joseph Lane
1864 lost George Brinton McClellan George Hunt Pendleton
1868 lost Horatio Seymour Francis Preston Blair, Jr.
1872 lost Horace Greeley[3] Benjamin Gratz Brown
1876 lost Samuel Jones Tilden Thomas Andrews Hendricks
1880 lost Winfield Scott Hancock William Hayden English
1884 won Stephen Grover Cleveland Thomas Andrews Hendricks[2]
1888 lost Allen Granberry Thurman
1892 won Adlai Ewing Stevenson
1896 lost William Jennings Bryan Arthur Sewall
1900 lost Adlai Ewing Stevenson
1904 lost Alton Brooks Parker Henry Gassaway Davis
1908 lost William Jennings Bryan John Worth Kern
1912 won Thomas Woodrow Wilson Thomas Riley Marshall
1916 won
1920 lost James Middleton Cox Franklin Delano Roosevelt
1924 lost John William Davis Charles Wayland Bryan
1928 lost Alfred Emmanuel Smith Joseph Taylor Robinson
1932 won Franklin Delano Roosevelt[2] John Nance Garner
1936 won
1940 won Henry Agard Wallace
1944 won Harry S. Truman
1948 won Harry S. Truman Alben William Barkley
1952 lost Adlai Ewing Stevenson II John Jackson Sparkman
1956 lost Estes Kefauver
1960 won John Fitzgerald Kennedy[2] Lyndon Baines Johnson
1964 won Lyndon Baines Johnson Hubert Horatio Humphrey
1968 lost Hubert Horatio Humphrey Edmund Sixtus Muskie
1972 lost George Stanley McGovern Robert Sargent Shriver[4]
1976 won James Earl Carter, Jr. Walter Frederick Mondale
1980 lost
1984 lost Walter Frederick Mondale Geraldine Anne Ferraro
1988 lost Michael Stanley Dukakis Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr.
1992 won William Jefferson Clinton Albert Arnold Gore, Jr.
1996 won
2000 lost Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. Joseph Isadore Lieberman
2004 lost John Forbes Kerry John Reid Edwards

