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Encyclopedia > USB mass storage device class

The USB mass storage device class (USB MSC) is a set of computing communications protocols defined by the USB Implementers Forum that run on the Universal Serial Bus. The standard provides an interface to a variety of storage devices. For other senses of this word, see protocol. ... The USB Implementers Forum, USB-IF, is a non-profit organisation to promote and support the Universal Serial Bus. ... USB redirects here. ...

A USB flash drive like this one, will typically implement the USB mass storage device class.
A USB flash drive like this one, will typically implement the USB mass storage device class.

Some of the devices which are connected to computers via this standard are: Image File history File links USB_flash_drive. ... Image File history File links USB_flash_drive. ... JumpDrive redirects here. ...

Devices which support this standard are referred to as MSC (Mass Storage Class) devices. While MSC is the official acronym, UMS (Universal Mass Storage) has become common as an online jargon. Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... A USB flash drive. ... JumpDrive redirects here. ... Four major types of memory cards (from left to right: CompactFlash, Memory Stick, Secure Digital, and xD. A memory card or flash memory card is a solid-state electronic flash memory data storage device used with digital cameras, handheld and Mobile computers, telephones, music players, video game consoles, and other... Look up digital camera in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Apple iPod nano (third-generation), a best-selling flash-based player An embedded hard drive-based player (Creative ZEN Vision:M) An MP3 CD player (Philips Expanium) More commonly referred to as an MP3 player, a digital audio player (DAP) is a portable consumer electronics device that stores, organizes and... An idle PMP compared with a coin A portable multimedia player (PMP) - sometimes referred to as a portable video player (PVP) - is an electronic device that is capable of storing and playing digital media. ... A card reader is a device used for communication with a smart card or a flash memory card. ... The Sony Ericsson K800, and its variant, the Sony Ericsson K790, are the latest mobile phones of their class from Sony Ericsson. ... The K510 is a mobile telephone manufactured by Sony Ericsson. ... The Nokia N73 is a smartphone by Nokia officially described as a multimedia computer. In common with other Nokia N-series and E-Series phones of its time (late 2006), the N73 comes loaded with many software applications, including contacts, messaging, picture and video galleries, a music player, a Visual... The Nokia E61 is a smartphone from the E-series range, a S60 platform third edition device with qwerty keyboard targeting business users. ...

Contents

Operating system support

Most current mainstream operating systems include support for USB mass storage devices, although support on older systems is available through patches. An operating system (OS) is a software that manages computer resources and provides programmers with an interface used to access those resources. ...


Microsoft Windows

Windows 95 OSR2.1, an update to the operating system, featured very limited support for USB. During that time, no generic USB mass storage driver was produced by Microsoft, even for Windows 98. This meant that a device-specific driver was needed for each type of USB storage device. By 2000, the problem was almost solved. Products designed for Windows Me and Windows 2000 (where a specific driver was required only for rare devices) are only fully corrected in subsequent OSes. On Windows Server 2003, however, a drive letter has to be assigned to it in order to access it. This can be done in Disk Management (under Computer Management (local) | Storage | Disk Management). Windows 95 is a consumer-oriented graphical user interface-based operating system. ... Windows 98 (codenamed Memphis) is a graphical operating system released on June 25, 1998 by Microsoft and the successor to Windows 95. ... Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows Me (IPA pronunciation: [miː], [ɛm iː]), is a hybrid 16-bit/32-bit graphical operating system released on September 14, 2000 by Microsoft. ... Windows 2000 (also referred to as Win2K) is a preemptive, interruptible, graphical and business-oriented operating system designed to work with either uniprocessor or symmetric multi-processor computers. ... Windows Server 2003 (also referred to as Win2K3) is a server operating system produced by Microsoft. ...


