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Encyclopedia > US dollar

The United States dollar is the official A currency is a unit of exchange, facilitating the transfer of goods and services. It is a form of money, where money is defined as a medium of exchange rather than e.g. a store of value. A currency zone is a country or region in which a specific currency... currency of the The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii... United States. It is also widely used as a A reserve currency is a currency which is held in significant quantities by other governments and institutions as part of their foreign exchange reserves. The United States Dollar is the most important reserve currency in the world today, followed by the Euro, the Japanese Yen, the Pound Sterling and the... reserve currency outside of the United States. Currently, the issuance of currency is controlled by the The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central bank of the United States. The Federal Reserve System is composed of a central Board of Governors in Washington, D... Federal Reserve Banking system. The most commonly used symbol for the U.S. dollar is the Alternate uses: Dollar (disambiguation) The dollar is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions (see list below). It is represented by the symbol $. The name is related to the historic currencies Tolar in Bohemia, Thaler in Germany, Daalder in the Netherlands and Daler in... dollar sign ($). The ISO 4217 is an international standard describing three letter codes to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization or ISO. The first two letters of the code are the two letters of ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country codes (which are similar to those used... ISO 4217 code for the United States Dollar is USD; the U.S. dollar is also referenced as US$ by the The flag of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the international organization entrusted with overseeing the global financial system by monitoring foreign exchange rates and balance of payments, as well as offering technical and financial assistance when asked. Contents // 1 Organization and Purpose 2 History... International Monetary Fund. In 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. It was the first year of the International Decade of the Worlds Indigenous People (1995- 2005): http://www.unesco.org/culture/indigenous/ Years: 1992 1993 1994 - 1995 - 1996 1997 1998 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s... 1995, over $380 The word billion, and its equivalents in other languages, refer to one of two different numbers. 1012 The original meaning, established in the 15th century, was a million of a million (1,000,0002, hence the name billion), or 1012 = 1 000 000 000 000. This... billion (380 G$) in U.S. currency was in circulation, two-thirds of it overseas. 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) Elections were held in 73 countries during 2004. See a list of elections... As of April 2004 nearly 700 G$ [1] (http://www.federalreserve.gov/boarddocs/speeches/2004/20040426/default.htm) was in circulation, with an estimated half to two-thirds of it still being held overseas [2] (http://www.federalreserve.gov/paymentsystems/coin/default.htm).


The U.S. is one of many countries that use a currency named dollar. Several countries use the U.S. dollar as their official currency, and many others allow it to be used in a De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... de facto legal capacity. See Alternate uses: Dollar (disambiguation) The dollar is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions (see list below). It is represented by the symbol $. The name is related to the historic currencies Tolar in Bohemia, Thaler in Germany, Daalder in the Netherlands and Daler in... dollar.


Americans often use the word buck to refer to a U.S. dollar. This term originated with the colonial fur trade. Grand, sometimes shortened to simply g, is a common term for the amount of 1000 of several currencies, including dollars.

Contents

Overview

The U.S. dollar is most commonly divided into 100 A two cent euro coin In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals th of the basic unit of value. It also refers to the coin which is worth one cent. In the US and Canada, a common nickame of the 1¢ coin is penny, plural pennies. (In... cents (symbol ¢). Other divisions are 10 dimes or 1000 The mill (₥) is an abstract unit of U.S. currency, equivalent to 1/1000 of a U.S. dollar. No coins were ever made in this denomination; the denomination is used sometimes in accounting. The term comes from the Latin mille, meaning 1,000. The term was invented by... mills to a dollar; in addition, ten dollars was formerly referred to as an Eagle: retired $10-based denomination of a series of gold coins Eagle was the largest of the four United States circulating monetary denomination base-names: cent, dime, dollar, eagle. The eagle was denominated as 10 dollars in gold. Thus, quarter eagles were $2.50 in gold; half eagles were $5... eagle. However, only cents are in everyday use as divisions of the dollar; "dime" refers to the coin of the same denomination (see: A dime is a coin minted by the United States with a denomination of 1/10th of a United States dollar or ten cents. Dime (United States) Value: 0.10 US dollars Mass: 2.268 g Diameter: 17.91 mm Thickness: 1.35 mm Edge: 118 reeds Composition: 91.67... Dime (U.S. coin)), and "eagle" and "mill" are unknown to most Americans; mills are sometimes used in matters of A tax is an involuntary fee paid by individuals or businesses to a government. Taxes may be paid in cash or kind (although payments in kind may not always be allowed or classified as taxes in all systems). The means of taxation, and the uses to which the funds raised... tax levies. When currently issued in circulating form, denominations equal to or less than a dollar are emitted as Current US Coinage. Top row: Lincoln Cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Sacagawea Dollar. Middle row: Kennedy Half Dollar, Obverse of the Statehood Quarters. Bottom row: the Statehood Quarters of 1999: Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, and Connecticut. There are six denominations of United States coinage (or specie) currently in circulation... U.S. coins while denominations equal to or greater than a dollar are emitted as Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. Federal Reserve notes are legal tender currency notes. They are issued by the Federal Reserve Banks and have replaced United States notes which... Federal Reserve notes. (Both one-dollar coins and notes are produced today, although the note form is significantly more common.) In the past, paper money was occasionally issued in denominations less than a dollar (Fractional Currency) and gold coins were issued for circulation up to the value of twenty dollars.


U.S. coins are produced by the The United States Mint is responsible for producing and circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. The US Mint was created by Congress with the Coinage Act on April 2, 1792, within the Department of State, located in Philadelphia. It was the first building of... United States Mint. U.S. dollar banknotes have been printed by the BEP Annual Production Figures Categories: U.S. Dept. of the Treasury ... Bureau of Engraving and Printing for the The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central bank of the United States. The Federal Reserve System is composed of a central Board of Governors in Washington, D... Federal Reserve since 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. (see link for calendar) Years: 1911 1912 1913 - 1914 - 1915 1916 1917 Decades: 1880s 1890s 1900s - 1910s - 1920s 1930s 1940s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1914 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1914. They began as A large-sized note is a bill of any denomination of U.S. currency printed between 1863 and 1929. This is in contrast with small-sized notes, which were printed starting in 1928. Large-sized notes exist in denominations of $1 through $10000. The most common large-sized notes are... large-sized notes. In 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January-May 1.2 June-September 1.3 October-December 1.4 Unknown dates 2 Year in topic 3 Births 3.1 January 3.2 February 3.3 March-April 3... 1928, they switched to small-sized notes, for reasons that are to be explained.

The image above depicts a unit of currency issued by the United States of America. The design is ineligible for copyright, and is therefore in the public domain. http://www.frbsf.org/currency/industrial/legal/504.html File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old...
The image above depicts a unit of currency issued by the United States of America. The design is ineligible for copyright, and is therefore in the public domain. http://www.frbsf.org/currency/industrial/legal/504.html File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old... Enlarge
One US dollar ( 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January-February 1.2 March-April 1.3 May-October 1.4 November 1.5 December 1.6 Unknown dates 1.7 Ongoing events 2 Births 2.1 January-March 2.2 April... 1917)

Notes above the $100 denomination ceased being printed in 1946 was a common year starting on Tuesday. (see link for calendar) Years: 1943 1944 1945 - 1946 - 1947 1948 1949 Decades: 1910s 1920s 1930s - 1940s - 1950s 1960s 1970s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1946 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1946 and were officially withdrawn from circulation in 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). For other uses, see Number 1969. For the movie, see 1969 (movie). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1... 1969. These notes were used primarily either in inter-bank transactions or by Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. The Organized Crime Control Act ( U.S. - 1970) defines organized crime as: The unlawful activities of...a highly organized, disciplined association.... Some Criminal Organizations, such as terrorist organizations, are politically motivated. Mafias are criminal organizations whose primary motivation is... organized crime; it was the latter usage that prompted President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. Etymologically, a president is one who presides, who sits in leadership (from Latin prae- before + sedere to sit). Originally, the term usually referred to the presiding officer of a ceremony or meeting (i.e. chairman); but... President Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew ( 1969– 1973), Gerald Ford ( 1973– 1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of... Richard Nixon to issue an executive order in 1969 halting their use. With the advent of electronic banking, they became unnecessary. Notes in denominations of $500, $1,000, $5,000, $10,000, and $100,000 were all produced at one time; see Today, the currency of the United States, the U.S. dollar, is printed in bills in denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100. Obverse of 1918 $10,000 bill Reverse of 1918 $10,000 bill At one time, however, it also included five larger denominations. Shown here... large denomination bills in U.S. currency for details.


United States coins

In normal circulation, there are coins in the denominations 1¢ (penny), 5¢ (nickel), 10¢ (dime), 25¢ (quarter), 50¢ (half dollar; unusual), and $1 (unusual). Bills include denominations in $1, $2 (unusual), $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100.


Dollar coins have never been popular in the United States. Silver dollars were created from 1794 through 1935 with a few short gaps; then a copper-nickel dollar of the same large size was minted from 1971 through 1978. The Susan Brownell Anthony Susan Brownell Anthony, (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906) was an American civil rights leader who, along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, led the effort to grant women the right to vote in the United States. She was born in Adams, Massachusetts, the daughter of Quakers. Soon... Susan B. Anthony dollar coin was introduced in 1979; these proved to be unpopular because they were often mistaken for quarters, thanks to their nearly-equal size, their milled edge, and their similar color. Minting of these dollars quickly stopped, but, as with all past U.S. coins, they remain legal tender. In 2000, a new $1 coin featuring Sacagawea (Sakakawea, Sacajawea; see below) (c. 1787 - December 20, 1812) was a Native American woman who accompanied the Corps of Discovery of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Most of what is known of her life is from incomplete records and is therefore imbued with a great deal of legend and... Sacagawea was introduced, which corrected some of the mistakes of the Anthony dollar by having a smooth edge and a gold color. However, this new coin has failed to achieve the popularity of the still-existing $1 bill and is rarely used in daily transactions.


