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Encyclopedia > USA Today
USA Today

The paper's January 9, 2008 front page
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet

Owner Gannett Company, Inc.
Editor Ken Paulson, Editor
John Hillkirk, Executive Editor
Brian Gallagher, Editorial Page Editor
Founded September 15, 1982
Price US 75¢ (Monday to Friday)
No weekend editions available.
Headquarters 7950 Jones Branch Drive
McLean, VA 22108
Flag of the United States United States
Circulation 2,284,219[1]
Sister newspapers USA Weekend
USA Today Sports Weekly
ISSN 0734-7456

Website: usatoday.com

USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. It was founded by Allen 'Al' Neuharth. The paper has the widest circulation of any newspaper in the United States (averaging over 2.25 million copies every weekday), and among English-language broadsheets, it comes second world-wide, behind only the 2.6 million daily paid copies of The Times of India. Its circulation figures are a matter of some dispute, however, as USA Today has many contracts ensuring distribution in hotels, often to customers unaware they are paying[citation needed] for the newspaper. USA Today is distributed in all 50 states. is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... other uses, see Gannet (disambiguation). ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... USD redirects here. ... Boundaries of the McLean CDP as of 2003. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... An Issue of USA WEEKEND USA WEEKEND Magazine is a national publication distributed through more than 600 quality newspapers in the United States. ... USA Today Sports Weekly is a weekly magazine that covers Major League Baseball, Minor League Baseball, NCAA baseball and the National Football League. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... other uses, see Gannet (disambiguation). ... Allen H. Neuharth (born 1924, American businessman, author, and columnist. ... A newspapers circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day, although circulation rates are decreasing. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The Times of India, often abbreviated as TOI, is one of Indias leading daily newspapers, owned and managed by Bennett, Coleman & Co. ...


USA Today was founded in 1982 with the goal of providing a national newspaper in the U.S. market, where generally only a single local newspaper was available. Colorful and bold, with many large diagrams, charts, and photographs, it contrasted with the relatively colorless papers of the time such as The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Emphasizing its national focus, USA Today became well-known for its national polls on public sentiment. Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Sample flowchart diagram A diagram is a 2D symbolic representation of information according to some visualization technique. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Photograph (disambiguation). ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... An Opinion poll is a survey of public opinion from a particular sample or pool. ...


Early on, the initial success of the paper was met with criticism. Many people were hesitant to read a color newspaper and derided it as 'McPaper.' However, the newspaper has striven to set itself apart in distribution methods as well. The paper is still sold in unique newspaper vending machines with curved edges that resemble television sets. USA Today was also eager to latch onto the business traveler and was heavily distributed through airlines, airports, and hotels in addition to other sales outlets. The newspaper was also among the first newspapers to use satellite transmissions to send the final edition of the newspaper to multiple locations across the country for printing and final distribution in those regional markets. The innovation of using satellites and regional printing hubs allowed the paper to push back deadlines and include the most recent news and sports scores in each edition. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... This article is about artificial satellites. ... For other uses, see Print. ...


In 2001, the newspaper moved into its new 30 acre (120,000 m²) headquarters in McLean, Virginia, a Washington, D.C. suburb. Its original headquarters, the old USA Today and Gannett, Inc. "silver towers", are located in the neighborhood of Rosslyn and are a major landmark on the Washington skyline. Boundaries of the McLean CDP as of 2003. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... The skyscrapers of Rosslyn as seen behind The Pentagon. ...


In 2006, the USA Today increased its price of a copy from 50 cents to 75 cents per copy.


The newspaper's motto, appearing on the top and bottom levels of the nameplate, is The Nation's Newspaper - #1 in the USA. Belgian and Dutch street name plates on the border Name plate on a bridge in Krakow, Poland A name plate is an item that displays someone’s name. ...

Contents

Layout and format

USA Today's logo.

USA Today is known for synthesizing news down to easy-to-read-and-comprehend stories. Each edition consists of four sections: News (the oft-labeled "front page" section), Money, Sports, and Life. On Fridays, two Life sections are included: the regular Life for movies (subtitled Weekend; section E), which features television, film reviews and trends, and a travel supplement called Destinations & Diversions (section D). The paper does not print on Saturdays and Sundays. USA Today prints each complete story on the front page of the respective section with exception to the cover story. The cover story is a longer story that requires a jump (readers must turn to another page in the paper to complete the story, usually the very next page, page 2 of that section). Image File history File links USA_Today_Logo. ... Image File history File links USA_Today_Logo. ... Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films, individually and collectively. ...