[1] Resigned.
[2] Died in office.
[3] The Greeley/Brown ticket was nominated by the Liberal Republican Party and endorsed by the Democrats. Greeley died shortly after the election.
[4] Thomas Eagleton was the original vice presidential nominee, but was forced to withdraw his nomination.
Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), was the first governor of Florida (1821), seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782–March 31, 1850), was a prominent United States politician in the first half of the 19th century. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849) the eleventh President of the United States, served from March 4, 1845 to March 3, 1849. ... George Mifflin Dallas (July 10, 1792—December 31, 1864) was a U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania and the eleventh Vice President, serving under James K. Polk. ... Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... Lewis Cass Campaign poster for 12th United States Presidential campaign, 1848. ... William Orlando Butler (April 19, 1791 - August 6, 1880) was a U.S. political figure from Kentucky. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the 14th President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... William Rufus de Vane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813–June 3, 1861), American politician from Illinois, was one of the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860 (the other being John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky). ... Herschel Vespasian Johnson (September 18, 1812 - August 16, 1880) was an American politician. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Joseph Lane (1801-1881) was an American general during the Mexican War. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 - October 29, 1885) was a Major General of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... George Hunt Pendleton (July 19, 1825–November 24, 1889) was a Representative and a Senator from Ohio. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... Francis Preston Blair, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811–November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... Benjamin Gratz Brown (May 28, 1826 - December 13, 1885) was a Liberal Republican Senator, Governor of Missouri, and the Vice presidential candidate in the election of 1872. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... Summary Keeping a promise made during the 1876 campaign, incumbent President Rutherford Hayes did not seek re-election. ... Portrait of Winfield S. Hancock during the Civil War Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer who served with distinction as a general in the American Civil War and ran unsuccessfully for President of the United States in 1880. ... William Hayden English (August 27, 1822–February 7, 1896) was an American politician. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Congressman from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Jennings Bryan, 1907 William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860–July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... Arthur Sewall (November 25, 1835 _ September 5, 1900 was a U.S. Democratic politician from Maine most notable as William Jennings Bryans first running mate in 1896. ... Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Congressman from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Summary The election was held on November 8, 1904. ... Alton Brooks Parker (May 14, 1852 – May 10, 1926) was an American lawyer and judge and a U.S. presidential candidate in the 1904 elections. ... Henry Gassaway Davis (16 November 1823 - March 11, 1916) was a U.S. Democratic politician from West Virginia. ... Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. ... William Jennings Bryan, 1907 William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860–July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... John Worth Kern (December 20, 1849 - August 17, 1917) was a U.S. Democratic politician from Indiana. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Middleton Cox (March 31, 1870 - July 15, 1957) was a Governor of Ohio, U.S. Representative from Ohio and Democratic candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1920. ... FDR (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... Introduction Incumbent President Coolidge was relatively popular, and the economy was booming. ... John William Davis John William Davis (April 13, 1873 — March 24, 1955) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Charles Wayland Bryan (February 10, 1867 - March 4, 1945), was the younger brother of perennial U.S. Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, a leading Catholic, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... Joseph Taylor Robinson Joseph Taylor Robinson (August 26, 1872 - July 14, 1937) was a Democratic United States Senator, Senate Majority Leader, member of the United States House of Representatives, Governor of Arkansas, and U.S. Vice Presidential candidate. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... FDR (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... John Nance Cactus Jack Garner (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941-45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933-40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945-46). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-fourth Vice President (1945) and the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953), succeeding to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-fourth Vice President (1945) and the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953), succeeding to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Alben W. Barkley Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ... John Jackson Sparkman (December 20, 1899 - November 16, 1985) was a United States politician from Alabama. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Estes Kefauver Carey Estes Kefauver (July 26, 1903 – August 10, 1963) was an American politician from Tennessee. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was a Polish-American politician from Maine. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George McGovern Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential candidate, losing the 1972 presidential election to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For the submarine, see USS Jimmy Carter (SSN-23). ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) has been a two-term U.S. Senator, the forty-second vice president of the United States (1977-1981), and the wildly unsuccessful Democratic Party nominee for president in 1984 against the incumbent, Republican Ronald W. Reagan. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) has been a two-term U.S. Senator, the forty-second vice president of the United States (1977-1981), and the wildly unsuccessful Democratic Party nominee for president in 1984 against the incumbent, Republican Ronald W. Reagan. ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is best known as the first and, so far, only woman to be a candidate for Vice President of the United States on a major party ticket (although women on third-party tickets continue to run for the position). ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and former presidential candidate, born in Brookline, Massachusetts, to Greek-immigrant parents. ... Lloyd Bentsen Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman, (born February 24, 1942) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Connecticut, best known as Al Gores running mate on the Democratic ticket in 2000. ... Presidential election results map. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... This article is about the American attorney and politican. ... The United States Liberal Republican Party was a political party formed in 1872 to oppose the administration of the then-current President, Ulysses S. Grant. ... Thomas Eagleton Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former U.S. Senator from Missouri. ...


Factions

Neoliberals

Though neoliberal Democrats differ on a variety of issues, they typically foster a mix of political views and ideas. Compared to other Democratic factions, they're mostly more supportive of the use of military force, including the war in Iraq, and are more willing to reduce government welfare, as indicated by their support for welfare reform and tax cuts. Neoliberals argue that their ideas are more in line with the majority of Americans. Progressive Democrats such as Governor Howard Dean classify neoliberals as "Republican Lite" due to their willingness to promote and vote for a Republican agenda and their willingness to accept corporate fundraising. Welfare reform is the name for a political movement in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to institute changes in that system, generally in a more conservative direction. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ...