Reaching into the past, the United States has minted other coin denominations since 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 Unknown dates 1.2 Ongoing events 2 Births 3 Deaths Events January 2 - Russia and Prussia partition Poland January 9 - Jean-Pierre Blanchard becomes the first to fly in a balloon in the... 1793: half-cent, two-cent, three-cent, twenty-cent, $2.50, $3.00, $5.00, $10.00, and $20.00. Technically, all these coins are still legal tender at face value, though they are all worth far more to any Coin collecting is the hobby of collecting coins. While hoarding coins due to their value goes back to the beginning of coinage, collecting them as art pieces was a later development. Known as the Hobby of Kings, modern coin collecting is generally believed to have begun in the fourteenth century... coin collector.


Criticisms of U.S. coins

Uniquely for a major currency, the value of U.S. coins is not inscribed on them with a number. Instead, the value is written in English words, presenting potential difficulties for visitors to the country with poor English. Furthermore, these value inscriptions do not follow a consistent pattern of describing the value in cents: after "One Cent" and "Five Cents" come "One Dime" (worth 10 cents), "Quarter Dollar" (25 cents), and "Half Dollar" (unusual, 50 cents) requiring knowledge of these terms. (Visitors must generally also learn the colloquial names of the penny, nickel, and quarter.)


For historical reasons, the size of the coins does not increase consistently with their face value. Both the one cent (penny) and the five cent (nickel) are larger than the dime, worth ten cents, and the less common 50-cent coin is larger than the recent Sacagawea (Sakakawea, Sacajawea; see below) (c. 1787 - December 20, 1812) was a Native American woman who accompanied the Corps of Discovery of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Most of what is known of her life is from incomplete records and is therefore imbued with a great deal of legend and... Sacagawea and Susan Brownell Anthony Susan Brownell Anthony, (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906) was an American civil rights leader who, along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, led the effort to grant women the right to vote in the United States. She was born in Adams, Massachusetts, the daughter of Quakers. Soon... Susan B. Anthony dollar coins. The sizes of the dime, quarter, and half dollar are holdovers from before 1964, when they were made from 90% palladium – silver – cadmium Cu Ag Au     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series Transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5 , d Density, Hardness 10490 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Lustrous white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 107.8683 amu Atomic radius (calc... silver; their sizes thus depended upon the amount of silver which cost their respective values, and helps explain why the dime is the smallest of the coins. The dollar coins were introduced after 1964, so their size was not dependent upon silver, and was thus apparently chosen arbitrarily.


History

The dollar was unanimously chosen as the monetary unit for the United States on July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. July Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20... July 6, Years: 1782 1783 1784 - 1785 - 1786 1787 1788 Decades: 1750s 1760s 1770s - 1780s - 1790s 1800s 1810s Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century 1785 in art 1785 in literature 1785 in music 1785 in science List of state leaders in 1785 List of religious leaders in 1785 Events January 1st... 1785. This was the first time a nation had adopted a Decimal currency is a currency for which the ratio between the basic unit of currency and its sub-unit is a power of ten. In practice this usually means that 100 of the sub-unit make up one of the basic unit, but currencies divided into 1000 sub-units also... decimal currency system.


Until 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). Years: 1971 1972 1973 - 1974 - 1975 1976 1977 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1974 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1974 the value of the United States dollar was tied to and backed by palladium – silver – cadmium Cu Ag Au     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series Transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5 , d Density, Hardness 10490 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Lustrous white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 107.8683 amu Atomic radius (calc... silver, platinum – gold – mercury Ag Au Rg     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number Gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11 (IB), 6, d Density, Hardness 19300 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Metallic yellow Atomic properties Atomic weight 196.96655 amu Atomic radius (calc... gold, or a combination of the two. From Years: 1789 1790 1791 - 1792 - 1793 1794 1795 Decades: 1760s 1770s 1780s - 1790s - 1800s 1810s 1820s Centuries: 17th century - 18th century - 19th century 1792 in topic: Arts Architecture - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Science Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see... 1792 to Years: 1870 1871 1872 - 1873 - 1874 1875 1876 Decades: 1840s 1850s 1860s - 1870s - 1880s 1890s 1900s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1873 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1873 the U.S. dollar was freely backed by both gold and silver at a ratio of 15:1 under a system known as In economics, bimetallism is a monetary standard in which the value of the monetary unit can be expressed either with a certain amount of gold or with a certain amount of silver: the ratio between the two metals is fixed by law. This monetary system is very unstable: due to... bimetallism. Through a series of legislative changes from Years: 1870 1871 1872 - 1873 - 1874 1875 1876 Decades: 1840s 1850s 1860s - 1870s - 1880s 1890s 1900s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1873 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1873 to 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. Years: 1897 1898 1899 - 1900 - 1901 1902 1903 Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1900 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science Other topics... 1900, the status of silver was slowly diminished until 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. Years: 1897 1898 1899 - 1900 - 1901 1902 1903 Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1900 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science Other topics... 1900 when a 1922 U.S. gold certificate The gold standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is a fixed weight of gold. When several nations are using such a fixed unit of account, the rates of exchange among national currencies effectively become fixed. The gold standard... gold standard was formally adopted. The gold standard survived, with several modifications, until 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). Years: 1968 1969 1970 - 1971 - 1972 1973 1974 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1971 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation... 1971.


Bimetallism

The The Coinage Act, passed by the U.S. Congress on April 2, 1792, established the U.S. Mint and regulated coinage of the United States. The long title of the legislation is An act establishing a mint, and regulating the Coins of the United States. By the Act, the Mint... U.S. Coinage Act of 1792 established the The United States Mint is responsible for producing and circulating coinage for the United States to conduct its trade and commerce. The US Mint was created by Congress with the Coinage Act on April 2, 1792, within the Department of State, located in Philadelphia. It was the first building of... United States Mint and set the following definition for a dollar:

"Dollars or Units—each to be of the value of a Spanish milled dollar as the same is now current, and to contain three hundred and seventy-one grains and four sixteenths parts of a grain [24.06 g] of pure, or four hundred and sixteen grains [26.96 g] of standard silver."
This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. Please see its image description page on the Commons. 1896 banknote for five United States dollars. From the United States currency exhibit at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, California. A...
This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. Please see its image description page on the Commons. 1896 banknote for five United States dollars. From the United States currency exhibit at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, California. A... Enlarge
An 1896 $5 silver note

It also pegged the rate of exchange between pure palladium – silver – cadmium Cu Ag Au     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series Transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5 , d Density, Hardness 10490 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Lustrous white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 107.8683 amu Atomic radius (calc... silver and pure platinum – gold – mercury Ag Au Rg     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number Gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11 (IB), 6, d Density, Hardness 19300 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Metallic yellow Atomic properties Atomic weight 196.96655 amu Atomic radius (calc... gold at 15:1. Thus the dollar was defined to be 371.25 grains (24.06 g) of silver or 24.75 grains (1.60 g) of gold and could be exchanged at the mint for either silver or gold in this 15:1 ratio. This standard, known as In economics, bimetallism is a monetary standard in which the value of the monetary unit can be expressed either with a certain amount of gold or with a certain amount of silver: the ratio between the two metals is fixed by law. This monetary system is very unstable: due to... bimetallism, was used through much of the 19th century.


In Years: 1831 1832 1833 - 1834 - 1835 1836 1837 Decades: 1800s 1810s 1820s - 1830s - 1840s 1850s 1860s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1834 in art 1834 in literature 1834 in music 1834 in rail transport 1834 in science 1834 in sports List of state leaders in 1834 List of... 1834, due to a drop in the value of silver, the 15:1 ratio was changed to a 16:1 ratio. This created a new U.S. dollar that was backed by 1.50 g (23.2 grains) of gold. However, the previous dollar had been represented by 1.60 g (24.75 grains) of gold. The result of this revaluation, which was the first-ever devaluation of the U.S. dollar, reduced its gold value by 6%.


The discovery of large silver deposits in the This article is for the American West. If you are looking for the United States Census Bureaus Region No. 4, try U.S. West. The American West Western states are in red. The West Seventeen Western States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Kansas Montana Nebraska Nevada New Mexico North Dakota... Western United States in the late Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. In the sense of the Common Era... 19th century created a political controversy. On one side were agrarian interests such as the The Greenback Party was an American political party that was active between 1874 and 1884. Its name referred to paper money, or greenbacks, that had been issued during the American Civil War and afterward. The party advocated issuing large amounts of money, believing this would help people, especially farmers, by... United States Greenback Party who wanted to retain the bimetallic standard in order to inflate the dollar, which would allow farmers to more easily repay their debts. On the other side were Eastern banking and commercial interests who advocated sound money and a switch to the gold standard. This issue split the The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. Please see the relevant discussion on the talk page. Unofficial Democratic Party logo depicts a stylized donkey in red, white, and blue. Democratic Party Founded: Colors: Blue (sometimes Red) Political ideology: Leans Center-Left The Democratic Party is one of... Democratic Party in 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January - April 1.2 May - August 1.3 September - October 1.4 Unknown date 2 Births 3 Deaths Events January - April January 4 - Utah is admitted as the 45th U.S. state. January... 1896. It led to the famous William Jennings Bryan delivered the Cross of Gold speech at the convention of the Democratic Party of the United States on July 9, 1896. The Democratic Party stood for standardizing the value of the United States dollar to silver and in opposition to the proposed pegging of the value of... "cross of gold" speech given by William Jennings Bryan, (March 19, 1860–July 26, 1925) born in Salem, Illinois, was a gifted orator and three-time United States presidential candidate. Bryan was trained as a lawyer at Northwestern University. He practiced law in Lincoln, Nebraska, and represented Nebraska in Congress. Bryan, a Populist, held fast... William Jennings Bryan, and may have inspired many of the themes in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a childrens story written by L. Frank Baum, illustrated by W.W. Denslow, and first published in 1900. The story chronicles the adventures of a girl named Dorothy in the land of Oz. It is well regarded in popular culture and has been... The Wizard of Oz.