Each section is denoted by a certain color to differentiate sections beyond lettering and is seen in a box the top-left corner of the first page, with News being blue (section A), Money with green (section B), red for Sports (section C), and purple for Life (section D). Orange is used for bonus sections (section E or above), which are published occasionally such as for business travel trends and the Olympics; other bonus sections for sports (such as for the PGA Tour preview, NCAA Basketball Tournaments, Memorial Day auto races (Indianapolis 500 and Coca-Cola 600), NFL opening weekend and the Super Bowl) previously used the orange color, but now use the sports red in their bonus sections. This article is about the colour. ... For other uses, see Green (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... For the etymology of the word, see orange (word). ... Business travel, or travel management as it is often referred to, is on the rise especially with foreign business markets opening up. ... Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Medal count Winter Olympic Games Medal count Olympic sports Medal counts Participating NOCs Olympic symbols Olympics WikiProject Olympics Portal Athens 2004 • Beijing 2008 Torino 2006 • Vancouver 2010 ... The PGA Tour is an organization that operates the USAs main professional golf tours. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... Indy 500 redirects here. ... The Coca-Cola 600 (formerly the World 600) is a six hundred mile (966 km) stock car race held annually at Lowes Motor Speedway (formerly Charlotte Motor Speedway) in Charlotte, North Carolina on Memorial Day weekend. ... NFL redirects here. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ...


In many ways, USA Today is set up to break the typical newspaper layout. Some examples of that divergence from tradition include using the left-hand quarter of each section as reefers, sometimes using sentence-length blurbs to describe stories inside. It is also the only paper in the United States to utilize the Gulliver font, which is used for both headlines and stories.[2] Being a national newspaper, USA Today cannot focus on the weather for any one city. Therefore, the entire back page of the News section is used for weather maps and temperature lists for the entire United States and many cities throughout the world. In the bottom left-hand corner of the weather page is a graphic called "Weather Focus," which explains different meteorological phenomena. On Mondays, the Money section uses its back page to present an unusual graphic depicting the performance of various industry groups as a function of quarterly, monthly and weekly movements against the S&P 500. “Font” redirects here. ... The S&P 500 is an index containing the stocks of 500 Large-Cap corporations, most of which are American. ...


Book coverage, including reviews and a national sales chart is seen on Thursdays in Life, with the official full A.C. Nielsen television ratings chart printed on Wednesdays or Thursdays, depending on release. Advertising coverage is seen in the Monday Money section, which often includes a review of a current television ad, and after Super Bowl Sunday, a review of the ads aired during the broadcast with the results of the Ad Track live survey. ACNielsen is a U.S. marketing research firm, based in New York City. ... Television ratings may refer to: Arbitron or Nielsen Ratings, a private U.S. companys measurement of television audiences TV Parental Guidelines, a U.S. television rating system used to flag potentially offensive content This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... // Advert redirects here. ... In the United States, Super Sunday generally refers to the Sunday of the National Football Leagues championship game, the Super Bowl. ...


One of the staples of the News section is a state-by-state roundup of headlines. The summaries consist of paragraph-length Associated Press reports highlighting one story of note in each state, the District of Columbia, and one U.S. territory. The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... ...


Some traditions have been retained, however. The lede still appears on the upper-right hand of the front page. Commentary and political cartoons occupy the last few pages of the News section. Stock and mutual fund data are presented in the Money section. But USA Today is sufficiently different in aesthetics to be recognized on sight, even in a mix of other newspapers, such as at a newsstand. The overall design and layout of USA Today has been described as both neo-Victorian[3] and Impressionist.[4] News style or news writing is the particular prose style used for news reporting (ie. ... See also Impressionist (entertainment): A girl with a watering can by Renoir, 1876 Impressionism was a 19th century art movement, which began as a private association of Paris-based artists who exhibited publicly in 1874. ...