One of the most influential factions is the Democratic Leadership Council (DLC), an influential non-profit organization that advocates centrist positions for the party. Members often self-identify under the title "New Democrat". Selected former party leaders of the 1980s founded the DLC in response to the landslide victory of Ronald Reagan over Walter Mondale in 1984, believing the Democratic Party needed to reform its political philosophy if it was to ever retake the White House. The DLC hails President Bill Clinton as proof of the viability of third way politicians and a DLC success story. The DLC has no official allegiance with or control over the Democratic National Committee. Many Progressive Democrats believe the DLC to be partially responsible for the Republican take over of Congress in 1994 and 2002. Since 1992 and the involvement of the DLC the Democratic Party has not won control of either house of congress in every election since 1992. Chairman Howard Dean is the first DNC Chair since 1992 to not be aligned or involved with the DLC. However, critics contend that the DLC is effectively a powerful, corporate-financed influence within the Democratic Party that acts to keep Democratic Party candidates and platforms sympathetic to corporate interests. The DLC was founded and continues to be led by Al From. Governor Tom Vilsack of Iowa is the current chairman. The Democratic Leadership Council is an influential non-profit corporation that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from the its traditionally liberal positions. ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... For the Canadian New Democratic Party, see New Democratic Party. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Al From is the primary founder and current CEO of the Democratic Leadership Council. ... Thomas James Vilsack (born December 13, 1950) is 40th Governor of the state of Iowa. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 26th 145,743 km² 320 km 500 km 0. ...


Prominent neoliberals include President Bill Clinton; Senator Hillary Clinton; Vice President Al Gore up to 2000, but not since; Connecticut Senator Joseph Lieberman; Iowa Governor Tom Vilsack, and former Virginia Governor Mark Warner. This faction of Democrats are sometimes affiliated with the Democratic Leadership Council and were referred to as New Democrats in the 1990's. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a Jewish-American Democratic politician and a current U.S. senator from Connecticut. ... Thomas James Vilsack (born December 13, 1950) is 40th Governor of the state of Iowa. ... Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The Democratic Leadership Council is an influential non-profit corporation that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from the its traditionally liberal positions. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


Libertarians

Civil libertarians also often support the Democratic Party because its positions on such issues as civil rights and separation of church and state are more closely aligned to their own than the positions of the Republican Party, and because the Democrats' economic agenda may be more appealing to them than that of the Libertarian Party. They oppose gun control, the "War on Drugs", protectionism, corporate welfare, governmental borrowing, and an interventionist foreign policy. The Democratic Freedom Caucus is an organized group of this faction. A civil libertarian is one who is actively concerned with the protection of individual civil liberties and civil rights. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... The separation of church and state is a political doctrine which states that the institutions of the state or national government should be kept separate from those of religious institutions. ... The Republican Party was established in 1854 by a coalition of former Whigs, Northern Democrats, and Free-Soilers who opposed the expansion of slavery and held a Hamiltonian vision for modernizing the United States. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... The prohibition of drugs through legislation or religious law is a common means of controlling the perceived negative consequences of recreational drug use at a society- or world-wide level. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of protecting a nations manufacturing base from the effects of foreign competition (such as including Dumping) by means of high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, and other means of reducing importation. ... Corporate welfare is a pejorative term, first coined by Ralph Nader in 1956, describing a governments bestowal of grants and/or tax breaks on corporations or other special favorable treatment from the government. ... Interventionism is a term for a policy of non-defensive (proactive) activity undertaken by a nation-state, or other geo-political jurisdiction of a lesser or greater nature, to manipulate an economy or society. ... The Democratic Freedom Caucus (DFC) is a small caucus within the United States Democratic Party which seeks to help the Democratic Party rediscover its Jeffersonian roots, of individual liberty, constitutional democracy, civil liberties, and opposition to corporate welfare and special interests. ...