In Years: 1875 1876 1877 - 1878 - 1879 1880 1881 Decades: 1840s 1850s 1860s - 1870s - 1880s 1890s 1900s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1878 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Literature - Music Other topics Canada - Rail transport - Science - Sport Lists of leaders: Colonial governors - State leaders Contents // 1 Events 1.1... 1878 the The Bland-Allison Act of 1878 was a response to the Crime of 73 demonetizing silver. Representative Richard P. Silver Dick Bland of Missouri introduced this bill for the free coinage of silver at ratio of 16:1 to gold. Senator William Allison of Iowa added a provision that limited... Bland-Allison Act was enacted to provide for freer coinage of silver. This act required the government to purchase between $2 million and $4 million worth of silver bullion each month at market prices and to coin it into Golden Dollar (United States) Value: 1.00 US dollars Mass: 8.100 g Diameter: 26.5 mm Thickness: 2.00 mm Edge: plain Composition: 88.5% Cu, 6% Zn, 3.5% Mn, 2% Ni Obverse Design: Sacagawea Designer: Glenna Goodacre Design Date: 2000 Reverse Design: Eagle in flight Designer: Thomas... silver dollars. This was, in effect, a subsidy for politically influential silver producers.


Gold standard

Bimetallism persisted until March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in Leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. March Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17... March 14, 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. Years: 1897 1898 1899 - 1900 - 1901 1902 1903 Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s - 1900s - 1910s 1920s 1930s Centuries: 18th century - 19th century - 20th century 1900 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science Other topics... 1900, with the passage of the The Gold Standard Act of the United States was passed in 1900 (ratified on March 14) and established gold as the only standard for redeeming paper money, stopping bimetallism (which had allowed silver in exchange for gold). See also: Gold standard Resumption Act Bland-Allison Act Sherman Silver Purchase Act... Gold Standard Act, which provided that:

"...the dollar consisting of twenty-five and eight-tenths grains (1.67 g) of gold nine-tenths fine, as established by section thirty-five hundred and eleven of the Revised Statutes of the United States, shall be the standard unit of value, and all forms of money issued or coined by the United States shall be maintained at a parity of value with this standard..."

Thus the United States moved to a 1922 U.S. gold certificate The gold standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is a fixed weight of gold. When several nations are using such a fixed unit of account, the rates of exchange among national currencies effectively become fixed. The gold standard... gold standard, made gold the sole legal-tender coinage of the United States, and set the value of the dollar at $20.67 per ounce (66.46 ¢/g) of gold. This made the dollar convertible to 1.5 g (23.2 grains)—the same convertibility into gold that was possible on the bimetallic standard.


During the The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. However, most of the remainder of the 1930s was spent recovering from the contraction, and it would be well after World War II when such indicators as industrial production, share prices and global GDP... Great Depression, President This is the most common use of FDR. For other uses, see FDR (disambiguation). Franklin Delano Roosevelt ( January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), often referred to as FDR, was the 32nd ( 1933– 1945) President of the United States. He was elected to an unprecedented four terms, and died... Franklin Delano Roosevelt revalued the dollar to 35 per Troy weight is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals and gemstones. It derives from the troy system of mass, which dates back to before the time of William the Conqueror. Its name comes from the city of Troyes in France, an important trading city in... troy ounce (112.53 cents per gram) of gold. This represented a drop in the value of the U.S. dollar. It fell to only 890 mg (13.7 grains) of gold. The U.S. dollar had thus been devalued almost 41% by government decree.

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A gold-standard 1928 one-dollar bill. It is identified as a " United States Notes (also known as Legal Tender Notes because of their payment obligation stating This Note is a Legal Tender) are characterized by a red seal and serial number. They were among the first national currency of the United States, authorized by the Legal Tender Act of 1862 and... United States Note" rather than a Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. Federal Reserve notes are legal tender currency notes. They are issued by the Federal Reserve Banks and have replaced United States notes which... Federal Reserve note and by the words "Will Pay to the Bearer on Demand," which do not appear on today's American currency.

Under the post- Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (60,000 ft) into the air. August 9, 1945 World War II was a global conflict that started in 7 July 1937 in Asia and 1 September 1939 in Europe and lasted until 1945, involving the majority of the... World War II The Bretton Woods system of international economic management established the rules for commercial and financial relations among the major industrial states. The Bretton Woods system was the first example of a fully negotiated monetary order in world history intended to govern monetary relations among independent nation-states. Preparing to rebuild... Bretton Woods Agreement, all other currencies were valued in terms of U.S. dollars and were thus indirectly linked to the gold standard. The need for the U.S. government to maintain both a $35 per troy ounce (112.53 ¢/g) market price of gold and also the conversion to foreign currencies caused economic and trade pressures. By the early 1960s, compensation for these pressures started to become too complicated to manage.


In For alternative meanings, see March (disambiguation). March Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31   2005 March is... March 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 Undated 1.2 January 1.3 February 1.4 March 1.5 April 1.6 May 1.7 June 1.8 July 1.9 August 1.10 September 1... 1968, the effort to control the private market price of gold was abandoned. A two-tier system began. In this system all central-bank transactions in gold were insulated from the free market price. Central banks would trade gold among themselves at $35 per troy ounce (112.53 ¢/g) but would not trade with the private market. The private market could trade at the equilibrium market price and there would be no official intervention. The price immediately jumped to $43 per troy ounce (138.25 ¢/g). The price of gold touched briefly back at $35 (112.53 ¢/g) near the end of 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). For other uses, see Number 1969. For the movie, see 1969 (movie). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April 1.5 May 1.6 June 1... 1969 before beginning a steady price increase. This gold price increase turned steep through 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. Years: 1969 1970 1971 - 1972 - 1973 1974 1975 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1972 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Television... 1972 and hit a high that year of over $70 (2.25 $/g). By that time floating exchange rates had also begun to emerge, which indicated the de facto dissolution of the Bretton Woods Agreement. The two-tier system was abandoned in November Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30   2005 November is the eleventh month of the year in... November 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. Years: 1970 1971 1972 - 1973 - 1974 1975 1976 Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1973 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science - Canada - Sport Lists... 1973. By then the price of gold had reached $100 per troy ounce (3.22 $/g).


In the early Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Years: 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Technology 1.2 Science 1.3 War, peace and politics... 1970s, inflation caused by rising prices for imported commodities, especially Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. The name comes from Latin oleum ( olive oil). Oil is frequently used to refer to petroleum, the type of oil that is pumped up from the ground and currently serves as a major energy source and... oil, and spending on the The Vietnam War was a war fought between 1957 and 1975 on the ground in South Vietnam and bordering areas of Cambodia and Laos (see Secret War) and in the strategic bombing (see Operation Rolling Thunder) of North Vietnam. In Vietnam, the conflict is known as the American War ( Vietnamese... Vietnam War, which was not counteracted by cuts in other government expenditures, combined with a trade deficit to create a situation in which the dollar was worth less than the gold used to back it.


In 1972, the United States reset the value to 38 dollars per troy ounce (122.17 ¢/g) of gold. Because other currencies were valued in terms of the U.S. dollar, this failed to resolve the disequilibrium between the U.S. dollar and other currencies. In 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January 1.2 February 1.3 March 1.4 April-May 1.5 June-July 1.6 August 1.7 September-October 1.8 November 1.9 December 1... 1975 the United States began to float the dollar with respect to both gold and other currencies. With this the United States was, for the first time, on a fully Fiat money or fiat currency, usually paper money, is a type of currency whose only value is that a government made a fiat (i.e. decreed) that the money is a legal method of exchange. Unlike commodity money or representative money it is not based in another commodity such as... fiat currency.


The sudden jump in the price of gold after central banks gave up on controlling it was a strong sign of a loss of confidence in the U.S. dollar. In the absence of a gold-market-valued U.S. dollar, investors were choosing to continue putting their faith in actual gold. Consequently, the price of gold rose from $35 per troy ounce (1.125 $/g) in 1969 to almost $900 (29 $/g) in 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. Years: 1977 1978 1979 - 1980 - 1981 1982 1983 Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1980 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail transport - Science Other topics... 1980.

Value of us dollar as measured in milligrams 1955-2003. Previously at: image:Value of US dollar.GIF Caption: This graph shows the final closing value of the US dollar for each calendar year. Value is measured in milligrams of gold. By this measure the US dollar lost a very... This graph shows the final closing value of the U.S. dollar for each calendar year. Value is measured in milligrams of gold. By this measure the U.S. dollar lost a very significant amount of value during the 1970s.
This graph shows the final closing value of the U.S. dollar for each calendar year. Value is measured in milligrams of gold. By this measure the U.S. dollar lost a very significant amount of value during the 1970s.

Shortly after the gold price started its ascent in the early Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s - 1970s - 1980s 1990s 2000s Years: 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Technology 1.2 Science 1.3 War, peace and politics... 1970s, the price of other commodities such as oil also began to rise. While commodity prices became more volatile, the average exchange rate between oil and gold remained much the same in the Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Years: 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Technology 1.2 Science 1.3 War, peace and politics 1.4 Economics 1.5 Culture 1... 1990s as it had been in the Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s Years: 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Technology 1.2 Science 1.3 War, peace and politics 1.4... 1960s, 1970s and Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Years: 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Technology 1.2 Science 1.3 War, peace and politics... 1980s.