There is no native (supplied by Microsoft) support for USB in Windows NT, earlier versions of Windows, or MS-DOS, although some third-party solutions exist for each OS. A third party driver for Windows 98 and Windows 98SE is also now available. There is also a USB UMS driver for Windows NT 4.FreeDOS supports USB mass storage as ASPI devices. Windows NT (New Technology) is a family of operating systems produced by Microsoft, the first version of which was released in July 1993. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... Windows 98 (codenamed Memphis) is a graphical operating system released on June 25, 1998 by Microsoft and the successor to Windows 95. ... Windows NT 4. ... FreeDOS (formerly Free-DOS and PD-DOS) is an operating system for IBM PC compatible computers. ... ASPI, the Advanced SCSI Programming Interface provides an API originated by Adaptec which standardises communication on a computer bus between a SCSI host adapter on the one hand and SCSI (and ATAPI) peripherals on the other. ...


Windows Mobile supports accessing of the most USB mass storage devices formatted with FAT on devices with USB Host, although portable devices typically cannot provide enough power for disk enclosures containing hard drives (a 2.5" hard drive typically requires the maximum 2.5 W provided by the USB specification). On the other way around, Windows Mobile devices can not show their file systems as a mass storage device unless the device implementer explicitly decides to add such functionality. However, third party applications exist to add MSC emulation to most WM devices (commercial "Softick CardExport" and free "WM5torage"). Generally only memory cards can be exported, and not internal storage memory, due to the complications outlined below. Windows Mobile is a compact operating system combined with a suite of basic applications for mobile devices based on the Microsoft Win32 API. Devices which run Windows Mobile include Pocket PCs, Smartphones, Portable Media Centers, and on-board computers for certain automobiles. ... File Allocation Table (FAT) is a partially patented file system developed by Microsoft for MS-DOS and was the primary file system for consumer versions of Microsoft Windows up to and including Windows Me. ... A 3. ... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... For other uses, see Watt (disambiguation). ...


Mac OS

Apple Computer's Mac OS 8.5.1 supports USB mass storage through an optional driver. Mac OS 9 and Mac OS X support USB mass storage natively. Apple Inc. ... This article relates to both the original Classic Mac OS as well as Mac OS X, Apples more recent operating system. ... Mac OS X (pronounced ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ...


Unix-like

The Linux kernel has supported USB mass storage devices via a generic driver since kernel version 2.4 (year 2001); kernel 2.2 has also been back-patched to support it. Solaris also supports devices since the 2.8 release and up (year 1998), NetBSD since the 1.5 release and up (year 2000), FreeBSD since the 4.0 release and up (year 2000), and OpenBSD since the 2.7 release and up (year 2000). The Linux kernel is a Unix-like operating system kernel. ... Solaris is a computer operating system developed by Sun Microsystems. ... NetBSD is a freely redistributable, open source version of the Unix-like BSD computer operating system. ... FreeBSD is a Unix-like free operating system descended from AT&T UNIX via the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) branch through the 386BSD and 4. ... OpenBSD is a Unix-like computer operating system descended from Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD), a Unix derivative developed at the University of California, Berkeley. ...


AmigaOS

AmigaOS supports UMASS storage devices through Poseidon, a third-party USB stack which has become a de facto standard. It supports various USB device types through a modular system of Hardware Independent Device Driver (HIDD) classes. Poseidon as used in AmigaOS Classic up to version 4.0, and in the MorphOS operating system. The supposingly final AmigaOS version of the Poseidon stack is released OEM licensed with the Deneb USB card in May 2008. AmigaOS 4.0 has it's own USB stack called Sirion, though it can still use Poseidon. A new USB stack called ANAIIS (Another Native Amiga IO Interface Stack) is available for all Amiga platforms with Highway or Subway hardware, but does not yet support UMASS. AmigaOS is the default native operating system of the Amiga personal computer. ... MorphOS is a mixed proprietary and open source operating system produced for the Pegasos PowerPC (PPC)-processor-based computer, most models of PPC-accelerated classic Amiga computers, and the EFIKA PPC consumer device. ...


FAT16 and FAT32 filesystems are supported by the FAT95 filesystem.


AROS, an Open Source AmigaOS clone for Intel based PCs, does support UHCI and OHCI USB root hubs (since May 2007) but does not yet support USB mass storage class. What is AROS? AROS (Amiga Research Operating System) is an open source implementation of the AmigaOS 3. ... Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ...