Progressives

Many progressives are descendants of the New Left of Democratic Presidential candidate/Senator George McGovern of South Dakota; others were involved in the presidential candidacies of Vermont Governor Howard Dean and U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio. Progressive Democratic candidates for public office have had popular support as candidates in metropolitan areas outside the South, and among African-Americans nationwide. Unifying issues among progressive Democrats have been opposition to the War in Iraq, opposition to economic and social conservatism, opposition to heavy corporate influence in government, support for universal health care and steering the Democratic Party in the direction of being a more forceful opposition party. Compared to other factions of the party, they've been most critical of the Republican Party, and most supportive of social and economic equality. The 21st Century Democrats is a political organization active since 2000 in assisting candidates it describes as "progressive" or "populist" in winning elections. Its strategy puts emphasis on training large numbers of organizers to work at the grassroots level and targeting specific campaigns it sees as important. It has strong ties to veterans of campaigns for the late Minnesota Senator Paul Wellstone. The New Left is a term used in political discourse to refer to radical left-wing movements from the 1960s onwards. ... George McGovern Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential candidate, losing the 1972 presidential election to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 43rd 24,923 km² 130 km 260 km 3. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... Dennis John Kucinich (Kucinić in Croatian) (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 355 km 355 km 8. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Combatants Coalition Forces (United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Poland) Iraq Commanders Tommy Franks Saddam Hussein Strength 263,000 375,000 The 2003 Invasion of Iraq began on March 20 and consisted mainly of United States and United Kingdom forces. ... Universal health care is a health care system in which all residents of a geographic or political entity are covered, regardless of medical condition[1]. // What is covered under universal health care Universal health care systems vary in what services are covered completely, covered partially, or not covered at all. ... 21st Century Democrats is a political organization founded by Senator Tom Harkin, commentator Jim Hightower and Congressman Lane Evans to help elect progressive or populist candidates in winning elections. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Populism is a political philosophy or rhetorical style that holds that the common persons interests are oppressed or hindered by the elite in society, and that the instruments of the state need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and used for the benefit and advancement of the... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ...


The Congressional Progressive Caucus or CPC is a caucus of progressive Democrats, along with one independent, in the U.S. Congress. It is the single largest Democratic caucus in the House of Representatives, although it currently has no members from the Senate. Well-known members include Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH), Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA), and Rep. Bernie Sanders (I-VT). The CPC advocates universal health care, fair trade agreements, living wage laws, the right of all workers to organize into trade unions and engage in strikes and collective bargaining, the abolition of significant portions of the USA PATRIOT Act, the formation of a Department of Peace, the legalization of gay marriage, strict campaign finance reform laws, a complete pullout from Iraq, a crackdown on corporate crime and corporate welfare, an increase in income tax on whom they consider "wealthy", tax cuts for those they consider "poor", and an increase in welfare spending by the federal government. [8] [9] The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) the single largest caucus in the United States House of Representatives, and works together to advance progressive issues and causes. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... Dennis John Kucinich (Kucinić in Croatian) (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... John Lewis John Robert Lewis (born February 21, 1940) is an American politician and was an important leader in the American Civil Rights Movement as president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). ... Barbara Lee Barbara Lee (born July 16, 1946), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1998, representing the 9th District of California (map). ... Bernie Sanders at a press conference on the rising cost of fuel. ... Fair trade products shown at XI Unctad. ... Living wage refers to the hourly wage that one deems necessary for a person to achieve a basic standard of living. ... President George W. Bush signing the USA PATRIOT Act in the White Houses East Room on October 26, 2001. ... The United States Department of Peace is a proposed cabinet level department of the executive branch of the U.S. government. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between two people who are of the same characteristic sex. ... Campaign finance reform is the common term for the political effort in the United States to change the involvement of money in politics, primarily in political campaigns. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... ...


Progressive Democrats have included congressmen Kucinich, Congressman John Conyers (Michigan), Jim McDermott (Washington), John Lewis (Georgia), the late Senator Paul Wellstone (Minnesota). The Democracy for America (DFA) political action committee generally supports fiscally responsible and socially progressive candidates at all levels of government. It was founded by ex-Vermont Governor and current Democratic Party Chairman Howard Dean during his presidential campaign; its current Chairman is James H. Dean, Howard Dean's brother. DFA fights against the influence of the far-right on American politics and works to rebuild the Democratic Party "from the bottom up". The progressive Democrats of America lends itself to the progressive ideology within the party. Founded by members of Dennis Kucinich's 2004 presidential campaign, it does not hold much sway in the Democratic Party, being considered more radically liberal than other factions. John Conyers John Conyers, Jr. ... Rep. ... John Lewis John Robert Lewis (born February 21, 1940) is an American politician and was an important leader in the American Civil Rights Movement as president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). ... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ... Democracy for America (DFA) is a political action committee dedicated to supporting fiscally responsible, socially progressive candidates at all levels of government—from school board to the presidency. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Dennis John Kucinich (Kucinić in Croatian) (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ...