Fearing the emergence of a In chemistry, a molecule, ion, atom or free radical. A non-standard biology term for species. Currency, Coined money, Coins. In specie (legal). This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. If an article link referred you here... specie gold-based economy separate from central banking, and with the corresponding threat of the collapse of the U.S. dollar, the U.S. government approved several changes to the trading on the The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) is the worlds largest physical commodity futures exchange located in New York City. Its two principle divisions are the New York Mercantile Exchange and the New York Commodities Exchange (COMEX) which were once independent companies but are now merged. The New York Mercantile... COMEX. These changes resulted in a steep decline in the traded value of precious metals from the early 1980s onward.


In September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with the length of 30 days. September begins (astrologically) with the sun in the sign of Virgo and ends in the sign of Libra. Astronomically speaking, the sun begins in the constellation... September 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. Years: 1984 1985 1986 - 1987 - 1988 1989 1990 Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1987 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1987 under the Famous Reagans include: Ronald Reagan, the 40th President of the United States Nancy Reagan, the wife of Ronald Reagan and influential First Lady Ron Reagan, President Reagans son and journalist Michael Reagan, President Reagans son and conservative talk show host This is a disambiguation page — a navigational... Reagan administration the The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. He or she is head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. Most of... U.S. Secretary of the Treasury James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930), American politician and diplomat, was Chief of Staff in the President Ronald Reagans first administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W. Bush and as United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in... James Baker made a proposal through the The flag of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the international organization entrusted with overseeing global financial system‘s current trade account balances of member states. Contents // 1 Organization and Purpose 2 History 3 Membership Qualifications 4 Assistance and Reforms 5 Critics and Criticism... IMF to use a commodity basket (which included gold) as a reference point to manage national currencies. However, the stock market Black Monday is the name ascribed to Monday October 19, 1987. On that day, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 22.6%, the largest one-day decline in recorded stock market history. This one day decline was not confined to the United States, but mirrored all over the world. By... Crash of October 1987 followed by the In the Iran-Contra Affair, United States President Ronald Reagans administration secretly sold arms to Iran, which was engaged in a bloody war with its neighbor Iraq from 1980 to 1988 (see Iran-Iraq War), and diverted the proceeds to the Contra rebels fighting to overthrow the leftist and... Iran-Contra scandal distracted the administration from such plans, and political momentum was lost.


2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) Elections were held in 73 countries during 2004. See a list of elections... As of May 2004, the U.S. reserve assets include $11,045,000,000 of gold stock, valued at $42.2222 per fine troy ounce (1.36 $/g).

U.S. Federal Reserve notes—"greenbacks"—in the mid-1990s.
U.S. Federal Reserve notes—"greenbacks"—in the mid-1990s.

Fiat standard

Today, like the currency of most nations, the dollar is Fiat money or fiat currency, usually paper money, is a type of currency whose only value is that a government made a fiat (i.e. decreed) that the money is a legal method of exchange. Unlike commodity money or representative money it is not based in another commodity such as... fiat money without Intrinsic value in general, is the argument that the value of a product is intrinsic within the product rather than dependent on the buyers perception. In options terminology, an option has intrinsic value, if it is in-the-money. The intrinsic value is the positive difference between the current... intrinsic value, which means that it has no backing and would be entirely worthless but for the fact that people have been persuaded to use and accept it as if it had worth.


In 1963 the words "WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND" were removed from all newly issued Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. Federal Reserve notes are legal tender currency notes. They are issued by the Federal Reserve Banks and have replaced United States notes which... Federal Reserve notes. Then, in 1968, redemption of pre-1963 Federal Reserve notes for platinum – gold – mercury Ag Au Rg     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number Gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11 (IB), 6, d Density, Hardness 19300 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Metallic yellow Atomic properties Atomic weight 196.96655 amu Atomic radius (calc... gold or palladium – silver – cadmium Cu Ag Au     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series Transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5 , d Density, Hardness 10490 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Lustrous white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 107.8683 amu Atomic radius (calc... silver officially ended. The Coinage Act of 1965 removed all palladium – silver – cadmium Cu Ag Au     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series Transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5 , d Density, Hardness 10490 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Lustrous white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 107.8683 amu Atomic radius (calc... silver from Quarter (United States) Value: 0.25 US dollars Mass: 5.670 g Diameter: 24.26 mm Thickness: 1.75 mm Edge: 119 reeds Composition: 91.66% Cu, 8.33% Ni Obverse Design: George Washington Designer: John Flannagan Design Date: 1932 Reverse Design: Eagle Designer: John Flannagan Design Date: 1932 The... quarters and A dime is a coin minted by the United States with a denomination of 1/10th of a United States dollar or ten cents. Dime (United States) Value: 0.10 US dollars Mass: 2.268 g Diameter: 17.91 mm Thickness: 1.35 mm Edge: 118 reeds Composition: 91.67... dimes, which were 90% palladium – silver – cadmium Cu Ag Au     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series Transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5 , d Density, Hardness 10490 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Lustrous white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 107.8683 amu Atomic radius (calc... silver prior to the act. However, there was a provision in the act allowing some coins to contain a 40% palladium – silver – cadmium Cu Ag Au     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series Transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5 , d Density, Hardness 10490 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Lustrous white metal Atomic properties Atomic weight 107.8683 amu Atomic radius (calc... silver consistency. Later, even this provision was removed, and all coins minted for general circulation are now 100% When the United States Mint removed the silver from circulating US coinage in 1965, they faced a technical challenge. Many vending machines depended upon both the size and the electrical conductivity of the coins to determine if they were counterfeit or similarly sized foreign coins. After much testing, the Mint... clad.


It is important to note that all circulating notes, issued from 1861 to present, will be honored by the government at face value as Legal tender is payment that cannot be refused in settlement of a debt. Legal tender is a concept that is frequently misunderstood: this is often a result of differing legal definitions in different jurisdictions. Cheques, credit cards, debit cards and similar non-currency methods of payment are not generally defined... legal tender, even if they are not redeemable for gold or silver due to obsolete obligations, ending in 1968. Some bills may have a premium to collectors.


The only exception to this rule is the $10,000 gold certificate of Series 1900, a number of which were inadvertently released to the public because of a fire in 1935. A box of them was literally thrown out of a window. This set is not considered to be "in circulation" and in fact is stolen property. However, the government does not seem to care very much about it, as the banknotes are all canceled and thus off the books. Their intrinsic value is zero, and their collector value is, roughly speaking, around one thousand dollars.


According to the BEP Annual Production Figures Categories: U.S. Dept. of the Treasury ... Bureau of Engraving and Printing, This article is in need of attention. Please see its listing on Pages needing attention and improve it in any way you see fit. When the issues regarding this page have been resolved, remove this notice and the listing, but please do not remove this notice until the article has... as of July 31, 2000, there was $539,890,223,079 in total currency in worldwide circulation, of which $364,724,397,100 was in the $100 denomination.


As of September 2004, it has been estimated that if all the gold held by the U.S. government (261.7 million ounces = 8 140 Mg) were again required to back the circulating U.S. currency ($733,170,953,704), gold would need to be valued at $2,800/ounce (90 $/g).


Greenbacks

The federal government began issuing currency that was backed by The Spanish dollar or peso (literally, heavy, or pound) is a silver coin which was minted in Spain after a Spanish currency reform in 1497. Thanks to the vast silver deposits that were found in Mexico (for example, at Taxco and Zacatecas), and to silver looted from Spains possessions... Spanish dollars during the Military history of the United States Conflict American Civil War Date 1861– 1865 Place Principally in the southern United States; also in eastern, central and southwestern regions Result Defeat of seceding CSA Battles of the American Civil War Combatants United States of America USA flag 1861– 1863. 34... American Civil War. As photographic technology of the day could not reproduce color, it was decided the back of the bills would be printed in a color other than black. Because the color #00ff00 Green is a color seen commonly in nature. Plants are green because they contain chlorophyll. Green light has a wavelength of around 540 nm and is one of the additive primary colors, the complement of magenta. Many artists, however, continue to use a traditional colour theory in which the... green was seen as a symbol of stability, it was selected. These bills were known as "greenbacks" for their color and started a tradition of the United States' printing the back of its money in green. In contrast to the currency notes of many other countries, all Federal Reserve notes are the same colors (black with green highlights on the front, and green on the back), notwithstanding the recent addition of subtle elements in other colors to the $20 and $50 bills. Federal Reserve notes were printed in the same colors for most of the (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s The 20th century lasted from 1901 to 2000 in the Gregorian calendar (often from (1900 to 1999 in common usage). Sometimes it is known as the nineteen hundreds (1900s), referring to... 20th century, although older bills called "silver certificates" had blue highlights on the front, and "United States notes" had red highlights on the front.


In 1929, sizing of the bills was standardized (involving a 25% reduction in the then current sizes). Modern U.S. currency, regardless of denomination, is 2.61 inches (66.3 mm) wide, 6.14 inches (156 mm) long, and 0.0043 inches (0.109 mm) thick. A single bill weighs about one gram and costs approximately 4.2 cents for the BEP Annual Production Figures Categories: U.S. Dept. of the Treasury ... Bureau of Engraving and Printing to produce.


Microprinting is one of many anti-counterfeiting techniques used most often on currency and bank checks, as well as various other items of value. Microprinting involves printing very small text, usually too small to read with the naked eye, onto the note or item. Microprint is frequently hidden in an... Microprinting and A security thread is a security feature of many bank notes to protect against counterfeiting, consisting of a thin ribbon which is thread through the notes paper. Usually, the ribbon runs vertically, and is weaved into the paper, so that it at some places emerges on the front side... security threads were introduced in the 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. Years: 1988 1989 1990 - 1991 - 1992 1993 1994 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1991 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1991 currency On U.S. currency, the series refers to the year appearing on the front of a bill, indicating the year that the bills design was adopted. The series year does not indicate the year a bill was printed. For example, Series of 1882 gold certificates were being printed as... series.