Also, in most of the sections' front pages, on the lower left hand corner, are "USA Today Snapshots", which give statistics of various lifestyle interests according to the section it is in (for example, a snapshot in "Life" could show how many people tend to watch a certain genre of television show based upon the type of mood they are in at the time). These "Snapshots" are shown through graphs which are made up of various illustrations of objects that roughly pertain to the graphs subject matter (using the example above, the graph's bars could be made up of several TV sets, or ended by one). These are usually loosely based on research by a national institute (with the source in the box below the graph in fine print to show credit).


Starting in February 2008, the newspaper added a magazine supplement called Open Air, appearing several times a year.


Controversial incidents

In March 2004, the newspaper was hit by a major scandal when it was revealed that Jack Kelley, a long-time USA Today correspondent and nominee for the Pulitzer Prize, had been fabricating stories. The newspaper did an extensive review of Kelley's stories, including sending investigators to Cuba, Israel and Jordan, and sifting through stacks of hotel records to determine if Kelley was in the locations he claimed to be filing stories from. Kelley resigned, but denied the charges. The paper's publisher, Craig Moon, issued a public apology on the front page of the newspaper. Many remarked on the similarity of this scandal to that of the Jayson Blair situation at the New York Times, although it received less national attention. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jack Kelley was a longtime USA Today reporter and nominee for the Pulitzer Prize. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Jayson Blair (born March 23, 1976, Columbia, Maryland) is an African American and former New York Times reporter who was forced to resign from the newspaper in May 2003, after he was caught plagiarizing and fabricating elements of his stories. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

Further information: Journalistic fraud

In May 2006, USA Today reported that the National Security Agency had been working with AT&T, Verizon, and BellSouth to compile “the largest database in the world,” according to the anonymous sources inside the agency that went public.[5] This allowed the paper to uncover a new facet of the agency and further upset the White House after the New York Times revealed the Bush administration authorized the NSA to wiretap international phone calls and e-mails traveling within the U.S.[6] Journalistic Fraud book cover Journalistic Fraud: How The New York Times Distorts the News and Why It Can No Longer Be Trusted is a book by Bob Kohn with a thesis similar to that of Bernard Goldbergs Bias. ... May 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → May 1, 2006 (Monday) Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association outraged Vatican by planning to ordain another bishop, Liu Xinhong in Anhui Province. ... NSA redirects here. ... This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... This article or section should include material from Bell Atlantic This article or section should include material from GTE Verizon Communications (NYSE: VZ) is a local exchange telephone company formed by the merger of Bell Atlantic, a former Bell Operating Company, and GTE, which was the largest independant local exchange... BellSouth Corporation was an American telecommunications holding company based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Both stories challenged the administration's ability to spy on alleged terrorists without a judge’s approval, a provision of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act established in 1978. But unlike the Times' story, the USA Today story provoked private telecommunications companies to enter the debate amid the initial developments for the next Telecommunications Act, popularly nicknamed the "net neutrality" or "equal internet access" bill. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) of 1978 is a U.S. federal law prescribing procedures for the physical and electronic surveillance and collection of foreign intelligence information between foreign powers and agents of foreign powers (which may include American citizens and permanent residents engaged in espionage and violating U...


On June 29, 2006, a press release for AT&T stated, “The U.S. Department of Justice has stated that AT&T may neither confirm nor deny AT&T's participation in the alleged NSA program because doing so would cause ‘exceptionally grave harm to national security’ and would violate both civil and criminal statutes.”[7] BellSouth, which announced its merger with AT&T on March 5,[8] denies releasing any records to the NSA [9] and requested the newspaper retract claims in its story asserting BellSouth “provided phone records of its customers to NSA.”[10] “Both BellSouth and Verizon Communications Inc., another company cited in the story, denied this week that they provided the calling records,” according to the AP.[11] On June 30, USA Today published a statement: “The denial was unexpected. The newspaper had spoken with BellSouth and Verizon for several weeks about the substance of the report.”[12] is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... This article is about the day. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On August 17, 2006, U.S. District Judge Anna Diggs Taylor in Detroit issued a 43-page ruling stating the program is unconstitutional[13], but did not immediately suspend the program and grants a temporary stay, in which the Bush administration and the American Civil Liberties Union continue fighting the program's legality in the case ACLU v. NSA. is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anna Diggs Taylor (born Anna Katherine Johnston, 1932, Washington, D.C.) is a United States District Court judge in Detroit, Michigan. ... ACLU v. ...