Labor

One of the most important parts of the Democratic Party coalition is the labor vote. Labor supplies a great deal of the money, grass roots political organization and base of support for the party. While Union membership has fallen over the last four decades, the labor union component of the party is still very important. The Union vote tends to be more protectionist than centrists in the party. The labor wing is concerned with issues such as the minimum wage, as well as protection of pensions, collective bargaining and access to health insurance. Prominent members of this wing include Andy Stern of SEIU. Other important union organizations in the Democratic coalition include AFSCME, UAW, and the AFL-CIO. Most of the members in this faction tend to identify more with the progressive faction of the party. Health insurance is a type of insurance whereby the insurer pays the medical costs of the insured if the insured becomes sick due to covered causes, or due to accidents. ... Andrew Andy L. Stern (born 1950) is the president of the Service Employees International Union, the largest and fastest-growing union in the United States and Canada. ... Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is the largest and fastest growing labor union in the United States and Canada, representing 1. ... The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) is the second- or third-largest labor union in the United States and one of the fastest-growing, representing over 1. ... The United Auto Workers (UAW), officially the United Automobile, Aerospace & Agricultural Implement Workers of America International Union, is one of the largest labor unions in North America, with more than 700,000 members in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico organized into approximately 950 union locals. ... The AFL-CIO is the largest labor union federation in the United States. ...


Liberals

Liberal Democrats are to the left of centrist Democrats. The liberal faction was dominant in the party for several decades, although they have been hurt by the rise of centrist forces such as President Bill Clinton. Compared to conservatives and moderates, liberal Democrats generally have advocated fair trade and other less conservative economic policies, and a less militaristic foreign policy, and have a reputation of being more forceful in pushing for civil liberties. Liberals are increasingly identified as being part of the larger progressive wing of the party. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Fair trade products shown at XI Unctad. ... Civil liberties are protections from the power of governments. ...


Prominent liberal Democrats include U.S. Sens. Barbara Boxer (California), Russ Feingold (Wisconsin), Ted Kennedy (Massachusetts), Tom Harkin (Iowa), Joe Biden (Delaware) and House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi (California). Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... Russell Dana Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... Edward Moore Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, having served since 1962. ... Thomas Richard Harkin (born November 19, 1939) is the junior United States Senator from Iowa. ... Joseph Robinette Joe Biden, Jr. ... Representative Nancy Pelosi Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is the Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives. ...


Conservatives

The Democratic Party had a conservative element, mostly from the South and Border regions, into the 1980s. Their numbers declined sharply as the GOP built up its southern base. They were sometimes humorously called "Yellow dog Democrats", or "boll weevils", "Dixiecrats". In the House, they form the Blue Dog Democrats caucus of fiscal and social conservatives and moderates, primarily southerners, willing to broker compromises with the Republican leadership. They have acted as a unified voting bloc in the past, giving its thirty members some ability to change legislation. Yellow Dog Democrats are voters in the southern region of the United States who consistently vote for Democratic candidates in the late 19th and early 21st centuries because of lingering resentment against the Republicans dating back to the Civil War and Reconstruction period. ... Boll weevils was a American political term used in the mid- and late-20th century to describe conservative Southern Democrats. ... The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ... Blue Dog Democrats are social and economic conservatives and moderates in the United States Democratic Party. ...