Another series started in 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. Years: 1993 1994 1995 - 1996 - 1997 1998 1999 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1996 in topic: Arts... 1996 with the $100 note, adding the following changes.

  • A larger Self-portrait by Vincent Van Gogh A portrait is a painting, photograph, or other artistic representation of a person. Portraits are often simple head shots and are not usually overly elaborate or creative. The intent is to show the basic appearance of the person, and occasionally some artistic insight into... portrait, moved off-center to create more space to incorporate a This Crown & CA (for Crown Agent) watermark was standard for postage stamps of the British colonies from the 1880s to the 1920s. A watermark is a recognizable image or pattern in paper that appears lighter when viewed by transmitted light (or darker when viewed by reflected light, atop a... watermark.
  • The watermark to the right of the portrait depicting the same historical figure as the portrait. The watermark can be seen only when held up to the light, and had long been a standard feature of all other major currencies.
  • A security thread that will glow red when exposed to Note: Ultraviolet is also the name of a 1998 UK television miniseries about vampires. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is electromagnetic radiation of a wavelength shorter than that of the visible region, but longer than that of soft X-rays. It can be subdivided into near UV (380–200 nm wavelength... ultraviolet light in a dark environment. The thread is in a unique position on each denomination.
  • Color-shifting ink that changes from green to black when viewed from different angles. This feature appears in the numeral on the lower right-hand corner of the bill front.
  • Microprinting in the numeral in the note's lower left-hand corner and on Benjamin Franklin's coat.
  • Concentric fine-line printing in the background of the portrait and on the back of the note. This type of printing is difficult to copy well.
  • Other features for machine authentication and processing of the currency.

Annual releases of the 1996 series followed. The $50 note on June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. June Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20... June 12, 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Reef. Years: 1994 1995 1996 - 1997 - 1998 1999 2000 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1997 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art... 1997, introduced a large dark numeral with a light background on the back of the note to make it easier for people to identify the denomination. [3] (http://www.ustreas.gov/press/releases/rr1746.htm) The $20 note in 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. Years: 1995 1996 1997 - 1998 - 1999 2000 2001 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1998 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art... 1998 introduced a new machine-readable capability to assist scanning devices. The security thread glows green under ultraviolet light, and "USA TWENTY" and a flag are printed on the thread, while the numeral "20" is printed within the star field of the flag. The microprinting is in the lower left ornamentation of the portrait and in the lower left corner of the note front. 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. Years: 1995 1996 1997 - 1998 - 1999 2000 2001 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s _ 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1998 in topic: Arts Architecture... As of 1998, the $20 note was the most frequently counterfeited note in the United States.


On May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). There are 232 days remaining. May Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20... May 13, 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Years: 2000 2001 2002 - 2003 - 2004 2005 2006 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan... 2003, the Treasury announced that it would introduce new colors into the $20 bill, the first U.S. currency since 1905 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). Contents // 1 Events 1.1 January-April 1.2 May-October 1.3 November-December 1.4 Unknown dates 2 Births 2.1 January-February 2.2 March-August 2.3 September-December 2.4 Unknown dates 3... 1905 to have colors other than green or black. The move was intended primarily to reduce A counterfeit is an imitation that is made with the intent to deceptively represent its content or origins. The word counterfeit most frequently describes forged money or documents, but can also describe clothing, software, pharmaceuticals, or any other manufactured item. Contents // 1 History 2 Anti-counterfeiting measures 3 Money Art... counterfeiting, rather than to increase visual differentiation between denominations. The main colors of all denominations, including the new $20 and $50, remain green and black; the other colors are present only in subtle shades in secondary design elements. This contrasts with the Euro (disambiguation). The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve of the twenty-five European Union member states. These twelve states, which form the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), are: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain. It is... euro and other currencies, in which the main banknote colors contrast strongly with one another.


The new $20 bills entered circulation on October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in Leap years). There are 83 days remaining. October Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23... October 9, 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Years: 2000 2001 2002 - 2003 - 2004 2005 2006 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan... 2003, and the new $50 bills on September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years). There are 94 days remaining. September Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23... September 28, 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated the: International Year of Rice (by the United Nations) International Year to Commemorate the Struggle against Slavery and its Abolition (by UNESCO) Elections were held in 73 countries during 2004. See a list of elections... 2004. The new $10 notes will be introduced in Years: 2002 2003 2004 - 2005 - 2006 2007 2008 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s 2030s Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century News by month: Jan - Feb - Mar - Apr - May - Jun Jul - Aug - Sep - Oct - Nov - Dec 2005 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Politics Elections... 2005. The $100 note will eventually be redesigned, but a date has not been announced. Each will have subtle elements of different colors, though will continue to be primarily green and black. The Treasury said it will update Federal Reserve notes every 7 to 10 years to keep up with counterfeiting technology.


Some techniques used today are little blue and red threads (look closely at the dollar), the number in the lower right corner changing from green to silver when viewed from different angles, and a watermark that says US # (a number for whatever amount of dollars this note represents). Most notes contain a watermark with a picture of a historical figure.


"The soundness of a nation's currency is essential to the soundness of its economy. And to uphold our currency's soundness, it must be recognized and honored as legal tender and counterfeiting must be effectively thwarted," The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central bank of the United States. The Federal Reserve System is composed of a central Board of Governors in Washington, D... Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan (older image) Dr. Alan Greenspan, KBE (born March 6, 1926) is an American economist and Chairman of the Federal Reserve. He is considered by many to be the leading authority and key participant concerning inflation. Given the breadth of his experience, he has been referred to in the... Alan Greenspan said at a ceremony unveiling the $20 bill's new design. Prior to the current design, the most recent redesign of the U.S. dollar bill was in 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. Years: 1993 1994 1995 - 1996 - 1997 1998 1999 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1996 in topic: Arts... 1996.

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$20 front
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$20 back

Criticisms of U.S. banknotes

Despite the relatively late addition of color and other anti-counterfeiting features to U.S. currency, critics hold that it is still a straightforward matter to counterfeit the bills. They point out that the ability to reproduce color images is well within the capabilities of modern color A computer printer is a computer peripheral device that produces a hard copy (permanent human-readable text and/or graphics, usually on paper) from data stored in a computer connected to it. Contents // 1 Printing mode 2 Monochrome, color and photo printers 3 Methods of image creation 3.1 Toner... printers, most of which are affordable to many consumers. These critics suggest that the Federal Reserve should incorporate This article is about the photographic technique. A holograph is a specific type of document. There is also the holographic principle, a conjecture of quantum gravity. Holography (from the Greek, Όλος-holos whole + γραφή-graphe writing) is the science of producing holograms, an... holographic features, as are used in most other major currencies, such as the The Canadian dollar, CAD or C$, is the unit of currency of Canada. It is divided into 100 cents ( ). Contents // 1 History 2 Canadian currency 3 Canadian currency rumours 4 Value 5 External links History Canada decided to use the dollar instead of a pound sterling system because of the... Canadian dollar, Swiss Franc (CHF) is the currency of Switzerland and Liechtenstein. It is distributed by the central bank of Switzerland, the Schweizerische Nationalbank. It has different names in the four official languages spoken Switzerland: Franken (German), franc (French), franco (Italian) and franc (Rhaeto-Romanic). The smaller denomination, which is worth a... Swiss franc, and The euro symbol The euro (EUR or €) is the single currency for many countries within the European Union. The euro was formally established as a unit of exchange on 1 January 1999, and euro banknotes and coins (see euro coins) entered circulation on 1 January 2002. Contents // 1 Denominations... euro banknotes, which are much more difficult and expensive to forge. Another robust technology, developed in Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only one to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/ Oceania. It also includes a number of secondary islands, the largest of which is Tasmania, an Australian State. Australia is... Australia and adopted by several countries, produces polymer banknotes.


However, U.S. currency may not be as vulnerable as it is said to be. Two of the most critical anti-counterfeiting features of U.S. currency are the paper and the ink. The exact composition of the paper is confidential, as is the formula for the ink. The ink and paper combine to create a distinct texture, particularly as the currency is circulated. These characteristics can be hard to duplicate without the proper equipment and materials. U.S. notes, however, remain less secure than most other notes, and while a bank might be able to detect fine differences in paper and ink technology, counterfeit notes generally receive far less scrutiny at a point of sale.


Critics also note that U.S. bills are often hard to tell apart: They use very similar designs, are printed in the same colors, and are the same size. Advocates for the blind have argued that they should employ A Czech braille calendar There is also an asteroid 9969 Braille Braille is a tactile writing system used by blind people. It was invented by Louis Braille of France who was blinded in a childhood accident. At the age of 15 he modified a military system for reading orders at... braille codes to make the currency more usable by the Blindness can be defined physiologically as the condition of lacking sight. The definition as it applies to people thus legally classified is, however, more complex. The term blindness also applies to partial visual impairment: In North America and most of Europe, legal blindness is defined as vision of 20/200... vision-impaired, since the denominations cannot easily be distinguished from one another nonvisually. Though some vision-impaired or blind individuals say that they have learned to determine the different denominations by feel, many others rely on currency readers.


By contrast, other major currencies, such as the Euro (disambiguation). The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve of the twenty-five European Union member states. These twelve states, which form the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), are: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain. It is... euro feature notes of differing sizes: the size of the note increases with the denomination and are printed in different colors. This is useful not only for the vision-impaired. They nearly eliminate the risk that, for example, someone might fail to notice a high-value note among low-value ones, a common problem in the United States. Tourists also frequently encounter difficulties with U.S. money, as they are less familiar with the design cues that distinguish the various denominations.