Taylor’s ruling states the program violates the FISA court standards, which provide oversight for all wire taps. The FISA court provides retroactive review of all government wiretaps and allows all government agencies 72 hours before presenting their case for wiretapping before the court. “There are no hereditary kings in America and no such powers created by the constitution,” Taylor writes.


The White House issued a statement saying that it disagreed with the decision and declared that the program was legal.[14]


In a USA TODAY editorial, the staff writes, “Much has changed since terrorists rammed planes into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. But one thing that has not is that America is a constitutional democracy with checks and balances. A ruling such as Thursday’s is a useful and forceful affirmation of that.”[15]


Parodies

Parodies of USA Today have appeared in various movies and tv shows over the years, such as: In contemporary usage, parody is a form of satire that imitates another work of art in order to ridicule it. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... This is a listing of television programs. ...

  • The Harvard Lampoon published a parody issue of USA Today in 1986.
  • the futuristic 2015 look of a USA Today (Hill Valley edition) seen in Back to the Future Part II (1989)
  • a spinoff red planet version entitled Mars Today seen in Total Recall (1990)
  • an animated, dynamically updating e-paper version seen in Minority Report (2002)
  • a paper called BSA Today in an alternate reality where North America is still governed by the United Kingdom as the British States of America, seen in Sliders (1995)
  • Universe Today appeared in Babylon 5
  • an extended sequence of Doonesbury strips in the 1980s mocked the paper.
  • in the Simpsons, Homer reads a newspaper called USofA Today with the cover story: "America's Favorite Pencil - #2 is #1." Homer reads aloud another headline: "SAT scores are declining at a slower rate." After Lisa criticizes it, Homer says "this is the only newspaper in the country that is not afraid to tell the truth: that everything is just fine."
  • The comedy publication The Onion publishes a feature on its front page called "Statshot," patterned after similar statistics published on the front page of USA Today.
  • The 1988 computer game Hidden Agenda featured excerpts from a newspaper called 'USA Yesterday' in press digests.
  • The alternate history movie C.S.A.: The Confederate States of America (2004) features a newspaper called CSA Today.
  • Country Musician Alan Jackson has a song Entitled "USA Today" in which the paper thinks about doing a story of the loneliest man in the "USA Today". The Song is on his What I Do CD released in 2004.
  • Comedian Stephen Colbert frequently refers to it as The USA Today. He sarcastically criticizes the newspaper for its abundant use of colors and flashy, uninformative infographics.

This article does not cite its references or sources. ... For the video game developer, see 2015, Inc. ... The set of the Hill Valley courthouse at the Universal Studios backlot Hill Valley is a fictional California town that serves as the setting of the Back to the Future trilogy and its animated spin-off series. ... Back to the Future Part II is a 1989 film and the first sequel to the 1985 film Back to the Future. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Total recall (disambiguation). ... This article is about the year. ... A prototype electronic paper display. ... Minority Report is a 2002 film by Steven Spielberg starring Tom Cruise, Max von Sydow, Samantha Morton,Kathryn Morris, and Colin Farrell. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... For other possible meanings, see Slider (disambiguation). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Doonesbury is a comic strip by Garry Trudeau, popular in the United States and other parts of the world. ... The Simpsons. ... The Onion is a United States-based parody newspaper published weekly in print and daily online. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alan Eugene Jackson (born 17 October 1958 in Newnan, Georgia) is an American country singer-songwriter who has sold over 40 million records. ... What I Do is the eleventh studio album by country music singer Alan Jackson. ... This article is about Stephen Colbert, the actor. ... ...

TV show

In 1988, an attempt was made to bring the breezy style of USA Today to television. The result was the syndicated series USA Today on TV, which was a joint venture between Gannett and producer Grant Tinker. Correspondents on the series included Edie Magnus, Robin Young, Boyd Matson, Kenneth Walker, Dale Harimoto, Ann Abernathy, Bill Macatee, and Beth Ruyak. As with the USA Today tabloid, the show was divided into four "sections" corresponding to the different parts of the paper - News, Money, Sports, and Life. Grant Tinker (born January 11, 1925) is the former chairman and CEO of NBC from 1981 to 1986, co-founder of MTM Enterprises, and television producer. ...