Game consoles

The Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 support most mass storage devices. It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ... The PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[3] commonly abbreviated PS3) is the third home video game console produced by Sony Computer Entertainment; successor to the PlayStation 2. ...


Graphing Calculators

Independent developers have released drivers for the TI-84 Plus and TI-84 Plus Silver Edition in order to access USB mass storage devices. usb8x contains the driver for this access, while msd8x handles the user interface. Categories: Stub | Graphing calculators ... Categories: Stub | Graphing calculators ... Usb8x is a Flash application for the TI-84+ and TI-84+SE graphing calculators. ...


Device access

A USB Card reader like this one, will typically implement the USB mass storage device class.
A USB Card reader like this one, will typically implement the USB mass storage device class.

The USB mass storage specification does not require any particular file system to be used on conforming devices. Instead, it provides a simple interface to read and write sectors of data—much like the low-level interface used to access any hard drive—using the "SCSI transparent command set." Operating systems may treat the USB drive like a hard drive, and can format it with any file system they like. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (798x730, 660 KB) Summary Image of a 20-in-one Flash Card Reader with a 16MB SmartMedia card in slot. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (798x730, 660 KB) Summary Image of a 20-in-one Flash Card Reader with a 16MB SmartMedia card in slot. ... A card reader is a device used for communication with a smart card or a flash memory card. ... For library and office filing systems, see Library classification. ... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ... Scuzzy redirects here. ...


Because of its ubiquity and relative simplicity, the most common file system on embedded devices such as USB flash drives, cameras, or digital audio players is Microsoft's FAT or FAT32 file system with (optional) support for long names. Large USB-based hard disks may come formatted with NTFS, which is much less supported outside Microsoft Windows. However, a keydrive or any other device may be formatted using another filesystem (for example HFS Plus on an Apple Macintosh, or Ext2 under Linux, or Unix File System under Solaris or BSD). Of course, this choice may limit other operating systems' ability to access the contents of the device. A router, an example of an embedded system. ... JumpDrive redirects here. ... File Allocation Table (FAT) is a partially patented file system developed by Microsoft for MS-DOS and was the primary file system for consumer versions of Microsoft Windows up to and including Windows Me. ... File Allocation Table (FAT) is a partially patented file system developed by Microsoft for MS-DOS and was the primary file system for consumer versions of Microsoft Windows up to and including Windows Me. ... NTFS is the standard file system of Windows NT, including its later versions Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, and Windows Vista. ... Windows redirects here. ... A USB keydrive, shown with a US quarter coin for scale. ... HFS Plus or HFS+ is a file system developed by Apple Computer to replace their Hierarchical File System (HFS) as the primary file system used on Macintosh computers. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... The ext2 or second extended file system is a file system for the Linux kernel. ... This article is about operating systems that use the Linux kernel. ... The UNIX file system (UFS) is a file system used by many Unix and Unix-like operating systems. ... The Solaris Operating System, usually known simply as Solaris, is a free Unix-based operating system introduced by Sun Microsystems in 1992 as the successor to SunOS. Solaris is known for its scalability, especially on SPARC systems, as well for being the origin for many innovative features such as DTrace...


In cameras, MP3 players, and similar gadgets which must access the file system independently from an external host, the FAT filesystem is typically preferred by device manufacturers. Altering the file system on such a device is usually a bad idea: the device will probably stop working.


Complications of the mass-storage device class

The mass storage interface is an attractive option for many devices, such as cameras and media players, which are nonetheless capable of more functionality than being simple data repositories. By presenting themselves as simple datastores, these devices can take advantage of the high degree of support for the USB mass-storage device class in current operating systems' USB driver stacks and allow easy read and write access to their internal memories. The downside of doing so is that it prevents the device from easily presenting its actual functional behavior across the USB interface too. For example, the makers of a digital still camera would also like it to implement the USB still-image device class, allowing it to be controlled by image capture software.