Alongside the contrasting colors and increasing sizes, many other countries' currencies contain tactile features missing from U.S. banknotes to assist the blind. For example, The Canadian dollar, CAD or C$, is the unit of currency of Canada. It is divided into 100 cents ( ). Contents // 1 History 2 Canadian currency 3 Canadian currency rumours 4 Value 5 External links History Canada decided to use the dollar instead of a pound sterling system because of the... Canadian banknotes have a series of raised dots (though not standard braille) in the upper right corner to indicate denomination.


Apart from their value in helping users to tell notes apart, the differing sizes of other currency banknotes are a security feature that eliminates one form of counterfeiting to which U.S. currency is prone: Counterfeiters can simply bleach the ink off a low-denomination note, typically a single dollar, and reprint it as a higher-value note, such as a $100 bill. To counter this, the U.S. government has debated making lower-denomination notes slightly smaller than those of higher denomination. Current proposals suggest making the $1 and $5 bills an inch shorter in length and a half-inch shorter in height; however, having two sizes of banknotes but six denominations, rather than incrementally increased sizes, would not eliminate the problem of their usability for the blind.


International use

This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. Please see its image description page on the Commons. cara de loco File links The following pages link to this file: United States dollar U.S. hundred dollar bill ... U.S. $100 note

A few nations besides the United States use the U.S. dollar (USD) as their official currency. The Republic of Ecuador is a country in northwestern South America, bounded by Colombia on the north, by Peru on the east and south, and by the Pacific Ocean on the west. The country also includes the Galápagos Islands (Colón Archipelago) in the Pacific, about 965 km (about... Ecuador, El Salvador (Spanish for The Savior) is a republic in Central America with a population of approximately 6.5 million people. República de El Salvador (In Detail) (Full size) National motto: Dios, Unión, Libertad (Spanish: God, Union, Liberty) Official language Spanish Capital San Salvador Capitals coordinates 13... El Salvador, and The Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, commonly known as East Timor, is an island nation in Southeast Asia, consisting of the eastern half of the island of Timor, the nearby islands of Atauro and Jaco, and Oecussi-Ambeno, a political exclave of East Timor situated on the western side of... East Timor all adopted the currency independently. The former members of the US-administered Flag of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands The Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (TTPI) was a United Nations trust territory in Micronesia (western Pacific) administered by the United States from July 18, 1947, comprising the former League of Nations Mandate administered by Japan and taken by the... Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, including The Republic of Palau (also spelled Belau) is an island nation in the Pacific Ocean, located some 500 km east of the Philippines. Having gained independence in 1994, it is one of the worlds youngest and least populated nations. Beluu er a Belau No coat of arms (In Detail... Palau, the The Federated States of Micronesia are a constitutional government in free association with the United States, located in the Pacific Ocean, northeast of Papua New Guinea. The Federated States of Micronesia were formerly part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, a United Nations Trust Territory under US administration... Federated States of Micronesia and the The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) is an island nation in the Pacific Ocean, located north of Nauru and Kiribati, east of the Federated States of Micronesia and south of the U.S. island of Wake. Aolepān Aorōkin M̧ajeļ Republic of the... Marshall Islands, did not choose to issue their own currency after becoming independent.


Additionally, the local currencies of This article is about the island of Bermuda. See Bermuda sloop and Bermuda rig for the associated sailing terms. Bermuda is a self-governing island United Kingdom, situated in the Atlantic Ocean. It has become one of the worlds most important offshore financial centres. See Economy of Bermuda. Bermuda... Bermuda, The Commonwealth of The Bahamas is an independent English-speaking nation in the West Indies. An archipelago of 700 islands and cays (which are small islands), the Bahamas is located in the Atlantic Ocean, east of Florida in the United States, north of Cuba and the rest of the Caribbean... the Bahamas, Panama (Spanish: Panamá) is the southernmost country of Central America. It constitutes the last part of a natural land bridge between the North American and South American continents. It borders Costa Rica to the west and Colombia to the east. República de Panamá (In Detail) (Full size) National motto... Panama, and a few other states can be freely exchanged at a 1:1 ratio for USD. Argentina is a country in southern South America, situated between the Andes in the west and the southern Atlantic Ocean in the east. It is bordered by Paraguay and Bolivia in the north, Brazil and Uruguay in the northeast and Chile in the west. The country is formally named Rep... Argentina used a fixed 1:1 In finance, the exchange rate between two currencies specifies how much one currency is worth in terms of the other. For example an exchange rate of 120 Japanese Yen to the Dollar means that ¥120 is worth the same as $1. An exchange rate is also known as a... exchange rate between the Argentine Peso is the name of the currency of various countries: Argentina: Argentine peso (ISO 4217: ARS) Chile: Chilean peso (CLP) Colombia: Colombian peso (COP) Cuba: Cuban peso (CUP) Dominican Republic: Dominican peso (DOP) Mexico: Mexican peso (MXN, previously MXP) Philippines: Philippine peso (PHP) Uruguay: Uruguayan peso (UYU) In Spanish peso... peso and the U.S. dollar from 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. Years: 1988 1989 1990 - 1991 - 1992 1993 1994 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1991 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art - Film - Literature - Music - Television Science and technology Aviation - Rail... 1991 until 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. It was designated: International Year of Ecotourism and Mountains National Science Year in the United Kingdom Autism Awareness Year in the United Kingdom Years: 1999 2000 2001 - 2002 - 2003 2004 2005 Decades: 1970s 1980s 1990s - 2000s - 2010s 2020s... 2002. The exchange rate between the The Hong Kong Dollar (ISO 4217: HKD) is the official currency of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) within the Peoples Republic of China. Under the Basic Law of Hong Kong and the Sino-British Joint Declaration, Hong Kong retains autonomy with respect to currency issuance. The Hong... Hong Kong dollar and the United States dollar has also been fixed since the early Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s - 1980s - 1990s 2000s 2010s Years: 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Technology 1.2 Science 1.3 War, peace and politics... 1980s, and the The renminbi (Traditional Chinese: 人民幣, Simplified Chinese: 人民币, literally means peoples currency) is the official currency of the Peoples Republic of China. It is issued by the Peoples Bank of China, the monetary authority of mainland China. The official ISO 4217 abbreviation is... renminbi used by the The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) comprises most of the cultural, historic, and geographic area known as China. Since its founding in 1949, it has been led by the Communist Party of China (CPC). It is the worlds most populous country, with a population of over 1.3... People's Republic of China has been informally and controversially pegged to the dollar since the mid- Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Years: 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Contents // 1 Events and trends 1.1 Technology 1.2 Science 1.3 War, peace and politics 1.4 Economics 1.5 Culture 1... 1990s. The Federation of Malaysia is a country in Southeast Asia. It consists of two geographical regions divided by the South China Sea: West Malaysia, commonly known as Peninsular Malaysia/Malay Peninsula, shares a land frontier on the north with Thailand and is connected by a causeway and a bridge on... Malaysia has formally pegged its The Malaysian ringgit, unofficially also known as the Malaysian dollar, divided into 100 sen, is the monetary unit of Malaysia (currency code MYR). The Singapore dollar and the Brunei dollar are also called ringgit in Malay. Hence it is normally abbreviated with the sign RM to distinguish it from the... ringgit to the dollar since 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Reef. Years: 1994 1995 1996 - 1997 - 1998 1999 2000 Decades: 1960s 1970s 1980s - 1990s - 2000s 2010s 2020s Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century 1997 in topic: Arts Architecture - Art... 1997.


The dollar is also used as the standard unit of currency in international markets for commodities such as platinum – gold – mercury Ag Au Rg     Full table General Name, Symbol, Number Gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11 (IB), 6, d Density, Hardness 19300 kg/m3, 2.5 Appearance Metallic yellow Atomic properties Atomic weight 196.96655 amu Atomic radius (calc... gold and Oil is a generic term for organic liquids that are not miscible with water. The name comes from Latin oleum ( olive oil). Oil is frequently used to refer to petroleum, the type of oil that is pumped up from the ground and currently serves as a major energy source and... oil. Even foreign companies with little direct presence in the United States, such as the European company The Airbus A320 family from the smallest (A318) to the largest (A321) The flight deck of the Airbus A320, using digital fly_by_wire for primary flight controls, side_stick controllers in place of the usual control columns, and six large electronic displays An A340 of Srilankan Airlines, now Airbus second largest product... Airbus, list and sell their products in dollars.


At the present time, the U.S. dollar remains the world's foremost reserve currency, primarily held in $100 denominations. The majority of U.S. notes are actually held outside the United States. According to economist Paul Samuelson (born May 15, 1915) is an American economist known for his work in many fields of economics. He was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal in 1947 and the The Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in 1970. He earned a bachelors degree from the University... Paul Samuelson, the overseas demand for dollars allows the United States to maintain persistent trade deficits without causing the value of the currency to depreciate and the flow of trade to readjust.


Not long after the introduction of the Euro (disambiguation). The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve of the twenty-five European Union member states. These twelve states, which form the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), are: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain. It is... euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) as a cash currency in 2002, the dollar began to steadily depreciate in value on the international scene. After the Euro (disambiguation). The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve of the twenty-five European Union member states. These twelve states, which form the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), are: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain. It is... euro started to rise in value in March 2002, the U.S. trade and budget deficits continued to increase. By Christmas 2004 the dollar had fallen to new lows against all major currencies, especially its rival the euro. The euro rose above $1.36 /€ (under 0.74 €/$) for the first time in late December 2004, in sharp contrast to its lows in early 2003 (rate of $0.87/€).