There remains, however, a small conservative wing of the Democratic Party, one which is mostly rural or southern. Prominent conservative Democrats of recent time include Senators Joe Lieberman (Connecticut), Ben Nelson (Nebraska), Ken Salazar (Colorado) and Mary Landrieu (Louisiana); as well as Congressmen Ike Skelton (Missouri), Gene Taylor (Mississippi), Henry Cuellar (Texas), Collin Peterson (Minnesota), and Jim Marshall (Georgia). In American politics, Conservative Democrat is a term referring to a member of the Democratic Party who holds some conservative political views. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman, (born February 24, 1942) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Connecticut, best known as Al Gores running mate on the Democratic ticket in 2000. ... Earl Benjamin Nelson (born May 17, 1941 in McCook, Nebraska) to English-American parents. ... Kenneth Lee Salazar (born March 2, 1955) is an American politician, rancher, and environmentalist from the U.S. state of Colorado. ... Mary Loretta Landrieu (born November 23, 1955) is a Democratic United States Senator for the state of Louisiana. ... Rep. ... Rep. ... Henry Cuellar, a Texas Democrat, defeated James Hopson to become a member of the U.S. House of Representatives in 2004. ... Collin Clark Peterson (born June 29, 1944), is an American politician. ... Jim Marshall James Creel Marshall (born March 31, 1948 in Ithaca, New York), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 2003, representing the 3rd District of Georgia (map). ...


A newly emerging trend is the return of active pro-life Democratic groups and candidates. Many pro-lifer's left the Democratic Party in the 1980s due to a narrowing of the party on the abortion issue. Some of these candidates have won office or are being backed by the party establishment in their state. While some of these pro-life Democrats are more conservative that most Democrats in general, most are centrists or liberals in keeping with the majority of the Democratic Party on other issues. The largest national pro-life group within the party is the Democrats for Life. Democrats for Life of America (DFLA) is an advocacy group in the United States attempting to reshape the political left, primarily the Democratic Party, into taking a pro-life position opposing the unrestricted legality of abortion and, to a lesser exent, capital punishment and euthanasia. ...


Current structure and composition

Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American Political Parties

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is responsible for promoting presidential goals (when the party controls the White House) or articulating Democratic policies (when the Republicans have the White House). In presidential elections it supervises the national convention and, under the direction of the presidential candidate, it raises funds, commissions polls, and coordinates campaign strategy. There are similar state committees in every state and most large cities, counties, and legislative districts, but they have far less money and influence than the national body. The chairman of the DNC (currently Howard Dean) is chosen by the President when the Democrats have the White House. Otherwise the chairman is chosen by vote of the state committeemen; Dean ran against numerous candidates to win his position in early 2005. Rather than focusing just on close "swing states," Dean proposed the 50 State Strategy. His goal is for the Democratic Party to be committed to winning elections at every level in every region of the country, with Democrats organized in every single voting precinct in the country. The federal government of the United States was established by the United States Constitution. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ...


The Democratic Party in House and Senate have powerful fundraising and strategy committees. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (or DCCC) assists party candidates in House races, and the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in Senate races. They raise over $100 million per election cycle, and play important roles in recruiting strong candidates. The Democratic Governors Association is a discussion group that seldom funds state races. In each instance the Republicans have similar organizations. There is also a group focused on state legislative races, the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee. The DNC sponsors a youth oriented organization called the Young Democrats of America (YDA). Categories: Politics stubs ... Categories: Politics stubs ... DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ... The Democratic Governors Association is a Washington, D.C.-based organization founded in 1983, consisting of U.S. state and territorial governors affiliated with the Democratic Party. ... The Young Democrats of America, founded in 1932, is the official youth arm of the Democratic party of the United States, although it severed official ties with the Democratic National Committee following passage of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 and became an independent 527 group. ...