See also

  • USA Today All-USA high school baseball team
  • USA Today All-USA high school basketball team
  • USA Today All-USA high school football team
  • USA Today Super Bowl Ad Meter

Each year, USA Today, an American newspaper, awards outstanding High School baseball players with a place on its All-USA high school baseball team. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Saba, Jennifer (2008-04-28). New FAS-FAX: Steep Decline at 'NYT' While 'WSJ' Gains. Editor & Publisher. Nielsen Business Media, Inc.
  2. ^ USA Today gets a face-lift, Newspapers and Technology, May 2000
  3. ^ Barnhurst, Kevin G. (2006). After Modernism. AMERICAN MEDIA IN THE XX CENTURY: Chapter 1 (part 5). University of Illinois at Chicago. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. “The mélange of styles and practices in printed and now web-based newspapers, although postmodern in terms of scholarly and design thinking, might more meaningfully be understood as neo-Victorian. The new styles, embodied most famously in USA TODAY and its clones, mark a return to the mystifying abundance of facts and stories that newspapers of the industrial revolution made visually present to readers.”
  4. ^ Stephen Colbert. (2006, 13 November). The Colbert Report, Episode 2143 [TV-Series]. Comedy Central. "The world is so scary now, do we really want to see the world in crisp detail? I mean, shouldn’t we want to see the world right now more like an impressionist painting, kind of blurry, a lot of color and light but not much information … like USA TODAY"
  5. ^ Cauley, Leslie. "NSA has massive database of Americans’ phone calls", USA Today, 2006-05-11. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  6. ^ Risen, James; Eric Lichtblau. "Bush Lets U.S. Spy on Callers Without Courts" (Fee), The New York Times, 2005-12-15, p. A1. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  7. ^ AT&T (2006-06-27). "AT&T Statement on NSA Issue". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-05-03.
  8. ^ AT&T (2006-03-05). "AT&T, BellSouth to Merge". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-05-03.
  9. ^ Cauley, Leslie. "In statement, BellSouth denies giving information to National Security Agency", USA Today, 2006-05-16. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  10. ^ Pelofsky, Jeremy. "US FCC chief says won't probe NSA call program", Reuters, 2007-05-23. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  11. ^ Associated Press. "BellSouth Wants USA Today Retraction: Paper Claimed Telecom Company Gave Phone Records To NSA", CBS News, 2006-05-18. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  12. ^ "A Note to Our Readers", USA Today, 2006-06-30. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  13. ^ Jackson, David. "Judge: NSA warrantless wiretapping unconstitutional", USA Today, 2006-08-17. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  14. ^ Office of the Press Secretary, White House (2006-08-17). "Statement on the Terrorist Surveillance Program". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. “We couldn’t disagree more with this ruling… The Terrorist Surveillance Program is firmly grounded in law and regularly reviewed to make sure steps are taken to protect civil liberties.”
  15. ^ USA Today editorial staff. "Wiretap ruling affirms that presidents aren’t monarchs", USA Today, 2006-08-17. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. '

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about Stephen Colbert, the actor. ... The Colbert Report (—the Ts are silent in Colbert and Report) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... James Risen is a reporter for the New York Times and previously the Los Angeles Times, and author/co-author of two books about the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... CBS News logo, used from Sept. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
USA Today kills ludicrous Ann Coulter story! - Salon.com (689 words)
The second talked-about misfire was USA Today's decision to spike as unusable a column it had commissioned from radical right-wing pundit Ann Coulter.
USA Today spokesman Steven Anderson stands by the paper's decision, telling Salon: "We felt she would have been a suitable person" for the daily.
USA Today editorial page editor Brian Gallagher, defending the choice, told a reporter Coulter "was a voice from [the conservative] side with standing and visibility." Notice how credibility was not a requirement.
USA Today scandal -- -- baltimoresun.com (649 words)
The top editor of USA Today announced her early and immediate retirement yesterday, days before the expected public release of a critical report detailing how the paper's former foreign correspondent Jack Kelley was able to deceive editors and readers in print for years.
USA Today reported yesterday that its former star correspondent Jack Kelley fabricated major elements of stories filed from abroad, plagiarized passages in other instances and then concocted elaborate ruses to conceal his transgressions.
Editors at USA Today now say they forced former star reporter Jack Kelley to resign after he deceived them during an internal inquiry into whether he had fabricated some of his high-profile reports from abroad.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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