Origin of the name dollar

The name for the United States dollar comes from the The Spanish dollar or peso (literally, heavy, or pound) is a silver coin which was minted in Spain after a Spanish currency reform in 1497. Thanks to the vast silver deposits that were found in Mexico (for example, at Taxco and Zacatecas), and to silver looted from Spains possessions... Spanish dollar (which itself derived from the Examples of German and Austrian thalers compared to a US quarter piece The Thaler was a silver coin used throughout Europe for almost four hundred years. The roots and development of the thaler-sized silver coin dates back to the mid-1400s. As the fifteenth century drew to a close... thaler). The Spanish dollar was the silver coin widely circulated in the United States during the time of the The American Revolutionary War ( 1775– 1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. The war, which eventually widened far beyond British North America, resulted in the overthrow of British rule in... American Revolutionary War. Although private banks issued currency that was backed in Spanish dollars, the federal government did not do so until the Military history of the United States Conflict American Civil War Date 1861– 1865 Place Principally in the southern United States; also in eastern, central and southwestern regions Result Defeat of seceding CSA Battles of the American Civil War Combatants United States of America USA flag 1861– 1863. 34... American Civil War.


For further history of the name, see Alternate uses: Dollar (disambiguation) The dollar is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions (see list below). It is represented by the symbol $. The name is related to the historic currencies Tolar in Bohemia, Thaler in Germany, Daalder in the Netherlands and Daler in... Dollar.


The dollar symbol

The origin of the "$" sign has been variously accounted for. Perhaps the most widely accepted explanation, according to the The United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) is an agency in the United States Department of the Treasury that primarily prints Federal Reserve notes for the Federal Reserve, but also produces a variety of other government security documents. The Federal Reserve notes are printed at the bureaus... U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing, is that it results from the evolution of the Mexican or Spanish "P's" for Peso is the name of the currency of various countries: Argentina: Argentine peso (ISO 4217: ARS) Chile: Chilean peso (CLP) Colombia: Colombian peso (COP) Cuba: Cuban peso (CUP) Dominican Republic: Dominican peso (DOP) Mexico: Mexican peso (MXN, previously MXP) Philippines: Philippine peso (PHP) Uruguay: Uruguayan peso (UYU) In Spanish peso... pesos, or Originally a dollar size silver coin, the Piastre served as the major unit of currency of French Indochina (Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos), and Ottoman Turkey. The term is still unofficially used in Quebec French slang as a reference to the Canadian dollar. Early private bank issue currency in French speaking regions... piastres, or The Spanish dollar or peso (literally, heavy, or pound) is a silver coin which was minted in Spain after a Spanish currency reform in 1497. Thanks to the vast silver deposits that were found in Mexico (for example, at Taxco and Zacatecas), and to silver looted from Spains possessions... pieces of eight. This theory, derived from a study of old manuscripts, explains that the "S" gradually came to be written over the "P," developing a close equivalent to the "$" mark. It was widely used before the adoption of the U.S. dollar in 1785.


A dollar symbol with two vertical strokes is sometimes used. This is sometimes attributed to the idea of superimposing "U" and "S," but the form appears already to have existed when the future United States was still a number of British colonies. The two slashes are thought to represent the two pillars at the original temple of Solomon in Jerusalem.


For further information about the symbol, see Alternate uses: Dollar (disambiguation) The dollar is the name of the official currency in several countries, dependencies and other regions (see list below). It is represented by the symbol $. The name is related to the historic currencies Tolar in Bohemia, Thaler in Germany, Daalder in the Netherlands and Daler in... Dollar.


See also

  • An exchange rate represents the value of one currency in another. An exchange rate between two currencies fluctuates over time. This page records for various currencies the amount in that currency that is equal to one U.S. Dollar, the most widely traded currency in the world. The value of... Table of historical exchange rates
  • (Redirected from 1933 U.S. 20 dollar gold coin) The 1933 Double Eagle The 1933 US 20 dollar gold coin (known as the double eagle) exists only in very small numbers. Over 450,000 were minted, but never officially circulated, because of the end of the use of gold dollars... 1933 U.S. 20-dollar gold coin
  • On U.S. currency, the series refers to the year appearing on the front of a bill, indicating the year that the bills design was adopted. The series year does not indicate the year a bill was printed. For example, Series of 1882 gold certificates were being printed as... Series (U.S. currency)
  • A superdollar is an almost perfect counterfeit of United States banknote. They are thought to be printed and distributed by the North Korean government for two reasons: as a source of income and to undermine the US economy. Contents // 1 The notes 2 Distribution Method 3 Alternate meaning 4 See... Superdollar
  • The International dollar is a hypothetical currency unit that has the same purchasing power as the U.S. dollar has in the United States at a given point in time. It shows how much a local currency unit is worth within the countrys borders. Conversions to international dollars are... International dollar

Current USD exchange rates

AUD (http://finance.yahoo.com/currency/convert?amt=1&from=AUD&to=USD&submit=Convert) | CAD (http://finance.yahoo.com/currency/convert?amt=1&from=CAD&to=USD&submit=Convert) | EUR (http://finance.yahoo.com/currency/convert?amt=1&from=EUR&to=USD&submit=Convert) | GBP (http://finance.yahoo.com/currency/convert?amt=1&from=GBP&to=USD&submit=Convert) | INR (http://finance.yahoo.com/currency/convert?amt=1&from=INR&to=USD&submit=Convert) | NZD (http://finance.yahoo.com/currency/convert?amt=1&from=NZD&to=USD&submit=Convert)


External links

United States currency and coinage
Topics: Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. Federal Reserve notes are legal tender currency notes. They are issued by the Federal Reserve Banks and have replaced United States notes which... Federal Reserve note | United States Notes (also known as Legal Tender Notes because of their payment obligation stating This Note is a Legal Tender) are characterized by a red seal and serial number. They were among the first national currency of the United States, authorized by the Legal Tender Act of 1862 and... United States Notes | Current US Coinage. Top row: Lincoln Cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Sacagawea Dollar. Middle row: Kennedy Half Dollar, Obverse of the Statehood Quarters. Bottom row: the Statehood Quarters of 1999: Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, and Connecticut. There are six denominations of United States coinage (or specie) currently in circulation... United States coinage | United States dollar
Currency: The U.S. one dollar bill ($1) is a denomination of U.S. currency. U.S. President George Washington is currently featured on the front side of the bill, while the Great Seal of the United States is featured on the reverse side. The first one dollar bills were produced... $1 | The U.S. two dollar bill ($2) is a denomination of U.S. currency. The two dollar banknote is still one of the least-common denominations of U.S. currency. Because of its rarity, Americans remain remarkably superstitious about spending it, which further decreases its circulation. It is so rare... $2 | The U.S. five dollar bill ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. U.S. President Abraham Lincoln is currently featured on the front side of the bill, while the Lincoln Memorial is featured on the reverse side. The $5 bill is sometimes nicknamed a fin, although this usage... $5 | The old and new ten dollar bill The U.S. ten dollar bill ($10) is a denomination of United States currency. U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton is currently featured on the front side of the bill, while the U.S. Treasury is featured on the reverse side... $10 | The U.S. twenty dollar bill ($20) is a denomination of United States currency. U.S. President Andrew Jackson is currently featured on the front side of the bill, while the White House is featured on the reverse side. Twenty dollar bills are delivered by Federal Reserve Banks in violet... $20 | 2004 Federal Reserve note - Obverse 2004 Federal Reserve note - Reverse The U.S. fifty dollar bill ($50) is a denomination of United States currency. U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant is currently featured on the front side of the bill, while the U.S. Capitol is featured on the reverse... $50 | The U.S. hundred dollar bill ($100) is a denomination of United States currency. U.S. statesman, inventor, and diplomat Benjamin Franklin is currently featured on the front side of the bill, while Independence Hall is featured on the reverse side. It is the largest denomination that has been in... $100 | Today, the currency of the United States, the U.S. dollar, is printed in bills in denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100. Obverse of 1918 $10,000 bill Reverse of 1918 $10,000 bill At one time, however, it also included five larger denominations. Shown here... Larger denominations
Coinage: Cent (United States) Value: 1 cent ($0.01 U.S. dollars) Mass: 2.5 g Diameter: 19.05 mm Thickness: 1.55 mm Edge: plain Composition: Copper-plated Zinc 97.5% Zn, 2.5% Cu Obverse Design: Abraham Lincoln Designer: V.D. Brenner Design Date: 1909 Reverse Design: Lincoln Memorial... Penny | U.S. Nickel Value: 0.05 US dollars Mass: 5.000 g Diameter: 21.21 mm Thickness: 1.95 mm Edge: plain Composition: 75% Cu, 25% Ni Obverse Design: Thomas Jefferson Designer: Felix Schlag Design Date: 1938 The United States five cent coin, commonly called a nickel, is a unit... Nickel | A dime is a coin minted by the United States with a denomination of 1/10th of a United States dollar or ten cents. Dime (United States) Value: 0.10 US dollars Mass: 2.268 g Diameter: 17.91 mm Thickness: 1.35 mm Edge: 118 reeds Composition: 91.67... Dime | Quarter (United States) Value: 0.25 US dollars Mass: 5.670 g Diameter: 24.26 mm Thickness: 1.75 mm Edge: 119 reeds Composition: 91.66% Cu, 8.33% Ni Obverse Design: George Washington Designer: John Flannagan Design Date: 1932 Reverse Design: Eagle Designer: John Flannagan Design Date: 1932 The... Quarter | Half Dollar (United States) Value: 0.50 US dollars Mass: 11.340 g Diameter: 30.61 mm Thickness: 2.15 mm Edge: 150 reeds Composition: 91.66% Cu, 8.33% Ni Obverse Design: John F. Kennedy Designer: Gilroy Roberts Design Date: 1964 Reverse Design: Presidential Seal Designer: Frank Gasparro Design... Half-dollar | Golden Dollar (United States) Value: 1.00 US dollars Mass: 8.100 g Diameter: 26.5 mm Thickness: 2.00 mm Edge: plain Composition: 88.5% Cu, 6% Zn, 3.5% Mn, 2% Ni Obverse Design: Sacagawea Designer: Glenna Goodacre Design Date: 2000 Reverse Design: Eagle in flight Designer: Thomas... Dollar