Symbols

"A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" by Thomas Nast
"A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" by Thomas Nast

In its original form, the jackass was born in the intense mudslinging used during the presidential race of 1828 as a play on the name of President Andrew Jackson, the Democratic candidate. Download high resolution version (694x750, 126 KB)nast sketch of demo donkey This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Download high resolution version (694x750, 126 KB)nast sketch of demo donkey This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


On January 19, 1870, a political cartoon by Thomas Nast appearing in Harper's Weekly titled "A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" revived the donkey as a symbol for the Democratic Party; it had also been used in the 1830s. Cartoonists followed Nast and used the donkey to represent the Democrats, and the elephant to represent the GOP. The DNC's official logo, pictured above, depicts a stylized kicking donkey. January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840–December 7, 1902) was a famous caricaturist and editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and is considered to be the father of American political cartooning. ... An issue of Harpers Magazine from 1905 Another issue, from November 2004 Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly general-interest magazine covering literature, politics, culture, and the arts. ...


In some states, such as in Ohio and Indiana, the Democratic party has traditionally been symbolized by the rooster or cock on ballots, as opposed to the eagle for the Republicans. References to nonpartisan elections as "birdless ballots" in the early 20th century arose from use of the rooster and eagle symbols.


While every political party utilizes the traditional red, white, and blue colors in their marketing and representations, in the media states voting democratic are often depicted as blue while those voting republican are depicted as red.

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Democrats

Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote logo Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

See also

Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... For current status see United States Democratic Party // History Origins The Democratic Party evolved from the political factions that opposed Alexander Hamiltons fiscal policies in the early 1790s; these factions are known variously as the Anti-Administration “Party” or the Anti-Federalists. ... Presidential and Vice Presidential nominees Refer also to: List of Presidents of the United States ... Prominent figures of the Democratic Party Currently notable Democrats Evan Bayh (1955), U.S. senator from Indiana Joseph Biden (1942), U.S. senator from Delaware, candidate for the Democratic nomination for president Barbara Boxer (1940), U.S. senator from California Jerry Brown (1938), mayor of Oakland, California, former governor of... This is a list of state Democratic Parties in the United States. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... DINO stands for Democrat In Name Only, a disparaging term for a member of the modern-day United States Democratic Party whose words and actions are thought to be too fiscally or socially conservative. ...

Democratic organizations

Blue Dog Democrats are social and economic conservatives and moderates in the United States Democratic Party. ... The Democratic Freedom Caucus (DFC) is a small caucus within the United States Democratic Party which seeks to help the Democratic Party rediscover its Jeffersonian roots, of individual liberty, constitutional democracy, civil liberties, and opposition to corporate welfare and special interests. ... Democrats Abroad Democrats Abroad is the official organization of the Democratic Party of the United States for expatriates, representing Democrats that are citizens of the U.S. but live outside the United States. ... The Democratic Leadership Council is an influential non-profit corporation that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from the its traditionally liberal positions. ... The College Democrats (officially named the College Democrats of America) is the official organization of the Democratic Party of the United States for college and university students. ... Democrats for Life of America (DFLA) is an advocacy group in the United States attempting to reshape the political left, primarily the Democratic Party, into taking a pro-life position opposing the unrestricted legality of abortion and, to a lesser exent, capital punishment and euthanasia. ... The National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDIIA), a group established by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) to channel grants for democracy-building activities in third world nations. ... Unofficial organizations for Democrats are those bodies, not officially affiliated with the United States Democratic Party, but primarily intended for the participation of people who are at least self-described Democrats. ...

Other

Political parties in the United States lists political parties in the United States. ... The Republican Party was established in 1854 by a coalition of former Whigs, Northern Democrats, and Free-Soilers who opposed the expansion of slavery and held a Hamiltonian vision for modernizing the United States. ...

Notes

  1.   The other is the British Conservative Party, which is older if you consider its origins in the older Tory Party founded in about 1680.
  2.   Michael Moore, Stupid White Men (And Other Sorry Excuses for the State of the Nation), Chapter Ten, Regan Books. ISBN 0-06-039245-2
  3.   Ari Melber, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 26 March 2005, "Where's the Party At?". The Nation, 2 August 2004, "A People's Democratic Platform."
  4.   Al Franken and Tom Wolffe, Rolling Stone, 17 November 2004, "The Aftermath". Thomas Frank, New York Review of Books vol. 52 #8, May 12, 2005, "What's the Matter with Liberals?"
  5.   Jann S. Wenner, Rolling Stone, 17 November 2004, "Why Bush Won."
  6.   Sasha Abramsky, The Nation 18 April 2005, "Democrat Killer?".
  7.  This Week with George Stephanopoulos, Interview with Howard Dean, 23 January 2005, ABC-TV.