Some USB digital cameras feature a switch allowing them to appear either as a mass-storage device or as a still-picture device (PictBridge or PTP), but they cannot be both at the same time because file system layers in operating systems usually assume that they are the only user. However, the PTP implementation in the device would change the underlying filesystem without being able to notify the host's operating system about the changed sectors. PictBridge is an industry standard from the Camera & Imaging Products Association (CIPA) for direct printing. ... Picture Transfer Protocol (PTP) is a widely supported protocol developed by the International Imaging Industry Association to allow the transfer of images from digital cameras to computers and other peripheral devices without the need of additional device drivers. ...


Flash-based devices

Disk file systems were not devised with flash memory in mind. Flash-specific concerns like limited number of writes per cell can be affected by a write-heavy file system, causing flash memory manufacturers to reserve about 5 percent of each medium's capacity for wear leveling. On the other hand, issues such as fragmentation or contiguity which affect magnetic disk performance are irrelevant in flash, because they impose no appreciable I/O seeking delays. However, fragmentation may lead to reduced performance with file systems that use extents. A USB flash drive. ... Read-only memory (usually known by its acronym, ROM) is a class of storage media used in computers and other electronic devices. ... Wear levelling (also written -leveling) is a technique for prolonging the service life of some kinds of erasable computer storage media, such as flash memory. ... In computer storage, there are three related uses of the term fragmentation: external fragmentation, internal fragmentation, and data fragmentation, all related to storage. ... An extent is a contiguous area of storage in a computer file system, reserved for a file. ...


Hard drive-based devices

Many modern hard drives support additional advanced commands, such as Native Command Queuing, which may increase performance, and S.M.A.R.T., which allows a computer to measure various indicators of drive reliability. These exist as extensions to the basic low-level command sets used by hard drives, such as SCSI, SATA, or PATA. Native Command Queuing (NCQ) is a technology designed to increase performance of SATA hard disks by allowing the individual hard disk to receive more than one I/O request at a time and dynamically change the order in which they are applied. ... Scandinavian Multi Access Reservations for Travel Agents Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology of hard disk drives. ... Scuzzy redirects here. ... A SATA power connector. ... Pata can refer to: an Indian weapon, see Pata (weapon). ...


These features do not work when hard drives are encapsulated in a disk enclosure supporting the USB mass storage interface. USB mass storage provides a generic interface which only provides basic read/write commands, as outlined above. This works perfectly well for basic data transfer using hard drive-based devices, however it means that there is no simple way to send advanced, device-specific commands to USB mass storage devices (although devices may create their own communication protocols over the USB-standard "control interface"). A 3. ... Note: USB may also mean upper sideband in radio. ...


The new eSATA standard for external drives promises to address this issue, since it extends the internal SATA bus to external disks without any intermediate translation layer. This page has been deleted, and should not be re-created without a good reason. ...


See also

To protect confidentiality of the data stored on a computer disk a computer security technique called disk encryption is used. ... The Media Transfer Protocol is a set of custom extensions to the Picture Transfer Protocol (PTP) devised by Microsoft, to allow the protocol to be used for devices other than digital cameras, for example digital audio players such as MP3 players, and other portable media devices, for example portable video... Picture Transfer Protocol (PTP) is a widely supported protocol developed by the International Imaging Industry Association to allow the transfer of images from digital cameras to computers and other peripheral devices without the need of additional device drivers. ... JumpDrive redirects here. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: USB mass storage device class (2872 words)
The USB mass storage as such does not specify which file system shall be used on the device using it; instead, it mainly provides a way of reading out sectors as on any hard disk device, using the "SCSI transparent command set".
Some USB digital cameras feature a switch allowing them to appear either as a mass-storage device or as a still-picture device (PictBridge or PTP), but they cannot be both at the same time.
Devices (such as digital audio players) which support this standard are referred to as MSC (Mass Storage Class).
The Mass Storage Page (1409 words)
A typical guaranteed number of cycles for the NAND memory used in storage devices is 100,000.
USB Enumeration and Mass Storage Device firmware code for the Microchip PIC18F4550.
The mass-storage driver for USB devices is usbstor.sys.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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