edit this box (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:AmericanCurrencies&action=edit)
A currency is a unit of exchange, facilitating the transfer of goods and services. It is a form of money, where money is defined as a medium of exchange rather than e.g. a store of value. A currency zone is a country or region in which a specific currency... Currencies of The Americas (sometimes referred to as America) is the area including the land mass located between the Pacific Ocean and the Atlantic Ocean, generally divided into North America and South America. The term also usually includes the Caribbean, the islands in and around the Caribbean Sea, and Greenland, though not... The Americas
North  The dollar is the national currency of Bermuda since 1970. It is pegged to the US dollar at a 1:1 rate, but is not traded outside of Bermuda. Prior to 1970, Bermuda used the British pound/shilling/pence system [1] Coins in circulation 1 cent 5 cent 10 cent... Bermuda dollar | The Canadian dollar, CAD or C$, is the unit of currency of Canada. It is divided into 100 cents ( ). Contents // 1 History 2 Canadian currency 3 Canadian currency rumours 4 Value 5 External links History Canada decided to use the dollar instead of a pound sterling system because of the... Canadian dollar | The peso is the currency of Mexico. It is divided into 100 centavos. The symbol used for the peso is $, while centavos are represented by ¢. Its current ISO 4217 code is MXN (prior to 1993 the code MXP was used). Contents // 1 History 2 Current system 2.1 Coins 2... Mexican peso | US dollar
Central  The Belize dollar is the national currency of Belize. It is abbreviated BZ. As of 2004, its exchange rate is artificially set to 2 BZ for 1 United States dollar. The gray market has now been legalized and on average you get 2.06 BZ to the US dollar. Coins... Belize dollar | Costa Rican colón | The colón (named after Christopher Columbus, known as Cristóbal Colón in Spanish) is the currency of El Salvador. It is also the name of Costa Ricas currency (see Costa Rican colón). It is divided into 100 centavos. The plural is colones in Spanish, but English... Salvadoran colón | The Quetzal (ISO 4217 code: GTQ) is the name of the national unit of currency of Guatemala (divided into 100 centavos). Until 1979 it was pegged to and domestically equal to the US Dollar. There are currently 7.74520 quetzales to the US Dollar. It is named after the national... Guatemalan quetzal | Lempira is the currency of Honduras. Exchange rates were 2 Lempiras per 1 U.S. Dollar in the late 1980s (a twenty cent coin is called daime as it used to be worth the same as a U.S. 10 cent coin or dime). On December 2004, the exchange rate... Honduran lempira | Nicaraguan córdoba | Named in honor of Spanish explorer/conquistador Vasco Núñez de Balboa, the balboa is the official currency of Panama. Its ISO 4217 code is PAB. The balboa has been tied to the U.S. dollar (which is legal tender in Panama) at an exchange rate of 1:1 since... Panamanian balboa
Caribbean  The Bahamian dollar ($B; ISO 4217 code BSD) is the national currency of the The Bahamas. The Bahamian dollar is pegged to the US dollar on a one-to-one basis. The Central Bank of The Bahamas states that it uses reserve requirements, changes in the Bank discount rate and... Bahamian dollar | Barbadian dollar | The currency of the Cayman Islands is the Cayman Dollar, and the Cayman Islands Currency is issued by the Cayman Islands Monetary Authority (CIMA) as established by law in January 1997. CIMA replaced the previous Cayman Islands Currency Board which was formed in 1971. The Cayman Dollar was first circulated... Cayman dollar | The Cuban peso (ISO 4217 code: CUP) is one of two official currencies in use in Cuba. It has no official value outside the country, and is used almost exclusively by residents; for many years, the United States dollar (USD) has been used by tourists and for more luxury items... Cuban peso | The Dominican peso is the base currency of the Dominican Republic. Its symbol is $ or, to avoid confusion with other currencies that use the same symbol, the abbreviation RD$ is used. Its ISO 4217 code is DOP. Each peso is divided into 100 centavos (cents). The coins currently in circulation... Dominican peso | The East Caribbean Dollar is the currency of eight political units in the Caribbean Sea. Six of these are independent states, namely Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia and St Vincent and the Grenadines. Two are UK overseas territories, namely Anguilla and Montserrat. The East... East Caribbean dollar | Haitian gourde | The currency of Jamaica is known as the dollar. It is divided into 100 cents. As of January 6, 2005, there were 60.9200 Jamaican dollars to the US dollar The earliest money in Jamaica were Spanish copper coins called maravedis. In later years, as the island became increasingly important... Jamaican dollar | The dollar is the currency of Trinidad and Tobago. It is divided into 100 cents. As of January 6, 2005, there were 6.28369 Trinidad and Tobago dollars to the United States dollar Coins in circulation 1 cent 5 cent 10 cent 25 cent 50 cent (rare in circulation) Banknotes... Trinidad and Tobago dollar | Aruban florin | Netherlands Antilles florin
South  The Argentine peso (ISO 4217: ARS) is the currency of Argentina. The symbol used locally for it is $ (the US dollar is written U$S). It is divided in 100 centavos. Banknotes exist in the denominations of 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 pesos. Coins worth $1, 0.50... Argentine peso | The Boliviano is the currency of Bolivia. It is divided into 100 cents. Coins currently in circulation are: 10, 20, 50 cents; 1, 2, 5 Boliviano. Bills currently in circulation are: 10, 20, 50, 100, 200 Boliviano. As of January, 2005 the exchange rate was 1 USD = 8.06 Bolivianos... Bolivian boliviano | The Real (plural reais) is the present monetary unit (currency) of Brazil. Real Bills. Contents // 1 History 1.1 Past 1.2 Present 2 Bills 2.1 Plastic Bill 3 Coins 3.1 First Family 3.2 Second Family 4 See also 5 External Links History Past The Real was... Brazilian real | Chilean notes currently in use: 1,000; 2,000; 5,000; 10,000; 20,000 pesos The Chilean peso is the currency of Chile. The symbol used locally for it is the $. The ISO 4217 code is CLP. It used to be divided in 100 centavos up until 1984. The... Chilean peso | The Colombian peso is the currency of Colombia. Its ISO 4217 code is COP and it is also informally abbreviated as COL$. Its sign is the peso symbol ($). The exchange rate as of 18 December 2004 is: 1 euro = 3,137.09 COP 1 U.S. dollar = 2,356.50... Colombian peso | Guyanese dollar | Paraguayan guaraní | The sol (plural: soles) is the monetary unit (currency) of Peru. The nuevo sol was introduced in 1991 to replace the highly inflated inti. The inti itself was introduced in mid-1985 because the old sol was inflated beyond use. The ISO 4217 currency code is PEN. The name derives... Peruvian nuevo sol | The Suriname dollar was introduced on January 1, 2004, with one dollar valued at 1000 Suriname guilders. Initially only coins were available, with banknotes delayed until mid-February, reportedly due to a problem at the printer, the Bank of Canada. This currency was introduced with European Union EISO 4217, amendment... Suriname dollar | The Uruguayan peso is the official currency unit of Uruguay. It is subdivided into 100 centísimos. The Uruguayan peso (peso uruguayo) replaced the New Uruguayan Peso (nuevo peso uruguayo) on March 1, 1993 at the rate of 1,000 New Pesos = 1 Peso. The New Peso in turn had... Uruguayan peso | Venezuelan bolívar | Falkland pound

The Euro (disambiguation). The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve of the twenty-five European Union member states. These twelve states, which form the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), are: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain. It is... euro is used in the French DOM regions of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon (French Saint-Pierre et Miquelon) is a French overseas collectivity consisting of several small islands off the eastern coast of Canada near Newfoundland. Saint-Pierre et Miquelon Flag of Saint-Pierre and Miquelon Saint-Pierre and Miquelon Coat of Arms National motto: A mare labor Official... Saint-Pierre et Miquelon, Guadeloupe, in the Caribbean Sea, is an archipelago with a total area of 1,704 km² located in the Eastern Caribbean. Administratively speaking, Guadeloupe is an overseas département (département doutre-mer, or DOM) of France. As the other DOMs, Guadeloupe is also a r... Guadeloupe, The département of Martinique is an overseas département (département doutre-mer, or DOM) of France, located in the Caribbean Sea. The capital is Fort-de-France. Population at the 1999 census: 381,427 inhabitants. Population as of 1.1. 2004 estimates: 393,000... Martinique and French Guiana ( French: Guyane) is an overseas département (département doutre-mer, or DOM) of France, located on the Caribbean coast of South America. Guyane Region Guyane Official language French Political status Non- sovereign, overseas department of France Department Number 973 Préfecture Cayenne Sous... French Guiana.


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US Dollars Yielded Unanimous UN Vote Against Iraq (1100 words)
Bennis said that just after that 1990 vote, the U.S. envoy turned to the Yemeni ambassador and told him that his vote would be ''the most expensive 'no' vote you would ever cast''.
The U.S. aid package to the impoverished country, authorised by the U.S. African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), demands that the aid recipient ''does not engage in activities contrary to U.S. national security or foreign policy interests''.
After Colombia, the largest single beneficiary of U.S. aid is Bulgaria, which received 13.5 million dollars in outright military grants (mostly to buy U.S. weapons systems) last year and an additional 8.5 million dollars this year.
China's foreign trade hits 606 billion US dollars (294 words)
Statistics from Chinese Customs issued Wednesday show imports in the first nine months surged by 40.5 percent to 298.56 billion US dollars, exceeding the imports of last year.
Exports, one of the three economic generators, were 307.7 billion US dollars, up 32.3 percent year-on-year.
Exports, investment and consumption were regarded as the three driving forces of the national economy, which grew by about 8 percent in the first half of 2003 and the government said it would reach an 8 percent annual growth goal this year.
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