The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... Michael Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American film director, author, and social commentator. ... Stupid White Men U.S. cover Stupid White Men . ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (86th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... It has been designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) 2004 World Health Day topic was Road Safety (by World Health Organization) Year of the Monkey (by the Chinese calendar) See the world in... Al Franken (credit: Bill Hayward) Alan Stuart Franken (born May 21, 1951) is an American comedian, author, screenwriter, political commentator, and radio host, noted for his liberal politics. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece. ... It has been designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) 2004 World Health Day topic was Road Safety (by World Health Organization) Year of the Monkey (by the Chinese calendar) See the world in... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece. ... It has been designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) 2004 World Health Day topic was Road Safety (by World Health Organization) Year of the Monkey (by the Chinese calendar) See the world in... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Barone, Michael, and Grant Ujifusa, The Almanac of American Politics 2006: The Senators, the Representatives and the Governors: Their Records and Election Results, Their States and Districts (2005) covers all the live politicians with amazing detail.
  • Allen, Oliver E. The Tiger: The Rise and Fall of Tammany Hall (1993)
  • Blum, John Morton. The Progressive Presidents: Roosevelt, Wilson, Roosevelt, Johnson (1980)
  • Jensen, Richard. Grass Roots Politics: Parties, Issues, and Voters, 1854-1983 (1983)
  • Judis, John B. and Ruy Teixeira. The Emerging Democratic Majority (2004) demography is destiny
  • Kennedy, David M. Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945 (2001)
  • Kleppner, Paul et al. The Evolution of American Electoral Systems (1983), advanced scholarly essays.
  • Kleppner, Paul. The Third Electoral System 1853-1892: Parties, Voters, and Political Cultures (1979), major study of voting patterns in every state
  • Lawrence, David G. The Collapse of the Democratic Presidential Majority: Realignment, Dealignment, and Electoral Change from Franklin Roosevelt to Bill Clinton (1996)
  • Nichols, Roy Franklin. The Democratic Machine, 1850-1854 (1923)
  • Patterson, James T. Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945-1974 (1997) well balanced scholarly synthesis.
  • Patterson, James T. Restless Giant: The United States from Watergate to Bush vs. Gore (2005) well balanced scholarly synthesis.
  • Remini, Robert V. Martin Van Buren and the Making of the Democratic Party (1959)
  • Rutland, Robert Allen. The Democrats: From Jefferson to Clinton (1995). short popular history
  • Sabato, Larry J. Divided States of America: The Slash and Burn Politics of the 2004 Presidential Election (2005), scholarly.
  • Sabato, Larry J. and Bruce Larson. The Party's Just Begun: Shaping Political Parties for America's Future (2001) scholarly textbook.
  • Schlesinger, Arthur Meier, Jr. ed. History of American Presidential Elections, 1789-2000 (various multivolume editions, latest is 2001). For each election includes good scholarly history and selection of primary document. Essays on the most important election are reprinted in Schlesinger, The Coming to Power: Critical presidential elections in American history (1972)
  • Schlisinger, Galbraith. Of the People: The 200 Year History of the Democratic Party (1992) popular essays by scholars.
  • Silbey, Joel H. The American Political Nation, 1838-1893 (1991)
  • Witcover, Jules. Party of the People: A History of the Democrats (2003), 900 page popular history

External links

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Political Parties of the United States
Major Parties  Democratic    Republican
Third Parties  Constitution     Green     Libertarian     Reform
Smaller Parties Peace and Freedom    Socialist    Socialist Workers    VT Progressive
Historical Parties Anti-Masonic  Democratic-Republican  Federalist  Progressive  Whig
See List of political parties in the United States for a complete list.

 
 

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